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INSTITUTIONAL ASPECTS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN NIGERIA

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INTEGRATED DECISION-MAKING

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

Nigeria through the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA) had achieved the following major milestones in environmental protection and conservation of natural resources: development of the National Policy on the Environment; establishment of a National Council on Environment (NCE); establishment of a National Advisory Committee (NAC) on Agenda 21; review of National Environmental Policy Guidelines and Standards; enactment of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Law; establishment of a National Energy Policy; and enactment of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Legislation; implementation of the National Agenda 21; and the initial development of the VISION 2010 strategy.

The National Council on Environment, established in 1990, provides a forum for consultation and harmonization of environmental management matters throughout the Federation. Membership includes all the Commissioners responsible for the environment in all the States of the Federation as well as the Secretaries to the State Governments. Some of the achievements include the harmonization of environmental protection institutions throughout the Federation and the creation of State Environmental Protection Agencies in all the States of the Federation.

Following the Regional Workshop on the Implementation of Agenda 21 in Africa held in Abuja, Nigeria, the Federal Government established a National Advisory Committee on the Implementation of Agenda 21 in 1993. The Committee is made up of professionals from relevant private sector and government organizations, the academic community, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), and Community Based Organizations (CBOs). The Committee advises the Federal Government of Nigeria on sustainable development issues and strategies for implementing the provision of Agenda 21.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

As part of Government efforts towards integrating environmental concerns into development, the guidelines and standards approved prior to the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) were reviewed through Decree 59 in 1992. Apart from expanding the mandates of FEPA, the Decree legalized the proposed Guidelines and Standards for Environmental Pollution Control, the Regulations on Effluent Limitations, Pollution Abatement in Industries, and the Regulations for the Management of Solid and Hazardous Wastes.

The EIA Law was enacted by the Federal Government in 1992 as a tool for integrating environmental concerns into all major activities throughout the country. Procedural and Sectoral Guidelines for Agriculture and Rural Development, Oil and Gas, Infrastructural Manufacturing, and Mining activities in the country have also been put in place.

The Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Legislation was enacted in 1995, which sets standards and procedures for the safe use of nuclear radiation.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  


The National Policy on the Environment was launched by the Government on 27 November, 1989. It contains specific guidelines for achieving sustainable development in fourteen vital sectors of the nation's economy, namely: Human Population; Land Use and Soil Conservation; Water Resources Management; Forestry, Wildlife and Protected Natural Areas; Marine and Coastal Area Resources; Sanitation and Waste Management; Toxic and Hazardous Substances; Mining and Mineral Resources; Agricultural Chemicals; Energy Production; Air Pollution; Noise in the Working Environment; Settlements; Recreational Space, Green Belts, Monuments, and Cultural Property. The Policy is currently being reviewed by the Government in line with the challenges of the Vision 2010 and Agenda 21 programmes.

The Government through the Ministry of Science and Technology, has prepared a National Energy Policy that places emphasis on the exploitation of Nigeria's renewable and alternative energy sources (wind, solar, and biomass), and provides guidelines for environmental protection in the exploitation of Nigeria's fossil energy sources. It will soon be enacted into law.

Although the main thrust of Nigeria's petroleum policy is to increase the hydrocarbon reserve base through vigorous exploration, spurred by flexible and competitive fiscal incentives, environmental issues have been accorded considerable prominence in policy design. The Ministry of Petroleum Resources, through various Petroleum Acts and subsidiary legislation ensures that the petroleum industry carries out its activities safely and in an environmentally sound manner. Consequently, the Ministry has, within the past two decades, established measures to address the environmental problems associated with oil exploration, production, processing, transportation, storage, and marketing in the country. These measures include:

During the preliminary appraisal of the implementation of the National Agenda 21, several gaps were identified. These gaps have been incorporated into the laudable programmes of VISION 2010. The Federal Government of Nigeria recently mapped out plans and strategies toward the implementation of Agenda 21. The plans and strategies will be given in the detailed final report of the VISION 2010 committee recently inaugurated by the Government. It is a broad programme of actions aimed at rapid development of the country in terms of economic prosperity, political stability, and social harmonization.

