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Economic Aspects | Natural Resource Aspects | Institutional Aspects | Social Aspects |Guyana

NATURAL RESOURCE ASPECTS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN GUYANA

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  • Agriculture
  • Atmosphere
  • Biodiversity
  • Desertification and Drought
  • Energy
  • Forests
  • Freshwater
  • Land Management
  • Mountains
  • Oceans and Coastal Areas
  • Toxic Chemicals
  • Waste and Hazardous Materials

    AGRICULTURE

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    The Ministry of Agriculture remains at the centre of the institutional make up of the agricultural sector. Many local, national and international institutions and agencies are directly or indirectly involved in the agricultural sector.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects 

    No information is available.

    Status 

    Under the Agricultural sector loan, sponsored by the Inter American Development Bank (IDB), the Government has taken actions on key agricultural policies, in order to meet basic objectives of consolidation of commodity trade liberalization and extending the benefits of the adjustment process to key agricultural markets. This programme focused on:

    Agricultural activities in Guyana are concentrated on the coastal plain, which represents less than 10% of the country's total land area. Seventy percent of Guyana's population lives in rural households and is primarily dependent on the income from agriculture and related activities.

    Agriculture is the single most important sector of Guyana's economy both in terms of foreign exchange generation and the number of people employed. In 1995, agriculture and fisheries contributed about 38% of GDP and 43% of foreign exchange earning.

    Government has clearly placed top priority on the rehabilitation of rural infrastructures - drainage and irrigation, sea defence, and roads, in addition to other social infrastructure, such as water, rural schools, and health clinics, which serve to improve the attractiveness of agriculture and rural life in general.

    In December 1994 the Ministry of Agriculture signed an agreement with IICA whereby the latter would administer G $17 million and provide technical assistance for the management of an integrated rural development project with three basic sub-components:

    1. the development of a sustainable community agro-forestry project at Tapakuma;
    2. the partial rehabilitation of four government plant nurseries, and
    3. the strengthening of community capabilities to manage and maintain drainage and irrigation facilities at Mocha/Arcadia, Region 4.

    At Tapakuma, 50 acres of cleared forest land are being developed into sustainable agro-forestry enterprises. Research and development work are executed under community control.

    In the case of Mocha/Arcadia, efforts have gone into strengthening a small association of vegetable and food crop farmers, developing their managerial skills and providing guidance in their accessing of D & I services from public and private sectors.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available.  

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    No information is available.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update:1 April 1997

    To access the FAOSTAT Data Base for information by country, item, element and year, click here:
    Click here for information on land and agriculture.
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    Click here to link to the Biosafety Information Network and Advisory Service (BINAS), a service of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), which monitors global developments in regulatory issues in biotechnology.
    Click here to link to Country and Sub-regional Information on Plant Genetic Resources of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations.
    Click here to go to Web Site of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, which includes information on the Codex Alimentarius and the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme.
    Click here to access the Web Site of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR).
    Click here to access the sixteen international agricultural research centers that are members of the CGIAR.
    For country reports on Plant Genetic Resources, click here.
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    ATMOSPHERE

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available. 

    Status 

    No information is available.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available.  

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    Guyana ratified the Montreal Protocol (1987) on12 August 1993. Neither the London Amendment (1990) nor the Copenhagen Amendment (1992) has yet been signed. The latest report to the Montreal Protocol Secretariat was prepared on 31 December 1996

    Guyana ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in 1994. No report has, as yet, been submitted to the UNFCCC Secretariat due to the unavailability of financial wherewithal.

    However, Guyana is moving toward compliance with its obligations under the Convention. For example, Guyana will be participating in a regional project to be executed by the OAS and known as Caribbean Planning for Adaptation to Climate Change (CPACC). Under this project, Guyana will join with other CARICOM States to develop national programmes to mitigate climate and climate change by monitoring same. In so doing, Guyana will:

    1. create climate change databases
    2. inventories coastal resources and use
    3. conduct coastal vulnerability and risk assessments
    4. formulate a policy framework for coastal and marine management
    5. develop an economic valuation of coastal and marine resources
    6. develop economic and regulatory proposals for adaptation to climate change and;
    7. provide for institutional strengthening and human resource development of relevant national agencies.

    Guyana has applied to the UNDP and GEF for assistance in developing and publishing periodic national inventories of anthropogenic emissions. A UNDP consultant visited Guyana in late 1996 to assess the needs of the country.

     

     

     

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    This information was provided by the Government of Guyana to the fifth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development. Last Update: April 1997.

