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1540 Committee | United Nations

Canada

Direct Assistance

Type(s)of Assistance:
Expertise, Training and Resources
Scope:
Legal, Implemenation
Regions:
All
Subject(s):
Biological, Chemical, Nuclear, Missile, Export Controls

Subject to request and availability of expert resources, Canada could provide the following types of assistance to fight CBRN terrorism through the Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program:

  • legislative drafting and legal policy assistance related to the ratification and implementation of non-proliferation and arms control-related conventions (e.g. the CWC and the BTWC);
  • health security initiatives with bio-terrorism applications such as the establishment of disease surveillance systems; export controls training;
  • training in bio-safety/security standards;
  • detection and decontamination of chemical, biological and radiological terror agents;
  • food safety, animal and plant health initiatives; nuclear non-proliferation safeguards; nuclear and radioactive material accountancy and control; and physical protection of nuclear plants and materials.
SUBJECTS

In October 2004, Canada co-sponsored with Italy and Chile an international seminar on HCOC in Santiago aimed at increasing subscription to and understanding of the Code in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Canada receives numerous requests from countries to assist them in implementing the new international security standards to counter terrorism. In the globalized world of today, the security of Canada and of Canadian, both at home and abroad, is intrinsically linked to the capacity of other countries to ensure their own security. This is why the Government of Canada announced in April 2004, as part of Canada’s National Security Policy, the creation of a permanent Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program to be administered by Foreign Affairs Canada, with the participation of 17 other federal departments and agencies. Through this program, Canada will provide counter-terrorism related training, resources and expertise topartner states to enable them to prevent and respond to terrorist activity, in a manner consistent with international human rights and other norms and standards.

In accordance to a request of the Caribbean Community (Caricom) submitted on October 17, 2008, the Government of Canada co-sponsored, with the United States, a workshop on export controls and maritime security, which occurred from June 15-17, 2009 in Kingston, Jamaica. Officials of the following states attended: Antigua and Barbuda; Barbados; Belize; Dominican Republic; Haiti; Jamaica; Saint Kitts and Nevis; and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Representatives of the Organization of American States and Caricom joined the workshop and the Secretariat of the 1540 Committee provided most useful assistance.

The workshop was successful in explaining clearly the threat of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems in the Caribbean region to officials from foreign affairs, customs, and coast guard authorities, who are frequently focussed on other security challenges. It was also successful in that it moved beyond general awareness-building about UNSCR 1540 to discussion about implementing its specific obligations. Attendees returned to their capitals with a renewed sense of urgency about implementation and with ideas about how to do so.

Note Verbale from Canada dated 25 June 2009 on CARICOM’s assistance request:

The Permanent Mission of Canada is pleased to inform the Committee of the Government of Canada's contribution to the request of the Caribbean Community (Caricom) submitted on October 17, 2008. The Government of Canada co-sponsored, with the United States, a workshop on export controls and maritime security, which occurred from June 15-17, 2009 in Kingston, Jamaica. Officials of the following states attended: Antigua and Barbuda; Barbados; Belize; Dominican Republic; Haiti; Jamaica; Saint Kitts and Nevis; and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Representatives of the Organization of American States and Caricom joined the workshop and the Secretariat of the 1540 Committee provided most useful assistance.

The workshop was successful in explaining clearly the threat of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems in the Caribbean region to officials from foreign affairs, customs, and coast guard authorities, who are frequently focussed on other security challenges. It was also successful in that it moved beyond general awareness-building about UNSCR 1540 to discussion about implementing its specific obligations. Attendees returned to their capital s with a renewed sense of urgency about implementation and with ideas about how to do so.

Assistance through International Organizations

In support of the norm against bio-weapons, Canada is engaged in varied activities under the auspices of regional and multilateral fora: the G8 (bio-terrorism initiatives); APEC (health and food security initiatives); the OAS (declaration of the Americas as a CBW free zone) and the OECD (promoting responsible stewardship in the life‑sciences). Canada strongly encourages all states to support and cooperate with international organizations such as the WHO, the OIE and the FAO regarding their programmes of work and how these can complement the mandate of the BTWC. Canada also notes the WHO's current work on revising the International Health Regulations to facilitate the identification of, and response to, public health events of international concern.

Canada has also pledged $1 billion to the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, launched at the G8 Summit in Kananaskis, Canada in June 2002, which other countries have since joined. As a member of the Global Partnership, Canada is firmly committed to making a significant and sustained contribution to redirecting former weapons scientists into peaceful research, destroying chemical weapons, dismantling nuclear submarines and disposing of fissile materials. In March 2004, Canada acceded to the International Science and Technology Centre in Moscow.

Canada will co‑host with Singapore an ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) Export Licensing Experts Meeting at the end of 2005, in Singapore. This meeting will exchange national experiences in licensing the transfer of goods, software and technology to ensure that such items do not contribute to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction or their delivery systems.

Canada conducted extensive outreach activities during its chairmanship of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) in 2001-2002. Canada participated in an MTCR outreach visit to China in June 2004 to discuss effective implementation of export control and law enforcement mechanisms. Canada maintains the Regime’s website in order to contribute to a broader understanding of the MTCR. Foreign Affairs Canada plans to translate the MTCR Guidelines into other languages as a contribution to further outreach efforts.

In accordance to a request of the Caribbean Community (Caricom) submitted on October 17, 2008, the Government of Canada co-sponsored, with the United States, a workshop on export controls and maritime security, which occurred from June 15-17, 2009 in Kingston, Jamaica. Officials of the following states attended: Antigua and Barbuda; Barbados; Belize; Dominican Republic; Haiti; Jamaica; Saint Kitts and Nevis; and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Representatives of the Organization of American States and Caricom joined the workshop and the Secretariat of the 1540 Committee provided most useful assistance.

The workshop was successful in explaining clearly the threat of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems in the Caribbean region to officials from foreign affairs, customs, and coast guard authorities, who are frequently focussed on other security challenges. It was also successful in that it moved beyond general awareness-building about UNSCR 1540 to discussion about implementing its specific obligations. Attendees returned to their capitals with a renewed sense of urgency about implementation and with ideas about how to do so.

Points of Contact

Name:
Chantale Walker (as of August 2009)
Title:
First Secretary
Department:
Permanent Mission of Canada to the United Nations
Location:
New York
Contact:
chantale.walker@international.gc.ca, (212) 848-1172
Name:
Mi Nguyen
Title:
Deputy Director (Nuclear NACD Policy)
Department:
Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Division (IDA), Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Location:
Ottawa
Contact:
mi.nguyen@international.gc.ca, (613) 944-2480