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Economic Aspects | Natural Resource Aspects | Institutional Aspects | Social Aspects |Nepal

NATURAL RESOURCE ASPECTS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN NEPAL

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AGRICULTURE

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The Ministry of Agriculture, in collaboration with other line agencies such as the Ministry of Local Development, the Ministry of Water Resources, and the Ministry of Forests, is responsible for sustainable agriculture and rural development. The National Planning Commission (NPC) is the apex body formulating and monitoring the national plans on sustainable development. People, including farmers, NGOs, and the private sector are involved in this field. This is consistent with the efforts of Nepal which, after restoring a multi-party democracy, has been trying to practice decentralization through participatory decision-making. It is considered important in order to assist the people to exercise their power of choice, action, leadership and accountability.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

One of the major goals of the ongoing Eighth Five-Year Plan (1992-1997) is sustainable development.

Agriculture is very important to Nepal as it alone contributes to about 60% of the GDP, and provides employment to nearly 80% of the entire population. The percentages of the total land area used for agriculture are 9.3% in the mountains, 43.1% in the hills and 47.6% in the Terai. It is estimated that about 986,898 ha of the land area (6.5% of the country's total land area) are still available for agricultural production.

Nepal has to integrate a developmental dimension into land productivity within the Rural Development Programme as well as open up off-farm economic opportunities for industrial development based on the resources available in the mountain terrain. Recent studies indicate that the pre- and post-harvest losses in food crops caused by pests and diseases range from 20 to 35%. In 1996, a severe outbreak of rice hopper affecting an area of about 2,000 ha was recorded in the main rice growing belt of the south causing a loss of an estimated NRs 50 million.

Nepal may be among the few countries in the world where farmers use traditional botanicalpesticides with considerable success in crop protection. Exploiting these skills, His Majesty's Government of Nepal (HMG/N) has launched an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Programme in the Kingdom, and IPM has now been endorsed as the national policy. HGM/N is in the process of establishing a National Steering Committee for the effective launching of the IPM Programme.

HMG/N has established Regional Plant Protection Laboratories in five different development regions, though there is still a lack of human resources, equipment and infrastructural support.

A project proposal called IPM for the Reduction of Crop Losses has been prepared and submitted to the Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammen Arbeit (GTZ) (Germany). A similar project proposal, IPM in Rice, has also been prepared and submitted to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Both funders have given a positive response.

Among Nepal's cooperative efforts are:

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

See under Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  .

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.

To access the FAOSTAT Data Base for information by country, item, element and year, click here:
Click here to link to the Biosafety Information Network and Advisory Service (BINAS), a service of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), which monitors global developments in regulatory issues in biotechnology.
Click here to link to Country and Sub-regional Information on Plant Genetic Resources of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations.
Click here to go to Web Site of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, which includes information on the Codex Alimentarius and the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme.
Click here to access the Web Site of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR).
Click here to access the sixteen international agricultural research centers that are members of the CGIAR.

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ATMOSPHERE

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

See under Status.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

No information is available.

Status 

The protection of the atmosphere is a worldwide concern and Nepal, as a Least Developed Country, cannot afford to invest in this issue without compromising its economic growth and development.

With regard to the import and export of substances and products affecting the atmosphere, such as fossil fuels, industrial goods, agricultural chemicals and so forth, different governmental and non-governmental organizations make their own decisions depending on the national policies. There are no institutions or research groups with specific technology for improving the state of the environment. The Department of Hydrology and Meteorology has, to some extent, been supported by the US Government in assessing the nation's vulnerability to the impacts of climate change, and in preparing the national inventory of greenhouse gases. A preliminary national inventory of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 was prepared for 1990/91/92.

The Government of Nepal has actively promoted the development of greenhouse gas-free hydropower energy. It is estimated that Nepal has a theoretical hydropower potential of 83,000MW, of which 42,000 MW can be generated according to the economic feasibility studies. The installed hydropower generation capacity in the country is around 233 MW which is less than 0.3% of the total theoretical potential. The Government policy for the massive production of hydropower energy in Nepal has largely been targeted to the vast village communities which otherwise depend on the already dwindling forests and woods which are also the potential carbon dioxide sinks. Conservation and extension programmes of these forests are also being adopted and encouraged at the community level.

Challenges

One problem is that, from 1990 to 1994, the number of registered vehicles increased by 53%, from 68,891 to 130,958 vehicles and, in fact, the rate of annual change was even higher prior to 1990.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

Nepal signed the Montreal Protocol (1987) on 6 July 1994 and the London Amendment (1990) signed in 6 July 1994. It signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change on 2 May 1994. As a least developed country, the submission of Nepal's first report is left to its discretion.

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.

