UNITED NATIONS POPULATION INFORMATION NETWORK (POPIN)
UN Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs,
with support from the UN Population Fund (UNFPA)

Report of the 2nd Meeting of the ICPD Inter-Agency Task Force

***********************************************************************

This document has been prepared by the Secretariat of the United Nations 

Inter-Agency Task Force on the Implementation of the ICPD Programme of 

Action.  For further information please contact the United Nations 

Population Fund, Task Force on ICPD Implementation, 220 East 42nd Street, 

New York, NY 10017 USA, or send E-mail to: pierce@unfpa.org

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     Report of the Second Meeting of the ICPD Inter-Agency 

                Task Force on the Implementation 

                 of the ICPD Programme of Action



                          25 July 1995

                       UNFPA Headquarters

                          New York, NY





1.   The Second Meeting of the ICPD Inter-Agency Task Force (IATF)

took place on 25 July 1995, at the United Nations Population Fund

(UNFPA) Headquarters in New York.  Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive

Director, UNFPA and Chairman of the Task Force presided over the

initial sessions and the closing segment of the meeting.  Mr. Jyoti

Shankar Singh, Deputy Executive Director (Technical Services),

UNFPA, who had served as Executive Coordinator of the ICPD,

presided over the rest of the meeting.



2.   The agenda and list of participants are attached to this

report.



Agenda Items I and II: Welcome and Adoption of the Agenda



3.   Dr. Nafis Sadik opened the Second Meeting of the ICPD Inter-

Agency Task Force by welcoming the participants.  She noted that

the work of the IATF had evoked positive comments from various

sources, including the recent session of the Economic and Social

Council (ECOSOC) and had generated "great expectations" concerning

the follow-up to the ICPD Programme of Action.  She added that the

Secretary-General was also aware of and appreciated the work of the

IATF.  The agenda was adopted as presented.  



4.   Dr. Sadik congratulated the members of the IATF on the

impressive body of work that had been produced since the first IATF

meeting on 13 December 1994, and commended the Task Force for the

speed with which this had been accomplished.  While the guidelines

from each group varied, all were user-friendly and instructive. 

She noted that the format of the Guidelines on Reproductive Health

clearly illustrated how the Resident Coordinator System could help

to operationalize programmes in the field.  She also suggested that

the reproductive health dimension be included in the Guidelines on

Tracking Child and Maternal Mortality. 



5.   Dr. Sadik reiterated that the main purpose of the guidelines

was to provide advice to the field and, in particular, to the

Resident Coordinator to guide the operationalization of the

Programme of Action and the follow-up to other UN conferences in

the social sector.  These were not meant as technical sectoral

guidelines.  She observed that the Resident Coordinator should not

be expected to be an expert in the technical areas covered by the

guidelines, however, the five sets of guidelines should provide the

Resident Coordinator with guidance and a sound basis for:

developing dialogue with the Government; assisting the Government

in working in a particular sectoral area; and developing networks

and partnerships that include non-governmental organizations (NGOs)

and other groups.  Dr. Sadik added that bilateral agencies were

also keenly interested in sharing the guidelines and in being part

of the process in ways that would facilitate their own work at the

country-level.  She emphasized that each set of guidelines should

be accompanied by a short bibliography listing key documents and

relevant audio-visual materials.  Additionally, the Resident

Coordinator should be provided with a list of experts who could be

drawn on as needed.  Dr. Sadik urged all the lead-agencies to

collect these materials so that they could be sent to the field.



6.   Dr. Sadik emphasized the need for improving data collection

and analysis at the country level.  She noted that data systems

should help monitor the progress in achieving ICPD goals, as well

as, the impact of programmes and should guide the formulation of

future programmes.



7.   Dr. Sadik stated that the Administrative Committee on

Coordination (ACC) had recognized the ICPD IATF with UNFPA as the

lead-agency.  The work of the IATF would be reported on to the ACC.



Also under consideration by ECOSOC was a proposal for the

Secretary-General to report on the work of the IATF.  Dr. Sadik

invited the participants to discuss, during the course of the

meeting, the appropriate format and time-table for the report.  Dr.

Sadik noted that with regard to the IATF report to the Commission

on Population and Development we would need to discuss and define

its focus and content.  She added that the theme of the 1996 report

was reproductive health. 



8.   Noting that she had received requests from several NGOs and

inter-governmental organizations to participate in the IATF, Dr.

Sadik observed that it would be very useful to have this parti-

cipation at the country-level.  However, the IATF itself should not

be expanded to a point where it becomes unwieldy.



