GENERAL ASSEMBLY URGES MEMBER STATES TO SUPPORT IAEA IN PREVENTING ACTS OF NUCLEAR-RELATED TERRORISM

14 December 2001
GA/9999

GENERAL ASSEMBLY URGES MEMBER STATES TO SUPPORT IAEA IN PREVENTING ACTS OF NUCLEAR-RELATED TERRORISM

14/12/2001
Press ReleaseGA/9999

Fifty-sixth General Assembly

Plenary

86th Meeting (AM)

GENERAL ASSEMBLY URGES MEMBER STATES TO SUPPORT IAEA

IN PREVENTING ACTS OF NUCLEAR-RELATED TERRORISM

Several Delegations Advocate Strengthening

Coordination of Economic and Social Council, Other UN Bodies

The General Assembly this morning adopted a resolution urging all Member States to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in preventing acts of terrorism committed with nuclear and other radioactive materials.

The recorded vote on the resolution, introduced by the representative of Australia, was 150 Member States in favour to 1 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), and two abstentions (Côte d’Ivoire , Lao People’s Democratic Republic).  (See Annex VI.)  By further terms of the text, the Assembly called on all States in the Middle East to fully apply IAEA safeguards to all nuclear activities, adhere to international non-proliferation regimes and set up a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region.

The Assembly noted that it could make no conclusions about nuclear material being diverted from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and urged that country to fully comply with the safeguards agreement, preserving all information needed to verify its initial declaration on such material.

The representative of Iraq introduced an amendment to the resolution, whereby the Assembly would welcome the IAEA’s resumed activities in that country, and its cooperation with Agency inspection teams during visits in January 2000 and January 2001.

On behalf of the draft's co-sponsors, Australia’s representative tabled a motion for no action on Iraq’s amendment.  By a recorded vote of 96 in favour to  7 against (Libya, Tunisia, Sudan, Syria, Jamaica, Cuba, Algeria) and

20 abstentions, the Assembly decided to take no action on the proposed amendment (Annex I).  The representatives of Chile and Belgium spoke in favour of the motion, and the representatives of Iraq and Jamaica spoke against it.

Separate votes were taken for preambular paragraph 3 (on the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes), operative paragraph 5 (on safeguards agreements), operative paragraph 10 (on safeguards in the Middle East), and operative paragraph 12 (on Iraq’s cooperation with the Agency).

Preambular paragraph 3 (Annex II) was adopted by 127 votes in favour to

2 against (India, Israel), and 6 abstentions (Bhutan, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba,

Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan, Haiti).  Operative paragraph 5 was adopted by 130 votes in favour to none against and 5 abstentions (Haiti, India,

Pakistan, Syria, Côte d’Ivoire).  Operative paragraph 10 (Annex IV) was adopted by 136 votes in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States) and no abstentions. Operative paragraph 12 (Annex V) was adopted by 119 votes in favour to none against and 14 abstentions.

The representatives of United States, Israel, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, India, Iraq, Pakistan, China, Cuba and Syria explained their votes.

The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, a resolution recommending that the Secretary-General’s report “Road map towards the implementation of the United Nations Millennium Declaration” be considered a useful guide.  It requested the Secretary-General to prepare an annual report as well as comprehensive five-year reports on progress achieved towards implementing the goals of the Millennium Declaration.

Without a vote, the Assembly adopted two further resolutions, one on government support in promoting and consolidating new or restored democracies, and the other on returning or restitution of cultural property to countries of origin. The representatives of Poland (on behalf of the Convening Group of the Community of Democracies) and Suriname explained their votes on the first of the two resolutions.

The representative of Jamaica introduced a resolution whereby the Assembly would urge the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean to continue cooperating with the Latin American Economic System.  It would also encourage the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to continue financial and technical cooperation programmes in the region, and other United Nations bodies to intensify support for activities of the Latin American Economic System.

Opening the meeting, the President of the General Assembly, Han Seung-soo (Republic of Korea), said he had accepted the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo on behalf of the United Nations, along with the Secretary-General.  The award was meant to encourage men and women of the United Nations, and would be especially welcome to thousands of its personnel serving under difficult conditions, often at grave risk.  He added that one could be justly proud of what the United Nations had accomplished, but must also look to the daunting challenges ahead, such as terrorism, poverty, drug abuse and trafficking, HIV/AIDS, and environmental degradation.

In other business this morning, the Assembly considered the report of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).  Introducing the report, Council President Martin Belinga-Eboutou (Cameroon) said the organ had devoted much time to systematically following up development activities in the 1990s.  The eradication of poverty had remained its top priority, which had made Africa the core of its concerns.

Globalization had become one of the most decisive factors in decision making, he continued.  The Council should have a more prominent role in future

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debates on globalization, and should also involve itself in conflict resolution and re-establishing peace.

The representative of Croatia said that ECOSOC should continue helping Member States deal with the effects of globalization, and said he supported efforts to implement economic and social reforms.  He also noted that the Council’s economic, social and cultural expertise could be crucial in identifying the causes of conflicts, and urged cooperation with other main bodies of the Organization, including the Security Council.

The representatives of Belgium (on behalf of the European Union and associated States), Republic of Korea and Nepal also spoke on the item.

Announcements

The Assembly was informed that Tuiloma Slade (Samoa) and Elan Simcock (United Kingdom) had been appointed co-chairpersons of the third meeting of the Consultative Process on Ocean Affairs.

The Assembly will consider the item on Bosnia and Herzegovina, originally scheduled for Tuesday morning, 18 December, on Thursday afternoon, 20 December.

The same afternoon, it will consider the item:  Multilingualism.

Reports of the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) will be considered on the morning of Friday 21 December.

The Assembly will meet again at 3.00 p.m. to consider strengthening the coordination of United Nations humanitarian and disaster relief assistance, including special economic assistance.

Background

The General Assembly met this morning to consider draft resolutions on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), on follow-up to the outcome of the Millennium Summit, and on United Nations support for new or restored democracies.  It would also consider resolutions on return or restitution of cultural property and on United Nations cooperation with regional and other organizations.  The report of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) would be taken up, as would draft resolutions on strengthening the coordination of humanitarian and disaster relief assistance.

For its consideration of the ECOSOC report, the Assembly had before it a letter dated 26 October from the President of the Economic and Social Council addressed to the President of the General Assembly (document A/56/517).  The letter recalls the Assembly’s rules of procedure regarding the report, noting that some parts of the report are considered in the Assembly’s plenary while others are taken up by the Assembly’s Second (Economic and Financial), Third (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) and Fifth (Administrative and Budgetary) Committees.  The letter also recalls the Millennium Declaration’s statement that the Council had made substantial progress in strengthening its capacity to carry out its Charter functions.  It noted the appropriateness of the Assembly considering the report as a whole during its plenary session, and requested that a reasonable period of time be allocated for introducing and considering the report as a whole.

The Assembly has before it the report of the Economic and Social Council for 2001 (document A/56/3).  Chapter I outlines the matters before the Council that call for action by the Assembly or for its attention.  Those included follow-up to policy recommendations for international cooperation and for conferences and summits, as well as a report on implementation of a resolution on the repercussions of Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people.  With regard to economic and environmental questions, those issues related to the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction and to a Global Code of Ethics for Tourism.  The issues relating to social and human rights questions centred on the advancement of women, social development, crime prevention and criminal justice, human rights questions and situations, and the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Rights.

