United Nations

UN Police

Background

In 2000, The Report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations recommended a revolving on-call list (some 100 police officers) and related experts be created, to be available on 7 days’ notice to start-up police component of a new peacekeeping operation, train personnel and give the component greater coherence at an early date.

In December 2004, the High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change recommended the creation of “a small corps of senior police officers and managers (50-100 personnel) who could undertake mission assessments and organize the start-up of police components of peace operations” (A/59/565, paragraph 223).

In October 2005, the General Assembly, in its resolution on the World Summit Outcome endorsed “the creation of an initial operating capability for a standing police capacity” (A/RES/60/1, paragraph 92).

In March 2006, the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations welcomed “the creation of an initial operating capability for the Standing Police Capacity to provide a coherent, effective and responsive start-up capacity for the police component of the United Nations peacekeeping operations and to assist existing operations through the provision of advice and expertise.” (A/60/19, paragraph 99).

 In June 2006, the General Assembly approved proposed staffing for Standing Police Capacity (A/RES/60/268) with its base in New York. The Standing Police Capacity’s relocation from United Nations Headquarters to UNLB Brindisi, Italy was endorsed by the Fifth Committee in July 2009 and completed in January 2010.

 

Standing Police CapAcity

The Standing Police Capacity (SPC) is the rapidly deployable arm of the Police Division with an approved operational capacity of 40 staff members and a unique blend of leadership and specialized knowledge.It assists in the fulfilment of the strategic mission of the UN Police, which is to build institutional police capacity in post conflict environments.

Chief SPC Mr. Generaal Du Toit (second on right side) with the Somali Police Commissioner Maj. Gen. Shariif Maye (first from left), and the AMISOM Police Commissioner Dr. Charles Makono (second from left) in a discussion during the UN strategic review for Somalia in November 2012.

Chief SPC Mr. Generaal Du Toit (second on right side) with the Somali Police Commissioner Maj. Gen. Shariif Maye (first from left), and the AMISOM Police Commissioner Dr. Charles Makono (second from left) in a discussion during the UN strategic review for Somalia in November 2012.

Its areas of expertise include police reform and restructuring, training, investigations, analysis, planning, legal affairs, public order, community policing, budget and funds management, gender affairs, transnational crime, information and communication technology, human resources, detentions and logistics.

To enhance its effectiveness, the unit is based at the United Nations Global Service Centre (UNGSC) in Brindisi, Italy.




Start-up capability for the police components


Commandant Doucoure Mahamadou Sine, from National Gendarmerie, Controleur General Yacouba Tounkara, conseiller aupres du Secretaire General du Ministere de la Securite Interieure, Mr. Mamadou Barro, DPKO/OROLSI/PD, Controleur General Boubacar Konate, Direction General de la Police Nationale, and Mr. Paolo Bonanno, SPC Public Order Adviser; pose for a group photo during the planning mission in Mali held in November 2012.

Commandant Doucoure Mahamadou Sine, from National Gendarmerie, Controleur General Yacouba Tounkara, conseiller aupres du Secretaire General du Ministere de la Securite Interieure, Mr. Mamadou Barro, DPKO/OROLSI/PD, Controleur General Boubacar Konate, Direction General de la Police Nationale, and Mr. Paolo Bonanno, SPC Public Order Adviser; pose for a group photo during the planning mission in Mali held in November 2012.

The members of SPC are normally the first UN Police Officers deployed to a new UN peacekeeping operation. They provide start-up capability for the police components of new UN peacekeeping operations, including the strategic direction and organization to ensure the immediate and longer term effectiveness, efficiency and professionalism of the components.

The decision to establish a specialized entity to assist in the start-up phase of police components has demonstrated significant results. Since its inception, the SPC has contributed to the start-up process of the police components in the United Nations Mission in the Central African Republic and Chad (MINURCAT), the United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS), the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS) and the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL), developing the police command structure, frameworks of cooperation with national and international counterparts, and detailed logistical and infrastructural arrangements, as well as drafting mission specific guidelines

Assistance


SPC Gender Issues Officer Ms. Odile Kantyono (at the podium) helps put on a three-day training course for female police officers of the Afghan National Police (ANP) and health-care providers which was held in March 2013.

SPC Gender Issues Officer Ms. Odile Kantyono (at the podium) helps put on a three-day training course for female police officers of the Afghan National Police (ANP) and health-care providers, which was held in March 2013.

When not required to start-up police components in new UN peace operations, the SPC members are deployed strategically to provide time-limited and targeted advice, expertise and assistance in the field of institutional law enforcement capacity-building to DPKO or DPA-led missions. The skills and expertise of the team members were widely recognized during the emergency assistance mission to MINUSTAH after the earthquake in 2010, and were valuable assets in supporting the capacity building programs of UNPOS, UNMIT and MONUSCO. In 2012, SPC has continued providing assistance to UNMISS in the area of police reform and to UNSMIL in the area of capacity development and training.

The Standing Police Capacity has also worked closely with UN and agencies and programmes across the world. The team members provided advice to UNOWA and UNODC on the implementation of the West Africa Coast Initiative (WACI), participated in the OHCHR-led Fact Finding Mission on Syria and assisted UNDP Chad in the post-MINURCAT transition period and UNDP Mozambique in election security matters.

When requested, the SPC participates in operational assessments and evaluations of activities of police components, assisting in analyzing the overall performance of their operations, identifying risks and challenges and determining compliance with and possible updating of mandate implementation plans, concepts of operation and other planning tools.