9.   With regard to the future of the IATF and the Working Groups,

Dr. Sadik noted that the Working Groups had been established for

the specific purpose of producing the guidelines and once this had

been accomplished they would not continue.  If necessary, ad-hoc

meetings could be convened.  Dr. Sadik added that it was important

to keep alive the momentum, interest and attention that had been

generated by the IATF.  At the same time, it was necessary to

ensure ways and means for receiving and acting on views and

comments received on the guidelines and the work of the IATF in

general.



10.  Dr. Sadik concluded by once again commending the work achieved

by the IATF.  She expressed the hope that the discussions would be

constructive and fruitful and that the Task Force would be able to

finalize the guidelines.  She thanked the member agencies for their

participation and invited questions and comments.



11.  During the ensuing discussion the representative of the

International Monetary Fund (IMF) inquired about the relationship

of the IATF to the Consultative Committee on Programme and

Operational Questions (CCPOQ).  Dr. Sadik noted that she had agreed

to provide a report on the IATF to the next meeting of the CCPOQ

for its consideration, however, in the meantime the work of the

IATF should continue and not be delayed in any way.  The CCPOQ had

agreed to this.  Dr. Sadik added that since most of the IATF

members also belonged to the CCPOQ they should advise their repre-

sentatives of this.      



12.  The representative of the Economic Commission for Europe

(ECE), on behalf of the five regional economic commissions of the

UN, noted that it would be useful to include the linkages between

the regional framework and country programming.



13.  The meeting then turned to the next agenda item, a review of

the activities of the five IATF Working Groups.





Agenda Item III: Review of the Working Group Reports and Guidelines



Working Group on Women's Empowerment (Lead agency: UNIFEM)



14.  Ms. Noeleen Heyzer, Director of the United Nations Development

Fund for Women (UNIFEM), gave a short introduction on the work of

the Working Group on Women's Empowerment which had met on 16 May

1995.  She noted that ICPD was seen by many women as a key

conference on women's empowerment. She defined women's empowerment

as consisting of five components, namely, women's sense of self-

worth; the right to have choices; the right to have access to

opportunities and resources; the right to have the power to control

their own lives; and the ability to influence the direction of

social change.



15.  The draft Guidelines on Women's Empowerment for the Resident

Coordinator System contained strategies to address and opera-

tionalize this concept.  Ms. Heyzer stressed the importance of the

guidelines in providing legitimacy at the country level to the need

for empowering women. The guidelines also underscored the need for

multi-donor coordination and the desirability to bring civil

society and governments together in addressing this issue. Most

importantly, the guidelines were aimed at facilitating the creation

of gender-sensitive development policies by encouraging the

Resident Coordinators to play a key role in coordinating multi-

disciplinary national-level data-gathering. Ms. Heyzer also

explained that the guidelines placed much attention to the need for

training in gender analysis and gender-sensitive development

planning.



16.  The issue of reproductive health was also addressed in the

Guidelines on Women's Empowerment. The guidelines stress that the

Resident Coordinators' intervention in this area should be guided

by adhering to several key principles: a woman's right and social

responsibility to decide whether, when and how many children to

have; reproductive health issues should be considered an integral

part of everyday life; women have the right to autonomy and

reproductive choice and reproductive rights; and women have the

right to make their own fertility regulating decisions.  The goal

of an empowered reproductive health programme should be to increase

womenžs control over their bodies, their sexuality and ultimately

their lives. The guidelines further addressed the issues of culture

and tradition, violence against women, the role of the Convention

on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) as a

legal framework for action at the country level, the importance of

women NGOs and the need for strengthening their capacity.



17.  Thanking Ms. Heyzer for her presentation, the Chairman opened

the discussion by suggesting to include in these guidelines the

need to identify knowledge and research gaps and to set up a

research agenda in this field at regional and global levels. She

further suggested to avoid instructing Resident Coordinators as to

what they should do. It is up to the United Nations system, not the

guidelines, to instruct the Resident Coordinator on what he/she

should do. It was further pointed out that an annex to the

guidelines, summarizing the activities of different organizations

in this area, should be added.



18.  The representative of the ECE suggested that the Resident

Coordinators include all organizations active at the country level

in this field in the process of coordination, such as the

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and

the European Union (EU). The Resident Coordinators should further

make use of the regional frameworks for follow-up activities to

ICPD. Gender issues should also be an integral part of the Country

Strategy Notes (CSNs). The Chairman noted that the guidelines will

be accompanied by an introductory note on how to use the guide-

lines, including the involvement of non-UN organizations. This note

would draw the attention of the Resident Coordinators to involving

regional organizations.



19.  The representative of the United Nations Department for Policy

Coordination and Sustainable Development (DPCSD) informed the

participants of the comments she received from the Division for the

Advancement of Women. These comments would be submitted to UNIFEM.

