GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROVES BUDGET OF JUST OVER $2.6 BILLION FOR 12 ACTIVE PEACEKEEPING MISSIONS IN 2002-2003

27 June 2002
GA/10032

GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROVES BUDGET OF JUST OVER $2.6 BILLION FOR 12 ACTIVE PEACEKEEPING MISSIONS IN 2002-2003

27/06/2002
Press ReleaseGA/10032

Fifty-sixth General Assembly

Plenary

105th Meeting (AM)

GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROVES BUDGET OF JUST OVER $2.6 BILLION

FOR 12 ACTIVE PEACEKEEPING MISSIONS IN 2002-2003

Figure Includes $141.55 Million for Strategic Deployment Stocks

Acting on the recommendations of its Fifth Committee (Administrative

and Budgetary) this morning, the General Assembly adopted a budget of some

$2.6 billion for the functioning of 12 active United Nations peacekeeping missions for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, including some $100.9 million for the maintenance of the peacekeeping support account and $12.09 million for the United Nations Logistics Base (UNLB) in Brindisi, Italy.

The financial year of peacekeeping operations runs from 1 July to 30 June, and their costs are assessed among Member States on the basis of a special peacekeeping scale.  Unlike the regular budget, the budgets of peacekeeping missions are less amenable to forward planning, because they are subject to decisions of the Security Council that may be taken in response to world events in the course of the year.  For the same reason, the total cost of United Nations peacekeeping is subject to considerable fluctuations. 

[For the current peacekeeping budget cycle (2001/2002), prior to the Fifth Committee’s second resumed session this month, the Assembly had approved some

$2.8 billion, including prorated provisions of $7.9 million for the UNLB; and $91.9 million for the support account.  Introduced in the last decade, the support account allows the Secretariat to plan and deploy peacekeeping operations in a coordinated manner and is financed through assessments on all active missions, according to their size, as is the UNLB.]

Also this morning, the Assembly approved a new peacekeeping concept of strategic deployment stocks, which are expected to enhance the Organization’s rapid-deployment capacity.  Introduction of the stocks envisages the expansion of the role of the UNLB, which should take on new responsibilities as an operational arm for the strategic deployment stocks; a training and conference centre; and a support base for air operations.

By the resolution adopted today, taking into account the reserve at the UNLB as of 30 April 2002, the Assembly approved some $141.55 million for the implementation of the strategic deployment stocks, which would allow the Organization to deploy one complex mission per year.  To fund the strategic deployment stocks, on an exceptional and ad hoc basis, it would decide to credit Member States their respective shares of the cash balances from several closed

missions, giving them a choice of the manner in which they wish to make those payments, including any combination of the cash balances and/or new funds to cover their assessed share of the $141.55 million.

The draft resolution on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) was approved following two votes.  The text as a whole was adopted by a vote of 121 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions (see

Annex II).

Prior to that, the Assembly decided to retain in the text preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 3, 4 and 13 of the draft, by a vote of 74 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 46 abstentions (see Annex I).  [Those paragraphs refer to several previous General Assembly resolutions, by the terms of which Israel should pay some $1.28 million for the damage resulting from the 1996 incident at Qana, Lebanon.]

Representatives of Malta, Israel, Lebanon and Syria spoke in explanation of their votes on the draft.  A statement was also made by the representative of the United States.  Speaking in exercise of the right of reply were representatives of Iran and Israel.

All other drafts were approved without a vote.  For the 2002/2003 budget cycle, the Assembly approved the following amounts for various individual missions:

Mission       Amount         Support           UNLB        Total

            (in millions)     Account

UNOMIG      $ 31.71           $  1.28           $ 0.15      $ 33.14

UNMIBH      $ 78.54           $  3.18           $ 0.38      $ 82.11

UNMIK       $330.0            $ 13.36           $ 1.6       $344.97

UNFICYP     $ 43.65           $  1.77           $ 0.21      $ 45.63

UNDOF       $ 38.99           $  1.58           $ 0.19      $ 40.76

UNIFIL      $112.04           $  4.54           $ 0.54      $117.12

UNIKOM      $ 50.57           $  2.05           $ 0.25      $ 52.87

UNMISET     $292.00           $ 11.83           $ 1.42      $305.24

MINURSO     $ 41.53           $  1.68           $ 0.20      $ 43.41

UNAMSIL     $669.48           $ 27.11           $ 3.25      $699.84

MONUC       $581.93           $ 23.57           $ 2.82      $608.32

UNMEE       $220.83           $  8.94           $ 1.07      $230.85

TOTAL       $2.49 billion     $100.9            $12.09      $2.6 billion

The 12 missions are:  United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG); United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH); United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK); United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP); United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF); United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL); United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Observation Mission (UNIKOM); United Nations Mission of Support in East Timor (UNMISET); United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO); United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL); United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC); and United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE).

By another text adopted this morning, the Assembly noted with concern the negative impact of recently announced cutbacks in services, and reaffirmed its request that adequate conference services be provided to regional group meetings.  To finance such services, the resolution proposes several options, including absorption of the additional workload within the capacity of the Department of General Assembly Affairs and Conference Services and the Department of Management; use of savings resulting from the implementation of the calendar of conferences and meetings; and delay in the implementation of certain non-substantive activities within the two Departments.

Acting on another draft, the Assembly decided that provision of conference and support services to the Counter-Terrorism Committee should not adversely affect other conference services.  Further conference and support servicing requirements of the Counter-Terrorism Committee would be considered in the context of the first performance report on the current budget.

Also today, the Assembly appropriated some $57.79 million to strengthen the safety and security of United Nations premises and acted on the financial report; the report of the Board of Auditors and other documents relating to United Nations peacekeeping operations for the 2000-2001 budget cycle; and conditions of service and compensation of other than Secretariat officials, including members of the International Court of Justice and judges of the International Tribunals, as well as ad litem judges of the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

In other action, the Assembly decided on the dates for two plenary meetings of the fifty-seventh session devoted to the International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development and on the working dates for its Ad Hoc Committee of the Whole for the final review and appraisal of the implementation of the United Nations New Agenda for the Development of Africa later this year.