    Click here for national information from the Web site of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.
    For access to the Web Site of the Ozone Secretariat, click here

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    BIODIVERSITY

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    Please refer to the paragraph under Status.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available. 

    Status 

    The institutional arrangements relating to the coordination of all activities in the management of biological diversity have been assigned to the Environmental Protection Agency under the Environmental Protection Act of 1996. Imminent legislation will require the equitable sharing of benefits derived from the use and knowledge of biological diversity as well as safeguard the interests of local and indigenous people and ensuring their participation in the study and use of biodiversity.

    Guyana has developed a National Strategy for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of Guyana's Biological Diversity through the process of a series of national consultations. The Strategy identifies some key actions under the various subheadings, and will lead to the development of an Action Plan. Plans have already been initiated for the development of the latter. A National Biodiversity Advisory Committee meets under the aegis of the Environmental Protection Agency, to which it reports. This Committee works through a number of ad-hoc Groups and Working Groups. The national forest policy is being redrafted and incorporates the conservation of forest biological diversity as a major element. This policy will lead to new legislation that will aim to achieve sustainable forest resources management in Guyana. Included in this policy are mangrove forest resources.

    A new fisheries' policy is being drafted which seeks in part, to promote the conservation of fisheries resources. A draft fisheries management plan has been completed with assistance from CIDA. Work on Data Collection and analysis has begun through the CFRAMP regime fisheries project. The Draft National Development Strategy has been completed. This strategy seeks to promote the sustainable use of the natural resources of the country, including the biological resources of various sectors. In addition a Public Education and Awareness Programme based on a satellite network is targeting various audiences in various parts of the country. Its emphasis is on the environment, sustainable development and biodiversity.

    Biological impact assessments are required as part of Environmental Impact Assessments .These are required, by law, to address the impact of planned activities on biological diversity. Guyana continues the process of identification of the components of biological diversity, particularly at the species level, as part of the activities of the Centre for the Study of Biological Diversity in collaboration with the University of Guyana.

    Among the activities in the area of ex situ conservation has been work on the establishment of a National Biodiversity Park. This park seeks, among other things, to promote the ex situ conservation of biological diversity. A national working committee has been established to work on this project. Assistance is being provided through a working arrangement with associates of the San Diego Zoo, USA.

    The Iwokrama International Centre for Rain Forest Conservation and Development was legally established in 1996. Among the objectives of the Centre are the development of technologies for sustainable management of tropical rain forest biodiversity and resources, the preservation and application of the knowledge and innovations of local indigenous communities while providing for the equitable sharing of benefits from these to the communities. The Centre will also identify the components of biological diversity at the site and provide for the in situ conservation of biological diversity. To date, a permanent Board of Trustees has been installed, and the centre is a legally recognized entity. Communication links have also been established and strengthened where necessary, among neighbouring indigenous communities.

    Guyana has received a commitment for Global Environmental Policy (GEF) funding towards the establishing of a National Protected Areas System. A strategy is now being prepared for implementation. This system, when established, will provide for the in situ conservation of the various components of the national biodiversity patrimony, education, public awareness and training, research, and the involvement of local communities in the management of biodiversity.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available.  

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    The Convention on Biological Diversity was ratified on 29 August 1994. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora was ratified on 25 May 1977.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997


    Click here for information on policy recommendations for Biodiversity, National Parks and Protected Areas.
    Click here for information on policy recommendations for wildlife.
    Click here to link to the Biosafety Information Network and Advisory Service (BINAS), a service of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), which monitors global developments in regulatory issues in biotechnology.
    Click here to go to the Web Site of UNEP's International Register on Biosafety.
    Click here to link to biosafety web sites in the European Union.
    For access to the Web Site of the Convention on Biological Diversity, click here:
    For access to the Web Site of the CITES Convention, click here:
    For the Web Site of the CMS Convention, click here:
    For the Web Site of the Convention on the Protection of the World's Cultural and Natural Heritage, click here:
    For the country-by-country, Man in the Biosphere On-Line Query System, click here:

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    DESERTIFICATION AND DROUGHT

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available. 

    Status 

    No information is available.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available.  

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    Guyana ratified the International Convention to Combat Desertification in Countries Experiencing Drought and/or Desertification Particularly in Africa on 26 June 1997.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

    For access to the Web Site of the Convention to Combat Desertification and Drought, click here:

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    ENERGY

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available. 

    Status 

    Draft legislation to form a new Guyana Energy Agency has been completed. This new agency will incorporate under one umbrella all of the various energy related departments and units which would allow for the improvement in institutional arrangements. This will ensure more effective and efficient co-ordination planning and monitoring of energy matters. The Agency responsible for mining, the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the EPA which will ensure that Environmental Management is integrated in mining activities. Thus all large scale mining operations are subject to an Environmental Impact Assessment as provided for under the Environmental Protection Act.

