CITING TERRORISM AS VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS, SOCIAL COMMITTEE CALLS FOR INTERNATIONALISM, REGIONAL COOPERATION AGAINST IT

18 November 1999
GA/SHC/3566

CITING TERRORISM AS VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS, SOCIAL COMMITTEE CALLS FOR INTERNATIONALISM, REGIONAL COOPERATION AGAINST IT

18 November 1999

Press ReleaseGA/SHC/3566

CITING TERRORISM AS VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS, SOCIAL COMMITTEE CALLS FOR INTERNATIONALISM, REGIONAL COOPERATION AGAINST IT

19991118

Assembly Action Sought; Texts Also Approved on Migrants’ Protection, Right to Travel; Progress Is Seen in Iran, Despite Continuing Concern

The General Assembly would unequivocally reiterate its condemnation of terrorism, and would call for international and regional cooperation against it, by one of a number of resolutions approved this afternoon by the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural). The draft declared the methods and practices of terrorism to be activities aimed at destroying human rights. It was approved by a recorded vote of 93 in favour to none against, with 63 abstentions. (For details of the vote, see Annex I.)

Some of those abstaining said a clearer distinction between terrorism and the right to self-determination needed to be made. Others said the acts of terrorists were not human rights concerns but questions of criminal actions.

The Committee approved a draft resolution on non-interference in the internal affairs of States in their electoral processes by a recorded vote of 78 in favour to 57 against, with 14 abstaining. (See Annex III.)

A text on respect for the universal right to freedom of travel was approved by a recorded vote of 88 in favor to 1 against, with 68 abstaining. (See Annex IV.)

A draft welcoming progress in some aspects of the human rights situation in Iran expressed serious concern of continuing violations. This was approved by a recorded vote of 60 in favour, to 41 against, with 53 abstentions. (See Annex V.)

In a fifth recorded vote, the Committee approved a preambular paragraph in a text on the protection of migrants by 121 votes in favour to 1 against, with 19 abstentions. (See Annex II.) The draft itself was approved without a vote.

The other resolutions approved without a vote concerned the situation of human rights in Cambodia; strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights; national institutions for promoting and protecting human rights; and human rights and mass exoduses.

Third Committee - 1a - Press Release GA/SHC/3566 52nd Meeting (PM) 18 November 1999

In addition this afternoon, the Committee heard the introduction of eight draft resolutions. Two concerned amendments to other drafts -- one on the situation of human rights in Kosovo; the other on a text on human rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina (which was also introduced this afternoon).

The other new drafts related to assistance to unaccompanied refugee minors; the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa; the right to development; and the human rights situation in Rwanda.

The Committee will meet again tomorrow at 10 a.m. to continue hearing the further introduction of draft resolutions and to take action on others.

Committee Work Programme

The Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) met this afternoon to hear the introduction of draft resolutions on a range of issues and to take action on others.

Among draft resolutions expected to be introduced, a text on the right to development (document A/C.3/54/L.85) would have the General Assembly express deep concern that the gap between the developed and developing countries remained unacceptably wide. It would urge States to eliminate all obstacles to development at all levels by such measures as the promotion and protection of all rights, by such actions as implementing comprehensive development programmes at the national level, integrating them into development activities, and promoting international cooperation. Recommending proper consideration of the humanitarian effects of sanctions, it would stress the need for the Secretary- General to give high priority to the right to development, urging all States to promote it as a vital element in a balanced human rights programme. Finally, it would urge States, the Secretary-General and the United Nations system to fully support the follow-up mechanism for implementing the right to development. The draft is sponsored by South Africa on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement and China.

By the terms of a draft sponsored by Algeria, on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa (document A/C.3/54/L.99), the General Assembly would urge States and all other actors to take all necessary measures to protect activities related to humanitarian assistance, to prevent attacks on and kidnapping of national and international humanitarian workers, and to ensure their safety and security. Also, the international community would be asked to respond positively, in the spirit of solidarity and burden-sharing, to the third-country resettlement requests of African refugees. The text notes with appreciation that some African countries have offered resettlement places for refugees.

Also by the terms of the draft, the Assembly would urge the international community, in a spirit of international solidarity and burden-sharing, to continue to fund generously the refugee programmes of the Office of the High Commissioner and, taking into account the substantially increased needs of programmes in Africa, to ensure that Africa gets a fair and equitable share of the resources designated for refugees.