At the opening of the meeting, the Assembly observed a minute of silence in memory of the President of its twenty-seventh session, Stanislaw Trepczynski of Poland, who died on 20 June.  On behalf of his delegation and the bereaved family of Mr. Trepczynski, Poland’s representative expressed gratitude to the Assembly for that tribute.

Members of the Assembly also expressed sympathy to the Government and people of Iran for the loss of life and material damage resulting from the recent earthquake.

Also this morning, the Assembly was informed that Afghanistan had made the necessary payment to reduce its arrears below the amount specified in Article 19 of the Charter.  [Under that Article, a Member State that falls behind in its payments to the Organization in an amount that equals or exceeds its dues for the preceding two years, loses its vote in the Assembly.]

Action on Drafts before General Assembly

The texts were introduced by Fifth Committee Rapporteur SANTIAGO WINS (Uruguay).

By the terms of the first draft resolution regardingfinancial reports, the report of the Board of Auditors and other documents relating to United Nations peacekeeping operations for the 2000-2001 budget cycle contained in document A/56/651/Add.1, the Assembly would accept the audited peacekeeping financial statements for the period from 1 July 2000 to 30 June 2001 and endorse the recommendations of the Board of Auditors and the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) in that regard.

Further by the text, it would also take note of the Secretary-General’s report on the implementation of the Board’s recommendations for the period ending on 30 June 2001 and request the Secretary-General to improve internal control in peacekeeping missions, in particular, with respect to reconciliation of bank accounts and procurement activities.  The Secretary-General would also be requested to ensure prompt and timely implementation of the recommendations of the auditors and the ACABQ.

The text was adopted without a vote.

By the draft decision contained in document A/56/734/Add.2, the Assembly took action on certain items before the Fifth Committee.  In particular, it decided without a vote to defer consideration of several agenda items to its fifty-seventh session.  Those items include, under the 2002-2003 programme budget, concrete proposals on strengthening the Department of Public Information (DPI) to support and enhance the United Nations Web site in all official languages.  Issues deferred under the item on the pattern of conferences include improving conference facilities at the United Nations Office in Nairobi and the simultaneous availability of parliamentary documentation in all six official languages on the United Nations Web site.

By further terms of the text, the Assembly deferred consideration of several human resources issues, including:  the list of United Nations Secretariat staff; the employment of retirees; consultants and individual contractors; and a monitoring capacity of the Office of Human Resources Management of all relevant activities in the Secretariat.  Also deferred was consideration of several reports of the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS), including the report on the inspection of programme management and administrative practices at the Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention (ODCCP) and on the inspection of allegations of refugee smuggling at the Nairobi Branch of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

Also according to the text, the Assembly deferred consideration of the report of the Secretary-General on implementation of the recommendations of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations and the report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping.  Other peacekeeping matters deferred include the audit of the procedures and policies for recruiting staff for the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO); the audit and management of mission subsistence allowance rates; and the reform of procedures for determining reimbursement to Member States for contingent-owned equipment.  Also deferred was consideration of the report of the Secretary-General on the administration of justice at the United Nations.

The Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, the draft resolution on the relationship between the treatment of perennial activities in the programme budget and the use of the contingency fund (document A/56/653/Add.2).  By this text, it decided to note the report of the Secretary-General on the relationship between the treatment of perennial activities in the programme budget and the use of the contingency fund and the related ACABQ report on the matter (documents A/C.5/52/42 and A/53/7/Add.9).

The Assembly then took action on the five drafts contained in the Fifth Committee report on agenda items under the programme budget for 2002-2003 (document A/56/736/Add.2).  All five texts were adopted without a vote.

By the terms of draft resolution I on the conditions of service and compensation of other than Secretariat officials, including members of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) and judges of the International Tribunals, as well as ad litem judges of the Yugoslavia Tribunal, it endorsed the observations and recommendations of the ACABQ on the matter, without prejudice to the existing rules governing the conditions of service of the judges of the Tribunals.  It also decided that the conditions of service and remuneration for those officials would next be reviewed at its fifty-ninth session.

[The Advisory Committee commented on such issues as those officials’ emoluments, pensions, grants and other conditions of service, recommending, in particular, not to change the floor/ceiling mechanisms following the introduction of the euro; and to increase their education grants to the same level as the amount applicable to the Professional and higher categories of staff.  The ACABQ did not support the proposals of the Secretary-General to increase the level of the special allowance for the President and Vice-President of the Court, and reiterated its view that the members of the ICJ should themselves cover the cost of their participation in health insurance plans.  Also not recommended was any change in the current pension arrangements for judges of the two Tribunals.]

Also contained in the document is draft resolution II on the financing of the newly authorized United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and the United Nations Tajikistan Office of Peace-building. By that text, the Assembly concurred with the observations of the ACABQ on the matter, approving the charge of some $34.3 million for the biennium 2002-2003 for the Afghanistan Mission against the balance remaining of the provision for special political missions, within the framework of the Organization’s regular budget for the current biennium. 

The Assembly also approved an additional appropriation of some

$10.56 million under the procedures provided for in resolution 41/213, which sets out guidelines for revised estimates arising from the impact of extraordinary circumstances, including those relating to the maintenance of peace and security.  That amount would comprise $8.71 million for UNAMA and $1.86 million for the Tajikistan mission.  Yet another appropriation of some $4.17 million

($3.93 million for UNAMA and $236,300 for the Tajikistan mission) would be appropriated under section 32, Staff Assessment, of the programme budget, to be offset by a corresponding amount under income from staff assessment.