She noted that the guidelines should place more emphasis on the

need to create economic opportunities for women, as well as the

role of men in womenžs empowerment. The Resident Coordinators

should also be encouraged to communicate the issue of womenžs

empowerment in their contacts with government officials and

representatives of UN agencies and organizations.



20.  The representative of the International Labour Organisation

(ILO) emphasized creating economic opportunities for women in terms

of income generation. He further commented on the need for lifelong

training, in addition to lifelong education, to be included in the

paragraph on education. He also promised to submit some factual

comments on the report of the Working Group to the secretariat of

the IATF. One of the representatives of the United Nations

Development Programme (UNDP) shared the view that gender training

was important and that gender issues needed to be included in the

CSNs.



21.  The representative of the World Health Organization (WHO)

welcomed the emphasis in the guidelines on gender training. She

felt that the guidelines should not target women exclusively but

should also emphasize the importance of an enabling environment for

empowering women and focus on the roles and responsibilities of

men, particularly young men. The World Bank representative

suggested that some clarification be included in the guidelines on

how to make effective use of the comparative advantages of the

different United Nations agencies and organizations.  The repre-

sentative of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and

Cultural Organization (UNESCO) stated that the introductory note to

the guidelines should include reference to the role of culture and

tradition.



22.  The Chairman concluded the discussions on the Guidelines on

Women's Empowerment by reiterating the decisions made on the

follow-up procedure, namely that the set of guidelines would be

accompanied by a general introductory note which would explain

their purpose and underscore common dimensions.  



Working Group on a Common Data System (Lead agency: UNICEF)



23.  Ms. Tessa Wardlaw, Project Officer, Statistics and Monitoring,

Planning Office, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF),  gave a

brief introduction on the work of the Working Group on a Common

Approach to National Capacity Building in Tracking Child and

Maternal Mortality. She explained that the Working Group parti-

cipants had decided to focus on developing a common approach to

tracking child and maternal mortality. The larger task of deve-

loping a common data system would be taken up by the ACC Sub-

committee on Statistics.



24.  The guidelines were divided into two parts: child mortality

and maternal mortality. She explained that the focus on child

mortality was chosen because of the huge numbers (12 million or

more deaths of children under five years of age) and the fact that

under-five mortality measures are a key indicator for human deve-

lopment and well-being. To track child mortality, the guidelines

proposed a three-step approach: (1) determine what country level

child mortality data are available; (2) determine a reasonable set

of child mortality estimates over time; (3) fill data gaps.



25.  Maternal mortality, on the other hand, was a rare event. Also,

maternal deaths were often not reported, or when they were, they

were not correctly classified as maternal deaths. As a result, most

maternal mortality measurements were under-estimates.  Also, the

progress in achieving the ICPD goals needed to be measured against

the 1990 baseline data, but in many countries there was no baseline

data on maternal mortality.  The guidelines draw attention to

measurement problems, so that Resident Coordinators are aware of

the limited value of the existing data.  Ms. Wardlaw pointed out

that an important alternative to measure maternal mortality with

conventional methods was to monitor the processes which lead to

reductions in maternal mortality, such as access to emergency

obstetric care.  UNICEF and WHO had developed process indicators,

but more field testing was required.



26.  The Chairman thanked Ms. Wardlaw for her presentation and

opened the floor for discussion.



27.  The Director of the United Nations Statistical Division began

the discussion by reminding the participants that with regard to

the development of a common data system, the ACC Subcommittee on

Statistics could play a coordinating role.  Further he offered that

DESIPA would prepare a proposal that would elaborate common

approaches to data collection and presentation including, for

example, development of more explicit guidelines to countries not

only for monitoring mortality but social goal indicators more

generally such as those to be developed on reproductive health.  In

the meantime, the guidelines on a Common Approach to National

Capacity Building in Tracking Child and Maternal Mortality should

be issued.



28.  The representative of the World Bank expressed the Bank's

support for a common approach.  He noted that the Bank had decided

to discontinue its own population projections as of the beginning

of this year and to use the data of the Population Division.  With

regard to the guidelines, he suggested that the guidelines should

stress the need for the timely collection and analysis of data and

the explicit identification of their sources.  The representative

of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

complimented UNICEF for the excellent guidelines.  He stated,

however, that the guidelines were too focussed on monitoring and

less so on the importance of data collection for policy purposes.

The UNICEF representative replied that it was definitely the

intention to emphasize the link between data and policy-making.



29.  The WHO representative reminded the participants of Dr.

Sadik's statement on the need to set in motion a system to get the

information the UN agencies and organizations need for policy and

programming.  She also suggested that this Working Group continue

working on the development of alternative indicators and methodo-

logies, including those on reproductive health.  The Chairman then

concluded that the participants were in favour of setting up a

smaller working group with representatives of UNICEF, UNFPA, the UN

Statistical Division, WHO, and other interested organizations.  The

UN Statistical Division would take the lead and submit a proposal

on how to proceed.