Nigeria is confronted by major environmental problems, the most important of which are: deforestation, drought and desertification, soil and coastal erosion, water pollution, oil pollution, water hyacinth invasion, loss of biodiversity, flooding, urban decay, and industrial pollution. One important Sub-committee of VISION 2010 focuses on redressing these major existing environmental problems based on the goals of Agenda 21. Studies have indicated that the country would suffer large ecological and economic losses if these major environmental problems continue unchecked. Initial estimates indicate that the cost of unsustainable development for Nigeria may be as high as US $5.1 billion per year. Corrective action and new investment programmes are needed now to reduce and eventually prevent these losses.

Future measures are being considered to redress the major environmental problems affecting Nigeria. These measures build on the gains so far achieved in environmental protection and ensure that environmental protection programmes are anchored on a solid foundation. The strategy includes the following aspects: a) integrating environment into development planning and decision-making; b) strengthening the legal basis for sustainable development; c) creating and improving the capacity for sustainable development; d) harmonizing Federal, State and Local Government responsibilities for environmental management; e) adopting and promoting the use of existing environmentally friendly technologies; f) promoting research and development of environmentally sound technologies; g) forging viable partnerships among various stakeholders and interest groups both at National and international levels; h) managing environmental information and education to generate adequate public awareness for decision making; i) internalizing environmental costs through the use of economic instruments in the management of natural resources; j) alleviating poverty; and k) improving the funding for sustainable development.

It is necessary to enhance the capacity of the FEPA and other responsible organizations to enforce environmentally friendly practices and move towards achieving sustainable development. The strategy to accomplish this includes: a) expanding the fundamental objectives and state policy in the Constitution to include sustainable development as a National goal; b) the Government adopting the Polluter Pays Principle as an instrument of environmental protection policy and management; and c) speedy translation of international agreement protocols and conventions on environment and application into National laws and regulations, and their enforcement.

The strategy to integrate environment into economic and sectoral policies, planning and decision making processes includes: a) improving the provisions of the EIA Decree 86 of 1992, and ensuring its proper implementation; b) in parallel with current practice at the Federal level, establishing Sustainable Development Units (SDUs) in State Budget and Economic Offices with the same responsibility and function as the SDUs. in the National Planning Commission and the Urban and Regional Planning Department of the Ministry of Works and Housing to enable sustainable land use management; and c) adopting the System of National Accounting to adequately reflect the extent to which economic development activities have increased or decreased environmental pollution and natural resources on which future economic and social development depends.

Future plans to harmonize federal and state responsibilities for environmental management should ensure the optimum use of the limited technical and financial resources available to meet National goals and guidelines for environmental protection and sustainable development. The Federal responsibilities and functions should include: a) the establishment of environmental quality standards, and regulatory guidelines and procedures for implementing, enforcing, and evaluating such standards; b) the establishment of guidelines and procedures for project and policy environmental assessment screening and EIA as well as the necessary capacity to initiate and review them; c) the establishment of Federal Environmental Action Plans for execution by Federal Institutions; d) the establishment of consistent guidelines for state environmental management plans and action programmes, and the coordination of National and inter-State programmes, projects and exchanges of information on the environment; e) the review of federal policies which might have significant adverse impacts on the environment or natural resource base; f) the collection, analysis, and distribution of data relevant to EIA policy analysis and environmental monitoring as well as the preparation of periodic National reports on the state of the environment; g) the allocation and evaluation of the use of Federal funds for special environmental restoration, protection, and improvement programs and projects; h) the establishment and coordination of exchange of environmental information and expertise with relevant international agencies and international non-governmental organizations; and i) the development of special training programs for upgrading knowledge and skills in the various disciplines required for environmental management.

State responsibilities should include: a) the monitoring and enforcement of environmental quality standards and regulations as may be designated by FEPA to States; b) the regular assessment of environmental conditions and trends in rural areas and identification of programs and actions needed to reduce or avoid further environmental degradation and pollution; c) the application of the National environmental assessment guidelines and procedures for all development policies and projects likely to have adverse environmental impacts within the State; d) the development of a State environmental management plan with priorities for action to reverse environmental degradation, protect human health and the environment, and accelerate progress towards environmental improvement and sustainable development; e) the development of contingency plans and capabilities to respond quickly and effectively to environmental emergencies such as natural disasters or major industrial accidents; f) the collection, analysis, and distribution of data of relevance to EIAs, policy analysis, and environmental monitoring within the State and local governments; and g) the preparation of periodic reports on the state of the environment in their State or community for submission to the National Council on the Environment.