Click here for national information from the Web site of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

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BIODIVERSITY

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

Nepal is trying to develop an innovative, decentralized decision-making process involving the Department for National Parks and Wildlife Conservation (DNPWC), national NGOs, and international NGOs.

Other items of note include:

The DNPWC needs to expand its staffing and training activities for effective conservation and management. Training of professional, technical as well as administrative staff is necessary in order to strengthen DNPWC's capacity.

It is estimated that the financing needed for this area is US$ 67 million. Nepal cooperates with the World Wildlife Fund, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), the Mountain Institute USA, CARE International, and ICIMOD.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

Nepal signed the Convention on Biological Diversity in 1992, and ratified it in 1993. The Convention on International Trade in Endangeredof Wild Fauna and Flora was signed by Nepal in 1975, and the latest report was submitted in 1995.

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.

For access to the Web Site of the Convention on Biological Diversity, click here:
For access to the Web Site of the CITES Convention, click here:
For the Web Site of the CMS Convention, click here:
For the Web Site of the Convention on the Protection of the World's Cultural and Natural Heritage, click here:
For the country-by-country, Man in the Biosphere On-Line Query System, click here:
Click here to link to the Biosafety Information Network and Advisory Service (BINAS), a service of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), which monitors global developments in regulatory issues in biotechnology.
Click here to go to the Web Site of UNEP's International Register on Biosafety.
Click here for the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Biosafety WebPages

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DESERTIFICATION AND DROUGHT

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

Responsible for this area at the central level are: The Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation, the National Planning Commission, the Ministry of Finance (MOF), and the Ministry of Population and Environment; at the district level, District D C and District Soil Conservation Offices; and at the community level, user groups. NGOs, and GOs.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

Active participation of local people is important in land-use planning, forest management, and watershed development. Ecological rehabilitation and specific measures on land and resources have been the appropriate base for sustainable development. Experiences to date show that planning, decision-making and implementation efficiency is to grow from the grassroots level. Policies for resource management, ecological balance and industrial growth prevail in a broader sphere of human undertakings. Updating policy formulations need to be in terms of achieving the objectives through ensured implementation and of strengthening regional cooperation in specific issues of concern. National and regional activities need to be active simultaneously and be directed towards providing capacity for resource management.

Programmes and Projects 

The Department of Soil Conservation is planning, implementing and monitoring the Soil Conservation and Watershed Management (SCWM) Programme through its District Soil Conservation Offices in 45 of 75 districts. The SCWM Programme includes land-use development and improvement, land productivity conservation, erosion hazard prevention, infrastructural protection, and community soil conservation and income generation activities.

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

Nepal needs capacity-building for the technical and professional staff and, at the local level, awareness-building and transfer of technology.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies  

No information is available.

Financing

Finance for activities includes national funds and external assistance. Nepal cooperates with FARM; CLASP (FAO); ICIMOD.

Cooperation

Nepal signed the International Convention to Combat Desertification in Countries Experiencing Drought and/or Desertification Particularly in Africa in 1994, and ratified it in 1996. Nepal took an active part in the UN Conference on Desertification (1977), and in the formulation of the UN Plan of Action to Combat Desertification. For Nepal, being a mountainous country, combating desertification is a matter of great concern both in developmental activities as well as in regional cooperation.

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.

For access to the Web Site of the Convention to Combat Desertification and Drought, click here:

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ENERGY

No information is available.

 

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FORESTS

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

Agencies reposnsible for forests include the Department of Forests of The Ministry of Forest and Soil Conservation, The National Planning Commission, District Forest Offices, and NGOs and local communities (user groups).

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

Thirty-seven percent (5.4 million ha) of the total land area of Nepal is covered by natural forests, and another 16% is potentially suitable for forest development or for rangeland. Forests are the main natural resources of Nepal. Various programmes have been launched to develop the forestry sector, including forest management programmes under which, for example community groups have been formed. Other programmes have been designed for the production of saplings, for afforestation, and for the implementation of national and leasehold forestry programmes.

Programmes related to forests, soil and watershed conservation, and to the production and processing of medicinal herbs, have also been undertaken. Strengthening the capacities of both the governmental and semi-governmental organizations at all levels, from central to local level, is essential for the successful implementation of these programmes. Similarly, relevant laws and regulations are being reviewed and revised to meet operational needs.

Examples of forestry development projects:

I. The Hills Leasehold Forestry and Forage Development Project

The objectives:

Approach: A participatory approach is the basis for the implementation of the project. The project is specifically designed for the marginal and landless families to supplement the efforts of the Government's Community Forestry Programme. Main activities include:

Status through July 1996:

Finance:

II. The Hill Community Forestry Development Project:

The objective: To develop and manage forest resources through active participation of the local people to meet their basic needs of forest products.

