ASSEMBLY, URGING GLOBAL COOPERATION WITH ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY, EXPRESSES CONCERN AT NON-COMPLIANCE BY DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE"S REPUBLIC OF KOREA

15 November 1999
GA/9657

ASSEMBLY, URGING GLOBAL COOPERATION WITH ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY, EXPRESSES CONCERN AT NON-COMPLIANCE BY DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE"S REPUBLIC OF KOREA

15 November 1999


Press Release
GA/9657


ASSEMBLY, URGING GLOBAL COOPERATION WITH ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY, EXPRESSES CONCERN AT NON-COMPLIANCE BY DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA

19991115

IAEA Report Approved; In other Action, United Nations Support Is Sought for Work of International Organization of la Francophonie

The General Assembly this morning urged all States to strive for effective and harmonious international cooperation in carrying out the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in promoting the use of nuclear energy and the application of measures to further strengthen the safety of nuclear installations in order to minimize the risk to life, health and the environment; in strengthening technical assistance and cooperation for developing countries; and in ensuring the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards system of the Agency.

The Assembly took that action as it adopted a resolution on the report of the IAEA, as orally amended by France who introduced the text, by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) and 6 abstentions (Benin, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Syria, United Republic of Tanzania and Viet Nam. (For details of the vote, see Annex I.)

By that text, it expressed deep concern about the continued non-compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the IAEA Safeguards Agreement, despite repeated calls by the international community for such action. It urged that country to cooperate fully with the Agency in the implementation of the Agreement and to take all steps the IAEA might deem necessary to preserve all information relevant to verifying the accuracy and completeness of the initial report of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on the inventory of nuclear material subject to safeguards, until that country comes into full compliance with the Agreement.

Further, by the text, the Assembly stressed both the need for full implementation by Iraq of all relevant Security Council resolutions and the resumption without delay of the ongoing monitoring and verification activities. It also stressed that, although the Agency was satisfied that remaining unanswered questions as of December 1998 did not prevent the full implementation of the ongoing monitoring and verification plan, it was essential that the basis for resumption preserved the IAEA's right specified in that plan, including the full exercise of its rights of access as enshrined therein and the necessary cooperation of Iraq.

General Assembly Plenary - 1a - Press Release GA/9657 53rd Meeting (AM) 15 November 1999

The Assembly further stressed that greater transparency by Iraq in its dealings with the Agency would contribute greatly to the resolution of the few remaining questions and concerns in the ongoing monitoring and verification plan.

In other action this morning, the Assembly, acting on a request from the representative of India, took a vote on adopted the third preambular paragraph of the text on the report of the IAEA. The paragraph was adopted by a recorded vote of 112 in favour to 2 against (India and Israel), with 7 abstentions (Benin, Bhutan,Cuba, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Pakistan, Togo and the United Republic of Tanzania) (See Annex II).

[The third preambular paragraph recognizes the importance of the Agency's work in promoting the further application of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, as envisaged in its statute and in accordance with the inalienable rights of States parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons -- and other relevant international legally binding agreements -- that have concluded relevant safeguards agreements with the Agency to develop research, production and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes without discrimination and in conformity with articles 1 and 11 and other relevant articles of the Treaty.]

In other action this morning, the Assembly adopted without a vote a resolution, also introduced by France, on cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie. The text commended that organization for its action to develop multilateral cooperation among French- speaking countries, particularly in the areas of economic, social and cultural development, and the promotion of new information technologies, and requested United Nations bodies to give their support.

In other action this morning the Assembly, once more acting without a vote, elected five members to the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ): Gerard Biraud (France); Norma Goicochea Estenoz (Cuba); Vladimir V. Kuznetsov (Russian Federation); Susan M. Shearhouse (United States); and Roger Tchoungui (Cameroon). They take up their appointments on 1 January 2000.

Again acting without a vote, the Assembly filled six vacancies on the Committee on Contributions for terms beginning 1 January 2000 by electing Alvaro Gurgel de Alencar Netto (Brazil), Ju Kuilin (China), Sergei I. Mareyev (Russian Federation), Angel Marron (Spain), Hae-Yun Park (Republic of Korea), and Ugo Sessi (Italy), and elected the Auditor-General of South Africa to fill a vacancy on the United Nations Board of Auditors.