By draft resolution III on strengthening the security and safety of United Nations premises, the Assembly appropriated an amount of some $57.79 million for the implementation of the measures contained in the report of the Secretary-General, under various sections of the programme budget for the biennium 2002-2003, including some $9.14 million under the Office of Central Support Services and some $41.83 million under Construction, alteration, improvement and major maintenance.

The Assembly also affirmed that those appropriations would include one-time requirements for upgrading the physical and security infrastructure. It requested the Secretary-General to take all possible measures to ensure that the work within the projects approved for Headquarters be integrated with the capital master plan to the extent possible, once the further decisions on the plan are taken by the Assembly.

Also under the agenda item on the 2002-2003 programme budget, the Assembly had before it draft resolution IV on the implementation of the provisions of Assembly resolution 56/242.  [By the terms of resolution 56/242 of December 2001 on the pattern of conferences, the Assembly approved the Organization's calendar of meetings for 2002-2003; emphasized the importance of providing adequate conference-servicing resources to all United Nations conference centres; and decided to include all necessary resources in the budget for the 2002-2003 biennium to provide interpretation services for meetings of regional and other major groupings of Member States, on an ad hoc basis.  Following the $75 million reduction in the real level of resources under the budget for 2002-2003, however, the Secretariat announced cuts in services available to Member States in such areas as servicing night and weekend meetings other than those of the Security Council and the Assembly plenary.]

According to the text, the Assembly reaffirmed its resolution 56/242 and resolution 56/254 D of 27 March 2002.  [By the terms of that resolution, the Assembly noted with concern the implementation of the economy measures outlined in the Secretary-General’s note verbale of 28 February and information circular ST/IC/2002/13.  It requested the Secretary-General to implement the budget resolutions in a way that does not adversely affect the services provided to Member States, and to minimize the adverse effect of any changes in the established practice resulting from the announced cutbacks.]

The Assembly reaffirmed its request that adequate conference services be provided to regional group meetings in accordance with resolution 56/242 by using several options, including absorbing the additional workload within the capacity of the Department of General Assembly Affairs and Conference Services and the Department of Management.  Other options include:  using the savings generated as a result of the implementation of the calendar of conferences and meetings as approved in General Assembly resolution 56/242; delaying the implementation of certain non-substantive activities within the two Departments; and proposals for reprogramming the conference and support service activities of the two Departments for the Assembly's approval.

And finally, by draft resolution V on conference and support services extended to the Counter-Terrorism Committee, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to ensure that the provision of services to the Committee did not adversely affect other conference services.  The Security Council was invited to ensure that the proceedings of that and other subsidiary bodies of the Council are conducted with due regard to the most efficient use of conference-servicing resources and to consider the merits of establishing appropriate guidelines for the format and volume of communications that all States are requested to submit for consideration by the Counter-Terrorism Committee.  Further by the text, the Secretary-General was requested to report to the Assembly at the main part of its fifty-seventh session on the expenditures and programme impacts incurred in supporting the Committee.  Further conference and support-servicing requirements of the Committee would be considered in the context of the first performance report on the current budget.

The Assembly then acted on five draft resolutions and two draft decisions contained in the Fifth Committee report on administrative and budgetary aspects of the financing of United Nations peacekeeping operations (document A/56/989).  All seven texts were adopted without a vote.

By the terms of draft resolution I on the financing of the UNLB at Brindisi, Italy, the Assembly reiterated the need to implement an effective inventory management standard, especially in respect of peacekeeping operations involving high inventory value.  It took note of the Secretary-General’s reports on the matter and endorsed the recommendations of the Advisory Committee in that regard, approving the cost estimates for the UNLB in the amount of $12.09 million for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003.

It also decided to apply the unencumbered balance of some $1.56 million and other income of $643,000 to the resources required for the 2002/2003 budget cycle.  The decrease in the staff assessment income of $148,100 would be set off against the unencumbered balance in respect of the 2000/2001 financial period, and the balance of some $12.09 million would be prorated among individual active peacekeeping operation budgets to meet the requirements for 2002/2003.

According to the terms of draft resolution II on progress in the implementation of the field assets control system:  a module of the field mission logistics system, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to provide it with an update on the implementation of the field assets control system at its fifty-seventh session.  The Assembly also took note of the Secretary-General’s report on the issue and endorsed the observations of the ACABQ contained in its reports.

By the terms of draft resolution III on instances for which the United Nations is entitled to restitution as the result of non-compliance with status-of-forces or other agreements, the Assembly took note of the information contained in the Secretary-General’s report and requested him to report further on the issues raised in the report relating to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

In draft resolution IV on the concept of strategic deployment stocks and its implementation, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General, in implementing the resolution, to consider the provisions of its resolution 55/247 of April 2001 on procurement reform.  He was also requested to report annually to the Assembly on the award of contracts for procurement for the strategic deployment stocks to all Member States, in particular, to developing, least developed, African countries and countries with economies in transition.

Endorsing the concept and implementation of the strategic deployment stocks for one complex mission, and the recommendations contained in the related report of the Advisory Committee, the Assembly approved some $141.55 million for the strategic deployment stocks, taking into account the reserve at the UNLB at Brindisi as of 30 April 2002 that meets the requirements of the strategic deployment stocks.  To fund the strategic deployment stocks, it decided to credit Member States their respective share of the cash balance of $95.98 million from the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR), the United Nations Confidence Restoration Operation (UNCRO) in Croatia, the United Nations Preventive Deployment Force (UNPREDEP) and the United Nations Peace Forces (UNPF) Headquarters, and $45.57 million from the United Nations Mission in Haiti (UNMIH).