Strategy: By gradually handing over all accessible hill forests to the communities (user groups) to the extent that they are able and willing to manage the forests.

Status (from 1989/90 to 1995/96):

Data were collected from 51 districts. In order to strengthen the capacity to implement the programme, several training programmes have been organized in the districts on various aspects such as community forest management and nursery management. In addition, workshops on user group networking and field trips have been organized for user groups and progressive farmers. Because of this training, the user groups are more capable of managing the forests handed over to them. People are also more aware of the programme objectives and take more interest in the community forest management and in informing user groups. The district forest offices receive more and more requests from the communities to participate in the project.

Financing of the Hill Community Forestry Development Project:

On forestry programs, Nepal coperates with the World Bank; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO); International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO); International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD); United States Agency for International Development (USAID); Government of the Netherlands; Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), SNV; Government of Australia; Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammen Arbeit (GTZ) (Germany); and others on this issue.

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

Technology is provided for forest management, plantation and nursery techniques. Academic and technical training is provided to the concerned staff, and local communities are also provided with various kinds of training.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies  

No information is available.

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.


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FRESHWATER

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

Nepal's goal for this sector is poverty alleviation through the sustainable development of water resources. Responsible for this are The Ministry of Water Resources, The Department of Water Supply and Sewerage, and The Nepal Water Supply Corporation (which follows the government corporation decisionmaking procedures). Projects run by the Users' Committees follow the decision-making procedures of NGOs.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

No information is available.

Status 

With regard to drinking water, the national coverage at the end of the fiscal year 1993/94 was as follows:

 

Challenges

Among the difficulties in this area:

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.


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LAND MANAGEMENT

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

To make land use and environmental information effective, an appropriate institutional system will be developed under the National Planning Commission by integrating scattered units into a single unit.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

Management of land resources has been deemed critical from the point of view of sustainable agricultural production. Improved agricultural output is the only way towards economic growth and poverty alleviation. Soil fertility is a crucial element in determining the productivity of the land. It has been noted that soil fertility is declining in many parts of Nepal, having a negative impact on the yield of the key crops. Changes in farming practices are needed to reverse this trend, and institutional improvements are imperative for agricultural research and extension.

Agricultural policies must be flexible in order to conform to the features of different agro-ecological zones and thus take maximum advantage of the diversity of natural resources. As Nepal adjusts to these essential requirements, the production of food grains, fruit farming and livestock farming will be gradually expanded. In addition, district level planning will have a significant role. Therefore, a mapping system for districts will be developed taking into account different agro-ecological zones.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

No information is available.

Status 

There is a great diversity in the nature of different geographical regions of Nepal. The Terai occupies 23.11%, whereas hills and mountains cover 35.21% and 41.68%, respectively, of the country's total land area. Eighteeen percent of Nepal's land area is not in use, including barren land, land-slide affected areas, snow-covered land, etc. Of the remaining 82%, 20% is reserved for agricultural purposes.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.


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MOUNTAINS

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The Ministry of Population and Environment and sectoral ministries are responsible for mountain development.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

Nepal is a Himalayan terrain with hills and mountains covering three quarters of the country's total land area. Because of the pronounced steepness and fragility of the land, there are landslide and erosion problems which limit its productivity.

Migration from the hills and mountains to the Terai is likely to continue as new infrastructure increasingly opens up in the south, and as the disparity between incomes in upland and lowland regions continues to grow.

The hills and mountains need to be developed in an ecologically sustainable way with the development of watersheds and by providing hydropower to industrial establishments. Growing urbanization, markets and employment accelerate the economy in the hinterlands. This is still a matter of operational research and cautious practices. The ecologically and economically strained hills and mountains have to develop their unique but intrinsic potential to support the population growth. More research is needed in order to improve the productivity in terms of crop yield in the hills to serve the needs of the people living in the inner remote terrain.

Among policies of the Government:

 

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

No information is available.

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies  

No information is available.

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.


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OCEANS AND COASTAL AREAS

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

No information is available.

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

Although a land-locked country, Nepal has signed (but not yet ratified) the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.


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TOXIC CHEMICALS

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The Ministry of Health controls the use of toxic chemicals.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

Chemical manufacturing industries are now required to obtain a permit. The proponents need to submit IEE or EIA reports depending upon their annual production capacity. Importation of toxic chemicals also requires a permit from the Ministry of Home Affairs.