Still acting without a vote the Assembly also reappointed three members of the Investments Committee for a further three-year term commencing 1 January 2000. They were: Francine Bovich (United States); Takeshi Ohta (Japan); and Peter Stormonth Darling (United Kingdom).

Julio Barbozai (Argentina) and Mayer Gabay (Israel) were both elected to the Administrative Tribunal for terms beginning 1 January 2000, while Amjad

General Assembly Plenary - 1b - Press Release GA/9657 53rd Meeting (AM) 15 November 1999

Hussain Sial was elected as an alternate member for the United Nations Staff Pension Committee for a term beginning 1 January 2000. Those appointments were all made without a vote.

At this morning meeting, the Vice-President of the Assembly Claude Stanislas Bouah-Kamon (Côte d'Ivoire) extended sympathies on behalf of Member States to the Government and people of Turkey for the tragic loss of life and extensive material damage as a result of being struck by another disastrous earthquake.

The Vice-President also expressed condolences to the families of the United Nations officials who lost their lives on Friday when a Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) plane crashed in Kosovo.

The Vice-President informed the Assembly that, instead of taking up consideration of the "University of Peace" tomorrow, that item would be taken up on Thursday, 18 November. In addition, on 24 November, the Assembly would consider "Zone of peace and cooperation of the South Atlantic".

Statements were made this morning by: France, Côte d'Ivoire, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Norway, Romania, Mauritius, Senegal, Cambodia, Togo, Haiti, Burundi, Benin, Egypt and Cameroon. The Permanent Observer for the International Organization of la Francophonie also spoke.

Statements were also made in explanation of vote by Iraq, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, India, Republic of Korea, Japan, Syria, Cuba, Israel, Lebanon, China and Azerbaijan. A statement in exercise of the right of reply was made by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

The Assembly will meet again at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, 17 November, to consider the United Nations Decade of International Law and the University of Peace.

Assembly Work Programme

The General Assembly met this morning to begin consideration of cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie. It had before it a report of the Secretary-General and a related draft resolution. It was also expected to take action on a draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which was discussed by the Assembly on 4 November, and to hold elections to fill vacancies in six of its subsidiary organs.

The report of the Secretary-General on cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie (document A/54/397) highlights the increasing collaboration between the United Nations and the International Organization. That organization was created in 1997 by the member States of the Agency for Cultural and Technical Cooperation and received observer status with the Assembly in 1998. The Charter of la Francophonie, also adopted in 1997, underlines the objectives of the organization, including the assistance in the establishment and development of democracy, the prevention of conflicts and the strengthening of solidarity through multilateral cooperation activities. La Francophonie, which brings together "countries that use French as a common language", is committed to respecting the sovereignty of States and to observing the strictest neutrality on issues of domestic policy.

The report states that cooperation between the United Nations system and the International Organization embraces political, economic, social, scientific and cultural activities. The organization intends to play an active role in the field of preventive diplomacy, conflict resolution, protection of human rights and strengthening of the rule of law. In particular, the report continues, the United Nations and la Francophonie have carried out activities in Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Guinea-Bissau, as well as Togo. Moreover, cooperation with the United Nations also concerned electoral assistance, electoral observation and the strengthening of African peacekeeping capacities.

Turing to the economic, social and cultural fields, the International Organization cooperates with the United Nations programmes, funds and specialized agencies. With respect to the development of Internet services in Africa, the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) and the International Organization organized a seminar in francophone West Africa to familiarize participants with the Internet and train them in its use. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is currently exploring the possibility of signing a protocol with the International Organization for the recruitment of young professionals from developing countries, who would be taken on by that organization and seconded to UNESCO for a year. Increasing cooperation was also under way with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD).

According to the report, the International Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) cooperate in advocating compliance with the Convention on the Rights of the Child in both developing and developed countries. Moreover, a collaboration with the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) was under way in the execution of several projects, including the strengthening of national capacity in information technology.

By the terms of a draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie (document A/54/L.25), the General Assembly would commend the International Organization of la Francophonie for its action in favour of the development of multilateral cooperation among countries with French as a common language, particularly in the areas of economic, social and cultural development, and the promotion of new information technologies, and request United Nations bodies to give it their support.

It would also commend the high-level meetings held periodically between the secretariats of the United Nations and la Francophonie and advocate those secretariats' participation in major meetings of both organizations.

The Assembly would note with satisfaction the strengthening of collaboration between the United Nations Organization and the International Organization of la Francophonie in the area of electoral monitoring and assistance and advocate the strengthening of cooperation between the two organizations in that area.

