List of variables

A. Overview

For most of the indicators included in the databank comparable and recent national data as well as time-series are available. However the quality of the underlying data varies to a great extent. General remarks on these differences are given below. Specific explanations and additional information referring to a specific variable, country or source can be found in the footnotes, which accompany the data.

1. Population

Size and Distribution

V1 Total population (thousands)
V2 Urban population (percentage of total)
V3 Population density (persons per square kilometer)

Structure

Age

V4 Population aged below 15 (thousands)
V5 Population aged between 15 and 59 (thousands)
V6 Population aged 60 and over (thousands)
V7 Population aged 80 and over (thousands)
V8 Proportion of population aged below 15 (percentage)
V9 Proportion of population aged between 15 and 59 (percentage)
V10 Proportion of population aged 60 and over (percentage)
V11 Proportion of population aged 80 and over (percentage)
V12 Median age (years)

Gender

V13 Total female population (thousands)
V14 Total male population (thousands)
V15 Sex ratio of population aged 60 and over (per hundred)
V16 Sex ratio of population aged 80 and over (per hundred)

Dependency ratios

V17 Child dependency ratio (per hundred)
V18 Older population dependency ratio (per hundred)

Population dynamics

Fertility

V19 Crude birth rate (births per 1,000 mid-year population)
V20 Total fertility rate (children per woman)
V21 Contraceptive prevalence (percentage)
V22 Proportion of births attended by skilled health professionals (percentage)

Mortality and Health

V23 Crude death rate (deaths per 1,000 mid-year population)
V24 Life expectancy at birth (years)
V25 Life expectancy at birth, females (years)
V26 Life expectancy at birth, males (years)
V27 Infant mortality rate (deaths per 1,000 live births)
V28 Under-5 mortality rate (deaths of children under 5 per 1,000 live births)
V29 Maternal mortality ratio (women's deaths per 100,000 live births)
V30 Prevalence of HIV among adults aged 15 to 49 years old (percentage)

Migration

V31 International migrant stock(number of persons)
V32 Percentage female of international migrants

Nuptiality

V33 Singulate mean age at marriage, female (years)
V34 Singulate mean age at marriage, male (years)

Demographic change

V35 Total population: average annual growth rate (percentage)
V36 Urban population: average annual growth rate (percentage)
V37 Rural population: average annual growth rate (percentage)
V38 Child population: average annual growth rate (percentage)
V39 Working age population: average annual growth rate (percentage)
V40 Older population: average annual growth rate (percentage)

2. Resources

Land

V41 Total area (1000 hectares)
V42 Land area (1000 hectares)
V43 Population per cropland (persons per hectare)
V44 Cropland as a percentage of land area
V45 Forest as a percentage of land area
V46 Irrigated land as a percentage of cropland
   

Water

V50 Fresh water annual withdrawals as a percentage of total resources
V51 Fresh water resources (billion cubic meters)
   

Food

V55 Cereal production (metric tons)
V56 Cereal yield (hectogram per hectare)
V57 Food aid in cereals (metric tons)
V58 Cereals, imports (metric tons)
V59 Cereals, exports (metric tons)
V60 Roots and tubers (metric tons)

3. Environment

Natural world

V61 Nationally protected area as a percentage of total area
V74 Annual percentage change in forest area

Emissions

V75 Carbon dioxide emissions (thousands of metric tons)
V76 Carbon dioxide emissions per capita (metric tons)

4. Development

Economic development

Economic output

V77 GDP total (millions of US dollars)
V78 GDP per capita (constant 2000 US dollars)
V79 GDP per capita PPP (current international dollars)
V80 Agricultural share of GDP (percentage)
V81 Industrial share of GDP (percentage)
V82 Services share of GDP (percentage)
V83 GDP average annual growth rate (percentage)
V84 GDP per capita average annual growth rate (percentage)

Labour force

V85 Economically active population (percentage)
V86 Economically active population, females (percentage)
V87 Economically active population, males (percentage)
V89 Women as a percentage of the labour force
V90 Economically active population in agriculture as a percentage of labour force
V91 Economically active population in industry as a percentage of labour force
V92 Economically active population in services as a percentage of labour force

Income

V93 Population with income less than one US dollar per day (percentage)
V94 Income share of lowest 20 per cent (percentage)
V95 Income share of highest 20 per cent (percentage)

Social development

Nutrition and underweight

V96 Children underweight (percentage)
V98 Population undernourishment (percentage)
V99 Low birth weight infants (percentage)

Water and sanitation

V100 Percentage of population using improved drinking-water sources, total
V101 Percentage of population using improved sanitation facilities, total
V102 Percentage of population using improved drinking-water sources, urban
V103 Percentage of population using improved sanitation facilities, urban
V104 Percentage of population using improved drinking-water sources, rural
V105 Percentage of population using improved sanitation facilities, rural