By further terms of the text, the Assembly decided, on an exceptional

and ad hoc basis, that unless notified by a Member State within 45 days of the notification by the Secretary-General of the apportionment of the respective shares of the above-mentioned cash balances, to transfer balances to the UNLB account to finance the strategic deployment stocks.  In the same manner, the Assembly decided that if a Member State did not select that option, it would be assessed its respective share of the $141.55 million as a one-time requirement according to levels as of 1 July 2002 and taking into account the 2002 scale of assessments.  Payment would be made in a manner of the Member State’s choosing, to include any combination of the cash balances and/or new funds to cover its assessed share of the $141.55 million.  The Assembly also decided that the same provisions would apply to Member States with no share in any of the unspent balances.  It decided thatin the absence of a direct transfer to the strategic deployment stocks, the respective share of the credits from the liquidated missions would be credited to those Member States once their assessed contribution was received.

Following the application of the Member States’ cash transfers, the Assembly would authorize the Secretary-General, again on an exceptional and ad hoc basis, to transfer a portion of the interest income from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, taking into account the provisions of General Assembly resolution 51/218 E of June 1997, so as to make available to the UNLB account a total of $141.55 million, inclusive of Member States’ contributions to establish the programme.  The Secretary-General would be requested to report to the Assembly at its fifty-seventh session on the expenses incurred in implementing the strategic deployment stocks.  The Assembly would decide to review the financing arrangements after considering the Secretary-General’s report.

[In paragraph 124 of his report on implementation of the recommendations of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and the Panel of United Nations Peace Operations (document A/55/977), the Secretary-General had proposed a modest up-front procurement of a medium strategic reserve for Brindisi, which would permit deployment of operations within 30 to 90 days.  The budget for the strategic reserve stocks was estimated at $179.7 million.  In view of the fund balances from the closed missions, it was proposed that those balances be transferred to the account of the Brindisi Logistics Base to cover those needs.]

By the terms of draft resolution V on the support account for peacekeeping operations, the Assembly affirmed the need for adequate funding for the backstopping of peacekeeping operations, as well as the need for justification for such funding in support account budget submissions.  Taking note of the Secretary-General’s reports on the matter, the Assembly noted with appreciation the introduction of results-based budgeting and requested that further improvements be made in that respect.

For the period of 1 July 2000 to 30 June 2001, the Assembly approved the additional requirements of some $2.24 million and decided to apply against that amount other income of some $2.26 million, interest income of $1.7 million and other savings and income amounts.  In respect of income from staff assessment for 2000/2001, the Assembly approved an increase of $741,000.

As for the budget estimates for 2002-2003, the Assembly approved the requirements of some $100.9 million gross, including 687 continuing and 15 new temporary posts.  In respect of income from staff assessment, it approved an estimate of some $13.74 million.

It further decided that for 2002-2003, the support account will be financed as follows:  the balance of $127,800 between the additional requirements and actual expenses for the 2000-2001 period, would be applied to the total amount of $100.9 million, and the balance of $100.77 million would be prorated among the budgets of active peacekeeping operations for the 2002-2003 budget cycle.

Further by the text, the Secretary-General would be requested to develop a coherent departmental level policy within the DPKO on gender mainstreaming in all peacekeeping activities and submit, if necessary, a request on that issue, reporting thereon at the fifty-seventh session.  At the same session, it would review the proposal for a D-1 Chief of the Communications and Technology Service.  The Assembly approved the request for two information officer posts at the P-4 level, however.

Noting with concern the high level of resources for consultants and travel, especially in view of the large number of new posts proposed, the Secretary-General would be requested to ensure full and efficient use of “in-house” United Nations expertise before projecting resource needs for consultants within the support account submission.  The Assembly decided to review, at the resumed fifty-eighth session, the existing posts already approved since 2000 in order to consider their justification, taking into account the ongoing OIOS evaluation of the impact of recent restructuring of the DPKO.  It also took note of the status of recruitment of the 91 additional posts approved for the DPKO in its resolution 56/241, and requested an update at its fifty-seventh session.

For the 2002/2003 budget period, the Assembly decided to maintain the support account funding mechanism used in the current budget.  It further reiterated its concern over the imbalance in the geographical representation of Member States within the DPKO, and urged the Secretary-General to take immediate measures to improve the representation of unrepresented and under-represented countries.  As recommended by the ACABQ, the Assembly also reiterated the need to develop a methodology and monitoring system to evaluate the results of training in peacekeeping and related areas.

According to draft decision I on the write-off of contingent-owned equipment at liquidated missions, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to intensify his efforts to finalize the write-off claims in liquidated missions by December 2002 and to submit a report to it at its resumed fifty-seventh session.

By the terms of draft decision II on the administrative and budgetary aspects of the financing of the United Nations peacekeeping operations, the Assembly decided to request the Secretary-General to suggest measures that would better streamline policy guidelines related to the temporary duty assignment of staff in peacekeeping missions and to report thereon at its next session.

The Assembly then took up the draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) (document A/56/973).  By the terms of the text, concerned that the surplus balances in the Force’s special account have been used to meet expenses of the Force in order to compensate for non-payment and late payment of contributions by Member States, the Assembly

took note of the status as of 30 April, including the outstanding amount of

$15.7 million, and noted with concern that only 51 countries had made their payments in full.  The Secretary-General was requested to continue his productive and fruitful dialogue with local staff on report on its results.

Further by the text, the Assembly took note of the financial performance report of UNDOF for the 2000/2001 budget cycle, and decided to appropriate some $38.99 million for the maintenance of the Force for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, exclusive of the amounts needed for the support account and the UNLB.  It also decided that for Member States that have fulfilled their financial obligations to UNDOF, their respective shares of the unencumbered balance of $575,100 and income of $2.26 million for 2000/2001 would be set off against their apportionment for 2002/2003.  The shares of Member States that have not fulfilled their financial obligations to the mission would be set off against their outstanding dues.

The text was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly next considered thedraft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/56/722/Add.1).  By the terms of the text, the Assembly decided that Member States that have fulfilled their financial obligations to the Force should receive their respective shares

of the unencumbered balance of some $23.34 million and other income of over

$12.48 million for the period ended on 30 June 2001.  The share of the Member States that have not fulfilled their financial obligations to the mission shall be set off against their outstanding obligations.  The decrease in the staff assessment income of $420,200 shall be set off against the credits from the unencumbered balance.