A draft resolution on assistance to unaccompanied refugee minors (document A/C.3/54/L.94) would have the Assembly express its deep concern at their continued plight, and emphasize once again the urgent need for their early identification and for timely, detailed and accurate information on their number and whereabouts. It would call upon the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), in cooperation with other relevant United Nations bodies, to pursue policies aimed at preventing refugee family separation, conscious of the importance of family unity.

Further, the Assembly would call upon all States and other parties to armed conflict to respect international humanitarian law. It would also call upon States parties to respect fully the provisions of the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 and related instruments, and to respect the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which accord children affected by armed conflict special protection and treatment.

Also by the draft, the Assembly would condemn all acts of exploitation of unaccompanied refugee minors, including their use as soldiers or human shields in armed conflict and their forced recruitment into military forces, and any other acts that endanger their safety and personal security. It would call upon the Secretary-General, the UNHCR, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), other United Nations organizations and other international organizations to mobilize adequate assistance to unaccompanied refugee minors in the areas of relief, education, health and psychological rehabilitation.

The draft is sponsored by Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Botswana, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Iran, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Qatar, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Also before the Committee is a draft resolution on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (document A/C.3/54/L.95), sponsored by Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mali, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

By the terms of the draft, the General Assembly would condemn all acts that pose a threat to the personal security and well-being of refugees and asylum-seekers, such as refoulement, unlawful expulsion and physical attacks, and calls upon all States of refuge, in cooperation with international organizations where appropriate, to take all necessary measures to ensure respect for the principles of refugee protection, including the humane treatment of asylum-seekers.

It would call upon all States to promote conditions conducive to the voluntary repatriation of refugees in safety and with dignity, including conditions furthering reconciliation and long-term development in countries of return, and to support the sustainable reintegration of returnees by providing countries of origin with necessary rehabilitation and development assistance in conjunction, as appropriate, with the Office of the High Commissioner and relevant development agencies.

Further, it would urge the Office of the High Commissioner to strengthen its cooperation and coordination with relevant entities, including international financial institutions and non-governmental organizations.

By the same text, the Assembly would call upon States to adopt an approach that is sensitive to gender-related concerns and to ensure that women whose claims to refugee status are based upon a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons enumerated in the 1951 Convention and the 1967 Protocol -- including persecution through sexual violence or other gender-related persecution -- are recognized as refugees, and would encourage the Office of the High Commissioner to continue and to strengthen its efforts for the protection of refugee women.

The Assembly would also call upon governments and other donors to demonstrate their international solidarity and burden-sharing with countries of asylum, in particular developing countries, countries with economies in transition and countries with limited resources that, owing to their location, host large numbers of refugees and asylum-seekers. It would stress the need for the Office of the High Commissioner to be given adequate resources to fulfil its mandated functions and, in this regard, call on governments to contribute generously to the unified annual programme budget of the Office of the High Commissioner, to support efforts to widen the donor base so as to achieve greater burden-sharing among donors, and to assist the High Commissioner in securing additional and timely income from traditional governmental sources, other governments and the private sector to ensure that the needs of persons of concern to the Office of the High Commissioner are fully met.

By an eight-Power draft on the situation of human rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) (document A/C.3/54/L.86), the Assembly would urge all States and parties to the Peace Agreement to meet their obligations to cooperate fully with the International Tribunal for the prosecution of persons responsible of serious violations of international humanitarian law in the territory since 1991.

Part I of the draft, on Bosnia and Herzegovina, would acknowledge progress but would condemn, in the strongest terms, the complicity by local governments in perpetrating violence against minority refugees and internally displaced persons returning to their homes, and in the destruction of their homes, including acts of intimidation. It would urge the authorities to ensure full and free access to their territories to all institutions and organizations concerned with implementing the present resolution, stressing the importance of implementing the proposed programme for judicial reform. It would note the importance of the work of the human rights ombudsman while condemning recurrent instances of religious discrimination and the denial to religious minorities of their rights to reclaim their religious sites. It would also express concern that trafficking in women was a growing problem.

By Part II of the text, on the Republic of Croatia, the Assembly would note and welcome initiatives to improve the situation of human rights. It would express deep concern, however, about Government commitments to improve freedom of the press remaining unfulfilled, and about reports of an extensive wiretapping campaign against the independent media and opposition political figures.