    Guyana has formulated a National Energy Policy (NEP) in which the basic core idea is the substitution of imported fossil fuels through the promotion and increased use of renewable sources of energy with which Guyana is well endowed. Recognizing the vital link between energy and development, the NEP administers short, medium and long term technological options for satisfying energy demand.

    Guyana is well endowed with renewable energy resources including hydropower, biomass, solar, wind and biogas. The NEP reviewed energy supply mixes and recommended a shift toward further use of renewable sources of energy.

    Co-operation with the newly established EPA to ensure that energy planning and project implementation are done in an environmentally acceptable manner has already begun through a Natural Resources and Environment Advisory Committee.

    Efforts are being made to promote energy conservation through public awareness programmes. Energy Audits at various industrial and other enterprises are being undertaken.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies  

    No information is available.

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    No information is available.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

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    FORESTS

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    The Guyana Forestry Commission (GFC) is responsible for the administration and management of the forest resources of Guyana under the Forest Act, Chapter 67:01 Laws of Guyana. Since 1992 the GFC has rehabilitated twelve of eighteen forest stations, established four new stations and forecast the establishment of four additional stations for 1997-98.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available. 

    Status 

    A National Forest Policy is in its final stage after two years of consultation with industry, public and private sectors, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) indigenous groups and other interested parties.

    The Guyana Forestry Commission is currently collaborating with the recently established Environmental Protection Agency to implement and maintain strict environmental management and monitoring programmes of the forest resources of Guyana. To this end the GFC established an Environmental Unit in 1995 to perform these functions. The Inter-American Development Bank is involved in supporting this activity. Through the Natural Resources and Environmental Advisory Committee the GFC is working with other natural resources agencies to better co-ordinate all planning functions and strategies at a national level.

    The GFC has created buffer zones around Amerindian villages and has streamlined logging activities to prevent encroachment on these communities. Currently the commission is collaborating with the Ministry of Amerindian Affairs to demarcate Amerindian land boundaries.

    A Code of Practice for responsible forest management was worked out with the Forest Producers Association of Guyana during two years of consultation and was introduced to the industry for voluntary adoption in July 1996. The GFC and the EPA are working together to ensure its full acceptance by industry.

    According to statistics from the Food and Agriculture Organization, the annual rate of deforestation in Guyana is negligible at less than 1%. The GFC has stepped up its programme to monitor deforestation and other activities in the state forests while examining measures to combat unacceptable practices. There are no reforestation programmes in Guyana because selective logging activities have made little impact on forest canopy. Natural regeneration of the species composition is currently encouraged. Local forests still supply all the domestic demands for timber, and there is no evidence of any scarcity. There are not any major wood-using industries at this time to justify the establishment of plantations. The GFC has withdrawn from influencing the trade in timber products. This is in keeping with Government Policy to encourage the forces of supply and demand to evolve the policing mechanisms in the market place.

    The Commission has successfully introduced improved systems to ensure better collection of forest revenue and in 1996 the Government approved increases in Royalty and Acreage Fees to logging and Sawmill Operations.

    The Overseas Development Administration (ODA) of the British Government has been providing technical assistance since 1994 to the Guyana Forestry Commission under a Project for the "Institutional Capacity Strengthening of the GFC." Included in this project are the the organizational restructuring of the GFC, implemented in January 1997; new wages and salary structure to attract and retain trained staff, introduced in January 1997; the completion of the National Forest Policy; a review of revenue systems; law revision; and education and training support programmes for staff to improve administrative, management and forest monitoring capabilities. This project is scheduled for completion in the year 2000.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available.  

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    No information is available.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

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    FRESHWATER

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    The Guyana Water Authority (GUYWA) is the organization in charge of the water systems in the entire country other than Georgetown, Linmine and SILWFC. The latter two systems are also under a proposal to be tagged onto GUYWA.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available. 

    Status 

    GUYWA is developing public participatory techniques by involving the Citizens' Water Committees into the system. It is creating a public awareness for the conjunctive use of the water extracted and delivered at a certain cost. These are being done through the newspapers, television and meetings with the community.

    Ninety percent (90%) of the population is living in the Northern Coastal belt, which is only about four percent (4%) of the land. The annual rainfall averages 2,300mm. A substantial proportion of Guyana's water run-off is deposited into the three major rivers - Essequibo, Demerara and Berbice flowing into the Atlantic Ocean.

