SECURITY COUNCIL EXTENDS UNMOP MANDATE UNTIL 15 JANUARY 2001

13 July 2000
SC/6888

SECURITY COUNCIL EXTENDS UNMOP MANDATE UNTIL 15 JANUARY 2001

13 July 2000

Press ReleaseSC/6888

SECURITY COUNCIL EXTENDS UNMOP MANDATE UNTIL 15 JANUARY 2001

20000713

Resolution 1307 (2000) Adopted Unanimously

The Security Council this morning authorized the United Nations Mission of Observers in Prevlaka (UNMOP) to continue monitoring the demilitarization of the peninsula for a further six months, until 15 January 2001. As it took that action, it reiterated its call upon the parties -- Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia -- to cooperate fully with the Mission.

Unanimously adopting resolution 1307 (2000), the Council again called on the parties to cease all violations of the demilitarized regime in the United Nations designated zone, and to take further steps to reduce tension and improve safety and security in the area. They were also to ensure the safety of the observers and their full and unrestricted freedom of movement.

The Council once again urged the parties to abide by their mutual commitments and implement fully the 1996 Agreement on Normalization of Relations. It stressed, in particular, the urgent need for them to fulfil rapidly and in good faith their commitment to reach a negotiated resolution of the disputed issue of Prevlaka. The Council asked them to continue to report, at least bi-monthly, to the Secretary-General on the status of their bilateral negotiations.

By other provisions of the text, the Council noted with concern the lack of progress by the parties in devising means to implement the recommendations and options for confidence-building provided by the Secretariat. It encouraged them to take concrete steps towards that end to facilitate the freedom of movement of the civilian population. The Secretary-General was asked to report on the matter by 15 October. The Council asked UNMOP and the Multinational Stabilization Force to cooperate fully with each other.

The meeting, which began at 11:56 a.m., was adjourned at 11:58 a.m.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 1307 (2000) reads as follows:

"The Security Council,

"Recalling all its earlier relevant resolutions, in particular its resolutions 779 (1992) of 6 October 1992, 981 (1995) of 31 March 1995, 1147 (1998) of 13 January 1998, 1183 (1998) of 15 July 1998, 1222 (1999) of 15 January 1999, 1252 (1999) of 15 July 1999 and 1285 (2000) of 13 January 2000, "Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 3 July 2000 (S/2000/647) on the United Nations Mission of Observers in Prevlaka (UNMOP),

"Recalling also the letter to its President from the Chargé d'affaires a.i. of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia of 16 June 2000 (S/2000/602) and the letter to the Secretary-General from the Permanent Representative of Croatia of 5 April 2000 (S/2000/289), concerning the disputed issue of Prevlaka,

"Reaffirming once again its commitment to independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Republic of Croatia within its internationally recognized borders,

"Noting once again the Joint Declaration signed at Geneva on 30 September 1992 by the Presidents of the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, in particular articles 1 and 3, the latter reaffirming their agreement concerning the demilitarization of the Prevlaka peninsula,

"Noting with satisfaction that the overall situation in the UNMOP area of responsibility has remained stable and calm,

"Reiterating its concern about continuing violations of the demilitarization regime, including limitations placed on the free movement of United Nations military observers,

"Noting with satisfaction that the opening of crossing points between Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Montenegro) in the demilitarized zone continue to facilitate civilian and commercial traffic in both directions without security incidents and continue to represent a significant confidence- building measure in the normalization of relations between the two parties, and urging the parties to utilize these openings as a basis for further confidence- building measures to achieve the normalization of relations between them,

"Reiterating its serious concerns about the lack of substantive progress towards a settlement of the disputed issue of Prevlaka in the continuing bilateral negotiations between the parties pursuant to the Agreement on Normalization of Relations between the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia of 23 August 1996 (S/1996/706, annex), noting positive developments in this regard, and calling for the resumption of discussions,

"Expressing its concern over the delay in putting in place a comprehensive demining programme by the parties,

"Commending the role played by UNMOP, and noting also that the presence of the United Nations military observers continues to be essential to maintaining conditions that are conducive to a negotiated settlement of the disputed issue of Prevlaka,

