United Nations

A/RES/47/120


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

18 December 1992

ORIGINAL:
ENGLISH



                                                   A/RES/47/120
                                                A: 91st plenary meeting
                                                   18 December 1992
                                                B: 112th plenary meeting
                                                   20 September 1993
 
    An Agenda for Peace: Preventive diplomacy and related matters
 
                                  A
 
       The General Assembly,
 
       Recalling the statement of 31 January 1992, adopted at the conclusion
of the first meeting held by the Security Council at the level of Heads of
State and Government, in which the Secretary-General was invited to prepare,
for circulation to the States Members of the United Nations by 1 July 1992, an
"analysis and recommendations on ways of strengthening and making more
efficient within the framework and provisions of the Charter the capacity of
the United Nations for preventive diplomacy, for peacemaking and for
peace-keeping",
 
       Welcoming the timely presentation of the forward-looking report of the
Secretary-General entitled "An Agenda for Peace", in response to the summit
meeting of the Security Council, as a set of recommendations that deserve
close examination by the international community,
 
       Recognizing the need to maintain the increased interest in and momentum
for revitalization of the Organization to meet the challenges of the new phase
of international relations in order to fulfil the purposes and principles of
the Charter of the United Nations,
 
       Stressing that the implementation of the concepts and proposals
contained in "An Agenda for Peace" should be in strict conformity with the
provisions of the Charter, in particular its purposes and principles,
 
       Recalling also its resolution 2625 (XXV) of 24 October 1970, the annex
to which contains the Declaration on Principles of International Law
concerning Friendly Relations and Cooperation among States in accordance with
the Charter of the United Nations, and its resolution 43/51 of 5 December
1988, the annex to which contains the Declaration on the Prevention and
Removal of Disputes and Situations Which May Threaten International Peace and
Security and on the Role of the United Nations in this Field,
 
       Emphasizing that international peace and security must be seen in an
integrated manner and that the efforts of the Organization to build peace,
justice, stability and security must encompass not only military matters, but
also, through its various organs within their respective areas of competence,
relevant political, economic, social, humanitarian, environmental and
developmental aspects,
 
       Stressing the need for international action to strengthen the
socio-economic development of Member States as one of the means of enhancing
international peace and security and, in this regard, recognizing the need to
complement "An Agenda for Peace" with "An Agenda for Development",
 
       Acknowledging that timely application of preventive diplomacy is the
most desirable and efficient means of easing tensions before they result in
conflict,
 
       Recognizing that preventive diplomacy may require such measures as
confidence-building, early-warning, fact-finding and other measures in which
consultations with Member States, discretion, confidentiality, objectivity and
transparency should be combined as appropriate,
 
       Emphasizing the need to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations
in the field of preventive diplomacy, through, inter alia, allocating
appropriate staff resources and financial resources for preventive diplomacy,
in order to assist Member States to resolve their differences in a peaceful
manner,
 
       Reaffirming the fundamental importance of a sound and secure financial
basis for the United Nations in order, inter alia, to enable the Organization
to play an effective role in preventive diplomacy,
 
       Emphasizing the importance of cooperation between the United Nations
and regional arrangements and organizations for preventive diplomacy within
their respective areas of competence,
 
       Emphasizing also that respect for the principles of sovereignty,
territorial integrity and political independence of States is crucial to any
common endeavour to promote international peace and security,
 
       Recalling further other resolutions adopted by the Assembly during its
forty-seventh session concerning various aspects of "An Agenda for Peace",
 
       Emphasizing the need for all organs and bodies of the United Nations,
as appropriate, to intensify their efforts to strengthen the role of the
Organization in preventive diplomacy, peacemaking, peace-keeping and
peace-building and to continue the discussion of the report of the
Secretary-General with a view to adequate action being taken,
 
       Stressing the need for adequate protection of personnel involved in
preventive diplomacy, peacemaking, peace-keeping and humanitarian operations,
in accordance with relevant norms and principles of international law,
 
       Noting the definition of preventive diplomacy provided by the
Secretary-General in his report entitled "An Agenda for Peace",
 
                                     I
 
                     PEACEFUL SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES
 
       Emphasizing the need to promote the peaceful settlement of disputes,
 
       1. Invites Member States to seek solutions to their disputes at an
early stage through such peaceful means as provided for in the Charter of the
United Nations;
 
       2. Decides to explore ways and means for a full utilization of the
provisions of the Charter whereby the General Assembly may recommend measures
for the peaceful adjustment of any situation, regardless of origin, which is
deemed likely to impair the general welfare or friendly relations among
nations; 
 
       3. Encourages the Security Council to utilize fully the provisions of
Chapter VI of the Charter on procedures and methods for peaceful settlement of
disputes and to call upon the parties concerned to settle their disputes
peacefully;
 
       4. Encourages the Secretary-General and the Security Council to engage
at an early stage in close and continuous consultation in order to develop, on
a case-by-case basis, an appropriate strategy for the peaceful settlement of
specific disputes, including the participation of other organs, organizations
and agencies of the United Nations system, as well as regional arrangements
and organizations as appropriate, and invites the Secretary-General to report
to the General Assembly on such consultations;
 