By Part III of the draft, on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro), the Assembly would strongly condemn the presence of indicted war criminals in the hierarchy of the Government and would demand that the Government hand them over to the Tribunal. It would make other demands for the Government to bring about justice, including by such measures as ending illegal detentions and institutionalizing democratic norms. It would denounce the Government for its legal and physical intimidation of peaceful political opposition activities and of individuals expressing differing views from the Government. Finally, it would insist that the Government support activities of the international community and the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo to rebuild and facilitate the multi-ethnic society in Kosovo.

The draft resolution is sponsored by Bulgaria, Djibouti, Hungary, Ireland, Portugal, Slovenia, Turkey and the United States.

A draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Rwanda (document A/C.3/54/L.87/Rev.1) would have the Assembly express concern that most perpetrators of the genocide and other gross violations of human rights continued to evade justice. It would also express concern that, despite an arms embargo, the militias and former members of the armed forces continued to receive military, financial and logistic support. It called on the international community to take urgent measures to enable disarmament of those groups in accordance with the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement. It would express continuing concern for the violations of human rights and international humanitarian law in Rwanda and would urge the Government, and invite the International Tribunal for Rwanda, to prosecute and punish crimes of sexual violence against women during the 1994 genocide. It would reiterate its appeal to the international community to provide financial and technical assistance to Rwanda. It would welcome numerous steps taken by the Government in its efforts to build a State based on the rule of law and encourage further such actions. It would reiterate its concern at the conditions in many communal detention centres and some prisons, and would urge the Government to ensure that civil defence patrols in the north-west part of the country were properly controlled and held accountable for their actions. The draft is sponsored by Canada.

A draft resolution sponsored by the Russian Federation (document A/C.3/54/L.96) would amend the draft on human rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina (document A/C.3/54/L.86). By the amendment, a preambular paragraph would be added to the original text, to reaffirm the territorial integrity of States in the region.

Another draft submitted by the Russian Federation (document A/C.3/54/L.97) would amend the draft on the human rights situation in Kosovo (document A/C.3/54/L.82). The title of the Kosovo draft would be amended to read, "The situation of human rights in Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia". Also a second preambular paragraph, reaffirming commitment to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and other States, would be added.

A draft resolution sponsored by the United States (document A/C.3/54/L.98) would propose amendments to the draft on the situation of human rights in the Sudan (document A/C.3/54/L.81). Those proposed amendments concern updated information on the situation.

In addition, the Committee has before it a number of drafts on which action is expected.

A draft resolution on the human rights situation in Iran (document A/C.3/54/L.59) would have the Assembly welcome progress in a number of important human rights areas in Iran, noting with interest the increased presence of women in public life. It would express concern that the “15 Khordad Foundation” continued to threaten the life of Salman Rushdie and that no invitation had been extended for the Special Representative to visit since 1996.

It would also express concern at restrictions on all forms of freedom of expression and at discrimination against religious minorities, in particular Baha'is. The Assembly would express serious concern at the continuing violation of human rights as reported by the Special Representative, such as executions and torture, calling upon the Government to take steps to end the practice of such cruel punishments as amputation and stoning.

The draft is sponsored by Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, San Marino, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States.

By a 35-Power draft on the human rights situation in Iraq (document A/C.3/54/L.60), the Assembly would strongly condemn the systematic and extremely grave violations of human rights in Iraq resulting in an all-pervasive repression sustained by widespread terror. It would also strongly condemn the suppression of freedoms, the widespread use of the death penalty, summary and arbitrary executions and widespread, systematic torture. It would call upon the Government to correct those violations and to abide by obligations under human rights treaties, by such actions as bringing security forces into conformity with international standards; cooperating with United Nations mechanisms, particularly by receiving a return visit by the Special Rapporteur; establishing independence of the judiciary; by respecting the rights of all ethnic and religious groups; cooperating with the Tripartite Commission concerning missing persons and, finally, continuing to cooperate in implementing Security Council resolutions to ensure the equitable distribution of humanitarian supplies purchased under the oil-for-food programme.

The draft is sponsored by Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kuwait, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, San Marino, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States.

By the terms of a draft on the protection of migrants (document A/C.3/54/L.67), the Assembly would strongly condemn all forms of racial discrimination and xenophobia with regard to access to employment, vocational training, housing, schooling, health services and social services, as well as services intended for use by the public. It would welcome the active role played by governmental and non-governmental organizations in combating racism and assisting individual victims of racist acts, including migrant victims.

