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UNAMID Background

A civil war erupted in Darfur in 2003 between the Government of Sudan and its allied militia, and other armed rebel groups. Particularly during the first two years of the conflict, tens if not hundreds of thousands of people were killed. Fighting continues between the Government and the now splintered movements, and 1.8 million people are estimated to be internally displaced.

«UNAMID has the protection of civilians as its core mandate, but is also tasked with contributing to security for humanitarian assistance, monitoring and verifying implementation of agreements, assisting an inclusive political process, contributing to the promotion of human rights and the rule of law, and monitoring and reporting on the situation along the borders with Chad and the Central African Republic.»

In 2003, the United Nations first raised the alarm on the crisis in Darfur. Since that time, finding a lasting resolution has been a top priority for the Security Council as well as two consecutive Secretaries-General. The long peace process included the Darfur Peace Agreement signed on 5 May 2006 under the auspices of the African Union (AU) and with support of the UN and other partners.

Intensive diplomatic and political efforts to bring the non-signatories into the peace process have continued since then, with the All Darfur Stakeholders’ Conference of 27-31 May 2011 in Doha intended as another milestone. Once an agreement has been reached between the major parties to the conflict, the United Nations and African Union intend to bring the peace process back to Darfur for dialogue and implementation on the ground.

In 2006, the African Union deployed a peacekeeping mission to Sudan, which was replaced in 2008 by the unprecedented joint African Union/United Nations Hybrid operation in Darfur(UNAMID), currently the largest peacekeeping mission in the world (see Facts and Figures page). UNAMID’s mandate has been extended since then on several occasions.

UNAMID has the protection of civilians as its core mandate, but is also tasked with contributing to security for humanitarian assistance, monitoring and verifying implementation of agreements, assisting an inclusive political process, contributing to the promotion of human rights and the rule of law, and monitoring and reporting on the situation along the borders with Chad and the Central African Republic.

The Mission’s headquarters is in El Fasher, the capital of North Darfur, with further deployment locations throughout the three Darfur states. The Mission conducts an average of more than 200 patrols a day, attempting to increase its robustness, often in the face of bureaucratic or armed obstruction. The aim is to do everything in its power to protect civilians in Darfur, facilitate the humanitarian aid operation to all areas, regardless of who controls them, and to help provide an environment in which peace can take root. Top