Emphasizing that no peacekeeping mission shall be financed by borrowing funds from other active missions, the Assembly also encouraged the Secretary-General to continue to take additional measures to ensure the safety and security of all personnel under the auspices of the United Nations participating in the Force.

By other terms of the text, expressing its deep concern that Israel did not comply with several previous resolutions on the matter, the latest of which is resolution 56/214 of 21 December 2001, the Assembly stressed that that country should strictly abide by them.

The representative of Malta referred to the vote taken at the sixtieth meeting of the Fifth Committee, held on 17 June 2002, on the fourth preambular paragraph and operative paragraphs 3, 4 and 13 of draft resolution A/C.5/56/L.70.  In expressing its vote, his delegation had inadvertently voted in favour of the paragraphs referred to when, in fact, it had wished to abstain.  He requested that the Assembly take note of his statement and to reflect his delegation’s intentions in the official records.  Malta aligned itself with the explanation of position expressed at the vote by the representative of Spain on behalf of the European Union and associated States.

Speaking in explanation of vote before the vote, the representative of Israel said the introduction of four politically motivated paragraphs and the discussion in the Fifth Committee had forced Israel to extend the vote in the General Assembly.  Delegates knew Israel’s position regarding the 1996 Qana incident, in which Hezbollah terrorists launched terrorist attacks at Israel from a position less than 300 metres from a United Nations camp.  Hezbollah had launched the attack knowing that its actions had engaged civilian and international personnel.  Israel had warned the United Nations of the dangers of the situation, but no action had been taken by the United Nations or by Lebanon to end those illegal practices.  The ensuing tragedy that occurred at Qana was the direct result of the fact that Hezbollah terrorists had launched attacks on Israel from close proximity to a United Nations installation, in disregard for the dangers their actions posed for civilians there. 

He said there was no precedent for a Member State’s bearing sole financial responsibility for damage sustained by United Nations forces in the context of peacekeeping operations.  In every other case, Israel had acted in accordance with the principle of collective responsibility and absorbed such costs within the general budget for peacekeeping operations.  Despite the selective treatment of Israel, year after year, the same initiatives were introduced in the Fifth Committee with the same political motives, pinning the blame and the costs for Qana squarely on Israel.  The dangerous circumstances continued to threaten regional peace and security.  More than six years later, Hezbollah continued to launch attacks across the Blue Line.  On 12 March, terrorist killed six Israeli motorists on a northern Israeli highway.  On 30 March, they fired dozens of mortar rounds and anti-tank missiles across the Blue Line.  Several other attacks followed.  The list of attacks went on and on. 

So long as Hezbollah's attacks persisted, Israel had no choice but to take certain necessary measures in exercise of its legitimate right to self-defence, he said.  The measures were not only to defend Israel, but also to deter further escalation in the region.  There was no comparison between the measures Israel took in self-defence and the aggressive use of armed force by Hezbollah with Lebanese, Syrian and Iranian support in violation of Security Council resolutions.  The Government of Lebanon remained steadfast in its refusal to fulfil its obligation to reassert its authority in southern Lebanon and to prevent its territory from being used as a terrorist base.  Hezbollah enjoyed unhindered freedom of movement and were granted safe harbour, a situation which affected both Israeli and Lebanese citizens.  Those truly concerned with protecting civilians and United Nations personnel and with contributing to a settlement of the Middle East conflict would stop politicizing the deliberations of the Fifth Committee, and instead bring pressure to bear on the relevant authorities to end their support for acts of violence aimed at civilians.

Israel called on the Governments of Syria and Lebanon to comply with the will of the Security Council and the principles of international law to allow the deployment of Lebanese armed forces up to the Blue Line, to ensure the return of the effective authority of the Government of Lebanon in the area and to prevent the launching of terrorist attacks from Lebanese territory.  He would vote against the one-sided, politically motivated paragraphs and the resolution as a whole.  Israel had no reservations regarding figures of both personnel and budget allocations to UNIFIL.  It did have reservations, however, regarding the way UNIFIL fulfilled its mandate.  Israel paid its full assessment to UNIFIL as it did for all other peacekeeping operations.

The representative of Lebanon said that, according to the Israeli logic, it was necessary to kill civilians in occupied territories and dislodge their inhabitants to extend the Jewish diaspora there.  However, according to the principles of justice and international legality, that was not logical at all.  Among the rights recognized by the United Nations Charter was the right to resist occupation.  Several Security Council resolutions referred to the fact that occupation by a foreign force was an illegal act and a threat to international peace and security. 

The representative of Israel had tried on every occasion to involve the Assembly in a political dialogue when dealing with financial and legal matters, he continued.  The delegation of Lebanon would like to clarify the basis on which it had voted for the resolution now before the Assembly, along with the “Group of 77” developing countries and others.  Following an attack on Qana, Lebanon, in April 1996, the Assembly had adopted a resolution on the Israeli attack and its consequences.  In its preamble, it had expressed extreme concern over the acts and steps that threatened UNIFIL and prevented it from discharging its mandate.

The representative of Israel sought to justify an attack that had killed civilians in the UNIFIL area, he said, but several Assembly resolutions had decreed that the United Nations should be compensated by Israel for the damages incurred.  The criminal responsibility of Israel for attacking Qana should be made quite clear.  It was a premeditated act, confirmed by the Secretary-General’s 1996 report and by the fact that 100 Lebanese civilians had been killed at the UNIFIL camp at Qana.  According to that document, it was highly unlikely that the bombing against Qana could have been caused by error.  In his report, the Secretary-General had said he was extremely disquieted by the incident.

He went on to say that Israel’s financial responsibility stemmed from its actions.  Israel was criminally responsible and should be held financially responsible, as well.  Lebanon would continue to demand compensation and criminal and financial reparations for crimes perpetrated by Israel against it.  As for the damages suffered by the United Nations, they should be paid for by Israel, as confirmed by General Assembly resolutions on the matter.