Education

V106 Adult literacy rate (percentage)
V107 Adult literacy rate, females (percentage)
V108 Adult literacy rate, males (percentage)
V109 Young adult literacy rate (15-24 years old), total (percentage)
V110 Young adult literacy rate (15-24 years old), female (percentage)
V111 Young adult literacy rate (15-24 years old), male (percentage)
V112 Gross enrolment ratio, primary school, total
V113 Gross enrolment ratio, primary school, female
V114 Gross enrolment ratio, primary school, male
V115 Net enrolment ratio, primary school, total
V116 Net enrolment ratio, primary school, female
V117 Net enrolment ratio, primary school, male
V118 Gross enrolment ratio, secondary school, total
V119 Gross enrolment ratio, secondary school, female
V120 Gross enrolment ratio, secondary school, male
V121 Net enrolment ratio, secondary school, total
V122 Net enrolment ratio, secondary school, female
V123 Net enrolment ratio, secondary school, male

Public expenditure

V124 Final international expenditures for population activities (thousands of US dollars)
V125 Total public spending on education (percentage of GDP)
V126 Total public spending on health (percentage of GDP)

5. Policy

Population policy

V127 Views on population growth
V128 Intervention on population growth
V129 Views on fertility level
V130 Intervention on fertility level
V131 Views on mortality level
V132 Views on immigration level
V133 Policy on immigration level
V134 Views on emigration level
V135 Policy on emigration level

International Treaties

V136 Convention on Climate Change (1993)
V137 Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer (1985)
V138 Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (1987)
V139 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (1982)
V140 Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (1979)

 

B. Description of Variables

1. Population

Size and distribution

Variable Label Unit Description of variables
V1 Total population Thousands Mid-year de facto population estimated by the Population Division/ DESA of the United Nations Secretariat. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V2 Percentage urban Percentage Percentage of total population residing in urban areas. 'Urban' is defined according to the national census definition used in the latest available population census. When necessary and if possible, urban data from earlier census and surveys were adjusted to be consistent with those from the latest census.
Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2008a)
V3 Population density Persons per square kilometer Mid-year population as compared to the surface area in hectares. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)

Structure

Age

V4 Population under age 15 Thousands Number of persons aged under 15 years. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V5 Population aged 15 – 59 Thousands Number of persons aged 15-59 years. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V6 Population aged 60 or over Thousands Number of persons aged 60 years or over. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V7 Population aged 80 or over Thousands Number of persons aged 80 years or over. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V8 Population under age 15 as percentage of total population Percentage Relative size of population under age 15 as compared to total population, computed as: 100*V4/ V1. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V9 Population aged 15 to 59 as percentage of total population Percentage Relative size of population aged 15–59 compared to total population, computed as: 100*V5/ V1. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V10 Population aged 60 or over as percentage of total population Percentage Relative size of population aged 60 or over as compared to total population, computed as: 100*V6/ V1. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V11 Population aged 80 or over as percentage of total population Percentage Relative size of population aged 80 or over as compared to total population, computed as: 100*V7/ V1. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V12 Median age Years Age of the 50th percentile of the population age distribution. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)

Gender

V13 Total female population Thousands Mid-year de facto female population. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V14 Total male population Thousands Mid-year de facto male population. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V15 Sex ratio ages 60 or over Per hundred Number of men per 100 women in the population aged 60 or over, computed as: 100* (Number of men over 60 / Number of women over 60). Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V16 Sex ratio ages 80 or over Per hundred The number of men per 100 women in the population aged 80 or over, computed as: 100* (Number of men over 80 / Number of women over 80). Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)

Dependency ratios

V17 Child dependency ratio Per hundred Population aged under 15 compared to the working age population (15-59), computed as: 100 * V4/V5. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V18 Older population dependency ratio Per hundred Population aged 60 or over compared to the working age population (15-59) computed as: 100 * V6/V5. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)

Population dynamics

Fertility

V19 Crude birth rate Births per 1,000 people Number of births occurring during the year per 1,000 mid-year population. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V20 Total fertility rate Children per woman Average number of children that would be born to a woman in her lifetime, if she were to pass through her childbearing years experiencing the age-specific fertility rates for a given period. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V21 Contraceptive prevalence Percentage Contraceptive prevalence refers to the percentage of currently married women (including, where possible, those in consensual unions) currently using contraception, either traditional or modern methods. Users of contraception are defined as women who are practicing, or whose male partners are practicing, any form of contraception, including female or male sterilization, injectable or oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, diaphragms, spermicides, condoms, withdrawal and periodic or long-term abstinence.
Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2008b)
V22 Proportion of births attended by skilled health professionals Percentage Refers to the proportion of births attended by skilled health professionals (nurses or doctors). It is calculated by dividing the number of births attended by skilled health professional in a given year by the total number of births in this year. Data refer to the most recent year available during the period specified.
Source: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)