30.  All participants agreed that in the meantime the current

guidelines should be finalized and sent to the Resident Coor-

dinators, while further work is being carried out on a common

approach to data collection and analysis.  The representative of

the ECE expressed the hope that problems in measurement would not

lead to discontinuation of ongoing activities in data collection,

particularly at the regional level.  The guidelines should

encourage Resident Coordinators to continue current work in this

area.



Working Group on Basic Education (Lead agency: UNESCO)



31.  The Chairman invited Mr. Gustavo Lopez Ospina, the

representative of UNESCO, to present the Guidelines on Basic

Education.  UNESCO served as the lead-agency for the Working Group

on Basic Education.



32.  Mr. Lopez Ospina noted that in formulating the Guidelines on

Basic Education one key contextual element for the Working Group

was the World Conference on Education for All (Jomtien, Thailand,

1990).  The Working Group had emphasized the need to incorporate

open learning outside the school setting.  It underscored that

opportunities for learning must be offered to those who had never

been to school as well as a second chance to those who had dropped

out.  Such an approach would have a special impact on women who

constituted 60 per cent of the world's illiterates.  The guidelines

highlight the fundamental elements of Basic Education; present

strategies for programme implementation; suggest the types of

resources available; indicate sources of technical assistance;

emphasize the use of data; and suggest how momentum may be

generated and institutions mobilized.  The guidelines also

emphasize the need for good data, an effective strategy and timely

action.  The Working Group had stressed that the guidelines for

Resident Coordinators be clear, concise and available in the

appropriate language. 



33.  The UNESCO representative added that the guidelines currently

provided a brief background on Basic Education and outlined a

strategy for coordination.  The guidelines also underscored that

under the leadership of the Resident Coordinator, the inter-agency

group could serve as a strong catalyst for change at the country

level.  In addition, they noted the need to eliminate gender

disparities in education; and to encourage partnerships amongst

Government, NGOs, UN agencies and civil society in an effort to

make "education for all the business of all".



34.  During the discussion that ensued, the UNIFEM representative

noted that paragraphs 3 and 4 of the Guidelines on Basic Education

were very useful and had been incorporated into the Guidelines on

Women's Empowerment.  She suggested that the paragraphs could be

incorporated in the other sets of guidelines as well.



35.  UNDP and UNICEF representatives observed that the guidelines

needed to have a greater focus on gender disparities in basic

education and the need to eliminate those disparities since the

elimination of gender disparities was a key objective.  Several

other participants concurred with this view.  One participant

suggested that the gender dimension should be added to the

principal sections of the guidelines.  



36.  The Chairman noted that the goal set by ICPD takes the

"Education for All" concept further and emphasizes the need to

dispel gender disparities.  He added that the Guidelines on Basic

Education would be amended as suggested and that the two annexes

under preparation would shortly be completed.



37.  The representative of the IATF Secretariat informed the

meeting that the Guidelines on Basic Education had been sent for

review to Resident Coordinators in ten countries and replies had

been received from three Resident Coordinators (Ghana, Morocco and

Sudan).  These Resident Coordinators noted that the guidelines

served a very useful purpose in providing insights into key issues;

one expressed the need for more details on how to proceed on

specific issues.  The Chairman then invited the representative of

WHO to introduce the Guidelines on Reproductive Health.  



Working Group on Reproductive Health (Lead agency: WHO)



38.  Ms. Carla AbouZahr, the WHO representative, noted that the

Working Group on Reproductive Health held its meeting on 29 June

1995 at WHO Headquarters in Geneva.  She observed that the

Guidelines on Reproductive Health were developed on the basis of

the Working Group discussion with a thematic focus on "what is new"

and "what is different" with regard to the concept of reproductive

health.  The WHO representative stated that the guidelines were

divided into two parts: (1) Key Facts about Reproductive Health;

and (2) Key Actions for the Resident Coordinator System to Improve

Reproductive Health.  Noting that reproductive health is a crucial

part of general health and impacts all stages of life, the WHO

representative underscored that reproductive health does not start

out from a list of diseases, problems or programmes.  The aim of

interventions is reproductive health and rights rather than

population policies and fertility control.  She highlighted the

involvement of people (including women, adolescents and other

marginalized groups such as refugees and migrants) as being a key

element in defining reproductive health concerns and responses and

stated that this marked a new approach.



39.  The guidelines point out that each country must define its own

reproductive health programme in light of its own needs and

priorities in this area.  The reproductive health programme should

be the product of and should derive from a local "bottom-up"

process.  Reproductive health priorities need to be defined through

a participatory process at the national level.  She stressed the

need to clarify that reproductive health is not just a bio-medical

issue but is determined by a whole series of structures and

relationships -- social, economic, legal, civil and sexual.