The strategy to achieve participation and cooperation of other groups includes: a) the installation of very effective machinery to enhance environmental awareness through public enlightenment and environmental education at all levels of society; b) establishment of environmental data banks and information networks; c) creation of fora for building consensus and for the exchange of information among all stakeholders and interest groups on sustainable development decisions; and d) the strengthening of mutually beneficial relationships with bilateral and multilateral environmental bodies, including regional and international NGOs. Inadequate trained manpower in the area of integrated environmental management is a major constraint in Nigeria. Also, there is inadequate awareness of the importance of environment and natural resources management especially in resource accounting. Lack of appreciation and involvement of the general public in environment related issues and development, and insufficient popular participation in project design and implementation will for some time constrain the attainment of Agenda 21 goals. Available technology in the country appears grossly inadequate to meet the challenges of implementing Agenda 21 and the programme of technology transfer is yet to be fully implemented.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

The constraints to the effective implementation of Agenda 21 are: a) uncoordinated policy and legal instruments in environmental and natural resources conservation in Nigeria; b) the existence of a large number of disparate legislation and policy documents directed at individual environmental or resources issues or problems; c) weak databases and inadequate/inaccurate data adversely affecting policy formulation, project planning, and implementation of environment and natural resources conservation; d) the inadequate and unsystematic inventory of Nigeria's natural resources and the dearth of detailed technical data that could be used to plan the management and National utilization of resources; e) the enforcement of existing environmental rules and regulations and the inadequacy of monitoring and enforcement mechanisms; and f) inadequate institutional capacity, and inter-sectoral communication and co-ordination to manage the environmental and resource management network throughout the country.

Government might be well committed to the objectives, policies, and mechanisms for achieving sustainable development, but it will take the commitment and genuine involvement of all groups in society to make this goal a reality. It requires the forging of a partnership of not only shareholders, but the stakeholders in environmental issues. Broad public participation in policy development, combined with greater accountability, is essential to achieving sustainable development. Individuals, groups, and organizations need to know about and participate in environment and development decisions, particularly those which can affect their communities. For people to make informed decisions, they must have access to all relevant information on environment and development issues. This includes information on products and activities that have or are likely to have significant impact on the environment, and information on environmental protection measures. Considering the transboundary nature of environmental problems and the fact that no nation on its own can achieve sustainable development, there is also the need to foster bilateral and multilateral cooperation to facilitate exchange of ideas and the transfer of sound environmental technologies and concerted global action affordable and adaptable to local needs.

The major constraint to the implementation of Agenda 21 remains the financial provisions for implementation. The average annual incremental cost of implementing Agenda 21 in developing countries have been estimated at US$ 600 billion dollars out of which only US$ 125 billion dollars or 25% is expected to be contributed by developed countries. This implies that a larger proportion of the money is to be supplied by the developing countries including Nigeria. The country's high debt servicing profile makes this impracticable. Currently about one-third of the annual budget goes into external debt servicing. Accordingly, implementation of Agenda 21 in Nigeria will require the assistance of relevant international, multilateral, and bilateral agencies, such as the United Nations, the World Bank/International Development Association (IDA), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF). Possible assistance options that may be considered by the IMF and the World Bank/lDA is the conversion of the country's debt service flows into investments in environmental management and protection programmes and projects.

National Decision-Making Structure

1.National Sustainable Development Coordination Body: YES
2.National Sustainable Development Policy: YES
3.National Agenda 21/other strategy for SD: YES
4.Local/Regional Agenda(s) 21: IN PROCESS
5.Environmental Impact Assessment Law: YES
6.Major Groups involved in Sustainable Development Decision-Making: YES

National Instruments and Programmes

1.Sustainable. Dev. or Environmental education incorporated into school curricula: YES
2.Sustainable Development Indicators Program: IN PROCESS
3.Ecolabel Regulations: IN PROCESS
4.Recycle/Reuse Programs: YES
5.Green Accounting Program: YES
6.Access to Internet: YES
7.Access to World Wide Web: YES
8.A national World Wide Web Site for Sustainable Dev. or State of the Environment: IN PROCESS
 

Policies, Programmes, and Legislation

1.Combatting poverty: YES
2.Changing consumption and production patterns: YES
3.Atmosphere: YES
4.Land Use Planning: YES
5.Forest and Deforestation: YES
6.Desertification and Drought: YES
7.Sustainable Mountain Development: YES
8.Sustainable Agriculture: YES
9.Biological Diversity: YES
10.Biotechnology: YES
11.Oceans and Coastal Areas: YES
12.Freshwater Management: YES
13.Toxic Chemicals: YES
14.Hazardous Wastes: YES
15.Solid Wastes: YES
16.Radioactive Wastes: IN PROCESS
17.Energy: YES
18.Transport: YES
19.Sustainable Tourism: YES

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies  

No information is available.