Mortality and Health

V23 Crude death rate Deaths per 1,000 people Number of deaths occurring during the year per 1,000 mid-year population. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V24 Life expectancy Years Number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing age patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V25 Life expectancy at birth, females Years Number of years a female newborn would live if prevailing age patterns of mortality at the time of her birth were to stay the same throughout her life. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V26 Life expectancy at birth, males Years Number of years a male newborn would live if prevailing age patterns of mortality at the time of his birth were to stay the same throughout his life. Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V27 Infant mortality rate Deaths per 1,000 live births Number of deaths of infants under one year of age per 1,000 live births in a given year. It shows the probability of a newborn dying before reaching his first birthday. It is usually calculated as the number of infant deaths in a period divided by the number of births in the same period. Figures are quinquennial estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V28 Under 5-mortality rate Deaths of children under 5 per1,000 live births Number of deaths of children under 5 years of age per 1,000 live births. It shows the probability of a newborn dying before reaching his fifth birthday. Figures are quinquennial estimates and medium-variant projections .
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V29 Maternal mortality ratio Women's deaths per 100,000 live births A maternal death is the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes. The maternal mortality ratio is the number of maternal deaths over a year per 100,000 live births in that year.
Source: United Nations (2008a)
V30 Prevalence of HIV among adults aged 15 to 49 years old Percentage Refers to the proportion of adults aged 15 to 49 years old infected with the HIV virus. It is calculated by dividing the number of adults aged 15 to 49 years who are found to be infected with HIV in a given year by the population of adults of the same age group.
Source: United Nations (2009b)

Migration

V31 International migrant stock Number of persons Number of foreign-born persons or the foreign population within a country.
Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2009a)
V32 Women as a percentage of international migrants Percentage Women migrants as a proportion of international migrants
      Source: United Nations (2009a)

Nuptiality

V33 Singulate mean age at marriage, females Years Estimated mean age at first marriage for women among those who ever marry before age 50.
Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2009b)
V34 Singulate mean age at marriage, males Years Estimated mean age at first marriage for men among those who ever marry before age 50.
Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2009b)

Demographic changes

V35 Total population: average annual growth rate Percentage Average annual percentage growth rate of a population between dates t1 and t2 computed using the mid-year estimates and an exponential rate of increase: 100 * ln (V1t2 / V1t1) / (t2 - t1). Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V36 Urban population: average annual growth rate Percentage Average annual percentage growth rate of urban population.
Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2008a)
V37 Rural population: average annual growth rate Percentage Average annual percentage growth rate of rural population.
Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2008a)
V38 Child population: average annual growth rate Percentage Average annual percentage growth rate of population under age 15 between dates t1 and t2 computed using the mid-year estimates and an exponential rate of increase: 100 * ln (V4t2 / V4t1 ) / (t2 - t1). Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V39 Working age population: average annual growth rate Percentage Average annual percentage growth rate of population aged 15 - 59 between dates t1 and t2 computed using the mid-year estimates and an exponential rate of increase: 100 * ln (V5t2 / V5t1) / (t2 - t1). Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)
V40 Older population growth rate Percentage The average annual percentage growth rate of population aged 60 or older between dates t1 and t2 computed using the mid-year estimates and an exponential rate of increase: 100 * ln (V6t2 / V6t1 ) / (t2 – t1). Estimates and medium-variant projections.
Source: United Nations (2009a)

2. Resources

Land

V41 Total area 1000 hectares Total surface area of the country, comprising land area and inland waters, which include major rivers and lakes.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V42 Land area 1000 hectares The total area of the country, excluding area under inland water bodies.
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V43 Population per cropland Persons per hectare Mid-year population (unrounded) as compared to the cropland area in hectares, computed as: 1000 * V1/ Cropland in hectares. Cropland is arable land and permanent cropland. Arable land is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens and land temporarily fallow (less than five years). The abandoned land resulting from shifting cultivation is not included in this category. Data for “Arable land” are not meant to indicate the amount of land that is potentially cultivable. Permanent cropland is the land cultivated with long-term crops which do not have to be replanted for several years (such as cocoa and coffee); land under trees and shrubs producing flowers, such as roses and jasmine; and nurseries (except those for forest trees, which should be classified under "forest"). Permanent meadows and pastures are excluded from land under permanent crops.
Source: United Nations (2009a); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V44 Cropland as percentage of land area Percentage Cropland is arable land and permanent cropland (see V43). Computed as: 100 * Cropland in hectares / V42
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V45 Forest area as percentage of land area Percentage Forest area is the land spanning more than 0.5 hectares with trees higher than 5 metres and a canopy cover of more than 10 percent, or trees able to reach these thresholds in situ. It does not include land that is predominantly under agricultural or urban land use. Forest is determined both by the presence of trees and the absence of other predominant land uses. The trees should be able to reach a minimum height of 5 metres (m) in situ. Areas under reforestation that have not yet reached but are expected to reach a canopy cover of 10 percent and a tree height of 5 m are included, as are temporarily unstocked areas, resulting from human intervention or natural causes, which are expected to regenerate. Includes: areas with bamboo and palms provided that height and canopy cover criteria are met; forest roads, firebreaks and other small open areas; forest in national parks, nature reserves and other protected areas such as those of specific scientific, historical, cultural or spiritual interest; windbreaks, shelterbelts and corridors of trees with an area of more than 0.5 ha and width of more than 20 m; plantations primarily used for forestry or protective purposes, such as: rubber-wood plantations and cork, oak stands. Excludes: tree stands in agricultural production systems, for example in fruit plantations and agroforestry systems. The term also excludes trees in urban parks and gardens. Data are expressed in 1000 hectares. Land area is V42.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V46 Irrigated land as percentage of cropland Percentage Irrigated land refers to areas purposely provided with water, including land irrigated by controlled flooding. Cropland is permanent cropland and arable land (or temporary cropland).
Source: World Bank (2009)
 