Clearly, women bear the greatest burden of reproductive ill-health.

Also, young people of both sexes are particularly vulnerable to

reproductive health problems because of a lack of information and

access to services.  The WHO representative noted that the

reproductive health concept had major human resource implications.

Also, there is a clear need to define and develop better indicators

for monitoring and evaluation, particularly of quality concerns. It

should also be emphasized that data collection is a means to an end

and not and end in itself.  She concluded by mentioning the key

actions for the Resident Coordinator System that were outlined in

Part II of the guidelines.



40.  During the discussion that followed, the representative of the

World Bank complimented WHO on its leadership role in producing

clear guidelines in a timely fashion.  He suggested the following

revisions: (1) delete the word "must" from the sub-heading of item

5; and (2) rephrase the second sentence in the first paragraph

under item 8,  so as to avoid any negative connotation in the use

of the word "experts".  The representative added that item 10,

Monitoring and Evaluation is very important and needs to be

developed further.  He emphasized the need to develop surveillance

systems that utilize performance-based/operational measures and

move away from population-based measures.



41.  Mr. Eduardo Gutierrez, Director, Office of UN System Support

Services, UNDP, stated that he was very pleased to note the kind of

discussion that was taking place as well as the nature and scope of

the guidelines that had been developed.  The clear focus on speci-

fics is ultimately what is most useful to the Resident Coordinators

and their teams.  He added that it would be helpful to include the

following information in the guidelines: (1) Availability of

Resources -- the UNDP/UNFPA Executive Board at its recent session

had approved the use of 1.7 per cent of overall resources

(approximately US $18 million per year) by the Resident Coordinator

System; (2) Regional dimension -- in an effort to integrate the

follow-up to various UN conferences, several proposals were under

consideration.  A major debate on development was scheduled to take

place in the near future and the main actors had indicated a clear

willingness for synthesizing and integrating the outcomes of

various UN conferences. It was also important to bear in mind

Chapter III of the Agenda for Development, as well as, the upcoming

triennial review of operational activities.  Clearly, all this

would have implications for the Resident Coordinator System and the

guidelines should signal that changes would take place as a result

of the effort to integrate the follow-up process; and (3) Training

-- it is essential to think of ways and means to include the

guidelines in the training offered to Resident

Coordinators. The UNDP representative concluded by noting that it

would also be useful to select a few Resident Coordinators and have

them review and provide feedback on the guidelines. He observed

that perhaps this could be done in Beijing at the time of the

Women's Conference.



42.  The Chairman thanked Mr. Gutierrez for the useful information

he had provided and noted that some of it could be incorporated in

the introductory note to the guidelines.



43.  The other UNDP representative noted that it would be useful to

indicate in the guidelines that the reproductive health concept was

new and would evolve and be further elaborated over time.  She

added that the Working Group should orchestrate an information

exchange amongst countries on how the ICPD Programme of Action was

being operationalized.  She also stressed the need to further

develop Part II of the guidelines and, in this context, underlined

the need for greater emphasis on national capacity building.



44.  The representative of FAO observed that item 9 "human re-

sources for reproductive health" should be developed further.  In

particular, training needs should be outlined.  Also, the issue of

training should be included under the item on Monitoring and Eva-

luation.



45.  The representative of the ECE commended the format of the

Guidelines on Reproductive Health and suggested that the same

format be followed in the other sets of guidelines.  She added that

the need for regional coordination could be highlighted in part II,

section 6 of the guidelines.  The ECE representative agreed with

the suggestions made by the UNDP representative and noted that

perhaps the guidelines should underscore the need for Resident

Coordinators to seek co-financing and cost-sharing for programme

operationalization.  She observed that this may be especially

necessary in countries where Governments may not be keen to promote

reproductive health.



46.  The WHO representative expressed her appreciation for the

comments made and noted that they would help to strengthen the

guidelines.  She welcomed further comments and noted that WHO would

need about three weeks to finalize the Guidelines on Reproductive

Health.



47.  The Chairman agreed that this schedule was appropriate and

noted that the annexes to the guidelines should also be completed

in the same time-period.  IATF members were asked to submit their

comments to WHO within two weeks.  The Chairman then closed the

discussion on the Guidelines on Reproductive Health.