    Most of the freshwater requirement in the "land of many waters" are met through seasonal rainfall, conservancies or aquifers. However, there is a question of the quality of this water. There is also need for improved and continued water quality monitoring. Since the surface flows are through the plains and sedimentary zones, the water is turbid, attracting high treatment cost. Therefore most of the country's demand for domestic water use is being met from groundwater. As the recharging conditions are favourable and the demand is not much, the possibility of sea water intrusion into the aquifers may not be there. However, this needs to be investigated.

    The Guyana Water Authority with the aid of IDA, ODA, CDB etc. has embarked on The Water Supply Technical Assistance and Rehabilitation Programme. One hundred seventeen new pumps are programmed to be installed by mid 1998, and forty-eight have already been completed. These minor systems, when fully rehabilitated, assure sufficient quantity of water supply in the country. There are considerable leaks in the distribution system which are also being replaced with the new pipe laying to utilize the water extracted by the new pumps optionally to the community.

    Thus it is envisaged that, by the year 2000, GUYWA would have a designed, initiated and targeted national action programme at an advanced stage with appropriate institutional structures and legal instruments.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available.  

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    No information is available.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

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    LAND MANAGEMENT

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available. 

    Status 

    Guyana recognizes that land use planning is only as effective as the goals that guide the exercise. Many countries practice land use planning based on economic efficiency goals. Guyana has adopted sustainable land use planning, in which multiple goals such as conservation, spatial equity, as well as economic efficiency, form the basis for land evaluation and land use decisions. Guyana has turned attention to the comprehensive management of its natural resources, a key element of which is land use planning of those geographic areas where the natural resources lie. In this regard significant progress has been made in some fundamental land use tasks.

    1. A land use baseline report has been prepared. This report assembles all of the land use legislation, institutions and processes; identifies the land use issues and makes recommendations for the implementation of land use planning in Guyana. The report benefitted from country wide local consultations at the community level.
    2. A National Land Use Plan has been developed.
    3. A map of existing land uses and a land use classification system has been prepared at the national level.
    4. A geographical information system has been installed; training has been given to key personnel and a data base is being created as the basis for national decision making in land use matters.
    5. A pilot regional land use plan is being initiated. This pilot study will serve as a model for the planning of other regions.

    Much work remains to be done in the areas of (1) resource valuation, (2) land evaluation, (3) soil mapping at the district and local levels, (4) institutional capacity for land use planning, and (5) legislative reform for natural resource management.

    A key concept in sustainable land use planning is the interrelatedness of resource utilization. One cannot consider forestry without the people who live in the forests, nor can one talk about water pollution in isolation from economic activities that pollute the water, or about watershed management without hydropower development. Accepting the global nature of sustainable development and the need for a comprehensive focus, it is Guyana's position that, in the area of natural resources management, sustainable land use planning should not only be a key consideration, but also an essential one.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available.  

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    No information is available.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

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    MOUNTAINS

    No information is available.

     

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    OCEANS AND COASTAL AREAS

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects 

    No information is available.

    Status 

    The Fishery sector is of critical importance to the economy and to the social well being in Guyana. The economic contribution of the fisheries sector has grown over the years. In 1996 the government drafted a new Fisheries policy which seeks to promote the conservation of fishery resources. A draft Fisheries Management Plan has been developed in which action for fisheries development has been identified.

    Guyana has been working on the Wider Caribbean Initiative for Ship Generated Waste project. In 1994 a national task team was established to look at the legal, technical and institutional arrangement needed for the ratification of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution (MARPOL 73/78) from ships. Local legislation has been drafted to incorporate provisions for the accommodation of this convention.

    In the area of Coastal Zone Management the Government of Guyana Guyana requested the IDB to finance a loan for the establishment of a Shorezone Management Programme (SMP) which has been scheduled for approval early 1998. Two major background studies have been completed. One dealt with a feasibility and design study to formulate the overall programme needs and priorities to maximize the usefulness and sustainability of the SMP for Guyana.The second study was an institutional assessment of the agencies and their strengths and weaknesses with regard to sustainably managing the coastal zone. A study is currently under way to design a coastal management training programme in support of a wider coastal zone management programme.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies  

    No information is available.

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea was ratified in 1993. Guyana, however, has not yet capitalized on its rights and privileges under the Convention as the country lacks both the institutional capability to provide the monitoring, control, and surveillance necessary and the resource assessment capability. These are necessary to protect diligently its marine resources from over exploitation through proper conservation and management measures.

    The Maritime Boundaries Act (Turtle Excluder Device), which was enacted to deal with the problem of accidental turtle catching. was signed on 25th April 1994.