Chapter II provides a synopsis of the special high-level meeting of the Council with the Bretton Woods institutions on 1 May.  The report states that the meeting took the form of a free-flowing dialogue between ministers and high-level officials, permanent representatives and representatives of international financial institutions as well as policy-makers.  It focused on development financing and on the promotion of a development-friendly international financial system with appropriate public and private responsibility for preventing financial crises.  The report summarizes the salient points and main aspects of statements and views exchanged with the aim of deepening understanding of issues related to financing for development and to reform of the global financial system.       

The high-level segment, held from 16 to 18 July, is summarized in Chapter III.  The report notes that the theme of the section was the role of the United Nations in supporting the efforts of African countries to achieve sustainable development.  A policy dialogue and exchange of views was held on world economic developments and developments in international economic cooperation.  Round tables were held on the investment climate in African countries, the financing of investment and infrastructure needs.  A panel of eminent personalities considered the nexus between peace and development.

By a draft Ministerial Declaration adopted during the segment, ministers agreed to support the consolidation of democracy in Africa and to assist Africans in their struggle for lasting peace, poverty eradication and sustainable development.  They also agreed to encourage and sustain regional and subregional mechanisms for preventing conflict; take special measures to address the challenges of poverty eradication, including debt cancellation and improved market access; and help Africa build up its capacity to tackle the spread of HIV/AIDS.

Under operational activities for development presented in Chapter IV, the report stresses the need for economic and technical cooperation among developing countries.  Among its agreed conclusions, the Council found that the transfer of technology should be suited to the particular needs of developing countries and their development policies.  Emphasis should be concentrated in such areas as training of educators, e-commerce, telemedicine, and promotion of access to information and communication technology (ICT).  A deliberate effort must be made to improve access to ICTs and to transfer such knowledge to developing countries.

In Chapter V, on coordinating elements of the United Nations system to promote development with particular reference to ICTs, the Council adopted conclusions on the transfer of technology, international trade and foreign investment, as well as increasing access to them.  It also adopted conclusions on the role of the developed world in the transfer of technology and knowledge to developing countries, bridging the "digital divide", and the Information and Communication Technologies Task Force.

Chapter VI of the report is a humanitarian affairs segment, dealing with special economic, humanitarian and disaster relief assistance.  It contains an overview of the Secretary-General's report on that assistance (A/56/95-E/2001/85) and a summary of the Council's general debate.  Chapter VII is a general segment containing sections on integrated and coordinated implementation of major United Nations conferences and summits and follow-up to them.  Elections, appointments, nominations and confirmations are covered in Chapter VIII and organizational matters in Chapter IX.

Annex I contains the agendas of the substantive session and the two organizational sessions for the year.  Annex III is a listing of the intergovernmental organizations designated to participate in the Council's deliberations.  An addendum to the report (document A/56/3/Add.1) contains Annex II, with information on the composition of the Council and its bodies.  A second addendum (document A/56/3/Add.2) updates the report by integrating the outcome of the Council’s resumed substantive session, which took place in October. 

      Resolutions

Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency

Before the Assembly is a draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (document A/56/L.10).  The Assembly’s consideration of the item took place on 22 October (for background information and a report on the meeting, see Press Release GA/9938 of 22 October).

By the draft, the Assembly would urge all States to bring into force comprehensive safeguards agreements as soon as possible.  It would stress the importance of the Agency’s safeguards system, requesting States and other parties to the safeguard agreements to sign additional protocols promptly.  The Assembly would urge all States to strive for effective and harmonious international cooperation in carrying out the work of the Agency in promoting the use of nuclear energy and applying measures to strengthen the safety of nuclear installations and to minimize risks to life, health and the environment.  It would also urge States to help the IAEA strengthen technical assistance and cooperation for developing countries and ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards system.

Further, the Assembly would stress the need for the Agency to continue pursuing activities in the areas of nuclear science, technology and applications for meeting the basic sustainable development needs of Member States.  Regarding the Middle East, the Assembly would call upon all States in the region to implement the provisions contained in the Agency General Committee resolution GC(45)/RES/18, including by applying the full scope of Agency safeguards to all nuclear activities, adhering to international non-proliferation regimes and establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region.

Regarding the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, the Assembly would note that the country is a party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT).  Despite that, the Agency continues to be unable to verify the accuracy and completeness of the initial declaration of nuclear material made by the country, and is therefore unable to conclude that there has been no diversion of nuclear material.  The Assembly would express deep concern about the country’s continuing non-compliance with the safeguards agreement and would urge its full compliance, including with all steps deemed necessary to preserve all information relevant to verifying the accuracy and completeness of the initial declaration. The Assembly would strongly encourage the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to respond positively and at an early date to the Agency’s detailed proposal for the first concrete steps toward implementation of the generic requirements for verification of the accuracy and completeness of the initial declaration.

The Assembly would also appeal to all States to become party to the Convention on Nuclear Safety, the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management.  The Assembly would urge States to cooperate fully with the Agency’s Director General and to support the IAEA's efforts in reviewing its activities and programmes, with a view to strengthening its work relevant to preventing acts of terrorism involving nuclear materials and other radioactive materials.

The draft is sponsored by Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine and United Kingdom.

An amendment to the above draft resolution (document A/56/L.11), submitted by Iraq, would add an insert after operative paragraph 12 of the resolution as follows:

"Welcomes the resumption of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Iraq pursuant to the safeguards agreement, in accordance with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, and the cooperation provided by Iraq to the inspection teams of the Agency during visits to Iraq from 22 to

25 January 2000 and 19 to 24 January 2001, which enabled the inspection teams to verify the nuclear material subject to safeguards, as explained in the report of the Agency to the Security Council (see S/200/300).”

Follow-up to the Millennium Summit

The debate on this item took place on 19 November (for background information and an account of the meeting, see Press Releases GA/9973 and GA/9974 of 19 November).

By a draft resolution on follow-up to the Millennium Summit (document A/56/L.48), the Assembly would note with appreciation the report of the Secretary-General entitled “Road map towards the implementation of the United Nations Millenium Declaration”.  It would recommend that the road map be considered as a useful guide in implementing the Millennium Declaration.  It would request the Secretary-General to prepare both an annual report and a five-yearly comprehensive report on progress achieved by the United Nations system and Member States towards implementing the Millennium Declaration.  It would request that the annual report focus on cross-cutting and cross-sectoral issues, and on the major areas set forth in the road map, while the quinquennial comprehensive reports would examine progress in implementing commitments made in the Declaration.   

Further to the draft, the Assembly would invite the United Nations system, in cooperation with Member States, to adopt specific measures to give widespread publicity to the Millennium Declaration and to increase the dissemination of information on the Declaration.

Support for new or restored democracies

Debate on this item took place on 11 December (for background information and a record of the meeting, see Press Release GA/9997 of 11 December).

The Assembly had a draft resolution on support by the United Nations system of the efforts of governments to promote and consolidate new or restored democracies (document A/56/L.46).  By it, the Assembly would encourage Member States to promote democratization and to make additional efforts to identify possible steps to support the efforts of governments to promote and consolidate new or restored democracies.  The Assembly would invite Member States, the United Nations system, and other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to continue to contribute actively to the follow-up to the Fourth International Conference of New or Restored Democracies.