It would also invite the specialized agencies, funds and programmes of the United Nations, as well as the regional commissions, including the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), to collaborate to that end with the International Organization of la Francophonie by identifying new synergies in favour of development, in particular in the areas of poverty elimination, energy, sustainable development, education, training and the development of new information technologies.

Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, France, Gabon, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Monaco, Morocco, Niger, Norway, Poland, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Slovenia, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo and Viet Nam sponsored the text.

By the terms of the draft resolution on the Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (document A/54/L.21/Rev.1), the General Assembly would urge all States to strive for effective and harmonious international cooperation in carrying out the work of the Agency in: promoting the use of nuclear energy and the application of measures to further strengthen the safety of nuclear installations in order to minimize the risk to life, health and the environment; strengthening technical assistance and cooperation for developing countries; and ensuring the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards system of the Agency.

The Assembly would commend the Director General and the secretariat of the Agency for their continuing, impartial efforts to implement safeguards agreements still in force between the Agency and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and would express deep concern about the continued non-compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the safeguards agreement, despite repeated calls by the international community for compliance.

The Assembly would also commend the Director General and the Agency for their strenuous efforts to implement Security Council resolutions 687, 707, 715 and 1051 in Iraq and would stress that the Agency's ongoing monitoring and verification activities should be resumed without delay.

The draft resolution is co-sponsored by Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Finland, Kazakhastan, Lithuania, New Zealand, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Ukraine.

The Assembly also had before it note from the Secretary-General (document A.54/540) transmitting the report of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) on the nominations to fill five vacancies on the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ). According to the note, the successful candidates would take up their positions on 1 January 2000.

The note states that the nominees for the vacancies are: Gerard Biraud (France), Norma Goicochea Estenoz (Cuba); Vladimir V. Kuznetsov (Russian Federation); Susan M. Shearhouse (United States); and Roger Tchoungui (Cameroon).

The Assembly also had before it a note from the Secretary-General (document A/54/541) transmitting the report of the Fifth Committee on the nominations to fill six vacancies on the Committee on Contributions. According to the note, the successful candidates would take up their positions on 1 January 2000.

The note states that the nominees are Alvaro Gurgel de Alencar Netto (Brazil); Ju Kuilin (China); Sergei I. Mareyev (Russian Federation); Angel Marron (Spain); Hae-Yun Park (Republic of Korea); and Ugo Sessi (Italy).

The Assembly had before it a note from the Secretary-General (document A/54/542) transmitting the report of the Fifth Committee on nominations to fill a vacancy on the United Nations Board of Auditors for a three-year term that will commence on 1 July 2000. The Board of Auditors is composed of the Auditors- General (or equivalent) of three Member States of the United Nations.

The Secretary-General states that the sole nominee for this position is the Auditor-General of South Africa.

The Assembly also had before it a note from the Secretary-General (document A/54/543) seeking the General Assembly's confirmation of three appointments to the Investments Committee.

According to the note, he proposes to reappoint the three members of that Committee whose terms expire on 31 December for an additional three-year term.

The note states that those people are: Francine Bovich (United States); Takeshi Ohta (Japan); and Peter Stromonth (United Kingdom).

The Assembly had before it a note from the Secretary-General (document A/54/544) transmitting the report of the Fifth Committee on nominations to fill two vacancies on the Administrative Tribunal of the United Nations for terms beginning 1 January 2000.

The note states that the nominees for these vacancies are Julio Barboza (Argentina) and Mayer Gabay (Israel).

Finally, the Assembly had before it a note from the Secretary-General (document A/54/545) transmitting the report of the Fifth Committee on nominations to fill a vacancy for a member of the United Nations Staff Pension Committee, to commence on the date of appointment and expire on 31 December 2000. The note states that the sole nominee for this vacancy is Amjad Hussain Sial (Pakistan).

Statements

JEAN-LOUIS BIANCO (France) said cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie was taking place in many areas, particularly in the field of prevention of conflicts and development of democracy. A working meeting which took place in April between the two secretariats focused on areas of common interest, including the political situation in seven African countries which were members of the International Organization of la Francophonie, cooperation with the United Nations on assistance and electoral observation, peacekeeping operations, and the prevention of conflicts. Moreover, the increasing participation of the organization in many conferences and meetings organized under the aegis of the United Nations underlined fruitful prospects of cooperation between the two bodies.