Water

V50 Fresh water annual withdrawals Percentage Annual freshwater withdrawals are total water withdrawals, not counting evaporation losses from storage basins. Withdrawals also include water from desalination plants in countries where they are a significant source. Withdrawals can exceed 100 per cent of total renewable resources where extraction from nonrenewable aquifers or desalination plants is considerable or where water reuse is insignificant. Renewable internal freshwater resources flows are internal renewable resources (internal river flows and groundwater from rainfall) in the country.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V51 Fresh water resources Cubic km. Renewable internal freshwater resources flows are internal renewable resources (internal river flows and groundwater from rainfall) in the country.
Source: World Bank (2009)

 

Food

V55 Cereal production Metric tons Cereal production includes wheat, rice, maize, barley, oats, rye, millet, sorghum, buckwheat, and mixed grains. It refers to crops harvested for dry grain only. Cereal crops harvested for hay or harvested green for food, feed or silage or used for grazing are excluded.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V56 Cereal yield Hectograms per hectare Cereal yield represents harvested production in hectogrammes per hectare of harvested cereal products.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V57 Food aid in cereals Metric tons per year Food aid shipments represent a transfer of food commodities from donor to recipient countries, on a total-grant basis or on highly concessional terms. Cereal food aid shipments are reported on a calendar year basis. From 1990 to date, the information on food aid shipments has been provided to FAO by the World Food Programme.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009b)
V58 Cereals imports Metric tons Cereals imports refer to grain equivalents imported, defined as comprising all cereal in the standard international trade classification (SITC).
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V59 Cereals exports Metric tons Cereals exports refer to grain equivalents exported, defined as comprising all cereal in the standard international trade classification (SITC).
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)
V60 Roots and tubers Metric tons Production of potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava, yams, taro, yautia, and arrowroot. Root crops are dietary staples in certain areas where cereals are less widely grown, particularly in tropical Africa. Root crops grown principally for feed such as turnips, mangels and swedes are not included.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009a)

3. Environment

Natural World

V61 Nationally protected area Percentage Nationally protected areas as percentage of total land area. Nationally protected areas are totally or partially protected areas of at least 1,000 hectares. Totally protected areas are maintained in a natural state and closed to extractive uses, encompassing: scientific reserves and strict nature reserves; national and provincial parks; and natural monuments and landmarks with unique geology or biodiversity. Partially protected areas may be managed for recreation, tourism, or for providing optimum habitat for certain species of wildlife. These areas encompass: nature reserves and wildlife sanctuaries, and protected landscapes/seascapes (including scenically attractive cultural areas). Marine areas, unclassified areas, littoral (intertidal) areas, sites protected under local or provincial law, and privately owned areas are excluded.
Source: United Nations Environment Programme – World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) (2007)
V74 Annual change in forest area Percentage The average annual percentage change in forest area, also called average annual deforestation, is the permanent conversion of natural forest area to other uses, including agriculture, ranching, settlements, and infrastructure. Deforested areas do not include areas logged but intended for regeneration or areas degraded by fule-wood gathering, acid precipitation, or forest fires.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2005)

Emissions

V75 Carbon dioxide emissions Thousands of metric tons Carbon dioxide emissions are emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement and include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fules and gas flaring. They were calculated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). Carbon dioxide emissions are calculated from reported elemental carbon, whose values are converted to actual carbon dioxide mass by multiplying them by 3.664 (the ratio of the mass of the carbon to that of carbon dioxide).
Source: World Bank (2009)
V76 Carbon dioxide emissions per capita Metric tons Carbon dioxide emissions per capita is computed by dividing the total emissions by the population of each country.
Source: World Bank (2009)