By the same draft, the Assembly would encourage the Secretary-General to continue to improve the capacity of the Organization to respond effectively to Member States, requests by providing coherent and adequate support for their efforts to achieve the goals of good governance and democratization.  The Assembly would request the Secretary-General to examine options for strengthening United Nations support for Member State efforts, and to report to the General Assembly at its fifty-eighth session, when it would include the item in its provisional agenda.

The draft is sponsored by Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Czech Republic, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Greece, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Haiti, Hungary, India, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mali, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nepal, Nigeria, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Rwanda, San Marino, Senegal, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Suriname, Uganda, Ukraine and United States.

Return or restitution of cultural property

Debate on this issue took place on 10 December.  (For background information and a record of the meeting, see Press Release GA/9995 dated 10 December.)

The draft resolution on return or restitution of cultural property (document A/56/L.41/Rev.1) would have the Assembly urge Member States to introduce effective national and international measures to prevent and combat the illicit trafficking in cultural property.  It would also request the Secretary-General to cooperate with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to define and implement a strategy for effective promotion of the International Fund for the Return of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin or its Restitution in Case of Illicit Appropriation.  It would invite Member States, intergovernmental bodies, the private sector and other interested donors of the international community to make voluntary contributions to the Fund. 

The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to cooperate with UNESCO in its efforts to develop all possibilities, including further initiatives of the present resolution.  It would request the Secretary-General, in cooperation with the Director-General of UNESCO, to submit to the General Assembly at its fifty-eighth session a report on the implementation of the present resolution.

The draft resolution is sponsored by Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Greece, Lebanon, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Uruguay.

Cooperation with Latin American Economic System

Debate on this issue took place on 7 December.  (For background information and a record of the meeting, see Press Release GA/9993 dated 7 December.)

The draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Latin American Economic System (document A/56/L.43) would have the Assembly urge the Economic Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean to continue deepening its coordination and mutual support with the Latin American Economic System.  It would urge the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to continue its financial and technical cooperation with programmes that the Permanent Secretariat for the Latin American Economic System was carrying out in areas of mutual interest.  It would also urge United Nations bodies to continue and intensify support for and cooperation with the Latin American Economic System.

Strengthening coordination of assistance

The debate on this item took place on 27 November (for background information and a record of the meeting, see Press Release GA/9980 of

27 November).

 Sub-item:  Strengthening coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance

       The first of three draft resolutions on this sub-item concerned emergency response to disasters (document A/56/L.14).  Sponsored by Greece and Turkey, it would have the Assembly note with satisfaction the progress achieved by the Governments of Turkey and Greece, in  cooperation with the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), on the formation of a joint Hellenic-Turkish standby disaster response unit.  That unit would have no financial implications for on the programme budget of the United Nations.  The Secretary-General, through OCHA, would be requested to continue work on the modalities for utilizing the standby disaster relief unit by the United Nations system.  He would also be asked to report on progress made in implementing the resolution at the Assembly's fifty-seventh session.

Another draft on the sub-item was on international cooperation on humanitarian assistance in the field of natural disasters, from relief to development (Document A/56/L.51).  By its terms, the Assembly would call upon all relevant States to adopt and implement legislative and other appropriate measures to mitigate the effects of natural disasters.  The Assembly would stress the importance of strengthening international cooperation in the provision of humanitarian assistance in support of the efforts of the affected States in dealing with natural disasters, and that this assistance should be provided in accordance with resolution 46/182.

Further to the draft, the Assembly would stress the need for partnership among governments of the affected countries, relevant humanitarian organizations and specialized companies to promote training, access, and use of technologies to strengthen preparedness for and response to natural disasters.  It would also stress the need to enhance the transfer of current technologies and corresponding know-how, in particular to developing countries, on concessional and preferential terms.  States would be encouraged to sign or ratify the Tampere Convention on the Provision of Telecommunication Resources for Disaster Mitigation and Relief Operations or to consider doing so.  Further, the Secretary-General would be asked to continue cooperating with relevant organization partners in compiling a directory of disaster mitigation capacity at the national, regional and international levels, and a Directory of Advanced Technologies for Disaster Response as a new part of the Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities.

The Secretary-General would also be requested to complete the compiling and issue of the global report on disaster reduction as undertaken by the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and to continue to consider mechanisms to improve the international response to natural disasters.  He would be asked to report on progress at the Assembly's fifty-seventh session.

The resolution is sponsored by Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, India, Iran, Lebanon, Mexico, Russian Federation, South Africa, Sudan, The former Yugoslavia Republic of Macedonia, Togo and Turkey.

By a draft on strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations (document A/56/L.55), the Assembly would welcome the holding of the fourth humanitarian affairs segment of the ECOSOC, during its substantive session of 2001.  It would emphasize the importance of discussion of humanitarian policies and activities in the General Assembly and the Council and call upon the relevant organizations to cooperate with the Secretary-General and the Emergency Relief Coordinator to ensure timely implementation of the follow-up to agreed conclusions of the humanitarian segment of the ECOSOC.

Further to the draft, the Assembly would express its appreciation to those governments that had contributed to the Central Emergency Relief Fund.  It would encourage better use of the Fund and endorse the Secretary-General's proposal to expand utilization of the Fund to include humanitarian assistance resulting from natural disasters, humanitarian assistance resulting from new requirements in protracted emergencies, and emergency staff safety arrangements for United Nations and associated personnel.  The Assembly would decide that the expanded utilization of the fund should follow the same procedures and terms of reference that have been established in resolution 46/182 for advances and reimbursement of the Fund's resources.  It would also request that the Secretary-General inform governments regularly on the use of the Fund.

The resolution is sponsored by Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States and Yugoslavia.

Sub-item:  Special economic assistance to individual countries and regions

By the first of eight resolutions on this sub-item is a draft on special assistance for the economic recovery and reconstruction of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (document A/56/L.39), the General Assembly would stress the link between the peace process and economic recovery.  It would welcome economic reforms undertaken by its Government and encourage it to carry on with the process for the benefit of the Congolese people.

The Assembly would also stress the importance of restoring river traffic, welcome the reopening of the Congo and Oubangi rivers and express its support for the establishment of the Congo River Basin Commission.  By other terms, it would encourage the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to pursue sound macroeconomic policies and promote good governance and the rule of law.  It would urge the Government to exert all efforts for economic reconstruction despite the ongoing armed conflict.

Urging all parties concerned in the region to cease military activities and cease any support for armed groups and the recruitment and training of children, the Assembly would call upon those States that have not done so to withdraw from the territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in accordance with the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement, the Kampala disengagement plan and relevant Security Council Resolutions.

The draft resolution is sponsored by Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Gambia, Guinea, India, Madagascar, Malawi, Morocco, Namibia, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

A draft resolution on humanitarian assistance to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (document A/56/L.49) would have the Assembly call on all States, regional organizations, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to provide humanitarian assistance to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.  It would call on them to support that Government in ensuring the transition from relief to the long-term goals of rehabilitation, reconstruction and development.

Further to the draft, the Assembly would encourage the Federal Republic to cooperate further with the United Nations system and humanitarian organizations in addressing the humanitarian needs of the affected population.  The Assembly would urge the relevant authorities and international community to support programmes ensuring that the needs of refugees and internally displaced persons were met, and pursue durable solutions to their plight, especially voluntary repatriation and reintegration.