He said there was also cooperation between them in the economic, social and cultural fields. This had developed fruitfully both with the Secretariat and with the United Nations specialized agencies. In particular, the cooperation with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) had intensified. Moreover, since the International Organization of la Francophonie considered the right to development and the World Conference against Racism, to be held in 2001, as highest priorities, the cooperation between the organization and the High Commissioner for Human Rights should be strengthened.

DIÉNÉBOU KABA CAMARA (Côte d’Ivoire) said that her country supported the aims and principles of the International Organization of la Francophonie and had demonstrated this by hosting a seminar and taking an active part in a number of conferences organized by the body.

In July, Côte d'Ivoire had hosted a seminar organized by la Francophonie and the DPI on the theme “The Internet as an instrument for Promoting Development”. The country had also collaborated with UNESCO in a French translation of the General History of Africa into eight volumes. The organization had also taken part in a conference organized by the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) on good governance, as well as many others.

She said that, as well as nurturing its relationship with the United Nations, the International Organization of la Francophonie had also established close cooperation with other regional international and intergovernmental organizations. Its contribution in cultural, social and political issues in the international arena had been considerable. Côte d’Ivoire was committed to the values and principles of that organization, which had worked with the European Union and UNESCO to promote the culture of French-speaking countries and to establish their artists on the international circuit. It had not only contributed to the advancement of the culture of French-speaking countries, but had worked hard to strengthen cooperation in establishing peace and the rule of law, as well as economic and social developments.

ALOUNKEO KITTIKHOUN (Lao People's Democratic Republic) said the formation of the International Organization of la Francophonie in 1997 had established a body that gave French-speaking countries more visibility in the international arena. Since then, it had expanded as a political, economic and cultural entity, and had pursued a policy of multilateral cooperation among its members. The Francophonie had been accorded observer status in the General Assembly in 1998 and, since then, there had been fruitful development with the United Nations.

In the area of preventive diplomacy, he went on, the Francophonie had played an active role. It had participated in assistance missions and promoting the rights of States. In the areas of economic, social and cultural cooperation, the organization had participated in projects with various agencies of the United Nations, including the UNDP, UNESCO and UNITAR. He noted that, at the recent summit in Canada, heads of State hoped that the Francophonie's development would become more diversified to serve the interests of both organizations, as well as in the areas of international peace and security, and diplomacy.

OLE PETER KOLBY (Norway) said the international community was now facing increasing problems and, therefore, multilateral negotiations and agreements had great importance. Regional organizations also played a significant role. Moreover, those organizations were instruments for the advancement of the principles of the United Nations.

On the cooperation between the International Organization of la Francophonie and the United Nations, he said its impact was expanding beyond the borders of the francophone countries and he cited collaboration in the field of development of democracy, prevention of conflicts, strengthening of the rule of law, protection of human rights and the intensification of dialogue between cultures and civilizations. All those areas provided possibilities for joint action between the United Nations and regional organizations, such as the francophone group.

He noted the possibility that UNESCO and the International Organization of la Francophonie might conclude a protocol agreement for the recruitment of young professionals from developing countries.

ION GORITA Romania) said the dedication of the International Organization of la Francophonie (in ensuring a pronounced role for French-speaking countries in the international arena was to be welcomed. The organization, which had a history of 30 years of cultural and technical cooperation to draw on, had assumed a new political dimension since the Hanoi Summit of French-speaking countries in 1997.

He said, the French-speaking world had shown it could be a venue for working out solutions to international problems, especially in Africa. The first ministerial-level conference of the International Organization of la Francophonie adopted a number of resolutions on the conflict situation in Africa and resolved to work in cooperation with other organizations in the areas of disarmament, the democratization of international relations and the development of durable economies. In April this year, finance and economic ministers of the organization held a conference entitled “Investment in Commerce” and the recent biennial summit had concentrated on youth, which opened a broad range of possibilities for cooperation with the United Nations.

ANUND PRIYAY NEEWOOR (Mauritius) stated that the International Organization of la Francophonie had evolved into a forum for serious cooperation for development and it had demonstrated an effect on numerous areas, ranging from diplomacy to women's entrepreneurship. His country appreciated the initiatives to promote economic development and increase capacity through training and education programmes. Within that framework, Mauritius had welcomed the establishment of "L'Institut Francophone d'Entreprenariat" on its territory. That institution would also be important in assisting the United Nations in its work.

He said the possibilities for fruitful cooperation existed on issues that included the environment and culture. It was up to the United Nations and la Francophonie to work more closely, so that their members would benefit from a pooling of their experiences. Mauritius noted with satisfaction the growth of political cooperation, particularly in the area of conflict resolution. His country also hoped that the joint la Francophonie/UNDP meeting to be held in the coming weeks would provide new impetus for further work. The ongoing cooperation was proof that globalization could be implemented.

ALIOUNE DIAGNE (Senegal) reviewed the birth of the Agency for Cultural and Technical Cooperation and of the International Organization of la Francophonie. He said the mandate of that organization was to develop, among it members, multidimensional cooperation on socio-economic development, international cooperation, the environment, the promotion of human rights and democracy, and the prevention of conflicts. The goals of the organization were those of the United Nations Charter.

Cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie had become a fact since the General Assembly, by its resolution of 16 October 1995, had noted the complementarity between the activities of the francophone group and those of the United Nations and its programmes and specialized agencies. The two organizations were now working together on issues of common interest, such as the political, economic, scientific and cultural sectors.

OUCH BORITH (Cambodia) said that apart from the United Nations, the International Organization of Francophonie was the only organization with member States with a diversity of race, colour, culture and religion representing a quarter of the United Nations membership. This was important to reinforce cooperation and solidarity among people of the world.

He said that the Francaphonie group was not limited in the issues it wanted to be involved in. It was already concerned with preventive diplomacy, conflict resolution, democratic developments, the defence of human rights and the rule of law, and would continue to be so. He believed that the new millennium would provide the basis for more fruitful international cooperation, the establishment of peace and stability for people all over the world. These were good reasons for strengthening the relationship between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie.

KODJO MENAN (Togo) said the establishment of the International Organization of la Francophonie demonstrated the French-speaking community's dedication to promoting the goals of the United Nations. Multi-dimensional and varied cooperation between the two organizations fit into the progress their peoples sought. He noted that la Francophonie had contributed to strengthening the African community. The initiatives undertaken had usefully complemented what the United Nations had been doing.

Togo appreciated the efforts made by the United Nations towards strengthening cooperation, he continued. However, his delegation would like to express the hope that lingustic diversity would be given more attention. At the summit in Canada, members had stressed how important the issue was to countries sharing the French language and how they hoped to ensure the most appropriate and adequate treatment possible for their language. That issue had been dealt with in all the recommendations of the report from the organization's last session. To that end, they hoped that initiatives would soon be implemented.

AZAD BELFORT (Haiti) expressed his support for the draft resolution on cooperation between the International Organization of la Francophonie and the United Nations. He said he attested to the strong collaboration between the two organizations. The Francophone group was in no way an instrument created to advance one language or to reduce the influence of other languages used in the United Nations. On the contrary, it was a means created to promote multilingualism and cultural diversity as a source of the enrichment of human patrimony.

The International Organization of la Francophonie would be able to make contributions to the projects of the United Nations. The cooperation between Haiti and the Francophone group had been fruitful in many areas, particularly in the field of university and primary education. He also stressed the importance given by the group to the theme of youth, as shown in the recent biennial Summit of la Francophonie, held in September in Canada.

MARC NTETURUYE (Burundi) said that his country welcomed the cooperation between the International Organization of la Francophonie and international as well as regional organizations. That action indicated that the group fully supported as well as promoted the principles of the United Nations Charter. Burundi had benefited from a joint cooperation between the francophone organization and Canada through a consultative meeting which was held in New York in January this year, to evaluate the steps taken towards achieving peace in Burundi. His Government was grateful and appreciative of the organization's direct involvement in the peace talks on Burundi.

Mr. ADEKAMBI (Benin) said his country welcomed the outstanding progress by the two organizations within the framework of shared actions in the economic, cultural and social fields. It was encouraging to note that at the core of joint activities in the political area were the objectives of advancing peace and democracy, and to assist in areas suffering from conflicts. Useful intervention was welcome, as was the competence and far-sightedness that had been indicated by both organizations in pursuing those goals. His delegation was also pleased with the work done in several other areas including the signing of the framework agreement with UNCTAD and the programmes of UNESCO for women and children.