4. Development

Economic development

Economic output

V77 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Millions of US dollars Gross Domestic Product (GDP) represents the sum of value added by all producers in the economy. Value added is the value of the gross output of producers less the value of intermediate goods and services consumed in production, before taking account of the consumption of fixed capital in the production process. The United Nations System of National Accounts calls for estimates of value added to be valued at either basic prices (excluding net taxes on products) or producer prices (including net taxes on products paid by producers but excluding sales or value added taxes). GDP at purchaser prices (shown here) is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V78 Gross Domestic Product per capita Constant 2000 US dollars Gross Domestic Product per capita, at constant 2000 US $ refers to total GDP (V77) divided by total population (V1).
Source: World Bank (2009); United Nations (2009a)
V79 GDP per capita at purchasing power parity (PPP) Current international dollars GDP per capita at purchasing power parity (PPP) are GDP estimates based on the purchasing power of currencies rather than on current exchange rates. These estimates are a blend of extrapolated and regression-based numbers, using the results of the international Comparison Programme (ICP). ICP benchmark studies are multilateral pricing exercises, where inter-country price comparisons are reported in several phases. PPP studies recast traditional national accounts through special price collections and the disaggregation of GDP by expenditure components. ICP details are reported by national statistical offices, and the results are coordinated by the World Bank, assisted by other United Nations agencies. International dollar-values, which are different from U.S. dollar values of GDP, are obtained using special conversion factors that equalize the purchasing powers of different currencies. This conversion factor, PPP, is defined as the number of units of a country's currency required to buy the same amounts of goods and services in the domestic market as one U.S. dollar would buy in the 'average' country. The average price-index thus equalizes dollar prices in every country so that cross-country comparisons of GDP based on them reflect differences in quantities of goods and services free of price-level differentials. PPP estimates tend to lower per capita GDPs in industrialized countries and raise per capita GDPs in developing countries. Data are in constant 1995 international dollars. Mid-year de facto population figures are used for GDP, PPP per capita figures.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V80 Agricultural share of GDP Percentage Agricultural share of GDP refers to the agriculture value added (current US$) as a proportion of GDP at market prices (current US$). Agriculture value added measures the output of the agricultural sector less the value of intermediate inputs. Agriculture comprises value added from forestry, hunting, and fishing as well as cultivation of crops and livestock production. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Agriculture corresponds to ISIC divisions 1-5.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V81 Industrial share of GDP Percentage Industrial share of GDP refers to the industry value added (current US$) as a proportion of GDP at market prices (current US$). Industry value added comprises value added in mining, manufacturing, construction, electricity, water, and gas. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Industry corresponds to ISIC divisions 10-45.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V82 Services share of GDP Percentage Services share of GDP refers to the services value added (current US$) as a proportion of GDP at market prices (current US$). Services value added include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V83 GDP growth Percentage GDP growth refers to the average annual percentage growth rate of GDP total computed as: 100 * ln ( V77t2 / V77t1 ) / ( t2 - t1 )
Source: World Bank (2009)
V84 GDP growth per capita Percentage GDP growth per capita refers to the average annual percentage growth rate of GDP per capita, computed as: 100 * ln ( V78t2 / V78t1 ) / ( t2 - t1 )
Source: World Bank (2009)

Labour force

V85 Economically active population Percentage Economically active population is all people aged 15 or over who supply labour for the production of goods and services during a specified period.
Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) (2009)
V86 Economically active population, females Percentage Economically active population, female is all women aged 15 or over who supply labour for the production of goods and services during a specified period.
Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) (2009)
V87 Economically active population, males Percentage Economically active population, male is all men aged 15 or over who supply labour for the production of goods and services during a specified period.
Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) (2009)
V89 Women as a percentage of the labour force Percentage Women as a percentage of the labour force is the proportion of the labour force that is female and show the extent to which women are active in the labour force.
Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) (2008)
V90 Percentage of the economically active population in agriculture Percentage Economically active population in agriculture refers to all people aged 15 or over, employed and unemployed, including those seeking work for the first time, who are in the agricultural sector. Agriculture corresponds to division 1 (ISIC revision 2) or tabulation categories A and B (ISIC revision 3) and includes hunting, forestry and fishing. It is shown as a percentage of the total economically active population.
Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) (2008)
V91 Percentage of economically active population in industry Percentage Economically active population in industry refers to all people aged 15 or over, employed and unemployed, including those seeking work for the first time, who are in the industrial sector. Industry corresponds to divisions 2-5 (ISIC revision 2) or tabulation categories (ISIC revision 3) and includes mining and quarrying (including oil production), manufacturing, construction, and public utilities (electricity, gas and water). It is shown as a percentage of the total economically active population.
Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) (2008)
V92 Percentage of economically active population in services Percentage Economically active population in services refers to all people aged 15 or over, employed and unemployed, including those seeking work for the first time, who are in the service sector. Services correspond to division 6-9 (ISIC revision 2) or tabulation categories G-P (ISIC revision 3) and includes wholesale and retail trade and restaurants and hotels; transport, storage, and communications; financing, insurance, real estate, and business services; and community, social and personal services. It is shown as a percentage of the total economically active population.
Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) (2008)