Also by the draft the Assembly would call upon all States to review and, where necessary, revise immigration policies with a view to eliminating all discriminatory policies and practices against migrants and providing specialized training for governmental policy-making and law enforcement, and for immigration and other concerned officials, thus underlining the importance of effective action to create conditions that foster greater harmony and tolerance within societies.

The draft is sponsored by Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, Cape Verde, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Russian Federation, Senegal and Uruguay.

A draft on human rights and terrorism (document A/C.3/54/L.70) would have the Assembly condemn the violations of the right to live free from fear and of the right to life, liberty and security. It would also condemn the incitement of ethnic hatred, violence and terrorism. It would reiterate its unequivocal condemnation of the acts, methods and practices of terrorism as activities aimed at destroying human rights, fundamental freedoms and democracy, threatening the security of States, destabilizing governments, undermining pluralistic civil society, and having adverse consequences for development. It would urge cooperation in fighting terrorism at the regional and international levels and would urge States to take steps to bring to trial those involved in terrorist acts.

The draft is sponsored by Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Georgia, India, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mauritania, Morocco, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey and Turkmenistan.

By a draft on the situation of human rights in Cambodia (document A/C.3/54/L.72) the Assembly would urge the Government of Cambodia to develop a democratic judicial system. Expressing concern about the situation of impunity in Cambodia, it would call upon the Government to take further measures to investigate and prosecute those who had perpetrated violations of human rights. The Assembly would also call on the Government to ensure that those most responsible for serious human rights violations be brought to account.

The Assembly would condemn the use of racist rhetoric and acts of violence against ethnic minorities, and would urge an end to racial violence and vilification. It would also urge the Government to take all steps to meet its obligations as a party to the Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, including the seeking of technical assistance. Finally, the Assembly would express grave concern at the devastating use of anti-personnel landmines on Cambodian society and would welcome the ratification of the Convention on landmines.

The text is sponsored by Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Costa Rica, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States.

By a draft on the strengthening of United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity (document A/C.3/54/L.73), the Assembly would call upon States to base their activities for the protection and promotion of human rights on relevant United Nations instruments, and to refrain from activities inconsistent within that framework.

The Assembly would also express its conviction that an unbiased and fair approach to human rights issues contributes to promoting international cooperation, as does the effective promotion, protection and realization of human rights and fundamental freedoms. In this context it would stress the continuing need for impartial and objective information on the political, economic and social situations and events in all countries.

The text is sponsored by Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Botswana, Burundi, Cambodia, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Namibia, Nigeria, Peru, Rwanda, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

By the terms of a draft resolution on respect for the principles of national sovereignty and non-interference in the internal affairs of States in their electoral processes (document A/C.3/54/L.74), the General Assembly would strongly appeal to all States to refrain from financing political parties or groups in other States and taking any other action that undermines their electoral processes. Also, it would condemn any act of armed aggression or threat or use of force against peoples, their elected governments or their legitimate leaders.

The draft is sponsored by Angola, Burundi, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Myanmar, Namibia, Nigeria, Sudan, Syria, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam and Zimbabwe.

By the terms of a draft text on the respect for the right to universal freedom of travel and the vital importance of family reunification (document A/C.3/54/L.75), the Assembly would once again call upon all States to guarantee the universally recognized freedom of travel to all foreign nationals legally residing in their territory. Also by the draft, all States would be called upon to allow, in conformity with international legislation, the free flow of financial remittances by foreign nationals residing in their territory to their relatives in the country of origin. States would also be called upon to refrain from enacting legislation intended as a coercive measure that discriminates against legal migrants. Antigua, Barbuda and Bolivia became co-sponsors when the representative of Cuba introduced the draft on 16 November.

By terms of a draft on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (document A/C.3/54/L.76), the Assembly would urge the Government of Myanmar to cooperate with the Special Rapporteur and allow him to conduct a field mission. It would deplore the continuing violations of human rights in Myanmar and express grave concern at the increased repression of public political activity and at arbitrary detention and arrest of those exercising freedoms of expression. It would strongly urge the Government to release detained political leaders and political prisoners, expressing grave concern at the escalating persecution of the democratic opposition. It would strongly urge Myanmar, taking into account assurances given by it on various occasions, to take steps towards restoring democracy in accordance with the will of the people as expressed in the 1990 democratic elections.