MOHAMMED GOMAA (Egypt) said that by its nature the International Organization of la Francophonie was committed to respecting the sovereignty of States and to observing the strictest neutrality in issues of domestic policy. The fact that UNESCO was exploring the possibility of signing a protocol agreement with the organization for the recruitment of young professionals from developing countries was welcome and it showed how the multilateral system worked.

He underlined the link between education and development. Every investment in education had a great impact on development. In that regard, the International Organization of la Francophonie had undertaken an assiduous job through many seminars. He also welcomed the strong cooperation between that organization and UNICEF, in particular in the education of girls and training of young women.

MARTIN BELINGA–EBOUTOU (Cameroon) said his country welcomed the consensus on cooperation between the French-speaking world and the United Nations and wanted to express satisfaction that those countries would now be able to realize the United Nations goals and principles through the International Organization of La Francophonie.

Cameroon was proud to be a member of the Commonwealth as well as of la Francophonie -- membership of those two organizations inspired the country as well as endowed it with the tools to carry out the principles of the United Nations Charter. He called on all Member States to rally round in full support of the resolution.

RIDHA BOUABID, Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie, said the objectives of the United NationS in maintaining global peace and security were the same as those of the Francophonie. The draft was a reflection and embodiment of progress made in the areas of democracy and rule of law. At the summit in Canada, the hope for active partnership with the United Nations and its agencies and other bodies had been constantly expressed. The French-speaking countries, along with their partners, had sought to take the same approach at other major gatherings. The organization, he continued, looked forward to participating in upcoming conferences on the issues of racism and trade and investment, among others.

He noted that partnership with the United Nations had grown specifically in the areas of education, literacy and the development of technology. The report gave a complete picture of the type of partnership and cooperation that they sought to develop. He further noted that a new dimension for cooperation had been in the political arena. The eighth summit in Hanoi had marked a real turning point in the evolution of the French-speaking world, since they had decided to expand the realm of involvement to that area. The meeting saw the introduction of a Secretary-General of the organization that was designed to give the organization political dimensions, so that it could take political and diplomatic actions within the French-speaking world.

Citing examples of those actions, he said the Prime Minister of Senegal had been asked to conduct a goodwill mission to Togo during that country's political crisis in June 1998. He also noted the reconciliation mission undertaken by the Secretary-General of the Francophonie to the Central African Republic after the political impasse that had occurred there after the elections. The Francophonie had also supported Burundi in its restorative process after sanctions had been lifted from that country.

He said the organization attached importance to cooperation with the United Nations in promoting human rights and supporting electoral assistance programmes and democracy. However, he said, the Francophonie would appreciate more significant support in those areas.

Action on Draft

The draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the International Organization of la Francophonie (document A/54/L.25) was adopted without a vote.

Appointments to Fill Vacancies

The Assembly then considered the reports of the Fifth Committee on sub-items of agenda item 17 (appointments to fill vacancies in subsidiary organs and other appointments).

On the recommendation of the Fifth Committee contained in paragraph 5 of its report on sub-item (a) of agenda item 17, the Assembly appointed Gerard Biraud (France), Norma Goicochea Estenoz (Cuba), Vladimir V. Kuznetsov (Russian Federation), Susan M. Shearhouse (United States) and Roger Tchoungui (Cameroon) members of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) for a three-year term of office beginning on 1 January 2000.

Under the recommendation of the Fifth Committee contained in paragraph 5 of its report on sub item (b) of agenda item 17, the Assembly appointed Alvaro Gurgel de Alencar Netto (Brazil), Ju Kuilin (China), Sergei I. Mareyev (Russian Federation), Angel Marron (Spain), Hae-Yun Park (Republic of Korea) and Ugo Sessi (Italy) members of the Committee on Contributions for a three-year term of office beginning on 1 January 2000.

Under the recommendation of the Fifth Committee contained in paragraph 5 of its report on sub-item (c) of agenda item 17, the Assembly also appointed the Auditor-General of the Republic of South Africa as a member of the Board of Auditors for a three-year term of office beginning on 1 July 2000.

Under the recommendation of the Fifth Committee contained in paragraph 5 of its report on sub-item (d) of agenda item 17, the Assembly reappointed Francine Bovich (United States), Takeshi Ohta (Japan) and Peter Stormonth Darling (United Kingdom) as members of the Investments Committee for a three-year term of office beginning on 1 January 2000.

Under the recommendation of the Fifth Committee contained in paragraph 5 of its report on sub-item (e) of agenda item 17, the Assembly also appointed Julio Barbozai (Argentina) and Mayer Gabay (Israel) as members of the United Nations Administrative Tribunal for a three-year term of office beginning on 1 January 2000.

Under the recommendation of the Fifth Committee contained in paragraph 5 of its report on sub-item (f) of agenda item 17, the Assembly appointed Amjad Hussain Sial (Pakistan) as member of the United Nations Staff Pension Committee for a term of office beginning on 15 November 1999 and ending on 31 December 2000.

Action on IAEA Report

The representative of France said a group of States had been concerned over paragraph 9 of the draft resolution, but had since been given a new text which they now accepted. The text was as follows:

“Also commends the Director-General of the Agency and his staff for their strenuous efforts to implement Security Council resolutions 687,707 715,1051, 1060, 1115, 1194 and 1205, stresses the need for full implementation by Iraq of all relevant Security Council resolutions, stresses that the Agency’s OMV activities should be resumed without delay, and also stresses that it is essential that, although the Agency is satisfied that remaining questions which were unanswered as of mid-December 1998 do not prevent full implementation of the OMV plan, the basis for this resumption preserves the Agency’s rights specified in its OMV plan, including the full exercise of rights of access as enshrined therein and the necessary cooperation of Iraq, and that greater transparency by Iraq in its dealings with the IAEA would contribute greatly to the resolution of the few remaining questions and concerns in the framework of the OMV plan.”

ROKAN HAMA AL-ANBUGE (Iraq) said that while his delegation commended the work of the IAEA, the draft resolution before the Assembly lacked objectivity and reflected a political point of view which prejudiced the Agency’s independence. He was opposed to paragraph 9 of the draft resolution which called on Iraq to implement all the Security Council resolutions listed in the draft resolution.

He said this invitation for full implementation of those resolutions should also have been extended to the United Kingdom and the United States as they had both violated those resolutions, as well as the United Nations Charter, in exercising acts of aggression against Iraq. They had both launched a military aggression against Iraq without permission from the Security Council on December 16, 1998. This had effectively put an end to the monitoring in Iraq by the Agency.

Through UNSCOM, he continued, the United Kingdom and the United States spied on Iraq and created a political crisis. This had dealt a heavy blow against the United Nations Verification system and this flagrant breach had passed without punishment practices. He called on all States to take measures to guard their territorial integrity as well as their sovereignty against “spies who wore United Nations helmets”.

He said the co-sponsors of the draft resolution had ignored paragraph 14 of resolution 682, which had recognized that Iraq had honoured the resolutions. There was a need for a universality of the safeguards system. Iraq therefore opposed operative paragraph 9 for the reasons already stated.

KIM CHANG GUK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) said it was regrettable that the same draft resolution had been offered this year that, in the past, had hindered, rather than helped settlement of the nuclear issue of the Korean peninsula. That issue was not a question to be debated in the Assembly. It was an issue created by the United States, who brought nuclear weapons into south Korea and threatened the north with them, while fabricating "nuclear suspicion" aimed at isolating and stifling the north.

The nuclear issue of the Korean peninsula was a political and military one to be resolved between the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the United States, he said. The adoption of an Agreed Framework in 1994 between the two countries, spoke eloquently of that fact. The nuclear issue on the peninsula would be finally settled when that Framework was completely implemented.

He said that while his country was faithfully implementing its obligations under that Framework, the United States was not. That country's intention had been demonstrated when the Framework was signed. As one could see in the case of the "secret underground nuclear facility", the United States was fabricating all sorts of crises, attempting to shift the responsibility for non-compliance with the Framework onto the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. That confirmed, once again, that the United States wanted to isolate and stifle the Democratic People's Republic.

He said implementation of the Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA was inseparably related to implementation of the Agreed Framework, which clearly stipulated the obligations of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with regard to the former. "Our full compliance with the Safeguards Agreement entirely depends on whether or not the United States fulfils its obligations under the Agreed Framework", he added.

He said it was therefore contrary to reason for the co-sponsors of the text to demand that his country fully comply with the Safeguards Agreement when the Agreed Framework had not been implemented. The draft would not help the settlement of the Korean peninsula's nuclear issue, but serve the dishonest purpose of putting pressure on his country, while contributing to the non- fulfillment of the Framework. He would, therefore, vote against the draft resolution.