Income

V93 Population with income of less than 1 US$ /day Percentage Percentage of the population living under the international ($1.25 a day PPP) poverty line.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V94 Income of lowest 20 per cent of the population Percentage The share of total income received by the lowest 20 per cent of the population, ranked either by per capita expenditure or by per capita income. Because the underlying household surveys differ in method and in the type of data collected, the distribution indicators are not strictly comparable across countries.
Source: World Bank (2009)
V95 Income of highest 20 per cent of the population Percentage The share of income of the highest 20% of the population, ranked either by per capita expenditure or by per capita income. Because the underlying household surveys differ in method and in the type of data collected, the distribution indicators are not strictly comparable across countries.
Source: World Bank (2009)

Social development

Nutrition and underweight

V96 Children underweight Percentage Refers to the percentage of children under 5 years of age who have a weight that is more than two standard deviations below the median weight-for-age of the standard reference population at the United States National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The standard reference population is commonly referred to as the NCHS/WHO international reference population.
Source: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)
V98 Population under-nourishment Percentage Proportion of the population in a condition of undernourishment. Undernourishment refers to the condition of people whose dietary energy consumption is continuously below a minimum dietary energy requirement for maintaining a healthy life and carrying out a light physical activity with an acceptable minimum body-weight for attained-height.
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (2009b)
V99 Low birth weight infants Percentage Percentage of infants weighing less than 2,500 g at birth. Data refer to the most recent year available during the period specified.
Source: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)