"Recalling the relevant principles contained in the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel adopted on 9 December 1994 and the statement of its President of 10 February 2000 (S/PRST/2000/4),

"Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize peacekeeping personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all its peacekeeping operations, "1. Authorizes the United Nations military observers to continue monitoring the demilitarization of the Prevlaka peninsula, in accordance with resolutions 779 (1992) and 981 (1995) and paragraphs 19 and 20 of the report of the Secretary- General of 13 December 1995 (S/1995/1028), until 15 January 2001;

"2. Reiterates its calls upon the parties to cease all violations of the demilitarized regime in the United Nations designated zones, to take steps further to reduce tension and to improve safety and security in the area, to cooperate fully with the United Nations military observers and to ensure their safety and full and unrestricted freedom of movement;

"3. Notes with concern the lack of progress by the parties in devising means of implementing the recommendations and options to develop confidence- building measures with which they were provided pursuant to its request in resolution 1252 (1999), encourages the parties to take concrete steps to implement such recommendations and options with a view to, inter alia, further facilitating the freedom of movement of the civilian population, and requests the Secretary- General to report on the matter by 15 October 2000;

"4. Urges once again that the parties abide by their mutual commitments and implement fully the Agreement on Normalization of Relations, and stresses in particular the urgent need for them to fulfil rapidly and in good faith their commitment to reach a negotiated resolution of the disputed issue of Prevlaka in accordance with article 4 of the Agreement;

"5. Requests the parties to continue to report at least bi-monthly to the Secretary-General on the status of their bilateral negotiations;

"6. Reiterates its call upon the parties to put a comprehensive demining programme in place in the identified minefields in the UNMOP area of responsibility;

"7. Requests the United Nations military observers and the multinational stabilization force authorized by the Council in resolution 1088 (1996) of 12 December 1996 and extended by resolution 1305 (2000) of 21 June 2000 to cooperate fully with each other;

"8. Decides to remain seized of the matter."

Secretary-General's Report

As the Security Council met this morning to consider the situation in Croatia, it had before it the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Mission of Observers in Prevlaka (UNMOP) (document S/2000/647) in which he recommends that the Mission's mandate be extended for a further six months until 15 January 2001.

In his report, which covers developments in the area since last April, the Secretary-General states that the mandate extension was to ensure that the situation on the ground in Prevlaka continued to be free of tension, and that stable conditions essential to meaningful progress towards a political settlement are maintained. He says that UNMOP's efforts to convince the parties to devise means to implement the confidence-building measures proposed by the Secretariat had not been entirely successful. Their positions on the options package as a whole continued to reflect their differing interpretations of the Prevlaka dispute. The package covered basic elements of the dispute, confidence-building measures and freedom of movement for local civilians.

Against that background, the Secretary-General describes their agreement to hold a fifth round of negotiations as constituting a positive development. He hopes a common ground will be found by the parties to resolve their dispute. He indicates, however, that expectations for substantive progress appeared limited because of the still unsettled general political circumstances in the area.

The long-standing violations of the security regime in the United Nations- controlled zone remained unchanged, the Secretary-General states. Both Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia maintained manned positions for the purpose of operating the Cape Kobila crossing point. The unauthorized presence of civilians and officials in the zone constituted violations of the agreed security regime. "While they do not constitute a security threat, they nevertheless demonstrate that the parties do not feel obliged to ensure full respect for some of the provisions of the security regime freely agreed upon by them", he writes.

For UNMOP to fully implement its mandate, it is essential that its members be permitted to patrol at all times all areas of the demilitarized zone without preconditions or restrictions, the Secretary-General observes. During the period under consideration, the zone remained calm and stable. The Mission’s strength remained unchanged at 27 military observers headed by a Chief Military Observer, Colonel Graeme Williams (New Zealand).

Although an independent mission, for administrative and budgetary purposes UNMOP is treated as part of the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH). By its resolution 54/273 of 15 June 2000, the General Assembly appropriated $158.7 million gross for the maintenance of UNMIBH for the 12-month period from 1 July 2000 to 30 June 2001. The costs of maintaining UNMOP would be met from within the UNMIBH budget should the Security Council decide to extend the Mission's mandate.

* *** *

For information media. Not an official record.