The Assembly would call upon the Secretary-General to continue mobilizing international humanitarian assistance to the Federal Republic, and encourage the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Council of Europe and others to enhance their cooperation in providing humanitarian assistance to the country.  It would request the United Nations and specialized agencies to continue assessing humanitarian needs to ensure effective links between relief and longer-term assistance to the Federal Republic.

The resolution is sponsored by Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Chile, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States and Yugoslavia.

There is a resolution on assistance for humanitarian relief, rehabilitation and development for East Timor (document A/56/L.52).  By it, the Assembly would urge United Nations organizations, the international community and NGOs to continue efforts to enhance ownership and participation of all East Timorese, including women and vulnerable groups, in the rehabilitation, reconstruction and development of East Timor.  It would stress the need for continued international assistance to support local capacity-building, including in areas such as education, health, agriculture and rural development, the judiciary, governance and public administration, security and law and order. 

The Assembly would recommend that outstanding infrastructure needs remain an essential focus of international assistance in such areas as the reconstruction and rehabilitation of public buildings, educational facilities, roads and public services, including water and sanitation and the supply of electricity. 

By the terms of the text, the Assembly would reaffirm the need to ensure safe and unhindered access of humanitarian personnel and assistance to all those in need.  It would recognize in this regard the continuing implementation by the Government of Indonesia of Security Council resolution 1319 (2000), would encourage the Government to continue its efforts in that regard in full cooperation with Member States, the United Nations system and NGOs.  It would underscore the importance of continued international assistance to support the efforts of the Government of Indonesia and relevant organizations to meet the needs of East Timorese refugees in West Timor, by assisting voluntary repatriation or resettlement and by contributing to humanitarian assistance needs in the camps in West Timor. 

The Assembly would also urge the United Nations to continue to address the rehabilitation, reconstruction and development needs of East Timor and would request the Secretary-General to prepare a report on the implementation of the present resolution for consideration by the General Assembly at its fifty-seventh session. 

The draft resolution is sponsored by Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Malta, Mozambique, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Sao Tome and Principe, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Uganda, United Kingdom and United States.

A resolution on international assistance to and cooperation with the Alliance for the Sustainable Development of Central America (document A/56/L.53) would have the Assembly reiterate the importance of supporting and strengthening the efforts of the Central American countries to implement the Strategic Framework for the Reduction of Vulnerability and Disasters in Central America.  That would also apply to the projects and programmes of the Quinquennium for the Reduction of Vulnerability to and the Impact of Natural Disasters in Central America. 

It would note the efforts and achievements relating to mine clearance in Central America, and appeal to the organs of the United Nations system and the international community to continue providing the material, technical and financial support needed by the Central American Governments to complete mine clearance, mine awareness and victim assistance activities.  Further to the draft, the Assembly would stress the need for the international community to maintain its cooperation with the Central American countries, to support the promotion of sustainable development and the consolidation of peace, freedom and democracy in the region.

The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General, the organs, organizations and programmes of the United Nations system, and all States, international financial institutions and regional and subregional organizations to continue providing the support needed to attain the objectives of the programme for the sustainable development of Central America.

The resolution is sponsored by Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Italy, Lebanon, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal and Spain. 

A draft on assistance for humanitarian relief and the economic and social rehabilitation of Somalia (document A/56/L.54) would have the Assembly strongly urge all political groups in Somalia to participate in the ongoing peace process.  It would emphasize that need for political groups that have stayed outside the Arta Peace process.  It would further strongly urge all those parties to establish dialogue with the Transitional National Government, to achieve national reconciliation and allow transition from relief to reconstruction and development, while preserving the economic and administrative progress in many regions.

Further, the Assembly would urge all States and organizations concerned to continue implementing the relevant resolution aimed at assisting the Somali people in rehabilitating basic social and economic services, and in institution-building wherever peace and security prevail.  It would welcome ongoing efforts by regional and international actors contributing to the reconciliation process, and would also welcome the United Nations strategy focusing on community-based interventions.  It would emphasize that the Somali people have the primary responsibility for their own development and for the sustainability of assistance programmes, calling on all Somali parties to respect the security, safety and free movement of aid providers.

Further, the Assembly would call upon the Secretary-General to continue mobilizing assistance for Somalia, and upon the international community to provide increased support through the Consolidated Inter-Agency Appeal for Somalia.  Finally, in view of the critical situation in the country, the Secretary-General would be asked to take all measures to implement the resolution and to report during the Assembly's next session.

The resolution is sponsored by Algeria, Chad, Comoros, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, France, Guinea, India, Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Mali, Morocco, Namibia, Oman, Qatar, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swaziland, Syria, Tunisia, Uganda and Yemen.  

There is a resolution on economic assistance for the reconstruction and development of Djibouti (document A/56/L.56) by which the Assembly would encourage the Government of Djibouti, despite difficult economic and regional situations, to continue its serious efforts towards the consolidation of democracy.  The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to continue, in close cooperation with the Government of Djibouti, his efforts to mobilize necessary resources for an effective programme of financial, technical and material assistance to Djibouti.

Further to the text, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to report to the General Assembly at its fifty-eighth session on the progress made with regard to economic assistance to Djibouti and the implementation of the present resolution. 

The draft is sponsored by Algeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Comoros, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Gabon, Guinea, India, Kenya, Kuwait, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Namibia, Oman, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia.

By a resolution on economic assistance to the Eastern European States affected by the developments in the Balkans (document A/56/L.58), the Assembly would express concern at the persistence of special economic problems confronting the Eastern European States affected by developments in the Balkans, in particular their impact on regional trade and economic relations and on navigation along the Danube and on the Adriatic Sea. 

The Assembly would encourage the affected States of the region to continue enhancing the process of multilateral regional cooperation in the fields of transport and infrastructure development, including the resumption of full navigation on the Danube, as well as to foster conditions favourable to trade, such as customs issues, investment and private sector development, including privatization, in all the countries of the region.  The Assembly would also request the Secretary-General to report to the General Assembly at its fifty-eighth session on the implementation of the present resolution. 

The draft resolution is sponsored by Argentina, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Romania, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine, United States and Yugoslavia.

There is a draft resolution on emergency assistance to the Sudan (document A/56/L.60*) sponsored by the United Republic of Tanzania.  By it, the Assembly would call upon the international community to continue to contribute generously to the emergency needs, recovery and development of the Sudan, and would urge all parties to the conflict to facilitate the achievement of those objectives.

The Assembly would also urge the international community to give assistance for the rehabilitation of transportation means and infrastructure vital for the provision of relief supplies in the Sudan and their cost-effectiveness, and in that context it would stress the importance of continued cooperation by all the parties involved so as to facilitate and improve the delivery of relief supplies. 

Further to the text, the Assembly would call upon the donor community and the organizations of the United Nations system to provide financial, technical, and medical assistance, guided by the actions called for by the General Assembly in its relevant resolutions, to combat such diseases as malaria and other epidemics in the Sudan. 

The Assembly would urge the international community to continue to support national and international programmes of rehabilitation, voluntary resettlement and reintegration of returnees and internally displaced persons, as well as assistance to refugees.  It would urge all parties involved to continue to offer all feasible and necessary assistance, including facilitating the movement of relief supplies and personnel, so as to guarantee the success of Operation Lifeline Sudan in all affected parts of the country, with special emphasis on national capacity-building in the humanitarian field for governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as on meeting emergency relief needs.

It would also call upon all parties to respect international humanitarian law on the protection of civilians during times of war, and would condemn attacks against civilians and attacks against and detention of humanitarian personnel, including the incidents leading to the death of 15 humanitarian workers in the last two years, and would call for appropriate investigations into all allegations concerning such incidents. 

Finally, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to continue to mobilize and coordinate resources and support for Operation Lifeline Sudan, and to report to the General Assembly at its fifty-eighth session on the emergency situation in the affected areas and the recovery, rehabilitation and development of the Sudan. 

Sub-item: Chernobyl disaster

A draft resolution on the sub-item concerns strengthening international cooperation and coordination of efforts to study, mitigate and minimize the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster (document A/56/L.57).  It would have the Assembly emphasize the importance of full cooperation and assistance by the authorities of the affected countries in facilitating the work of humanitarian organizations to mitigate the humanitarian consequences of the Chernobyl catastrophe.  It would encourage the governments of the affected countries to take further measures to simplify their relevant internal procedures and to identify ways in which to make their systems of granting exemption from customs and other duties more effective with regard to goods provided free of charge as humanitarian assistance.

Further by the draft, the Assembly would stress the need for coordinated international cooperation in studying the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster.  It would invite Member States and interested parties to take part in and promote the activities of the International Chernobyl Centre on Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology.

It would request the Secretary-General to consider possible ways for further strengthening the coordination, analytical and technical capacities of the United Nations in the field, as well as at Headquarters, with due regard to the existing administrative and budgetary procedures of the Organization.  It would also request him to submit to the General Assembly at its fifty-eighth session, under a separate sub-item, a report containing a comprehensive assessment of the implementation of all aspects of the present resolution.  He would be asked to provide proposals for innovative measures for optimizing the effectiveness of the response of the international community to the Chernobyl disaster.

The resolution is sponsored by Argentina, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Egypt, Estonia, Georgia, Honduras, India, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lithuania, Malta, Panama, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United States and Uzbekistan.  

Sub-item:  White Helmets

A draft on participation of volunteers, “White Helmets”, in the activities of the United Nations in the field of humanitarian relief, rehabilitation and technical cooperation for development (document A/56/L.50) would have the Assembly recognize the White Helmets as an operational partner of the United Nations.  It would recognize that, in close cooperation with OCHA, they are an efficient and viable mechanism for making pre-identified and trained homogeneous teams available to the United Nations in support of immediate relief, rehabilitation, reconstruction and development activities.  It would recognize with appreciation the progress made by States members of the Common Market of the South and associated partners in strengthening and broadening the White Helmet humanitarian concept.  It would invite the international community and the United Nations system to ensure the integration of the White Helmet initiative into their programme activities.

Finally, by the draft, the Assembly would invite the Secretary-General to maintain an adequate structure for the White Helmets' liaison functions.  It would recommend that he encourage the United Nations system to explore opportunities for collaborating with the White Helmets.  It would request him to continue strengthening and broadening the consultative mechanisms to promote and operationalize the concept, reporting on progress at the Assembly's fifty-eighth session.

The resolution is sponsored by Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Germany, Guatemala, Guyana, India, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Mongolia, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, and Yugoslavia.

Sub-item:  Assistance to the Palestinian People

A resolution on assistance to the Palestinian people (document A/56/L.59) would have the Assembly urge Member States, international financial institutions, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and regional and interregional organizations to extend economic and social assistance to the Palestinian people, as rapidly and as generously as possible.  It would ask them to do so in close cooperation with the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and through official Palestinian institutions. 

The Assembly would call upon relevant organizations and agencies of the United Nations system to intensify assistance in response to the urgent needs of the Palestinian people in accordance with Palestinian priorities set forth by the Palestinian Authority.  It would ask them to emphasize national execution and capacity-building and would urge Member States to open their markets to exports of Palestinian products on the most favourable terms, consistent with appropriate trading rules, and to implement fully existing trade and cooperation agreements. 

The Assembly would call upon the international donor community to expedite the delivery of pledged assistance to the Palestinian people to meet their urgent needs, and would stress the importance of ensuring the free passage of aid to the Palestinian people and the free movement of persons and goods. 

Further to the text, the Assembly would suggest the convening in 2002 of a United Nations-sponsored seminar on assistance to the Palestinian people.  It would request the Secretary-General to submit a report to the General Assembly at its fifty-seventh session, through the ECOSOC, on the implementation of the present resolution.  It would ask that an assessment of the assistance actually received by the Palestinian people be included, as well as an assessment of the needs still unmet and specific proposals for responding effectively to them. 

The draft resolution is sponsored by Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom. 

Statement by Assembly President

HAN SEUNG-SOO, President of the General Assembly, said he had just returned from Norway, where he had the great honour to accept the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the United Nations, along with the Secretary-General who had accepted the prize on his own behalf.  He took this opportunity to congratulate all the “family members” of the entire United Nations system and paid tribute to the Secretary-General, Kofi Annan. 

Since it was the first time that the United Nations as a whole was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, he was especially pleased that the major United Nations organs and various agencies were well represented at the ceremony.  He added that the award was meant to offer encouragement to the men and women of the United Nations in carrying out their work.  Such encouragement would be especially welcome to the thousands of United Nations personnel who served under extremely difficult conditions, often at grave risk to themselves.  While one could be justly proud of what the United Nations had accomplished, one must also look ahead to the many daunting challenges that still lay before the United Nations, such as terrorism, poverty, drug abuse and trafficking, HIV/AIDS, and environmental degradation.  None of those challenges could be met by any single Member State alone.

Since 1945, the international community and the peoples of the world had exerted their best efforts, often with high hopes, for the realization of global peace and well-being through the United Nations.  Efforts had not always been successful, nor had the successes always been permanent.  However, one must not be discouraged.  He had no doubt that, were it not for the United Nations, humankind could hardly have advanced as far as it had in realizing the vision of the Organization’s founding fathers.  He concluded by stating that he would closely consult with the representatives of the major organs and Member States about how to utilize the prize money the United Nations had received from the Nobel Committee.  He joined the United Nations family in celebrating the award of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize, as both a recognition of past achievements and a spur to even greater efforts in the future. 

Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency

JOHN DAUTH (Australia), introducing draft resolution A/56/L.10, said that the IAEA continued to make a vital contribution to international security.  It played a key role in collective efforts to achieve the twin goals of peace and development by ensuring that the benefits of nuclear technology were shared globally, by building and maintaining a global nuclear safety regime, and by preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons and ensuring the security of nuclear material and facilities.

Following the tragic events of 11 September, the work of the IAEA had taken on even greater significance, as Member States had become united in their concern about terrorism, and in their recognition of the role of the Agency in providing an international response to increased risks of nuclear terrorism.

As many States said during discussion of the item last year, it was disappointing that the General Assembly had been unable to adopt a substantive resolution on the work of the IAEA.  Many States had therefore worked hard in Vienna and New York to ensure that the General Assembly could adopt a substantive resolution this year.  Significant investments had been made in the draft resolution –- with hard compromises achieved on key issues such as integrated safeguards, the role of innovative nuclear technology and the safe transport of radioactive material.  It was the strong wish of the co-sponsors that the resolution be adopted as it stood, with no further amendment.

MOHAMMED A. ALDOURI (Iraq), introducing the amendment to draft resolution L.10 contained in document A/56/L.11, said that during consultations in Vienna, there had been other delegations wishing to include amendments, Iraq among them.  His country had strong reservations on operative paragraph 12, but had not objected to the inclusion of Iraq in that paragraph.  However, he considered the draft too unbalanced, as it neglected mention of activities carried out by the IAEA in Iraq.  Document A/56/330 referred to those activities, stating that Agency inspectors had been able to carry out verification activities in Iraq, and that that country had provided the necessary cooperation for its inspection team.  That fact had been stated in the resolution concerning Iraq in the General Conference of the IAEA.  He hoped the Assembly would decide that transparency and not selectivity should be the main concern in dealing with the draft, and that the Assembly would support the amendment.

Motion for no action

Mr. DAUTH (Australia), on a point of order, moved (on behalf of the co-sponsors of L.10 and under Rule 74 of the rules of procedure) that no action be taken on the amendment.  He requested a recorded vote.  He said the L.10 draft was the product of transparent negotiations in Vienna.  All delegations had had ample opportunity to table and defend amendments.  At the conclusion of the process, there had been no agreement to include the amendment.  The United Nations draft should be faithful to IAEA Conference resolutions.  Bearing in mind that the draft was the product of a transparent process, a no-action motion would be the best means to ensure that the substantive resolution was adopted.

[According to Rule 74 of the Assembly rules of procedure, a representative may move the adjournment of the debate on the item under discussion.  In addition to the proposer of the motion, two representatives may speak in favour of, and two against, the motion, after which the motion shall immediately be put to the vote.]

WALDEMAR COUTTS (Chile) said that the draft resolution was the result of a broad and transparent negotiation process, carried out both in Vienna and New York.  It was his belief that a decision to take no action on the proposal in L.11 would be the most appropriate way for the Assembly to adopt resolution L.10 as presented.  He seconded the no–action motion presented by the delegation of Australia.

JEAN DE RUYT (Belgium), speaking on behalf of the European Union, said that the Union attached the highest importance to the activities of the IAEA and hoped that the substantive resolution A/56/L.10 would be adopted by the General Assembly as a whole, without modifications.  For the same reasons that had been highlighted by the representative of Australia, the European Union fully supported the no-motion action suggested by Australia on amendments to A/56/L.11.  He hoped that Member States would vote in favour of that motion so that resolution A/56/L.10 could be voted on as a whole.

Mr. ALDOURI (Iraq) asked delegations to vote against the no-action motion, intended to deprive a Member State from its right to introduce an amendment that simply quoted the truth.

JOAN ELAINE THOMAS (Jamaica) said as a point of principle, that any Member State had the right to have its amendment considered.  While she did not necessarily support the substance of the amendment, she would vote against the no-action motion.

Action on no-action motion

In a recorded vote, the Assembly then adopted the no-action motion with

97 Member States voting in favor to 7 against (Libya, Tunisia, Sudan, Syria, Jamaica, Cuba and Algeria), with 20 abstentions.

No action would therefore be taken on amendment L.11.

The Assembly then turned to draft resolution L.10.

NANCY MARCUS (United States) said that operative paragraph 10 did not reflect what had been agreed upon at the General Conference in a balanced way and, as such, was objectionable.  Agreements reached in Vienna must be respected as one pursued efforts in New York.  She regretted that this had not been the case.

DAVID GOVRIN (Israel) said that his country attached great importance to the IAEA.  The report of the Agency should reflect agreed-upon language.  Unfortunately the wording of paragraph 10 did not reflect a cooperative sprit.  The resolution on the application of the IAEA in the Middle East had been a consensus resolution since 1991 and represented a delicate balance reached after long negotiations.  Israel had joined this consensus because it supported the establishment of a nuclear free zone in the Middle East.  Operative paragraph

10 was selective and unbalanced.  Since it was an attempt to introduce a new interpretation, Israel would vote against operative paragraph 10 of the resolution.

PAK GIL YON (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) said the core element contained in the agreed framework between his country and the United States was the construction of the light water reactor.  Seven years had passed since that agreement and his country had carried out its obligations under the framework. However, the United States had not implemented the framework in good faith. Nuclear issues on the Korean peninsula should not be addressed in the United Nations.  He would therefore vote against the draft resolution contained in L.10.

SATISH CHAND MEHTA (India) said India was a founding member of IAEA and appreciated its activities.  Since the resolution pertained to the duties of IAEA, India would go along with it.  However, India had considerable difficulty in accepting operative paragraph 3, where the language seemed to link adherence to the NPT to the use of nuclear power for peaceful purposes.  The statute of the IAEA called for the acceleration and enlargement of the contribution of nuclear activity for peaceful purposes, such as development, health and peace.  The statute also stressed the sovereignty of all States, and that there must be unfettered access to peaceful uses of atomic energy without prejudice.  He added that the IAEA statute predated the NPT, and that the NPT was not an equitable treaty.  The fact that article 6 of the NPT had not been fulfilled by some States must not be used to discriminate between members of IAEA, he said.  India would vote against operative paragraph 3.

Mr. ALDOURI (Iraq) said he regretted that his country’s amendment to the resolution had not been adopted.  That would have reflected the Agency's activities in Iraq, as mentioned in IAEA documents.  Given this imbalance, his delegation had no other choice but to ask for a separate vote on paragraph 12 of the draft, and he asked delegates to support his delegation and vote against that paragraph.

Action on draft resolution L.10

Separate votes had been requested on preambular paragraph 3 and operative paragraphs 5, 10 and 12.

Preambular paragraph 3 was adopted by 127 votes in favour to 2 against (India , Israel) with 6 abstentions (Bhutan, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan , Haiti).

Operative paragraph 5 was adopted by 130 votes in favour to none against with 5 abstentions (Haiti, India, Pakistan, Syria , Côte d’Ivoire).

Operative paragraph 10 was adopted by 136 votes in favour to 2 against (Israel , United States) with no abstentions.

Operative paragraph 12 was adopted by 119 votes in favour to none against with and 14 abstentions.

It was announced that Suriname had become a co-sponsor of the draft resolution.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution A/56/L.10 in a recorded vote of 150 Member States voting in favour to 1 voting against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) with and two abstentions (Côte d’Ivoire , Lao People’s Democratic Republic).

ASIF DURRANI (Pakistan) explained his delegation’s abstention on the votes on operative paragraphs 3 and 5.  The language in operative paragraph 3 was unacceptable to Pakistan, since it linked the use of nuclear power for peaceful purposes with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT).  Pakistan was not party to the NPT and could not accept commitments on its part.  He added that the role of the IAEA was to facilitate safeguards, not to indulge in political decisions.

WU HAITAO (China) said his delegation had voted in favour of draft resolution A/56/L.10.  In the past year the IAEA had done a lot of fruitful work and had achieved significant progress, for which his country expressed appreciation.  On the issue of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, China’s position remained unchanged.  It had always supported the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula.  The parties concerned needed to look for a solution through constructive dialogue and continue their dialogue on the basis of equality and mutual respect.