Water and sanitation

V100 Proportion of population using improved drinking-water sources, total Percentage The proportion of the population using an improved drinking water source is an MDG indicator that measures access to drinking water. An improved drinking-water source is defined as one that, by nature of its construction or through active intervention, is protected from outside contamination, in particular from contamination with faecal matter. The proportion of the population using an improved drinking water source, total, urban, and rural, is the percentage of the population who use any of the following types of water supply for drinking: piped water into dwelling, plot or yard; public tap/standpipe; borehole/tube well; protected dug well; protected spring; rainwater collection and bottled water (if a secondary available source is also improved). It does not include “unimproved” drinking water sources such as unprotected dug well, unprotected spring, water provided by carts with small tanks/drums, tanker truck-provided water and bottled water (if secondary source is not an improved source) or surface water taken directly from rivers, ponds, streams, lakes, dams, or irrigation channels. Definitions and a detailed description of these facilities can be found at the website of the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation at www.wssinfo.org.
Source: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)
V101 Proportion of population using improved sanitation facilities, total Percentage The proportion of population using improved sanitation facilities is an MDG indicator that measures access to basic sanitation. For MDG monitoring, an improved sanitation facility is defined as one that hygienically separates human excreta from human contact. To allow for international comparability of estimates, JMP uses the following classification to differentiate between the use of improved sanitation and use of "non-improved" sanitation. The proportion of the population using an improved sanitation facility, total, urban, rural, is the percentage of the population with access to any of the following facilities in the home or compound: flush/pour flush toilets or latrines connected to a piped sewer system, septic tank or pit latrine; ventilated improved pit latrines; pit latrines with a slab or platform of any material which covers the pit entirely, except for the drop hole; and composting toilets/latrines. Unimproved facilities include public or shared facilities of an otherwise acceptable type, flush/pour-flush toilets or latrines which discharge directly into an open sewer or ditch, pit latrines without a slab, bucket latrines, hanging toilets or latrines which directly discharge in water bodies or in the open and the practice of open defecation in the bush, field or bodies or water. Definitions and a detailed description of these facilities can be found at the website of the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation at www.wssinfo.org.
Source: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)
V102 Proportion of population using improved drinking-water sources, urban Percentage The proportion of the population using an improved drinking water source is an MDG indicator that measures access to drinking water. An improved drinking-water source is defined as one that, by nature of its construction or through active intervention, is protected from outside contamination, in particular from contamination with faecal matter. The proportion of the population using an improved drinking water source, total, urban, and rural, is the percentage of the population who use any of the following types of water supply for drinking: piped water into dwelling, plot or yard; public tap/standpipe; borehole/tube well; protected dug well; protected spring; rainwater collection and bottled water (if a secondary available source is also improved). It does not include “unimproved” drinking water sources such as unprotected dug well, unprotected spring, water provided by carts with small tanks/drums, tanker truck-provided water and bottled water (if secondary source is not an improved source) or surface water taken directly from rivers, ponds, streams, lakes, dams, or irrigation channels. Definitions and a detailed description of these facilities can be found at the website of the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation at www.wssinfo.org.
Source: UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)
V103 Proportion of population using improved sanitation facilities, urban Percentage The proportion of population using improved sanitation facilities is an MDG indicator that measures access to basic sanitation. For MDG monitoring, an improved sanitation facility is defined as one that hygienically separates human excreta from human contact. To allow for international comparability of estimates, JMP uses the following classification to differentiate between the use of improved sanitation and use of "non-improved" sanitation. The proportion of the population using an improved sanitation facility, total, urban, rural, is the percentage of the population with access to any of the following facilities in the home or compound: flush/pour flush toilets or latrines connected to a piped sewer system, septic tank or pit latrine; ventilated improved pit latrines; pit latrines with a slab or platform of any material which covers the pit entirely, except for the drop hole; and composting toilets/latrines. Unimproved facilities include public or shared facilities of an otherwise acceptable type, flush/pour-flush toilets or latrines which discharge directly into an open sewer or ditch, pit latrines without a slab, bucket latrines, hanging toilets or latrines which directly discharge in water bodies or in the open and the practice of open defecation in the bush, field or bodies or water. Definitions and a detailed description of these facilities can be found at the website of the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation at www.wssinfo.org.
Source: UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)
V104 Proportion of population using improved drinking-water sources, rural Percentage The proportion of the population using an improved drinking water source is an MDG indicator that measures access to drinking water. An improved drinking-water source is defined as one that, by nature of its construction or through active intervention, is protected from outside contamination, in particular from contamination with faecal matter. The proportion of the population using an improved drinking water source, total, urban, and rural, is the percentage of the population who use any of the following types of water supply for drinking: piped water into dwelling, plot or yard; public tap/standpipe; borehole/tube well; protected dug well; protected spring; rainwater collection and bottled water (if a secondary available source is also improved). It does not include “unimproved” drinking water sources such as unprotected dug well, unprotected spring, water provided by carts with small tanks/drums, tanker truck-provided water and bottled water (if secondary source is not an improved source) or surface water taken directly from rivers, ponds, streams, lakes, dams, or irrigation channels. Definitions and a detailed description of these facilities can be found at the website of the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation at www.wssinfo.org.
Source: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)
V105 Proportion of population using improved sanitation facilities, rural Percentage The proportion of population using improved sanitation facilities is an MDG indicator that measures access to basic sanitation. For MDG monitoring, an improved sanitation facility is defined as one that hygienically separates human excreta from human contact. To allow for international comparability of estimates, JMP uses the following classification to differentiate between the use of improved sanitation and use of "non-improved" sanitation. The proportion of the population using an improved sanitation facility, total, urban, rural, is the percentage of the population with access to any of the following facilities in the home or compound: flush/pour flush toilets or latrines connected to a piped sewer system, septic tank or pit latrine; ventilated improved pit latrines; pit latrines with a slab or platform of any material which covers the pit entirely, except for the drop hole; and composting toilets/latrines. Unimproved facilities include public or shared facilities of an otherwise acceptable type, flush/pour-flush toilets or latrines which discharge directly into an open sewer or ditch, pit latrines without a slab, bucket latrines, hanging toilets or latrines which directly discharge in water bodies or in the open and the practice of open defecation in the bush, field or bodies or water. Definitions and a detailed description of these facilities can be found at the website of the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation at www.wssinfo.org.
Source: United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (2009)

