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United Nations Department of Public Information and
the International Bar Association

Justice and Accountability after the Holocaust

Archived Video

Wednesday, 9 November 2011
6:30 p.m.  – 8:30 p.m.

ECOSOC Chamber, Temporary North Lawn Building (UNHQ)


Photo: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Courtesy of Albert Rose

The roundtable discussion with prominent historians and legal professionals focused on the role of the judiciary in Germany under Nazi rule, and the establishment of the international justice system in the aftermath of WWII and the Nuremberg Trials. The panellists addressed the legal implications of the judiciary’s complicity in upholding discriminatory Nazi laws which culminated in the Holocaust. The discussion then shifted to the role of States and courts today in protecting vulnerable populations, holding war criminals accountable and preserving democratic values.



UN Photo: (left to right) Ramu Damodaran, Karen Odaba Mosoti, Kimberly Mann, Stéphane Dujarric,
Patricia Heberer, Irwin Cotler, and Cecile Aptel

Speakers:

  • Stéphane Dujarric, Officer-in-Charge, United Nations Department of Public Information
  • Cecile Aptel, Co-Chair of the International Bar Association (IBA) War Crimes Committee, Professor at Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University
  • Patricia Heberer, an historian with the Centre for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
  • Irwin Cotler, Member of Parliament and former Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
  • Karen Odaba Mosoti, International Lawyer, Head of Liaison Office of the International Criminal Court to the United Nations

  Moderator:

  • Ramu Damodaran, Deputy Director for Partnerships and Public Engagement, Outreach Division, United Nations Department of Public Information


UN Photo: (left to right) Cecile Aptel, Patricia Heberer, Ramu Damodaran,
Irwin Cotler and Karen Odaba Mosoti

Remarks:

Remarks by Cecile Aptel, Co-Chair of the International Bar Association (IBA) War Crimes Committee, Professor at Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University

Remarks by Patricia Heberer, an historian with the Centre for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum