SECURITY COUNCIL AUTHORIZES ADDITIONAL POLICE MONITORS FOR TRAINING OF LOCAL POLICE IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

21 May 1998
SC/6519

SECURITY COUNCIL AUTHORIZES ADDITIONAL POLICE MONITORS FOR TRAINING OF LOCAL POLICE IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

21 May 1998

Press ReleaseSC/6519

SECURITY COUNCIL AUTHORIZES ADDITIONAL POLICE MONITORS FOR TRAINING OF LOCAL POLICE IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

19980521 By Resolution 1168 (1998), Adopted Unanimously, Council Agrees to Consider UNMIBH-led Court Monitoring Programme

The Security Council this afternoon authorized the deployment of an additional 30 monitors of the International Police Task Force (IPTF) in Bosnia and Herzegovina to carry out new intensive training programmes for the local police in a number of specialized fields. Today's action brings to 2,057 the total number of civilian police with the Force, which is part of the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Through its unanimous adoption of resolution 1168 (1998), the Council also agreed to consider expeditiously a United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH)-led court monitoring programme as part of an overall programme of legal reform and asked the Secretary-General to submit recommendations on the possibility of using locally hired personnel as far as is practical, as well as of voluntary funding. It also recognized that establishing an indigenous public security capability was essential to strengthening the rule of law in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

In a related report before the Council, the Secretary-General had stated that UNMIBH would require 26 additional Professional staff, at an estimated cost of $1.1 million for a period of three months, to fulfil its proposed role within the comprehensive legal reform programme being led by the Office of the High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement on Bosnia and Herzegovina.

By other terms of today's resolution, the Council expressed support for improvements in the overall management of the IPTF, stressed the importance of continued reforms, and strongly encouraged the Secretary-General to make further improvements to the Force, particularly with regard to personnel management issues. The Council also encouraged Member States to intensify efforts to provide training, equipment and related assistance for local police forces, on a voluntary basis and in coordination with the Task Force.

The IPTF was established on 21 December 1995 to monitor law enforcement activities and facilities, provide advice and training, and otherwise facilitate implementation of the civilian aspects of the 1995 General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The meeting, which was called to order at 1:18 p.m., was adjourned at 1:21 p.m.

Text of Resolution

The text of resolution 1168 (1998), which was sponsored by France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States, reads as follows:

"The Security Council,

"Recalling all its previous relevant resolutions concerning the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, including resolutions 1031 (1995) of 15 December 1995, 1035 (1995) of 21 December 1995, 1088 (1996) of 12 December 1996, 1103 (1997) of 31 March 1997, 1107 (1997) of 16 May 1997 and 1144 (1997) of 19 December 1997,

"Expressing its continued commitment to the political settlement of conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, preserving the sovereignty and territorial integrity of all States there within their internationally recognized borders,

"Recalling the conclusions of the Steering Board of the Peace Implementation Council held in Sintra on 30 May 1997 (S/1997/434, annex) and the Peace Implementation Conference held in Bonn on 9 and 10 December 1997 (S/1997/979, annex),

"Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 12 March 1998 (S/1998/227 and Add.1), and taking note of his observations and the planning outlined in paragraphs 37 to 46 of that report,

"Reaffirming its full support for the High Representative and his staff and his responsibility in implementing the civilian aspects of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Annexes thereto (collectively the Peace Agreement, S/1995/999, annex),

"Commending the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH), including the International Police Task Force (IPTF), and recalling the recommendations of the Bonn Peace Implementation Conference relating to UNMIBH, including the IPTF,

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"Expressing its appreciation to the personnel of UNMIBH, including the IPTF, and to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the IPTF Commissioner,

"Emphasizing the increasing importance of specialized training for local police in Bosnia and Herzegovina, especially in the areas of critical incident management, corruption, organized crime and drug control, as outlined in the report of the Secretary-General,

"Acknowledging that success in the area of police reform in Bosnia and Herzegovina is closely linked to complementary judicial reform, and taking note of the report of the High Representative of 9 April 1998 (S/1998/314), which emphasizes that judicial reform is a priority for further progress,

"1. Decides to authorize an increase in the strength of the IPTF by 30 posts, to a total authorized strength of 2,057;

"2. Supports the improvements in the overall management of the IPTF undertaken by the Secretary-General, his Special Representatives, and the IPTF Commissioners and personnel in Bosnia and Herzegovina, stresses the importance of continued reforms in this area, and in this regard strongly encourages the Secretary-General to make further improvements to the IPTF, in particular with regard to personnel management issues;

"3. Encourages Member States to intensify their efforts to provide, on a voluntary funded basis and in coordination with the IPTF, training, equipment and related assistance for local police forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina;

"4. Recognizes that establishing an indigenous public security capability is essential to strengthening the rule of law in Bosnia and Herzegovina, agrees to consider expeditiously an UNMIBH-led court monitoring programme as part of an overall programme of legal reform as outlined by the Office of the High Representative, and requests the Secretary-General to submit recommendations on the possibility of utilizing locally hired personnel as far as is practical and of voluntary funding;

"5. Decides to remain seized of the matter."

Secretary-General's Report

In considering the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Council had before it a report of the Secretary-General on the activities of the UNMIBH (document S/1998/227 and Add.1). In it, he recommends that the Council approve the deployment of an additional 30 monitors of the International

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Police Task Force (IPTF) within UNMIBH, at an estimated cost of some $0.9 million for a period of three months.

The Secretary-General also proposes a programme of court monitoring by UNMIBH, as part of the comprehensive legal reform programme being led by the Office of the High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement on Bosnia and Herzegovina. To fulfil that task, UNMIBH would require 26 additional Professional staff with the relevant legal background. Costs associated with the programme are estimated at $1.1 million for a period of three months.

In addition, the 12 March report provides an overview of the wide range of activities of the United Nations system in Bosnia and Herzegovina since the Secretary-General's report of 10 December 1997. It also reviews steps taken to implement the recommendations of the meeting of the Peace Implementation Council, held at Bonn on 9 and 10 December 1997.

Addressing the proposal for additional police monitors, the Secretary- General notes that the Security Council had already endorsed the conclusions of the Peace Implementation Council, asking IPTF to carry out new intensive training programmes for the local police in a number of specialized fields. To design and deliver the training and advice needed to address security concerns which had been raised, UNMIBH plans to set up three specialized police training units under the management of the IPTF's Deputy Commissioner for Development. Staffing these specialized training units will require the recruitment of 43 carefully selected specialists as IPTF monitors.

A careful study of the current IPTF strength has shown that it might be possible to accommodate 13 of the 43 required specialists on available posts, replacing departing IPTF monitors, the report states. This requires an increase of 30 posts in the overall strength of IPTF, bringing the total authorized strength from 2,027 to 2,057. Should the Council decide to deploy additional police monitors, the Secretary-General would then seek the additional resources required from the General Assembly.

It is also envisaged that 21 IPTF officers from among the present monitors will supplement and support the formal training to assist the local police in tactical planning and exercises for dealing with crowds, natural disasters and other forms of critical incidents. The plan will ensure that there will be at least one IPTF monitor especially dedicated to the area of critical incident management in each canton of the Federation and each public security centre in the Republika Srpska. This intensive presence is a reflection of the assessment that the local police and IPTF will face major challenges in connection with refugee returns -- a main objective of the international community for the 1998.

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In an assessment of the further progress towards implementing the task of UNMIBH and IPTF, the Secretary-General notes that in the Federation, there are only two cantons out of 10 where the new police force has still not been inaugurated. Issues of a purely political nature are holding up police restructuring in the last two Croat-dominated cantons. Political obstacles to the implementation of election results, refugee return and political reform cannot be tolerated. It is also necessary to start a serious effort to include Serb officers in the Federation police.

In the Republika Srpska, the restructuring of the police is still at a very early stage, the report states. Such positive developments as the new Government's cooperative attitude and the transfer to a second phase of police reform are welcome. However, they have also increased the IPTF's workload, as recent commitments have had to be absorbed into existing work -- such as checkpoint monitoring, weapons inspections, human rights investigations, election security, and security for the return of displaced persons and refugees. Successes in dealing with long-standing problems and in initiating new patterns of police work reveal the continuing importance of IPTF monitoring, to ensure that gains are not lost.

Addressing the proposed programme of court monitoring by UNMIBH, the Secretary-General states that of the 26 additional Professional legal staff required, 21 would be assigned to UNMIBH regional offices. Five would work at Headquarters, analysing the reports of the court monitors and liaising with other organizations on the design and preparation of the associated training and restructuring programmes.

The activities by United Nations agencies in 1988 will give particular attention to refugee returns and measures to support them, the Secretary- General states. Projects to strengthen civil society, build local democracy and promote respect for human rights will be given special attention. Noting that all the agencies consider justice to be an important basis for stabilization, he cites the work of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the accounting for missing persons, and UNMIBH's work on legal reform as important components of the overall strategy of the United Nations system in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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For information media. Not an official record.