Speaking in explanation of vote before the vote, the representative of Syria said the General Assembly once again was reaffirming its position vis-à-vis the responsibility of those who attacked the United Nations to shoulder the responsibility for their attacks.  He supported the statement of the representative of Lebanon.  Bombarding the Qana United Nations complex had been a premeditated act.  The occupying Power, therefore, should be responsible for compensating the United Nations for its actions.  By the same token, regarding incursions on the Blue Line, it was strange that Israel talked about others while forgetting that its own troops crossed the Blue Line every day.  The Secretary-General’s report indicated that the breakthroughs constituted provocation by Israel.  Whoever followed the matter would notice the continuous contradictions in the statements made by Israel. 

He urged delegations to vote in favour of the paragraphs and the resolution as a whole, so that a clear signal could be sent to the occupation forces of Israel to respect the United Nations.  The operation did not stop at the Qana bombing.  United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) personnel were subject to arrest, torture, persecution and separation while working in their international capacities as United Nations personnel.  Israel did not display divine respect at all.  Qana was the place where Jesus Christ had demonstrated the first of His miracles.  That had not been respected by Israel.  Israel’s claim to be a seeker of peace ran counter to various Security Council documents.  He found it strange that the representative of Israel talked about respecting Security Council resolutions when Israel had not respected such resolutions, including the recent resolution on the Jenin investigation.  Israel violated all international resolutions. 

The Assembly PRESIDENT informed members that a single recorded vote had been requested on the fourth preambular paragraph of the text, as well as on operative paragraphs 3, 4 and 13.

The Assembly then voted to retain those paragraphs by a vote of 74 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 46 abstentions (see Annex I).

      The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution as a whole by a vote of 121 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions (Annex II).

Speaking in right of reply, the representative of Iran said that having listened to Israel he was amazed.  He recalled that 102 Lebanese civilians, including children and elderly, had been killed during the Qana attack.  Such violations of international law had been perpetuated continually by Israeli forces against people who were living under occupation and who were exercising their right of liberation from foreign occupation.  Misleading allegations by Israel were aimed at weakening the legitimate struggle in Lebanon by painting it as terrorism.  They were not new allegations.  Lebanese people, characterized by Israel as terrorists, had compelled Israel to withdraw from their territory.  They had been defending their national soil against an occupying Power.

Speaking in right of reply, the representative of Israel said he was amazed to hear the representative of Iran speak about terror.  If he were Iranian, he would not have taken the floor on the issue.  Iran was the most dangerous force in the Middle East.  "Read my lips", he said.  Iran posed the biggest threat to the world. 

Speaking also in right of reply, the representative of Iran said the result of today’s vote showed who was the biggest threat to peace and security in the world.

The representative of the United States, speaking in explanation of position after the vote, said the United States strongly supported the work of UNIFIL in fulfilling its mandate.  However, the use of General Assembly funding resolutions to pursue claims against a Member State was not procedurally correct.  His delegation had opposed resolutions containing sections that required a Member State to pay for peacekeeping expenses.  They were not consensus resolutions.  There was a procedure governing the Secretary-General’s pursuit of the settlement of claims against a State.  The procedure had been pursued in other instances, including the Middle East and the Balkans.  Politicizing the work of the General Assembly should be avoided both now and in the future. 

Regarding the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) (document A/56/977), the Assembly had before it a draft resolution contained in document A/56/977, which it then adopted without a vote.  By its terms, it decided to appropriate $330 million for the maintenance of the Mission from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, exclusive of the amounts needed for the support account and the UNLB.

As with other missions with an unencumbered balance and other income, for those Member States that had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, their respective shares of those amounts would be set off against the apportionment for 2002/2003.  For those countries that had not paid their dues for the Mission, their shares would be set off against their debt.  For the Kosovo Mission, the amount of the unencumbered balance is some $66.54 million, with other income amounting to some $29.04 million.

Further by the text, the Assembly decided that the decrease in the staff assessment income of some $5.17 million shall be set off against the credits from the unencumbered balance referred to above in respect of the financial period ended 30 June 2001.

The Assembly then acted on the draft resolution on the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and the United Nations Mission of Support in East Timor (UNMISET) (document A/56/715/Add.1), adopting the draft without a vote.  By the terms of the text, the Assembly took note of UNTAET’s financial performance report for 2000/2001 and of the Secretary-General’s report on the final disposition of the assets of the Transitional Administration, approving the donation of assets to the Government of newly independent East Timor.

By further terms of the text, it decided that the expenditure for the period from 21 May to 30 June 2002 for the transitional financing of the new Mission of Support in East Timor would be met from the appropriation of $455 million for the Transitional Administration for 2001/2002, provided in resolution 56/249.  To be apportioned among Member States would be the amount of $80.1 million for the period from 1 January to 30 June 2002, representing the balance of previous appropriations.

Regarding the budget estimates for the Support Mission for 2002-2003, the Assembly decided to appropriate some $292 million for the establishment and maintenance of the Mission, exclusive of the requirements for the support account and the UNLB.

The Assembly then took up the draft resolution on thefinancing of the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE) contained in document A/56/714/Add.1, whereby it would take note of the financial performance report

of the Mission for the 2000/2001 budget cycle and decide to approve, on an exceptional basis, special arrangements with regard to several articles of the financial regulations of the United Nations in order to retain longer appropriations required to honour obligations owed to governments providing contingents and logistical support to the Mission.

For the maintenance of the Mission for the period from 1 July 2002 to

30 June 2003, the Assembly would appropriate $220.83 million, exclusive of the amount needed for the support account and the UNLB.  It would also decide that for Member States that have fulfilled their financial obligations to the force, their respective shares of the unencumbered balance of $25.08 million and income of $858,000 for 2000/2001 would be set off against their apportionment for 2002/2003.  The shares of Member States that have not fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission would be set off against their outstanding dues. 