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information is based on Nigeria's Report to the fifth and seventh Sessions of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development.  Last update: April 1999

For national information on impact assessment, including the Environmental Impact Assessment Decree; the Federal Environmental Protection Agency Decree; and the Federal Environmental Protection (Amendment) Decree, click here.
For leglislation on Environmental Protection, click here.
For information on Environmental Law around the World, click here:

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MAJOR GROUPS

Women

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   


As a demonstration of Government's recognition of gender initiatives in sustainable development, the National Commission for Women has been upgraded to the Ministry of Women's Affairs. The new Ministry recently organized a post-Beijing National Workshop held in April 1996 in Maiduguri. Technical and financial assistance were given by the Federal Environment Protection Agency (FEPA) to demonstrate its support for Women's efforts in raising the level of environmental awareness in Nigeria. In order to tap women's knowledge on issues related to the environment, FEPA has strengthened the Women Environment Desk within its structure. The Agency was very active in the National Preparatory Committee set up by the National Commission for Women to prepare the National position for the Fourth World Conference on Women held in Beijing, China in 1995.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

Several of the activities embarked on have continued to yield positive results. As a result of an increased level of awareness, for example, women have been mobilized to undertake various projects on resources conservation especially in the area of waste recycling.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women was ratified in Nigeria in 1985.

 

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This information was provided by the Government of Nigeria to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

For information on WomenWatch in different countries, click here:
For information on national plans of action in the follow-up to the Beijing Conference, click here:

Children and Youth

No information is available.

 

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Indigenous People

No information is available.

 

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Non-Governmental Organizations

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   


Government collaborative efforts with NGOs has been a most valued instrument for information and a catalyst for grassroots participation in activities aimed at implementing Agenda 21. There has been a steady increase in the number of NGOs concerned with environment over the past two decades. The principal ones include the Forestry Association of Nigeria (FAN), the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF), the Nigerian Environmental Society (NES), the Nigerian Environmental Study/Action Team (NEST), the Foundation for Environmental Development and Education in Nigeria (FEDEN), the Country Women Association of Nigeria (COWAN), the Ecological Society of Nigeria (ECOSON), the Friends of the Environment (FOTE), the Centre for African Settlement Studies and Development (CASSAD), EANET Africa, the Media Practitioners Environment Group, the Fisheries Society of Nigeria (FISON), and the Nigeria Regional Group of the International Bar Association of Nigeria (NRG/IBA). A number of key NGOs located in different parts of the country have been consistently implementing different aspects of Agenda 21 in different communities working in collaboration with Community Based Organizations.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

No information is available.

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information was provided by the Government of Nigeria to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

Local Authorities

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The Government has stipulated that all States of the Federation that have established their Environmental Protection Agencies should implement the National Policy on Environment and enforce environmental standards and regulations within their area of jurisdiction. Virtually all States have almost completed the preparation of their long-term State Environmental Action Plans (SEAP) under the World Bank assisted Environmental Management Project for Nigeria. The overall goal of SEAP is to strengthen the capacity of State Environmental Protection Agencies to identify and prioritize environmental problems in their domains and formulate projects to mitigate the identified problems.

Apart from the State Environmental Protection Agencies, line ministries/agencies at local levels are responsible for compliance monitoring of environment guidelines and standards. These include Urban Planning and Development Departments, Environmental Sanitation Task Forces, and Forestry Guards.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information was provided by the Government of Nigeria to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

Workers and Trade Unions

No information is available.

 

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Business and Industry

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The Government is actively encouraging the establishment of environmental desks by some organized private sectors such as the Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN), the National Association of Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture (NACCIMA), the Oil Producers Trade Sector (OPTS), the Clean Nigerian Associates (CNA), etc. Environment Units have been established by most oil companies and manufacturing industries for more effective monitoring and protection of the environment, and for health and safety matters.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information was provided by the Government of Nigeria to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

Scientific and Technical Community

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

In the scientific and technical community, the Government through the Ministry of Science and Technology is carrying out, on a continuous basis, training of manpower in leather production, foundry, and equipment fabrication; and organizing workshops and seminars for personnel from industries in the areas of assessment and management of technology.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information was provided by the Government of Nigeria to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

Farmers

No information is available.