With regard to Iraq, his delegation believed that the prolongation of the problem without resolution had worsened the humanitarian crisis and was not conducive to peace and security.  Relevant Security Council resolutions needed to be implemented fully, and the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq needed to be respected.  The sanctions regime imposed on Iraq should be lifted.

RODOLFO BENITEZ VERSON (Cuba) said that he was in favour of draft resolution L.10, which reflected the great importance of the work of the IAEA.  As had been said in the debate on the issue, Cuba highly valued the efforts of the Agency in terms of its technical assistance and its work on safety.  It was unfortunate that there was controversial language in the resolution that did not have the support of all Member States.  The General Assembly must not be the forum for the most controversial issues of every organization.  The reopening of such debates was inconvenient.   On the political level, it did not contribute to the work of the IAEA.  It was for that reason that Cuba had abstained from the separate vote on operative paragraph 12, and would have abstained on draft text L.11 if it had been put to the vote.  Concerning operative paragraph 3, he said that it linked the peaceful uses of nuclear power to adherence to the NPT.  Cuba’s position on the NPT was well-known:  it was discriminatory and established two categories of States.

MILAD ATIEH (Syrian Arab Republic) said his delegation had voted in favour of resolution L.10.  That position reflected the conviction that the resolution constituted the basis of the strengthening of the safeguard regime of the IAEA.  However, his delegation was also apprehensive that the constant precedence given to the development of the safeguard regime over the other programmes of the agency would result in the destruction of the balance required, in particular by the developing countries, in the budget programmes of the Agency.

Follow-up to outcome of Millennium Summit, action on draft resolution

The Assembly adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on the subject, contained in document A/56/L.48.

Support of Governments to promote and consolidate new or restored democracies, action on draft.

The Assembly was informed that Ethiopia, Liechtenstein, New Zealand, Venezuela and Cyprus had joined as co-sponsors of the draft resolution on the subject, contained in document A/56/L.46.

Draft resolution A/56/L.46 was then adopted without a vote.

Explanation of vote after the vote

MAREK MADEJ (Poland), speaking on behalf of the Convening Group of the Community of Democracies, welcomed the adoption of the resolution.  The United Nations system as a whole continued to play a substantial role in providing timely, coherent and adequate support for Member States in their efforts to achieve democratization and good governance.  Consolidating and promoting democratic principles and practices, in particular new or restored democracies, must remain one of the main tasks of the Organization. 

The Convening Group of the Community of Democracies took note, with particular attention, of the observation of the Secretary-General, contained in paragraph 33 of his report on the issues, that two international forums, namely the Conference of New or Restored Democracies and the Community of Democracies, played an important role in mobilizing the political will for advancing democratic values, principles and practices and ensuring that the lessons learned from democratization processes in various parts of the world would not be lost to future generations. 

IRMA TOBING-KLEIN (Suriname) said that her country was very satisfied with the debate and the outcome of agenda item 35 and other agenda items regarding the strengthening and consolidation of democracy, peace, security and the rule of law. Experiences following serious disruptions in Suriname’s democratic system in the past had taught her country that continued attention and action were needed to maintain a true democratic culture in which peace, security, respect for human rights, good governance and the rule of law could prevail.

True partnership between governments, civil society, and NGOs was a sine qua non for the realization of the Organization’s noble goals.  Suriname felt very much protected by the regulations in the Organization of American States Democratic Charter, in cases of disruption and/or unconstitutional alteration of the democratic order of a member country.

Representatives of the following States indicated that they were co-sponsors of draft resolution L.46, even though their names were not on the list:  Australia, Thailand, Croatia, Yemen, Canada, Albania, Brazil, Denmark, Malta, Bangladesh, Italy, Norway, Liechtenstein, Republic of Moldova, El Salvador, Germany, and Madagascar. 

Return or restitution of cultural property to countries of origin, action on draft

The Assembly then turned its attention to draft resolution A/56/L.41/Rev.1. It was informed that Libya, Costa Rica, Madagascar, Egypt, Dominican Republic, Paraguay, Tonga, Morocco, Nigeria and Yemen had joined as co-sponsors of the draft.

Draft resolution A/56/L.41/Rev.1 was then adopted without a vote.

Cooperation between United Nations and regional and other organizations

The Assembly then turned to the draft text on cooperation between the United Nations and the Latin American Economic System, as contained in document A/56/L.43.

      Cooperation between United Nations and Latin American System

PATRICIA DURRANT (Jamaica), speaking for the Group of Latin American and Caribbean States, introduced the draft resolution (document A/56/L.43) entitled “Cooperation between the United Nations and Latin American System”.  She said it was aimed at encouraging greater cooperation in support of economic and social development in the region between the Latin American Economic System and United Nations organizations agencies and programmes, particularly the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC).

In the operative part of the draft, the General Assembly urged the ECLAC to continue deepening its coordination and mutual support with the Latin American Economic System.  It urged the UNDP to continue its financial and technical cooperation programmes that the permanent secretariat of the Latin American Economic System was carrying out in areas of mutual interest and concern.  It also urged the specialized agencies and other funds and programmes of the United Nations system to continue and intensify their support for cooperation in the activities of the Latin American Economic System.

She said that Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Chile and Dominican Republic had joined as cosponsors of draft, which she hoped would be adopted by consensus.

The Assembly then adopted draft resolution A/56/L.43 without a vote.

Report of the Economic and Social Council

MARTIN BELINGA-EBOUTOU (Cameroon), President of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), introduced the report of the Council.  He said that hitherto, the General Assembly had dealt with the annual ECOSOC report in a somewhat piecemeal fashion, and most of the consideration of the report was done in its committees.  That had one asset -- that it guaranteed a measure of efficiency -- but conversely, it had served to blur the Council’s image, as one did not have an overall vision of its work.  The General Assembly had decided to be actively involved in the rebirth of the Council’s work and for that he thanked the Assembly most sincerely.

The ECOSOC had been entrusted with giving guidance to the United Nations system organizations and with the promotion of economic and social development.  That was why the Council had devoted a lot of time to the systematic follow-up of development activities in the 1990s.  The eradication of poverty remained its top priority.  That had put Africa at the core of the Council’s concerns.  Indeed, the report before the Assembly contained powerful proposals regarding the implementation of the New African Initiative.

Globalization had become one of the most decisive factors in decision making, he said.  The Council should be given a more prominent role in the future with regard to the discussion of globalization.  The Council should also involve itself in conflict resolution and re-establishment of peace, and there should be new forms of interaction between ECOSOC and the Security Council.  In order for ECOSOC to achieve success it was also important to have the support of other international organizations, national bodies, NGOs and civil society.

JEAN DE RUYT (Belgium), speaking on behalf of the European Union, said he was pleased that ECOSOC had devoted its principal debate to Africa.  That continent was one of the Union’s priorities.  It was Africa’s largest single donor and leading trading partner.  He welcomed the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) initiative, and noted that the continent was on the way to taking better charge of its own development and future.

The humanitarian segment was an essential part of the Council’s coordination remit, he continued.  The European Union was fully committed to greater coordination to make humanitarian operations more effective, in response to natural disasters or complex crises, and considered it especially important in  helping displaced persons.  In that context, efforts had been made to promote improved coordination and communication between the major bodies involved in conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction, particularly ECOSOC and the Security Council.  The aim was to ensure that Member Sates provided effective support for an integrated approach to the problem.