Among industrial users, to date, very little pollution abatement equipment has been used by industries in Nepal. Investors wishing to maximise profits have opted for the cheapest technology, which, unfortunately, often turns out to be the most polluting one as well. It is the people in general who have to face the consequences of such decisions. Therefore, industries need to adopt less polluting technologies, and for that, His Majesty's Government of Nepal (HMG/N) may need to offer a limited range of subsidies as well as provide the technologies directly. Research has already been carried out in Nepal to identify pollution prone industries. The cement, leather and tanning, paper and pulp, soap and chemicals, sugar and textile industries have all been identified as major sources of various kinds of pollution.

HMG adopted the Pesticides Act in 1991, and Pesticides Regulation in 1993. In accordance with these laws, Nepal has established the Nepal Pesticide Board which will assist the Government in formulating pesticide policies and in adopting regulatory measures for the safe use of these.

There are about 10 major importers of pesticides in the country and nearly 100 domestic retail outlets. The predominant users of toxic chemicals, especially pesticides, are farmers who are also over 90% of the Nepalese population. Due to the lack of appropriate Integrated Pest Management technologies, farmers have been largely dependent on using these chemicals for pest control to obtain the expected yield. This has, in isolated cases, begun to cause health and environmental hazards.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

Among actions against toxic chemicals in the agriculture sector,

Lack of sound human resoures, R&D and infrastructural support make this a difficult issue for Nepal. FAO's assistance is being sought in order to strengthen plant quarantine and to implement the IPM programme.

Status 

As a member country, Nepal takes active part in the work of RENPAP (Regional Network on Pesticides for Asia and the Pacific) of the United Nations, and tries to establish links with other agencies such as FINNIDA (Finland), GTZ (Germany) and others.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.

To access the Web Site of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, click here:

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WASTE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

Solid Waste and Sanitation

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The National Council for Solid Waste Management is responsible for policy formulation at the national level and the Solid Waste Management and Resource Mobilization Center (SWMRMC) is responsible for landfill management in Kathmandu Valley. Local (municipal) bodies are responsible in the field.

The responsibility for public sanitation is divided among several institutions:

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

Nepal has a programme on waste management concentrating on street cleaning, waste collection, transport and landfill deposit activities. In urban and suburban areas, solid wastes have been identified as problematic.

In 1987, an act was adopted with a view to systematizing waste management in Kathmandu and to seek possibilities of recycling solid wastes into economic resources. In accordance with the act, the Solid Waste Management and Resources Mobilization Center was established. Composting activities were carried out by the Center with successful results, but were dropped for various reasons after 3-4 years. At present, the Center is responsible for the management of sanitary landfill sites, and the rest of the waste management activities are undertaken by municipalities.

Recently, His Majesty's Government (HMG) adopted a national policy for solid waste management in order to set standards for waste disposal, recycling and reuse. A National Council for Solid Waste Management has been set up under the chairmanship of the Ministry of Local Development. In addition, the Ministry undertakes major activities in this field. The role of local governments needs to be strengthened as self-contained and active agencies in waste management. They are encouraged to take more responsibitlities in accordance with their capacities.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies

No information is available.  

Financing

Municipal bodies and HMG/Nepal finance solid waste activities.

Cooperation

No information is available.



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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.

Hazardous Wastes

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The Ministry of Population and Environment is responsible for decision-making on hazardous wastes. At present, Nepal does not perceive itself to have a hazardous waste problem. In the future, activities will be regulated in accordance with the Basel Convention.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects

No information is available. 

Status 

No information is available.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

In November 1996, the Ministry of Population and Environment organized a one-day workshop on the Basel Convention and management of solid wastes in Kathmandu Valley. In the workshop, environmental experts and concerned officials from different governmental and non-governmental organizations discussed national policies and programmes for the control of transboundary movement of hazardous wastes and their disposal. In the conclusions of the workshop it was stressed that national policies need to be revised in accordance with the convention, and that the nature of toxic wastes should be identified so as to minimize their potential risks. Wastes from hospitals, laboratories, pathological clinics, and the leather industry cause massive harm to human health. In addition, the experts stressed that it is important to see the issue of hazardous waste in a global context as well as a domestic context and to integrate this issue into overall sustainable decision-making.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies  

No information is available.

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

Nepal ratified the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal in 1996.

 

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This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.

For direct link to the Web Site of the Basel Convention, click here:

Radioactive Wastes

Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

The Ministry of Population and Environment is responsible for radioactive wastes.

Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

No information is available.

Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

No information is available.

Programmes and Projects 

No information is available.

Status 

Safe disposal of radioactive waste is a growing concern for Nepal. However, there are no provisions for this newly emerging problem. Scientific research and consultation at regional and international levels is useful for Nepal when developing national policies and legislation in this respect.

Challenges

No information is available.

Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

No information is available.

Information

No information is available.

Research and Technologies  

No information is available.

Financing

No information is available.

Cooperation

No information is available.

 

* * *

 

This information is based on Nepal's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997.


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