By the draft, the Assembly would also note with grave concern that the Government of Myanmar had failed to review its legislation, and would strongly urge it to cease the widespread and systematic use of forced labour and to implement the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry of the International Labour Organization regarding implementing the Forced Labour Convention of 1930. It would deplore the continued violations of human rights, in particular those directed against persons belonging to ethnic and religious minorities, and would deplore the continuing violations of women's human rights. It would urge the Government to end the enforced displacement of persons, and other causes of refugee flows to neighbouring countries, and would strongly urge it to ensure full respect for all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

The draft is sponsored by Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Monaco, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States.

Under the terms of a draft resolution on national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/C.3/54/L.77), the Assembly would urge the Secretary-General to continue to give high priority to requests from Member States for assistance in the establishment and strengthening of national human rights institutions, as part of the programme of advisory services and technical assistance in the field of human rights.

Also by the draft, the Secretary-General would be requested to continue to provide the necessary assistance for holding meetings of the International Coordinating Committee of National Institutions during the sessions of the Commission on Human Rights, in cooperation with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. The Secretary-General would also be requested to continue to provide the necessary assistance for regional meetings of national institutions.

That draft is sponsored by Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Kenya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela.

By the terms of a draft resolution on human rights and mass exoduses (document A/C.3/54/L.78), the General Assembly would strongly deplore ethnic and other forms of intolerance as one of the major causes of forced migratory movements, and would urge States to take all necessary steps to ensure respect for human rights, especially the rights of persons belonging to minorities. The Secretary-General would be urged to give high priority to, and to allocate the necessary resources within the regular budget of the United Nations for, the consolidation and strengthening of emergency preparedness and response mechanisms, including early warning activities in the humanitarian area, for the purpose of ensuring, inter alia, that effective action is taken to identify all human rights abuses which contribute to mass exoduses of persons.

The text is sponsored by Afghanistan, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain and The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

Introduction of Draft Resolutions

The representative of the Sudan introduced the draft resolution entitled “Assistance to unaccompanied refugee minors” (document A/C.3/54/L.94). Guinea, Mauritania and Turkey added their sponsorship.

The representative of Denmark, also speaking for the Nordic countries, introduced the draft entitled “Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees” (document A/C.3/54/L.95). He made oral revisions to the draft. The penultimate sentence before last operative paragraph 23 should read “of refugees, returnees and displaced persons of concern”. The following countries were added as sponsors: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belarus, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Guyana, Jamaica, Latvia, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Suriname and Venezuela.

The representative of Algeria introduced the draft resolution entitled “Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa” (document A/C.3/54/L.99). She made oral revisions to that draft. In operative paragraph 22, the last two words should read: “of refugees”.

Next, the representative of South Africa, also speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement and China, introduced the draft resolution entitled “The right to development” (document A/C.3/54/L.85).

The Committee heard the introduction of a draft resolution by the United States on “The situation of human rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)” (document A/C.3/54/L.86). The following countries added their sponsorship to that draft: Pakistan, Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Poland and Japan. The following revisions were made to the text: on line three of operative paragraph 13, the words “the rights of” should be added before “persons belonging”. On the last line in operative paragraph 40, the following should be added after the parenthesis “and of the Government of the Republic of Serbia”. On line three of operative paragraph 41, the following should be added at the end “and of the Government of the Republic of Serbia”.

The representative of Syria made an oral amendment to the draft. In the last line in operative paragraph 13, the word “ethnic” should be replaced for “racial”.

Next, the representative of Canada introduced the draft entitled “The situation of human rights in Rwanda” (document A/C.3/54/L.87/Rev.1). The following countries were added as sponsors: Australia, Japan, New Zealand and the United States. He made several revisions to that draft. Operative paragraph 8 is deleted and replaced by the following: “Notes improvement in the human rights situation in Rwanda since the last session of the General Assembly, expresses concern at those violations of human rights that are reported, and urges the Government of Rwanda to continue to investigate and prosecute such violations.”

Operative paragraphs 15 and 16 of that draft were deleted. In line two of operative paragraph 18, the words “and the international community” are added after “Rwanda”. Also, in that same paragraph, the words “to address weakness in legislation” are deleted. Operative paragraph 19 now reads “Encourages the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Government of Rwanda, other governments, international organizations and non-governmental organizations to provide, within a mutually agreed framework of cooperation, the support for the reconstruction of a human rights infrastructure."