VIJAY TIWATHIA (India) said his country had difficulties with the third preambular paragraph. The statute must be the guide, and among other requirements the statute stressed the sovereignty of all its members, albeit with safeguards. The paragraph predicted and its concept predated the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). The resolution departed from the concepts enshrined in the IAEA and its objectives were being distorted by both the NPT and the Agency. India would vote against the resolution since it did not agree with that paragraph

LEE KIE-CHEON (Republic of Korea) said he had explained his position during the First Committee and in the plenary and, therefore, he was not going to repeat it. He hoped that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would comply with its obligations to the Agency.

The Vice-President, CLAUDE STRANISLAS BOUAH-KAMON (Côte d’Ivoire), informed the Assembly that the following countries became co-sponsors of draft resolution A/54/L.21/Rev.1: Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Costa Rica, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, France, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom.

The Assembly first took a recorded vote on the third preambular paragraph of the draft, which was requested by the representative of India. The Assembly adopted that paragraph by a recorded vote of 112 in favour, to 2 against (India, Israel), and 7 abstentions (Benin, Bhutan, Cuba, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Pakistan, Togo, United Republic of Tanzania).

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution on the Internatonal Atomic Energy Agency (document A/54/L.21/Rev. 1), as orally amended by the representative of France, by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) and 6 abstentions (Benin, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Syria, United Republic of Tanzania and Viet Nam).

AHMAD AL HARIRI (Syria) said that although his country appreciated the efforts of the International Atomic Energy Agency, it was dissatisfied with areas of its report in terms of the implementation of nuclear safety standards.

He said the draft resolution before the General Assembly had not referred to Israel by name as the only country which had refused to sign the NPT, even though that country had continued to develop its nuclear technology despite the threat that this posed, not only for its neighbours but for other States as well. Syria was disappointed with the way the Agency had acted in dealing with Israel. It should strive to avoid double standards by mentioning one country by name but not another. He said his country looked forward to the Middle East becoming a nuclear–free and peaceful region.

DAUSA CESPEDES (Cuba) said although his country had voted in favour of the resolution, his delegation regretted the inclusion of controversial issues in the text of the draft resolution. A draft should embody elements all could agree on. The IAEA was not the only organization involved in controversial issues but it was the only which felt the need to include these in its report, he continued. Cuba therefore wished to place on record that had paragraphs 8 and 9 of the draft resolution been voted on separately, he would have abstained, and he would also have abstained on the third preambular paragraph.

Although Cuba was a signatory to many international agreements, it had refrained from signing the NPT because it was discriminatory in essence.

NAOR GILON (Israel) said his country was grateful to the IAEA for the work it had done with regard to the third preambular paragraph on the use of nuclear technology for peaceful means. This must still be done by all States, whether or not they had signed the NPT.

HOUSSAM ASAAD DIAB (Lebanon) said he feared the draft resolution could be misunderstood by Israel. He wished to have his comments placed on record.

WANG LEI (China) said his country had voted in favour of the draft resolution because it appreciated the role and efforts of the IAEA. It had assessed the Agency’s work positively and supported its various activities with regard to nuclear technology.

He said that China also supported the efforts to make the Korean peninsula a region free of nuclear weapons and one that enjoyed peace and stability, but was against using pressure in order to achieve this.

FARID RAUF OGLU SHAFIYEV (Azerbaijan) said his delegation would like to place on record that, had they participated in the vote, they would have voted in favour.

Right of Reply

CHOE MYONG NAM (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) said the Republic of Korea did not have the right to intervene or comment in the matter that involved the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the United States.

(annexes follow)

ANNEX I

Vote on Report of International Atomic Energy Agency

The General Assembly adopted the draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (document A/54/L.21/Rev.1) by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 1 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:

In favour: Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia.

Against: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Abstain: Benin, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Syria, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua-Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Croatia, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Eritrea, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Gambia, Grenada, Haiti, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Latvia, Lesotho, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX I)

ANNEX II

Vote on Preambular Paragraph of IAEA Text.

The General Assembly adopted preambular paragraph 3 of the draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (document A/54/L.21/Rev.1) by a recorded vote of 112 in favour to 2 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:

In favour: Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Senegal, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela, Yemen.

Against: India, Israel.

Abstain: Benin, Bhutan, Cuba, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Pakistan, Togo, United Republic of Tanzania.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Croatia, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Eritrea, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Grenada, Haiti, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Latvia, Lesotho, Malawi, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

* *** *

For information media. Not an official record.