The text was adopted without a vote.

Turning to a draft decision on financing of the United Nations Angola Verification Mission and the United Nations Observer Mission in Angola (document A/56/988), the Assembly then approved the donation of assets, with total inventory value of $235,800 and corresponding residual value of $81,700, to various United Nations agencies and non-governmental organizations, as detailed in the Secretary-General’s report on the matter.  It also took note of the report of the Secretary-General on the final disposition of assets of the Observer Mission and the related report of the ACABQ.  The text was adopted without a vote.

On the financing of the United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Observation Mission (UNIKOM), the Assembly took up the draft resolution contained in document A/56/980, by whose terms the Assembly would appropriate some $50.57 million for the maintenance of the Mission in 2002-2003, exclusive of the amounts needed for the maintenance of the support account and the UNLB.  It noted with appreciation that two thirds of the appropriation related to the Mission would be funded through voluntary contributions from the Government of Kuwait.  It would apportion the remaining amount among Member States. 

Taking into account the unencumbered balance of some $2.64 million and other income of $3.95 million, it also decided that for Member States that have fulfilled their financial obligations to the force, their respective shares of those amounts would be set off against their apportionment for 2002/2003.  The shares of Member States that have not fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission would be set off against their outstanding dues. 

The Assembly adopted the draft resolution without a vote.

By the terms of the draft resolution on financing of the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) (document A/56/712/Add.1), the Assembly decided to reduce the appropriation authorized for the Mission for the period 1 July 2000-30 June 2001 from some $577.67 million to some $541.04 million, the amount apportioned among Member States in respect of the same period.  It also approved the increase in the estimated staff assessment income for that same period from some $7.34 million to some $7.6 million.  For the period 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, the Assembly appropriated an amount of $669.48 million, exclusive of the amounts needed for the support account and the UNLB.

As with other missions with an unencumbered balance, for those Member States that had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, their respective shares of those amounts would be set off against the apportionment for 2002/2003. For those countries that had not paid their dues for the Mission, their shares would be set off against their debt.  For the Mission in Sierra Leone, the amount of the unencumbered balance is some $20.30 million, with some $14.65 million in other income.

The draft was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on financing of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) (document A/56/990).  By the terms of that text, it decided to appropriate for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003 the amount of some $41.53 million for the maintenance of the Mission, exclusive of the requirements for the support account and the UNLB.

As with other missions which had an unencumbered balance left, as well as other income, for those Member States that had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, their respective shares of those amounts would be set off against the apportionment for 2002/2003.  For those countries that had not paid their dues for the Mission, their shares would be set off against their debt.  For the Mission in Western Sahara, the amount of the unencumbered balance is some $3.33 million, with some $2.49 million in other income.

Further, the Assembly decided that the decrease in the staff assessment income of $465,500 during the financial period ending on 30 June 2001 shall be set off against the credits from the unencumbered balance referred to above.

By the text on the United Nations Preventive Deployment Force (document A/56/981), the Assembly decided to reduce the appropriation of $183,730 ($166,330 net) provided in its resolution 53/20 B of 8 June 1999 for the liquidation of the Force for the period from 1 July to 15 October 1999 to the amount of $172,000 ($76,000 net).  As an ad hoc arrangement, it also decided to apportion that amount among Member States and offset that apportionment against the unencumbered balance of some $7.06 million gross.  The cash balance of some $18.21 million would be credited to Member States.

The resolution was adopted without a vote.

Turning to several other closed peacekeeping missions -- United Nations Protection Force, the United Nations Confidence Restoration Operation in Croatia, the United Nations Preventive Deployment Force and the United Nations Peace Forces headquarters -- the Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, a draft resolution contained in document A/56/978).  Taking that action, it credited to Member States the amount of some $95.98 million, subject to the pending resolution on strategic deployment stocks.  The remaining cash balance of some $39.29 million would also be credited to Member States.  The Assembly suspended several financial regulations in respect of the remaining surplus of some $61.22 million in order to allow for reimbursements to troop contributors, and in the light of the cash shortage of the combined Forces, requesting the Secretary-General to provide an updated report in a year.  Consideration of the treatment of the increase in staff assessment income of $776,343 in respect of the surplus was deferred.

The Assembly then acted on the draft resolution on financing of the United Nations Operation in Somalia II (document A/56/974), by whose terms it decided to suspend for the immediate future the provisions of Financial Regulations of the United Nations in respect of the remaining surplus of some $21.32 million, to allow for the reimbursement of troop contributors and in the light of the cash shortage of the Operation, and requested the Secretary-General to provide an updated report in one year.  It also decided to defer consideration of the treatment of the increase in staff assessment income of $950,300 in respect of that surplus. 

In addition, the Assembly authorized the Secretary-General to retain an amount of some $19.62 million from the balance of appropriations of some

$40.94 million to meet the cost of outstanding government claims.

The resolution was adopted without a vote.

By its draft resolution contained in document A/56/982, the Assembly took action regarding the financing of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP).  Adopting the draft without a vote, it took note of the financial performance report for the Force for the 2000/2001 budget cycle and decided to appropriate some $45.65 million for the maintenance of the mission for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, exclusive of the requirements for the support account and the UNLB. 

Deciding on the financing of that appropriation, the Assembly noted with appreciation that one third of the amount would be funded through voluntary contributions from the Government of Cyprus, and that $6.5 million would come from the Government of Greece.  As for the unencumbered balance of some $1.06 million and other income of $1.68 million for the financial period ended on 30 June 2001, the respective shares of those Member States that have fulfilled their financial obligations to the Force would be set off against their apportionment for 2002/2003.  The shares of those States that have not fulfilled their financial obligations to the Force would be set off against their outstanding obligations.  One third of the unencumbered balance and other income would be returned to the Government of Cyprus.  Greece’s respective share would also be returned to that country.

