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INSTITUTIONAL ASPECTS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN SLOVENIA


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INTEGRATED DECISION-MAKING

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies    

The Slovenian Council for Sustainable Development has been established under the auspices of the Ministry for Environment and Physical Planning.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations  

Reformulating an enormous amount of legislation remains a basic constraint. However, the basic principles for integrated decision making are established by the Environmental Protection Act, 1993. These principles are also considered in the policy of other sectors. The national report on the state of environment, which was adopted by Parliament, states that national programs and planning documents reveal a strong political and professional commitment to incorporate the environmental aspect in the policy of specific sectors. For the longer term, emphasis, including financial incentives, is being placed on professional education both at home and abroad.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans   

At the national level, there are attempts by the functional ministries to review and coordinate the implications and interrelationships towards sustainable development of a number of international agreements. These agreements call for national strategies, plans and programmes in cross-sectoral and sectoral areas. In signing and ratifying international agreements, an administrative and legal process that considers the relationship and overlaps between such agreements has been established. International cooperation is also fostered through the employment of some foreign advisors in the Slovenian Ministry of Environment on a full time basis.

Decision-Making: Major Groups involvement   

No information available.

Status 

National Decision-Making Structure

1. National Sustainable Development Coordination Body: YES
2. National Sustainable Development Policy: YES
3. National Agenda 21/other strategy for SD:
Economic Development Strategy of Slovenia, National Environmental Action Programme
YES
4. Local/Regional Agenda(s) 21: YES/IN PROCESS
5. Environmental Impact Assessment Law: YES
6. Major Groups involved in Sustainable Development Decision-Making: YES

National Instruments and Programmes

1. Sustainable. Dev. or environmental education incorporated into school curricula: IN PROGRESS
2. Sustainable Development Indicators Program: IN PROGRESS
3. Ecolabel Regulations: YES
4. Recycle/Reuse Programs: IN PROGRESS
5. Green Accounting Program: YES
6. Access to Internet: YES
7. Access to World Wide Web: YES
8. A national World Wide Web Site for Sustainable Dev. or State of the Environment: YES
Internet Address: www.sigov.si/mop

Policies, Programmes, and Legislation

Does your country have either a policy, programme, and/or legislation consistent with Agenda 21 in:  
1. Combatting poverty: NO
2. Changing consumption and production patterns: IN PROGRESS
3. Atmosphere: IN PROGRESS
4. Land Use Planning: YES
5. Forest and Deforestation: YES
6. Desertification and Drought: NO
7. Sustainable Mountain Development: YES
8. Sustainable Agriculture: YES
9. Biological Diversity: YES
10. Biotechnology: IN PROGRESS
11. Oceans and Coastal Areas: NO
12. Freshwater Management: YES
13. Toxic Chemicals: IN PROGRESS
14. Hazardous Wastes: YES
15. Solid Wastes: YES
16. Radioactive Wastes: IN PROGRESS
17. Energy: YES
18. Transport: YES
19. Sustainable Tourism: YES

* * * 

This information was provided by the Government of Slovenia to the 5th, 6th and 7th Sessions of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: February 1999.

To access the Slovenian Ministry of the Environment, click here.
For Government institutions and agencies, click here.
For the State of the Environment Report (in Slovenian) click here.
For information on Environmental Law around the World, click here.

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MAJOR GROUPS

WOMEN

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans   

Currently, Slovenia is preparing a national programme for achieving equal rights between men and women. Twelve expert groups have been established: one of them focuses on the relation between women and the environment. A strategy for the achievement of equality in all aspects of society including the elimination of obstacles to full participation of women in sustainable development will be in place by the year 2000.

Status   

In 1992, the percentage of women in national government was 6.7%. Between 1992 and 1996, the proportion of women in parliament declined from 14.4% to 7.8%. Within local government, 10.8% of decision makers were women in 1966.

Cooperation  

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women was signed in December 1979 and ratified in July 1992.

* * * 

This information was provided by the Government of Slovenia to the 5th Session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

For the National Office for Women's Policy, click here.

CHILDREN AND YOUTH

No information available.

INDIGENOUS PEOPLE

No information available.

NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies    

Major NGOs of Slovenia are not members of the National Sustainable Development Coordination Mechanism; and national groups have generally not participated in the sustainable development process to date. The Slovenian Government has included representatives from major NGOs in the national delegation to the Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD).

The overall contribution of major local, regional, and international NGOs groups to national sustainable development initiatives and activities has been "quite helpful." This participation tends to be on an ad hoc basis. Major organizations participate in national and local environmental impact assessment projects but individuals are also able to participate.

Status   

The major groups of Slovenia include: 

To support the role and contribution of major groups to national sustainable development efforts, Slovenia provides financial and technical assistance to support projects of the following groups: UMANOTERA (700,000 SIT); Tehniska fakulteta Maribor (500,000 SIT); DREVO (450,000 SIT); SEG (300,000 SIT).