The representative of the Russian Federation introduced two drafts containing amendments. The first (document A/C.3/54/L.96) contained amendments to the draft on the situation of human rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina (document A/C.3/54/L.86), reaffirming the territorial integrity of States. The second draft (document A/C.3/54/L.97) contained amendments to the text on the situation of human rights in Kosovo (document A/C.3/54/L.82). By those amendments, the territorial integrity of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia would be reaffirmed and the title of the draft text would be changed to read, “The human rights situation in Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.”

The representative of the United States withdrew a draft (document A/C.3/54/L.98) containing amendments to the resolution on the situation of human rights in the Sudan (document A/C.3/54/L.81).

Action on Drafts

The Committee took up the draft on human rights and terrorism (document A/C.3/54/L.70). The representative of Turkey said Kazakhstan had also become a sponsor.

A recorded vote was requested. In response to a question from the representative of Algeria, the CHAIRMAN said the representative of the United States had asked for the vote.

The representatives of Norway and of Finland, on behalf of the European Union and associated States, said they condemned terrorism. However, they would abstain from the vote. They could not support the draft because the question of terrorism belonged in the Sixth Committee. The acts of terrorists were not actions that affected human rights. They were criminal actions.

The resolution was approved by a recorded vote of 93 in favour and none against, with 63 abstentions. (For details of vote, see Annex I.)

The representatives of Lebanon and Syria said they had abstained because a definition for terrorism had yet to be agreed upon. General Assembly resolution A/46/52 of 1991 had not referred to the distinction between terrorism on the one hand and the right to self-determination on the other. Nevertheless, they categorically condemned terrorism.

The representatives of Argentina, United States and Chile said they had abstained because human rights could be violated only by States and agents. The resolution would grant the legitimacy of States to terrorists.

The representative of Mexico said she had abstained. She condemned terrorist acts and practices but she was concerned about the tie between terrorist acts and human rights. That linkage presented terrorist acts as human rights violations when they were criminal acts.

The representative of Liechtenstein said it was a conceptually flawed approach to link non-State actors with acts of States. Further, the draft contained new elements, such as a reference to international refugee laws, which belonged elsewhere.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution entitled “Protection of migrants” (document A/C.3/54/L.67).

The representative of Mexico said discussions had taken place over a number of weeks on that draft. He appealed to all delegations to make it possible to approve the draft, as a whole, without a vote.

A recorded vote was requested on the tenth preambular paragraph of the draft: “Taking note of the decisions of the relevant international juridical bodies on questions relating to migrants, particularly Advisory Opinion OC-16/99 of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights regarding the Right to Information about Consular Assistance within the Framework of Due Process Guarantees.”

The preambular paragraph was approved by a vote of 121 in favour, one against (United States), and 21 abstentions. (See Annex II.)

The Committee then approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The United States said approving the draft should not have been controversial. A reference to a recent decision by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights had made it that way. That Court was not a United Nations body and its proceedings had been directed against the United States. It had done so in Spanish only. His country had not had an opportunity to evaluate the Court’s decision.

The representative of Singapore said she did not agree with operative paragraph 3 of the draft, which “called upon all States to review and, where necessary, revise immigration policies with a view to eliminating all discriminatory policies and practices against migrants”. The welfare of migrants was very important for her country, where migrants even had more protection than regular citizens. For example, employers were severely punished if they broke the law. In spite of that, uncontrolled immigration to her country was not acceptable since it could lead to extensive economic and social disruption. Immigration policies should be viewed as part of domestic laws which depended on the circumstances of the particular country.

Next, the Committee took up the draft resolution on “the situation of human rights in Cambodia” (document A/C.3/54/L.72). Canada and Malta added their sponsorship to that draft.

The representative of Cambodia said some parts of the draft were based on the report of the Special Representative on his country. They were based on rumors, not facts, and were supported by the opposition. Authorities in his country had always made efforts to investigate all crimes. His Government had made great efforts to bring the Khmer Rouge to trial; two of its leaders had been apprehended. Also, discrimination against women almost did not exist in his country.

The Committee approved that draft resolution without a vote.

Next, the Committee took up the draft entitled “Strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity” (document A/C.3/54/L.73). Madagascar and Suriname joined in sponsoring that draft.

The Committee approved that draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft on respect for the principles of national sovereignty and non-interference in the internal affairs of States in their electoral processes (document A/C.3/54/L.74). The representative of Cuba said Benin, Madagascar and Suriname had become co-sponsors.

A recorded vote was requested. In response to a question from Cuba, the CHAIRMAN said the United States had requested the vote.

Nigeria withdrew its co-sponsorship of the draft.