     

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

    For information on the status of ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, click here:
    Click here for information on Environmental Features of the Coastal Zone.
    Click here for information on policy recommendations for Coastal Zone management.
    Click here for information on fisheries.

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    TOXIC CHEMICALS

    No information is available.

     

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    WASTE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

    Solid Waste and Sanitation

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans 

    No information is available 

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available

    Programmes and Projects 

    No information is available

    Status 

    Solid Waste disposal practices in Guyana have not kept pace with the demands posed by increases in population and waste generation. Municipal solid waste management in Georgetown, more than elsewhere, suffers from years of under-funding and public neglect. Presently Solid Waste disposal activities are undertaken without a full appreciation of the impact of these activities on human health and the environment. Disposal of collected waste is of tremendous concern in the city. Most available land adjacent to the city is either privately owned or earmarked for housing. The master plan for the city does not make provisions for sanitary landfill activities. The Ministry of Local Government which has the responsibility for Local Town Councils has a proposal to develop a Solid Waste Management Plan. This plan will focus on solid waste collection in an environmentally sound manner, solid waste disposal into a secure landfill, and management of the secure landfill.

    At present work is being done to establish a new landfill site. In the rural areas solid waste is collected by the household and is burnt. Septic tanks and pit latrines are commonly used for sewage disposal. The septic tank and pit latrines are approved by the regional Environmental Health Officer.

    The only city, Georgetown, is the only area in Guyana served by a communal sewage system which discharges to the Dimerara River. Currently however, there is no treatment of sewage before discharge. Guyana recognizes the need to concentrate on more efficient and environmentally sound ways of disposing solid waste. The Environmental Protection Act will help to ensure that requirements of Agenda 21 are carried out.

    Challenges

    No information is available

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available

    Information

    No information is available

    Research and Technologies

    No information is available  

    Financing

    No information is available

    Cooperation

    No information is available

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

    Click here for information on waste management and pollution control.
    Click here for information on policy recommendations for waste management and pollution control.

    Hazardous Wastes

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available

    Programmes and Projects

    No information is available 

    Status 

    At present there are no data on the generation of hazardous waste and Guyana does not have the capacity to dispose of hazardous waste. There is the need for carry out inventories of hazardous waste production, distribution, management and use. However, provisions under the Environmental Protection Act shall help to regulate hazardous waste issues in order to meet the requirements of Agenda 21 .

    Challenges

    No information is available

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available

    Information

    No information is available

    Research and Technologies  

    No information is available

    Financing

    No information is available

    Cooperation

    To date the Basel Convention has not been signed or ratified. However it has been recognized as a significant issue in the Caribbean Basin of which Guyana forms the southernmost boundary. This transboundary movement also includes the movement of hazardous waste from which member states are at risk because of poor storage and transportation techniques. A regional integrated approach is perceived as the only way by which measures may be adopted to implement the convention. It is recognized that without the resources for minimisation of production of hazardous waste and for management and enforcement of the measures in the Convention among all territories within the region, safe movement of such wastes will be a difficult task.

    To this end, states of the Caribbean Basin have developed a proposal which is expected to become the Work Plan by which the measures in the convention are implemented. Foremost in the proposal which was submitted to the CARICOM Heads of Government was the request for member states to speedily ratify the Basel Convention.

     

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

    For direct link to the Web Site of the Basel Convention, click here:

    Radioactive Wastes

    Decision-Making: Coordinating Bodies   

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Legislation and Regulations 

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Strategies, Policies and Plans  

    No information is available.

    Decision-Making: Major Groups Involvement  

    No information is available.

    Programmes and Projects 

    No information is available.

    Status 

    Currently Guyana is working on regulations which shall govern the use, possession and importation of radioactive substances. At the moment, these substances are used in the Health-care services, particularly for the treatment of cancer of the cervix, and in the mining industry. It is believed that various radioactive substances have been imported into Guyana for other purposes, but these have not yet been properly accounted for.

    A project is being drafted to regulate the use of ionizing radiation in Guyana with the additional aim of making employers, employees and other users aware of the risks associated with ionizing radiation. This second draft should ideally be done prior to the development of regulations, but unfortunately, the urgency to develop these regulations is as a result of the mining industry. However, a background radiation survey needs to be done.

    Challenges

    No information is available.

    Capacity-building, Education, Training and Awareness-raising  

    No information is available.

    Information

    No information is available.

    Research and Technologies  

    No information is available.

    Financing

    No information is available.

    Cooperation

    No information is available.

     

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    This information is based on Guyana's submission to the 5th Session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, April 1997. Last update: 1 April 1997

    For direct link to the Web Site of the Basel Convention, click here:


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