* * * 

This information was provided by the Government of Slovenia to the 5th Session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

LOCAL AUTHORITIES

Status   

The overall contribution of major local groups, including local authorities, to sustainable development is rated as "quite helpful".

* * * 

This information was provided by the Government of Slovenia to the 5th Session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

WORKERS AND TRADE UNIONS

No information available.

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

No information available.

SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL COMMUNITY

No information available.

FARMERS

No information available

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SCIENCE

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies  

The permanent cooperation of the scientific sector is significant to a small country with a relatively small administration such as Slovenia. This is particularly true in terms of an integrated approach to the solution of particular problems. Science is incorporated into decision - making through the National Council for Science and Technology. In addtiion, it is incorporated through applied and target-oriented projects, to provide basic parameters for decision makers and for ad-hoc organized groups. The Council for Environmental Protection of the Republic of Slovenia is the institution which facilitates dialogue among the scientific community, the Government and the public at large with respect to issues related to sustainable development. It is also responsible for the transfer of reports and conclusions to the Parliament of the Republic of Slovenia, to ministries responsible for Sustainable Development, and to NGOs.

Research and Technologies  

To date, scientific research and recommendations have provided a professional basis for several governmental measures aimed at sustainable development. Scientific experts are regularly involved in activities for the preparation and implementation of the National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) and its numerous operative projects.

Scientists, often with the help of scholarships, are included in special research for projects supported through international cooperation. In addition, new graduate and post graduate programs primarily relevant to sustainable development have already been established.  The Science sector has conducted research on creating more sustainable production and consumption patterns by undertaking projects such as the following:

Research related to water management is currently being undertaken in Slovenia by public and private research institutes, universities, and consulting firms. Research is funded by Ministries, international funds, and industry. The results are published and made available to the public.

* * * 

This information was provided by the Government of Slovenia to the 5th and 6th Sessions of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 June 1998.

Ministry of Science and Technology
University of Ljubljana
University of Maribor
Jozef Stefan Institute
Council for Environmental Protection of the Republic of Slovenia
National Institute of Chemistry

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INFORMATION

Status   

The availability and quality of sustainable development information at the national level can be summarized as follows:

Agenda 21 Chapters

Very good

Good

Some good data but many gaps

Poor

Remarks

2. International cooperation and trade  

X

     
3. Combating poverty    

X

   
4. Changing consumption patterns    

X

   
5. Demographic dynamics and sustainability  

X

     
6. Human health  

X

     
7. Human settlements  

X

     
8. Integrating E & D in decision-making    

X

   
9. Protection of the atmosphere

X

       
10. Integrated planning and management of land resources    

X

   
11. Combating deforestation  

X

     
12. Combating desertification and drought  

X

     
13. Sustainable mountain development  

X

     
14. Sustainable agriculture and rural development    

X

   
15. Conservation of biological diversity  

X

     
16. Biotechnology    

X

   
17. Oceans, seas, coastal areas and their living resources  

X

     
18. Freshwater resources  

X

     
19. Toxic chemicals    

X

   
20. Hazardous wastes  

X

     
21. Solid wastes  

X

     
22. Radioactive wastes  

X

     
24. Women in sustainable development    

X

   
25. Children and youth    

X

   
26. Indigenous people      

X

 
27. Non-governmental organizations  

X

     
28. Local authorities      

X

 
29. Workers and trade unions      

X

 
30. Business and industry    

X

   
31. Scientific and technological community    

X

   
32. Farmers    

X

   
33. Financial resources and mechanisms    

X

   
34. Technology, cooperation and capacity-building    

X

   
35. Science for sustainable development    

X

   
36. Education, public awareness and training  

X

     
37. International cooperation for capacity-building  

X

     
38. International institutional arrangements  

X

     
39. International legal instruments    

X

   
40. Information for decision-making  

X

     

* * * 

This information was provided by the Government of Slovenia to the 5th Session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

For the National Statistics Office, click here.
For the Government Center for Informatics, click here.

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INTERNATIONAL LAW

Cooperation  

With the 1991 Declaration of Independence, Slovenia took over its duties according to all international agreements concluded by the former Yugoslavia, which, however, demanded a special, separate procedure for each individual obligation. Special attention had to be given to many international agreements in the field of environmental protection where obligations had not always been complied with in the past. In addition, the former Yugoslavia was not a contracting party to certain international agreements important to Slovenia; for example, the Basel Convention on the Control of the Transboundary Movement of Special Waste Materials and their Disposal, and the London Amendment on Ozone Depleting Substances. Apart from their environmental dimension, such agreements are of economic significance. Thus, accession to these agreements was a priority task for the country.

Since independence, Slovenia has become a signatory to the following International Conventions: the Montreal Protocol and the London Amendment both signed in 1992; the Convention on Biological Diversity signed in 1992 and ratified in 1996; the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea ratified in 1995; and the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal ratified in 1992.

* * * 

This information was provided by the Government of Slovenia to the 5th Session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.



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