 

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SCIENCE

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

The Federal Government, through the Ministry of Science and Technology, is currently undertaking a review of the National Policy on Science and Technology, enacted in 1986. The Government views this policy as a key instrument for sustainable development.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information was provided by the Government of Nigeria to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

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INFORMATION

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

Sustainable development requires intelligent environmental decisions. Sound environmental decisions can only be made with the help of timely, relevant, and reliable information. With this in mind, the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA), as the coordinating agency for environmental issues in Nigeria, has taken concrete steps to facilitate the acquisition and exchange of environmental information both before and after the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). These steps are consistent with recommendation 101 of the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment as well as the concerns expressed at UNCED in 1992. The steps include: a) the establishment of a Data Management and Information Unit; b) the establishment of an environmental reference library; c) Nigeria's active participation in the International Environmental Information Network (INFOTERRA) of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

The strategy to improve information for decision making includes: a) establishment of a functional data management and information system capable of managing environmental trends over time by 1998; b) developing a baseline database on the state of urban air, freshwater, forests and rangelands, desertification, soil degradation, biodiversity, industrial pollution, and oil pollution by 1999; c) monitoring the state of the Nigerian environment on a continuous basis and publishing regular bulletins to guide policy formulation and decision-making processes; d) acquiring and/or seeking necessary assistance for direct access to information systems such as data from satellites; e) creating greater harmonization among different environmental data gathering organizations; f) developing an inter-sectoral framework and infrastructure for sharing of data, expertise and resources on environmental information; g) promoting standardization of data formats, and minimizing and/or eliminating duplication of efforts in environmental information management; h) developing an information access and use policy, including the resolution of copyright issues on environmental information; and i) developing a core of indigenous professionals for the efficient management of Geographical Information Systems and other spatial information technologies.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

The Data Management and Information Unit was established as one of the major components of the World Bank assisted Environmental Management Project in Nigeria. The project commenced in 1992 shortly after UNCED. The Unit is a network in which FEPA as the cental node is connected to other sectoral nodes dealing with forestry, natural resources, land, and water resources conservation.

FEPA established an environmental reference Library at its headquarters in Abuja in 1994 to provide the public with excellent and up-to-date reading materials on environmental issue. This is in addition to the existing library at the Lagos Office. The Headquarters Library is stocked mainly with the publications of the Agency, UNEP, the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and other global donors. The Library has 30 serial publications, 33 FEPA publications, and 2,100 monograph titles. The Library is currently being expanded and computerized under the World Bank Assisted Environmental Management Project in Nigeria The facility is being used by various Government agencies, universities, the private sector, and individual consultants from all over Nigeria.

FEPA continues to be an active member of INFOTERRA as part of its efforts to encourage information exchange on the environment. INFOTERRA is the global environmental information exchange network with National Focal Points in 174 Countries coordinated by UNEP. Nigeria joined the network in 1974. To date, the Agency has forwarded 25 local sources of environmental information for inclusion in the International Directory of Sources. In addition, 35 sources have been identified for registration while a National directory of sources is being compiled for publication. Plans are underway to establish sub-focal points in the Environmental Protection Agencies of the 36 States of the Federation and the Federal Capital Territory. FEPA is consulting with UNEP on the possibility of establishing an INFOTERRA Regional Service Centre in Nigeria for the anglophone West African countries. As part of this programme, the Ministry of Science and Technology has established a three-tier linkage (Federal, State, Local Government) for disseminating timely technical data for decision-making applications related to the establishment of cottage, small, and medium scale industries. In addition, the Ministry is in the process of establishing a wide area network to link all research institutes for information exchange and to facilitate institutional linkages.

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

A wealth of information that could be used for the management of sustainable development is available within various organizations and individuals in Nigeria. However, many people, including decision makers, have difficulties in finding the information they need, when they need it, and in useful formats. The existing environmental information is yet to be adequately managed due to shortages of needed technology and trained specialists, lack of awareness of its value and availability, and the narrow demands of data collecting individuals and organizations. There is also a need for different types of information. Commonly used indicators such as GNP and measurements of individual resource or pollution flows do not provide enough information about sustainability.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information was provided by the Government of Nigeria to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: 1 April 1997.

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INTERNATIONAL LAW

No information is available.

 

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