The Union was pleased at the direction taken by the Council’s discussions on human rights in the general segment, he said.  Next year, the Council would be looking at the important question of human resources for development and measures to be taken on education and health.  The European Union remained deeply committed to revitalizing and gradually upgrading the Council’s coordination and consistency between economic and social questions, such as that between it and the Bretton Woods institutions.  It was unfortunate that several decisions and agenda items had not been finalized at the Fund Session in July, and that the substance of decisions and conclusions of subordinate bodies was sometimes called into question.

IVAN SIMONOVIC (Croatia) said the high-level special meeting with the Bretton Woods institutions held last May had again demonstrated the increasing development of the ECOSOC as a forum for policy dialogue.  The event provided a unique opportunity for policy makers in finance, foreign affairs and development cooperation to engage in a meaningful dialogue.  It also served as an excellent forum for strengthening links between the United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions.  The overriding task now was to enhance the effectiveness of that interaction to include all relevant stakeholders, such as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the UNDP. 

He said the Council should continue with the promotion of an integrated approach to sectoral problems and with helping Member States deal with the effects of globalization.  He supported efforts to implement the proposed reforms in the economic and social fields.  The success of thematic panels organized as part of the Council’s sessions had contributed towards its transformation and should be strongly supported, he said.

There was great potential for further cooperation between ECOSOC and the rest of the United Nations system in the area of peace-building and peacekeeping, he said.  The Council’s expertise in the economic, social and cultural fields would be crucial in identifying and removing the causes of conflicts.  He urged a clearly defined role for the Council, including cooperation with the other main bodies of the Organization, including the Security Council.

He noted that a recent round-table discussion organized by the International Peace Academy had underlined the comparative advantages the ECOSOC had in its ability to bring together research and policy planning with operational activities and civil society participation.  Examples of that were the Council’s link to the broader United Nations system through the Administrative and Coordinating Committee; its increasingly closer relationship with the international financial institutions; and its responsibility as the institutional base for coordination with respect to the executive boards of the United Nations funds and programmes.

He paid tribute to Council President Martin Belinga-Eboutou of Cameroon for the initiative in placing, for the first time, the Council’s report on the General Assembly’s agenda.

SUN JOUN-YUNG (Republic of Korea) said that given the magnitude and implications of the work of ECOSOC on the entire United Nations system and beyond, key policies in the socio-economic fields needed to be thoroughly scrutinized at the plenary of the General Assembly, and if necessary, feedback should be given to the Council.  In that regard, his delegation had been a strong supporter of Council resolution 2001/21.  Among the numerous achievements of the 2001 substantive session of ECOSOC, his country attached particular importance to the outcome of the high-level segment, which had produced an excellent Ministerial Declaration on the sustainable development of Africa.

The result of the coordination segment on the role of ICT had also been commendable, as the agreed conclusion provided a number of policy options to promote ICT and bridge the digital divide.  In the light of the Council’s important role in providing guidance to the United Nations system on the coordination of humanitarian assistance, in was regrettable that the Council had failed to produce an agreed conclusion.  Bearing in mind that a well-coordinated approach among the principle organs of the United Nations would produce synergy, his delegation hoped that the Assembly and the Council would further explore avenues to enhance cooperation and policy coherence in a mutually reinforcing manner.

ASHA SHAH (Nepal) said that while ECOSOC’s scope of work and its relevance were global, the vast bulk of that work was concentrated in the developing countries, where two-thirds of the world population and the majority of the poor lived.  As the Council was the leading organ for coordination of all United Nations social and economic activities, there was an undeniable imperative to enhance its status on a level with its responsibilities.  That meant that on the one hand, the Council must try to assume the challenges its daunting agenda posed; and on the other hand, there must also be a clear recognition of, and deference to, its role in the United Nations system and beyond.  In that context,

co-ordination between ECOSOC and other United Nations agencies, and necessary mechanisms to ensure it, became critically important to successful implementation of the economic and social policies of the United Nations.

Nepal, she said, strongly believed that the Office of the President as well as the secretariat of the Economic and Social Council must be strengthened and provided with adequate financial and human resources, so that it could carry out its mandated task effectively.  When knowledge and technological development had become the principal engine of social and economic transformation, access to and transfer of knowledge and technology must be accorded high priority.  However, since the majority of the world population still lived in poverty and had no access or means to necessary resources to be connected with the new world, they had not yet been able to reap the full benefits of the information and communications revolution. 

In that context, she was encouraged by the adoption of the agreed conclusions of the coordination segment of the Economic and Social Council.  The agreed conclusions recognized the above constraints, and called for the strengthening of the United Nations system to play a catalytic role in promoting transfer of technology and access to knowledge critical for developing countries and countries with economies in transition.  The agreed conclusions made various suggestions to the United Nations system to that effect, and her delegations fully endorsed those suggestions.  Her delegation supported the work of the Council in general, and encouraged it to continue its efforts to uplift the socio-economic

status of the poorest and the neediest, with particular focus on the least developed countries (LDCs).

(annexes follow)

ANNEX I

Vote on the motion for no action on proposed amendment to A/56/L.11

The no-action motion was adopted by a recorded vote of 96 in favour to      7 against, with 20 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Yugoslavia.

Against:  Algeria, Cuba, Jamaica, Libya, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia.

Abstaining:  Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Benin, Botswana, China, Djibouti, Egypt, India, Iran, Jordan, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Togo, Venezuela, Zambia.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Oman, Palau, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX I)

ANNEX II

Vote on preliminary paragraph 3 of the draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency

Preliminary paragraph 3 of the text (document A/56/L.10) was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 2 against with 6 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt,

El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yugoslavia, Zambia.

Against:  India, Israel.

Abstaining:  Bhutan, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Pakistan.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Kiribati, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX II)

ANNEX III

Vote on operative paragraph 5 of the draft resolution on the report of the IAEA

Operative paragraph 5 of the text (document A/56/L.10) was adopted by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to none with 5 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yugoslavia, Zambia.

Against:  None.

Abstaining:  Côte d’Ivoire, Haiti, India, Pakistan, Syria.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Palau, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX III)

ANNEX IV

Vote on operative paragraph 10 of the draft resolution on the report of the IAEA

Operative paragraph 10 of the text (document A/56/2.10) was adopted by a recorded vote of 136 in favour to 2 against, with 0 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia.

Against:  Israel, United States.

Abstaining:  None.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX IV)

ANNEX V

Vote on operative paragraph 12 of the draft resolution on the report of the IAEA

Operative paragraph 12 of the text (document A/56/L.10) was adopted by a recorded vote of 119 in favour to none against, with 14 abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands,

New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain,

Sri Lanka, Suriname, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yugoslavia.

Against:  None.

Abstaining:  Algeria, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Malaysia, Morocco, Pakistan, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Zambia.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Oman, Palau, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX V)

ANNEX VI

Vote on the draft resolution on the report of the IAEA

The draft text as a whole (document A/56/2.10) was adopted by a recorded vote of 150 in favour to one against, with two abstentions, as follows:

In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zambia.

Against:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Abstaining:  Côte d’Ivoire, Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

Absent:  Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Dominica, Gambia, Guinea, Kiribati, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritania, Namibia, Niger, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Zimbabwe.

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For information media. Not an official record.