Agenda Item IV: Review of the Common Advocacy Statement on Social

Issues



Working Group on Policy-Related Issues (Lead agency: UNFPA)



48.  Mr. Michael Vlassoff, Senior Technical Officer, Technical and

Evaluation Division, UNFPA, introduced the work of the Working

Group on Policy-Related Issues.  He explained that the Working

Group had decided to address the "common advocacy" concern by

drawing up a Statement of Commitment that would then be issued by

all agencies and organizations involved in the IATF.  The aim of

such a statement would be to ensure that all UN agencies and

organizations use the same language regarding population and

development issues.  The "Statement of Commitment on Population and

Development by the United Nations System", drafted by the Working

Group, is divided into three sections: a general introduction

stressing the commitment by the UN agencies and organizations to

implement ICPD; a section on the linkages between population issues

and other development issues; and a concluding section calling for

global partnership in addressing these interrelated issues.



49.  During the discussion that followed, different points of views

were expressed as to the "Statement of Commitment".  One of the

representatives of UNDP noted that the Programme of Action was in

fact a statement of commitment.  The Chairman stated that the idea

behind such a Statement was to ensure that in the follow-up to ICPD

all the UN agencies and organizations would say the same thing.

This Statement just reiterates what is in the Programme of Actions

of the ICPD and the World Summit for Social Development (WSSD); it

is not an operational tool describing the actions to be carried by

various organizations.



50.  The UNICEF representative offered some suggestions which she

felt would further strengthen the Statement.  She thought that the

Statement did not give adequate attention to the central issues of

the ICPD Programme of Action, such as education, health, including

reproductive health, and womenžs empowerment.  If the purpose of

this Statement is to link the ICPD with the WSSD, then this should

be made clear in the introduction.  The Statement should be made

more operational, not in the sense of guidelines, but in committing

the UN system to implement ICPD.  She also suggested changing the

order of topics in section II, to read: education; health; womenžs

empowerment; environment; food security; employment and sustainable

livelihoods; and poverty eradication.  Subsequent speakers,

however, felt that the existing sequence could be retained.



51.  The UNICEF representative also suggested some changes in the

opening sentence, to read as follows: "The organizations and

agencies of the United Nations System fully commit themselves to

the implementation of the Programme of Action of the International

Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), in accordance with

their respective mandates, building upon international agreements

related to population and development".  In order to resolve the

difficulties the representative of UNICEF had with the reference to

paragraph 8.25 in the last paragraph on page 6 of the Statement,

the Chairman suggested that the complete text of paragraph 8.25 of

the ICPD Programme of Action be included in the Statement.



52.  One of the representatives of the United Nations Department of

Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis (DESIPA) felt

that the tone of the Statement was too pessimistic.  He also

suggested to add the word "programme" after "policies" in paragraph

14, line 5.  Another representative of DESIPA noted that the issue

of data gathering should be extended to all issues in the Statement

and not just in the section on poverty eradication.  The repre-

sentative of the IMF stated that her organization would like to be

associated with the Statement.  The IMF would submit some comments

on the text. It  was currently looking into ways to integrate the

issues included in the Statement in its own policies.



53.  The representative of WHO, like UNICEF, felt that the

Statement did not adequately reflect the main issues of the ICPD.

Also, she would like to see included in the section on health

reference to paragraph 7.3 of Programme of Action on reproductive

rights and in the goals section mentioning of paragraph 8.5 of

Programme of Action, containing the goals in the field of life

expectancy.  She further suggested some editorial changes, i.e., to

add the "quality" before "care" in paragraph 18, line 7, and the

word "primary" before "health-care" in paragraph 18, last line.



54.  The ECE representative cautioned the participants to be

careful with the use of the word "commitment".  She suggested to

change the title to "Statement of Immediate Follow-up".  She also

questioned why there was nothing on migration in the Statement.



55.  The participants felt that a common statement was useful as an

advocacy tool.  The Chairman suggested that UNFPA redraft the

Statement, taking into account the comments received.  The final

text could eventually be submitted to the CCPOQ and then ACC for

final consideration, although such a statement could stand on its

own.  The issue of reordering would be decided later, based on the

comments received.  It was agreed that the tone should be more

positive and that, where necessary, the commitments should be made

more specific.



Agenda Item V: Future Work of the Inter-Agency Task Force



56.  It was agreed that four of the working groups had completed

their work, but could be convened on an ad-hoc basis, if deemed

necessary. The IATF participants decided that the tasks dealt with

by the Working Group on a Common Approach to National Capacity

Building in Tracking Child and Maternal Mortality would be

addressed further by a smaller group consisting of UNICEF, UNFPA,

DESIPA, WHO and other interested organizations.  DESIPA would

submit a proposal for future work aimed at inter alia elaborating

and refining the current guidelines and perhaps extending them to

social indicators more broadly.



57.  At the suggestion of Dr. Sadik, who chaired the closing

session, it was agreed that the Working Group on Reproductive

Health would continue its work, since reproductive rights and

reproductive health were new and evolving issues. This Working

Group would deal, inter alia, with the development of performance

indicators in reproductive health. The Working Group would,

however, not meet for some time, given the range of meetings on

this topic already planned for in the near future. The

organizations will keep WHO informed of developments in this area

and vice versa.