Education

V106 Adult literacy rate Percentage Adult literacy rate is the percentage of people aged 15 and above that can, with understanding, both read and write a short, simple statement about their everyday life.
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V107 Adult literacy rate, female Percentage Adult literacy rate among females is the percentage of females aged 15 and above that can, with understanding, both read and write a short, simple statement about their everyday life.
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V108 Adult literacy rate, male Percentage Adult literacy rate among males is the percentage of males aged 15 and above that can, with understanding, both read and write a short, simple statement about their everyday life.
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V109 Young adult literacy rate (15-24 years old), total Percentage Young adult literacy rate is the percentage of people aged 15-24 that can, with understanding, both read and write a short, simple statement about their everyday life.
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V110 Young adult literacy rate (15-24 years old), female Percentage Young adult literacy rate among females is the percentage of females aged 15-24 that can, with understanding, both read and write a short, simple statement about their everyday life.
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V111 Young adult literacy rate (15-49 years old), male Percentage Young adult literacy rate among males is the percentage of males aged 15-24 that can, with understanding, both read and write a short, simple statement about their everyday life.
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V112 Gross enrolment ratio, primary school, total Percentage Gross enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment, regardless of age, to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here primary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V113 Gross enrolment ratio, primary school, female Percentage Gross enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment, regardless of age, to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here primary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V114 Gross enrolment ratio, primary school, male Percentage Gross enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment, regardless of age, to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here primary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V115 Net enrolment ratio, primary school, total Percentage Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment of children of official school age based on the International Standard Classification of Education 1997 to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here primary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V116 Net enrolment ratio, primary school, female Percentage Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment of children of official school age based on the International Standard Classification of Education 1997 to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here primary).
Source: UNESCO (2004); World Bank (2004)
V117 Net enrolment ratio, primary school, male Percentage Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment of children of official school age based on the International Standard Classification of Education 1997 to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here primary).
Source: UNESCO (2004); World Bank (2004)
V118 Gross enrolment ratio, secondary school, total Percentage Gross enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment, regardless of age, to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here secondary).
Source: UNESCO (2004); World Bank (2004).
V119 Gross enrolment ratio, secondary school, female Percentage Gross enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment, regardless of age, to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here secondary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V120 Gross enrolment ratio, secondary school, male Percentage Gross enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment, regardless of age, to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here secondary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009).
V121 Net enrolment ratio, secondary school, total Percentage Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment of children of official school age based on the International Standard Classification of Education 1997 to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here secondary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V122 Net enrolment ratio, secondary school, female Percentage Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment of children of official school age based on the International Standard Classification of Education 1997 to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here secondary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V123 Net enrolment ratio, secondary school, male Percentage Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of total enrolment of children of official school age based on the International Standard Classification of Education 1997 to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education specified (here secondary).
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)

Public expenditure

V124 Final international expenditures for population activities Thousands of US dollars Amount of external assistance expended in 2007 for population activities (family planning services, reproductive health services, sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS activities, and basic research and development policy analysis) in each country. External funds are disbursed through multilateral and bilateral assistance agencies and by non-governmental organizations. Donor countries are indicated by their contributions being placed in parentheses.
Source: United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) (2009a); United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) (2009b)
V125 Total public expenditure on education Percentage of GDP Total public expenditure on education is current and capital public expenditure on education as a percentage of GDP.
Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics (2009)
V126 Total public expenditure on health Percentage of GDP Total public expenditure on health is expressed as a percentage of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds.
Source: World Bank (2009)

5. Policy

Population policy

V127 Views on population growth Governments’ perception of the acceptability of the population growth rate. It is expressed in three categories: The rate is too high; the rate is satisfactory; the rate is too low.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V128 Intervention on population growth Governments’ intervention policy to modify the population growth rate. It is expressed in four categories: To raise the rate; to maintain the rate; to lower the rate; no intervention reported.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V129 Views on fertility level Governments’ perception of the acceptability of the fertility level. It is expressed in three categories: The rate is too high; the rate is satisfactory; the rate is too low.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V130 Intervention on fertility level Governments’ intervention policy to modify the level of fertility. It is expressed in four categories: To raise the rate; to maintain the rate; to lower the rate; no intervention reported.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V131 Views on mortality level Governments’ perception of the acceptability of the current mortality level. It is expressed in two categories: Acceptable; unacceptable.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V132 Views on immigration level Governments’ perception of the immigration level. It is expressed in three categories: Immigration level is too low; immigration level is satisfactory; immigration level is too high.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V133 Policy on immigration level Governments’ intervention policy to modify the level of immigration. It is expressed in four categories: To raise the level; to maintain the level; to lower the level; no intervention reported.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V134 Views on emigration level Governments’ perception of the acceptability of the emigration level. It is expressed in three categories: Emigration is too high; emigration level is satisfactory; emigration level is too low.
Source: United Nations (2008b)
V135 Policy on emigration level Governments’ intervention policy to modify the level of emigration. It is expressed in four categories: To raise the level; to maintain the level; to lower the level; no intervention reported.
Source: United Nations (2008b)

International Treaties

V136 Climate change Framework Convention on Climate Change (1993): the years signed and ratified. Updated with ratifications and signatures as of 28 May 2004.
Source: United Nations (1993)
V137 Ozone layer UN Environment Program. It refers to the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer (1985): the years signed and ratified by individual countries. Updated with ratifications and signatures as of 28 May 2004.
Source: United Nations (1985)
V138 CFC Control The Protocol on Substances that deplete the Ozone Layer (1987): the years signed and ratified by individual countries. Updated with ratifications and signatures as of 28 May 2004.
Source: United Nations (1987)
V139 Law of the Sea The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (1982): the years signed and ratified by individual countries. Updated with ratifications and signatures as of 16 July 2004.
Source: United Nations (1982)
V140 Women The Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (1979): The years and ratified by individual countries. Updated with ratifications and signatures as of 26 March 2004.
Source: United Nations (1979)