The representative of Finland, on behalf of the European Union and associated States, said she would vote against the draft because it inappropriately undermined the important role of assistance in the holding of fair and periodic elections. A large number of States had requested assistance from the United Nations in the past year. The Charter should not be misused to limit people’s access to fair elections.

The resolution was then approved by a vote of 78 in favour to 57 against, and 14 abstentions. (See Annex III.)

The representative of Cuba thanked the co-sponsors of the resolution and said she regretted that consensus had not been achieved. She introduced the draft on the respect for the right to universal freedom of travel and the vital importance of family reunification (document A/C.3/54/L.75) and said Madagascar had become a co-sponsor. A recorded vote was requested on the draft resolution. The draft was approved by a recorded vote of 88 in favour, one opposed and 68 abstaining. (See Annex IV.)

The representative of Chile said he had supported the resolution because it protected human rights of migrants. The text should, however, set forth the principle that all persons had a right to leave their country and return to it. Without that, the draft was selective.

The representative of Mexico said she had voted in favour of the draft; freedom of movement was an established right that applied to all persons whether or not they were of a migratory character.

The representative of Cuba said that nowadays it was necessary to remove all barriers from people moving about.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution entitled “National institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights” (document A/C.3/54/L.77). Added as sponsors to the draft were: Greece, Ireland, Jordan, Cyprus, Sudan, El Salvador, Republic of Moldova, Guatemala, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Nigeria, Cameroon, Croatia, Ghana, Togo, Philippines and Tunisia.

The Committee approved the draft without a vote.

Next, the Committee took up the draft resolution on “Human rights and mass exoduses” (document A/C.3/54/L.78). The following countries added their sponsorship: Panama, France, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and the United States.

The Committee approved the draft without a vote.

The representative of India said operative paragraph 5 of the draft had not been updated. (The paragraph “urges the Secretary-General to give high priority and to allocate the necessary resources within the regular budget of the United Nations for the consolidation and strengthening of emergency preparedness and response mechanisms, including early warning activities in the humanitarian area, for the purpose of ensuring, inter alia, that effective action is taken to identify all human rights abuses which contribute to mass exoduses of persons”.) The representative said humanitarian assistance and human rights should be distinct even though they should be supportive of on another. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) had dealt with preventive work for the past two years, and that was not reflected in the paragraph.

Next, the Committee took up the draft on “Human rights situation in the Islamic Republic of Iran” (document A/C.3/54/L.59). Liechtenstein and Malta joined in sponsoring that draft. A recorded vote was requested.

The representative of Jordan said that in order to achieve consensus on human rights, the comprehensive understanding of those rights needed to be ascertained. They were based on humanity, regardless of political views, ethnicity, race or religion. Human rights represented the legitimate interests of the international community. Thus, the international monitoring of them might affect the principle of State sovereignty. Sovereingty did not allow coercive treatment of individuals. Human rights instruments were supposed to constitute the exercise of justice in the world. However, accountability needed to be based on agreed yardsticks and norms. The responsibility of promoting human rights rested with all individual groups of States through constructive dialogue until accurate yardsticks could be built. His delegation would abstain from voting on human rights resolutions with the exception of those that had to do with ethnic violations, conflicts and genocide.

The representative of Egypt said human rights should not be used to interfere in the internal affairs of others. Also, double standards in dealing with human rights issues were not acceptable. The diversity of cultures worldwide needed to be taken into account. With regard to operative paragraph 16, there was no international consensus on capital punishment. It was the sovereign right of each State to enact its national laws in line with its traditions. His delegation would abstain from voting.

The representative of El Salvador said his Government was pleased with the reform process being launched by the Government of Iran and hoped it would continue. He wished that the fundamental rights of all Iranians were protected. Further steps needed to be taken so that “deep-seated changes” would take place. He would vote in favour of the draft in hope that the Iranian Government could further strengthen its actions.

The representative of Lybya said the draft resolution was “general, vague and obsolete”. It ignored Iran’s official religion and its right to enact legislation that suited its society. Operative paragraph 14 referred to “detaining members of the Iranian Jewish community”. It ignored the Iranian Government’s support to the Special Rapporteur on religious intolerance. A letter had been sent by the Jewish community in Iran which stated that minorities were well treated and that the accusations made had nothing to do with their religion. Operative paragraph 7 contained a contradiction; it stated that discrimination against women in law and in practice continued. For all of those reasons, he would vote against the draft.