58.  In response to the views expressed by the Commission on

Population and Development, at its 28th session, the Inter-Agency

Task Force decided to establish a Working Group on international

migration. Such a working group would deal, in the first instance,

with chapter X "International Migration" of the Programme of

Action. The working group would explore the implications for inter-

agency collaboration in this area. The ILO, together with the

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the

International Organization for Migration (IOM), and with the

support of the regional economic commissions and DESIPA, would

organize this working group.  It was suggested that ILO serve as

the lead agency for this working group.  The ILO representative

indicated that he would consult with headquarters and revert to the

IATF Secretariat on this matter.





Agenda Item VI: Other Matters:  Action Items



59.  A schedule for finalizing the guidelines was drawn up: by 11

August, each of the organizations present would send their comments

on the guidelines to the lead agency; by 18 August the lead agency

would send the completed guidelines to the IATF Secretariat.  These

would be compiled and sent out to the Resident Coordinators with an

introductory note which would address the purpose and common dimen-

sions of all the guidelines.



60.  The meeting was reminded that each set of guidelines should

include a short bibliography of the key publications in the area

and citations of relevant audio-visual materials.  Each agency

should also submit a brief profile of its activities in the

respective fields of women, reproductive health and common data

systems.  It was noted that most organizations had already

submitted a brief profile of their activities in the area of basic

education. 



61.  With regard to the reporting on the IATF to the 29th session

of the Commission of Population and Development (26 February - 1

March 1996), it was decided that the IATF Secretariat would draft

an outline for the approval by the organizations involved in the

IATF on their input for the report.  This outline would be sent to

the agencies and organizations by early September.



62.  It was agreed to have the third meeting of the IATF prior to

the 29th session of the Commission on Population and Development,

i.e., end of February 1996.  With regard to the shipment of

materials to the Resident Coordinators, the UNDP representative

noted that they would pouch those materials when the IATF secre-

tariat made them available to UNDP.  In order to assure broad

dissemination of IATF materials, UNICEF suggested that they be put

on a CD-ROM and the UNDP representative noted that the materials

should be added to the UNDP gopher.



63.  In closing the meeting, Dr. Sadik thanked the organizations

for their hard work and commitment of the past six months. She was

very pleased with the way the IATF had functioned and expressed the

hope that the spirit of cooperation that had prevailed in the first

half year would continue in the months ahead.





================================================================= 

                                                                



       Second Meeting of the ICPD Inter-Agency Task Force



                          25 July 1995



                       UNFPA Headquarters



                          New York, NY



                     LIST  OF  PARTICIPANTS



                         United Nations 

 Department for Policy Coordination and Sustainable Development   

                          (DPCSD)



Ms. Jeannie Peterson

Senior Adviser on Population

Department for Policy Coordination and Sustainable Development  

DC2 - 2246

United Nations

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 963-4177

Fax:           (212) 963-4260







                        United Nations, 

         Department for Economic and Social Information 

                  and Policy Analysis (DESIPA)





Mr. Hermann Habermann

Director, Statistical Division

Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis

DC2 - 1420

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 963-4996

Fax:           (212) 963-9851





Mr. Y.C. Yu

Chief, Demographic and Social Statistics Branch 

Statistical Division

Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis

DC2 - 1520

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 963-4983

Fax:           (212) 963-1940





Mr. Larry Heligman

Assistant Director, Population Division

Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis

DC2 - 1918

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 963-3208

Fax:           (212) 963-2147





Mr. Anthony Turner

(TSS) Technical Support Services Sampling Specialist

Statistical Division

Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis

DC2 - 1552

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 963-4877

Fax:           (212) 963-1940







              Economic Commission for Europe (ECE)





Ms. Dunja Pastizzi-Ferencic

Deputy Executive Secretary

Economic Commission for Europe

Palais des Nations

1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

Telephone:     (011) 41-22-917-2694

Fax:           (011) 41-22-917-0036







            United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) 





Ms. Leila Bisharat

Director, Planning Office

United Nations Childrenžs Fund

UNICEF House

H - 1330

New York, NY 10017

Telephone:     (212) 303-7996

Fax:           (212) 303-7959





Ms. France Donnay

Senior Adviser, Women's Health

United Nations Childrenžs Fund

UNICEF House

H - 1056

New York, NY 10017

Telephone:(212) 326-7313

Fax:      (212) 326-7336





Ms. Tessa Wardlaw

Project Officer, Planning Office

United Nations Children's Fund

UNICEF House

H - 1328

New York, NY 10017

Telephone:(212) 326-7183

Fax:      (212) 303-7959





Ms. Lesley Miller

Project Officer, Health Promotion

United Nations Children's Fund

UNICEF House

H - 1047-1

New York, NY 10017

Telephone:(212) 326-7609

Fax:      (212) 326-7336



           United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)