By another draft resolution adopted without a vote (document A/56/976), the Assembly took note of the financial performance report for 2000/2001 of the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG), and appropriated the amount of some $31.71 million for the maintenance of the Mission for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, exclusive of the requirements for the support account and the UNLB.  Also by the text, the Assembly disposed of the unencumbered balance

($4.05 million), and other income ($1.72 million) in a manner similar to other missions.

      The draft resolution on financing of the United Nations Mission in Haiti (document A/56/987) would have the Assembly decide that the unencumbered balance of some $39.56 million and interest income in the amount of some $6.06 million shall be credited to Member States.  The Assembly would also decide that the decrease in the staff assessment income of some $2.14 million shall be set off against the credits from the unencumbered balance referred to above.

The text was adopted without a vote.

On financing of the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution (document A/56/979) taking note of the Mission’s financial performance report for 2000/2001 and deciding to appropriate an amount of some $78.54 million for the maintenance and liquidation of the Mission for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, exclusive of the requirements for the support account and the UNLB.

The unencumbered balance of the Mission for the 2000/2001 budget cycle amounts to some $12.49 million; and the total amount of other income for the same period is $5.58 million.  Also by the terms of the text, the Assembly disposed of them in a manner similar to other missions.

      The Assembly then took up the draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Transitional Administration for Eastern Slavonia, Baranja and Western Sirmium (UNTAES) and the Civilian Police Support Group (document A/56/991).  By the terms of the text, which was adopted without a vote, the Assembly decided to credit Member States some $35.8 million.  [The Secretary-General originally proposed that Member States waive their respective shares in the cash balance of some $35.8 million to be applied to the financing of the strategic deployment stocks.]  The Assembly also requested the Secretary-General to provide an updated report on the financial position of the Transitional Administration and the Support Group in one year.

The Assembly also had before it a draft resolution on financing of the United Nations Support Mission in Haiti, the United Nations Transition Mission in Haiti and the United Nations Civilian Police Mission in Haiti (document A/56/986), which was adopted without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly decided to suspend for the immediate future the provisions of the Financial Regulations of the United Nations in respect of the surplus of some $4 million in the light of the cash shortage of the Missions, and request the Secretary-General to provide an updated report in one year.  It also deferred consideration of the treatment of the decrease in staff assessment income of $21,300 in respect of the surplus referred to above.

The Assembly then took up the draft on the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) (document A/56/713/Add.2), by which it took note of several reports, including one by the OIOS, relating to the airfield services contract for the Mission, and requested the Secretary-General to report further on that situation at its fifty-seventh session.  It also approved, on an exceptional basis, the special arrangements regarding reimbursing the troop- and equipment-contributing States.

In connection with the 2000/2001 budget cycle, the Assembly took note of the financial performance report of the Mission for that period and decided to appropriate the amount of $41 million, as previously authorized and apportioned under the terms of resolution 55/275 of 14 June 2001. 

For the 2002/2003 budget, it would appropriate some $581.93 million for the maintenance of the Mission, exclusive of the support account and the UNLB. 

The resolution was adopted without a vote.

The Assembly then took up a draft resolution on the Ad Hoc Committee of the Whole of the General Assembly for the final review and appraisal of the

implementation of the United Nations New Agenda for the Development of Africa in the 1990s (document A/56/L.79).

[The United Nations New Agenda for the Development of Africa in the 1990s (UN-NADAF) is the overarching framework and catalyst for activities of the United Nations System in Africa.  The Ad Hoc Committee of the Whole was established by Assembly resolution 56/218 of 21 December 2001 to conduct the final review and appraisal of the implementation of UN-NADAF.  The resolution set 9 to 13 September and 7 to 9 October as the dates for the substantive meetings of the Committee.  As those dates conflicted with plenary meetings of the General Assembly and a possible commemoration of 11 September 2001, it was proposed to hold the substantive session between 23 and 27 September and from 7 to 11 October.]

According to the draft resolution, the Assembly would decide that the Ad Hoc Committee should meet in substantive session for three working days, from Tuesday, 24 September, to Thursday, 26 September 2002, and for five working days from Monday, 7 October, to Friday, 11 October 2002.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft.

The Assembly next took up a letter dated 18 June 2002 from the Permanent Representative of Japan addressed to the General Assembly President (document A/56/985).  It explains that the Assembly, in December 2001, adopted resolution 56/38 on "Recommendations on support for volunteering".  According to that resolution, two plenary meetings of the fifty-seventh session of the Assembly would be held on 5 December 2002, the International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development.  The meetings would be devoted to the outcome of the International Year of Volunteers.  Due to the fact that 5 December 2002 is an official United Nations holiday, the Permanent Representative of Japan requests that an alternative date be set for the meeting, namely, Tuesday, 26 November 2002.

The Assembly then decided to hold the two plenary meetings of the International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development on Tuesday,

26 November 2002.

(annexes follow)

ANNEX I

Vote on Preambular Paragraph 4 and Operative Paragraphs 3, 4, and 13

of the Draft Resolution on the Financing of United Nations Interim Force

in Lebanon (UNIFIL)

The relevant paragraphs of the draft (document A/56/722/Add.1) were adopted by a recorded vote of 74 in favour to 2 against, with 46 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia.

Against:  Israel, United States.

Abstaining:  Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Cameroon, Comoros, Costa Rica, Djibouti, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, France, Gambia, Georgia, Grenada, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mongolia, Namibia, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sierra Leone, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX I)

ANNEX II

Vote on Draft Resolution on Financing of United Nations Interim Force

in Lebanon (UNIFIL)

The draft resolution as a whole (document A/56/722/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 2 against, with no abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia.

Against:  Israel, United States.

Abstaining:  None.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cameroon, Comoros, Djibouti, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, France, Gambia, Georgia, Grenada, Honduras, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mongolia, Namibia, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sierra Leone, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Zimbabwe.

* *** *

GA10032.p2

For information media. Not an official record.