The representative of Yemen said he would abstain from voting on the draft. The reason for the abstention would be explained in the General Assembly.

The Committee approved that draft resolution by a vote of 60 in favour to 41 against, with 53 abstentions. (Annex V)

The representative of Iran said he regretted he had not been given the opportunity to speak before the vote, even though he had requested it. When the draft was first introduced in front of the Commission, it could have been said that the intention was to isolate Iran from the international community. If the purpose was to point fingers, then the process of adopting the same resolution on Iran year after year was going well.

In Iran, however, events were a result of a dynamic process that was going forward rapidly, even as it respected its past. Iran had made clear its readiness to engage in open dialogue. Instead, the same formulaic phrases were applied to its situation, without recognizing the progress. The resolution was not a fair basis on which to continue monitoring human rights in Iran. That, notwithstanding, Iran continued to be fully committed to promoting human rights.

The representative of Guatemala said he had voted in favour of the draft. However, there were merits to what Iran had said. A better approach to the human rights situation could have been devised.

The representative of the United Republic of Tanzania said she had voted against the resolution because, while some areas of concern indicated in the Special Representative’s report were volid, there had been positive developments in Iran, and the resolution failed to acknowledge the progress.

The representative of Viet Nam said she voted against the draft because of the way the resolution criticized a Member State.

The representative of Japan said he had voted for the resolution, because there was room for improvement in Iran. However, he had taken notice of the great progress made, including the holding of elections.

The representative of Brazil said he had voted in favour of the resolution to express concern with the treatment of religious minorities, but he noted the progress made by the Government.

The representative of the Philippines said he had voted against because a negative resolution would not help programmes in Iran.

(annexes follow) ANNEX I

Vote on Human Rights and Terrorism

The draft resolution on human rights and terrorism (document A/C.3/54/L.70) was approved by a recorded vote of 93 in favour to none against, with 63 abstentions, as follows:

In favour: Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Viet Nam, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Against: None.

Abstain: Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Canada, Chile, Congo, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Gambia, Germany, Greece, Guinea, Guinea- Bissau, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Syria, Togo, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Gabon, Honduras, Kiribati, Lesotho, Mauritius, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Tonga, Uzbekistan, and Yemen.

(END OF ANNEX I)

ANNEX II

Vote on Preambular Paragraph of Draft on Protection of Migrants

The tenth preambular paragraph of the draft resolution on the protection of migrants (document A/C.3/54/L.67) was approved by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 1 against, with 19 abstentions, as follows:

In favour: Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Latvia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Against: United States.

Abstain: Azerbaijan, Bhutan, China, Estonia, Georgia, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kenya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Trinidad and Tobago.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Bahrain, Botswana, Comoros, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Gabon, Honduras, Iran, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Malawi, Mongolia, Nauru, Oman, Palau, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan.

(END OF ANNEX II)

ANNEX III

Vote on Non-interference in Electoral Processes

The draft resolution on the principles of national sovereignty and non- interference in the internal affairs of States in their electoral processes (document A/C.3/54/L.74) was approved by a recorded vote of 78 in favour to 57 against, with 14 abstentions, as follows:

In favour: Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, China, Colombia, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Against: Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.

Abstain: Belarus, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ghana, Guatemala, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Azerbaijan, Benin, Botswana, Chad, Comoros, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Grenada, Haiti, Honduras, Kiribati, Lesotho, Mauritius, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Uzbekistan.

(END OF ANNEX III)

ANNEX IV

Vote on Freedom of Travel and Family Reunification

The draft resolution on the universal right to freedom of travel and the importance of family reunification (document A/C.3/54/L.75) was approved by a recorded vote of 88 in favour to 1 against, with 68 abstentions, as follows:

In favour: Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea- Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

Against: United States

Abstain: Andorra, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Mongolia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Zambia.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Botswana, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Honduras, Kiribati, Lesotho, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Uganda.

(END OF ANNEX IV)

ANNEX V

Vote on Human Rights Situation in Iran

The draft resolution on the human rights situation in Iran (document A/C.3/54/L.59) was approved by a recorded vote of 60 in favour to 41 against, with 53 abstentions, as follows:

In favour: Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Monaco, Mongolia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Trinidad and Tobago, United Kingdom, United States.

Against: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Gambia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.

Abstain: Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Madagascar, Malawi, Mexico, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Zambia.

Absent: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lesotho, Mali, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Tonga, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Yemen.

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For information media. Not an official record.