Mr. Anders Wijkman

Assistant Administrator and Director, Bureau for Policy and

Programme Support United Nations Development Programme

DC 1 - 2028

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 906-5020

Fax:           (212) 906-5857





Mr. Eduardo Gutierrez

Director, Office of UN System Support Services

United Nations Development Programme

DC 1 - 1718

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 906-5500

Fax:           (212) 906-3609





Ms. Renata Lok

Senior Adviser

United Nations Development Programme

DC 1 - 2040

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 906-5038

Fax:           (212) 906-5365







       United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)





Ms. Noeleen Heyzer

Director

United Nations Development Fund for Women

FF - 0616

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 906-6435

Fax:           (212) 906-6705





Ms. Kristin Lewis

Executive Assistant to Director

United Nations Development Fund for Women

FF - 0616

New York, NY 10017

Telephone:     (212) 906-6892

Fax:           (212) 906-6705  







             International Labour Organisation (ILO)





Mr. David Freedman

Director, ILO Liaison Office

International Labour Organisation

Liaison Office with the United Nations

220 East 42 Street, Suite 3101

New York, NY  10017-5806

Telephone:     (212) 697-0150

Fax:           (212) 883-0844





Ms. Miki Takihana

Research Officer

International Labour Organisation

Liaison Office with the United Nations

220 East 42 Street, Suite 3101

New York, NY  10017-5806

Telephone:     (212) 697-0150

Fax:           (212) 883-0844







  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)





Mr. Alain Marcoux

Senior Officer, Population Programme Service

Sustainable Development Department

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Via delle Terme di Caracalla

00100 Rome, Italy

Telephone:     (011) 39-6-5225-3201

Fax:           (011) 39-6-5225-5490







United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization  

                          (UNESCO)





Mr. Gustavo L¢pez Ospina

Director, Interdisciplinary and Inter-Agency Cooperation Project:

Environment and Population Education and Information for Human

Development (EPD) United Nations Educational, Scientific and

Cultural Organization 7, place de Fontenoy

75700 Paris, France

Telephone:     (011) 33-1-45-68-08-68

Fax:           (011) 33-1-45-66-96-84







                 World Health Organization (WHO)





Ms. Carla AbouZahr

Associate Coordinator, Reproductive Health

Division of Family Health

World Health Organization

20, Avenue Appia

CH-1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland

Telephone:     (011) 41-22-791-33-67

Fax:           (011) 41-22-791-41-89





                         The World Bank





Mr. Thomas Merrick

Senior Population Adviser, Human Development Department

The World Bank

1818 H Street, NW

Washington, DC  20433

Telephone:     (202) 473-6762

Fax:           (202) 522-3235







                International Monetary Fund (IMF)





Ms. Harriet Shugarman

Special Assistant to the Director

International Monetary Fund 

Office at the United Nations

DC 1 - 1140

New York, NY  10017

Telephone:     (212) 963-0355

Fax:           (212) 319-9040







             United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)





Dr. Nafis Sadik

Executive Director





Mr. Jyoti Shankar Singh

Deputy Executive Director, Technical Services





Ms. Catherine S. Pierce

Manager, UNFPA Task Force on ICPD Implementation





Ms. Mari Simonen

Chief, Office of the Executive Director 





Mr. Arthur Erken

Programme Officer, UNFPA Task Force on ICPD Implementation





Mr. Michael Vlassoff

Senior Technical Officer, Technical and Evaluation Division





Ms. Ranjana Dikhit

Technical Adviser (Programme)

Reproductive Health Branch, Technical and Evaluation Division

=================================================================





                  ICPD INTER-AGENCY TASK FORCE



                Second Meeting of the Task Force



                      Tuesday, 25 July 1995



                       UNFPA Headquarters



                Rafael M. Salas Conference Room 



                           19th Floor



                             AGENDA







  I. Welcome and Chairmanžs overview of the work of the Task Force





 II. Adoption of Agenda





III. Review of the reports and guidelines produced by the Working

Groups





IV.  Review and adoption of the Common Advocacy Statement on Social

Issues





 V.  Future Work of the Task Force - items for consideration:



     1.   Working Groups - should existing ones continue; should

additional groups be set up?



     2.   Scope of work - response to the view of the twenty-eighth

session of the Commission on Population and Development,

"that the Task Force's work should be expanded to include

migration issues."



     3.   Inputs for the Report of the Inter-Agency Task Force to

be submitted to the twenty-ninth session of the Commission on

Population and Development.





VI.  Other Matters


For further information, please contact: popin@undp.org
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