 
                                   II
 
           EARLY-WARNING, COLLECTION OF INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS
 
       Recognizing the need to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations
for early-warning, collection of information and analysis,
 
       1. Encourages the Secretary-General to set up an adequate early-warning
mechanism for situations which are likely to endanger the maintenance of
international peace and security, in close cooperation with Member States and
United Nations agencies, as well as regional arrangements and organizations,
as appropriate, making use of the information available to these organizations
and/or received from Member States, and to keep Member States informed of the
mechanism established;
 
       2. Invites the Secretary-General to strengthen the capacity of the
Secretariat for the collection of information and analysis to serve better the
early-warning needs of the Organization and, to that end, encourages the
Secretary-General to ensure that staff members receive proper training in all
aspects of preventive diplomacy, including the collection and analysis of
information;
 
       3. Invites Member States and regional arrangements and organizations to
provide timely early-warning information, on a confidential basis when
appropriate, to the Secretary-General;
 
       4. Encourages the Secretary-General to continue, in accordance with
Article 99 of the Charter of the United Nations, to bring to the attention of
the Security Council, at his discretion, any matter which in his opinion may
threaten the maintenance of international peace and security, together with
his recommendations thereon;
 
       5. Invites Member States to support the efforts of the
Secretary-General in preventive diplomacy, including by providing assistance
he may require;
 
       6. Encourages the Secretary-General, in accordance with the relevant
provisions of the Charter, to notify the General Assembly, as appropriate, of
any situation which is potentially dangerous or might lead to international
friction or dispute;
 
       7. Invites the Secretary-General to bring to the attention of Member
States concerned, at an early stage, any matter which in his opinion may
adversely affect relations between States;
 
 
                              III
 
                          FACT-FINDING
 
       Recalling the statements made by the President of the Security Council,
on behalf of the Council, on 29 October and 30 November 1992, and its own
resolutions 1967 (XVIII) of 16 December 1963, 2104 (XX) of 20 December 1965,
2182 (XXI) of 12 December 1966 and 2329 (XXII) of 18 December 1967 on the
question of methods of fact-finding,
 
       1. Reaffirms its resolution 46/59 of 9 December 1991, the annex to
which contains the Declaration on Fact-finding by the United Nations in the
Field of the Maintenance of International Peace and Security, particularly its
guidelines;
 
       2. Recommends to the Secretary-General that he should continue to
utilize the services of eminent and qualified experts in fact-finding and
other missions, selected on as wide a geographical basis as possible, taking
into account candidates with the highest standards of efficiency, competence
and integrity;
 
       3. Invites Member States to submit names of suitable individuals whom
the Secretary-General might wish to use at his discretion in fact-finding and
other missions;
 
       4. Recommends that a request by a Member State for the dispatch of a
fact-finding mission to its territory should be considered expeditiously;
 
       5. Invites the Secretary-General to continue to dispatch fact-finding
and other missions in a timely manner in order to assist him in the proper
discharge of his functions under the Charter of the United Nations;
 
 
                               IV
 
                  CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES
 
       Recognizing that the application of appropriate confidence-building
measures, consistent with national security needs, would promote mutual
confidence and good faith, which are essential to reducing the likelihood of
conflicts between States and enhancing prospects for the peaceful settlement
of disputes,
 
       Recalling its resolutions 43/78 H of 7 December 1988 and 45/62 F of 4
December 1990, as well as its resolution 47/54 D of 9 December 1992 on the
implementation of the guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building
measures,
 
       Recognizing that confidence-building measures may encompass both
military and non-military matters, including political, economic and social
matters, 
 
       Stressing the need to encourage Member States, and regional
arrangements and organizations where relevant and in a manner consistent with
their mandates, to play a leading role in developing confidence-building
measures appropriate to the region concerned and to coordinate their efforts
in this regard with the United Nations in accordance with Chapter VIII of the
Charter of the United Nations,
 
       1. Invites Member States and regional arrangements and organizations to
inform the Secretary-General through appropriate channels about their
experiences in confidence-building measures in their respective regions;
 
       2. Supports the intention of the Secretary-General to consult on a
regular basis with Member States and regional arrangements and organizations
on further confidence-building measures;
 
       3. Encourages the Secretary-General to consult with parties to existing
or potential disputes, the continuance of which is likely to endanger the
maintenance of international peace and security, and with other Interested
Member States and regional arrangements and organizations, as appropriate, on
the possibility of initiating confidence-building measures in their respective
regions and to keep Member States informed thereon ln consultation with the
parties concerned;
 
       4. Commends such confidence-building measures as the promotion of
openness and restraint in the production, procurement and deployment of
armaments, the systematic exchange of military missions, the possible
formation of regional risk reduction centres, arrangements for the free flow
of information and the monitoring of regional arms control and disarmament
agreements;
 
                                 V
 
                     HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE
 
       Recalling its resolution 45/100 of 14 December 1990 on humanitarian
assistance to victims of natural disasters and similar emergency situations
and its resolution 46/182 of 19 December 1991 on the strengthening of the
coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations,
 
       Welcoming the increasing role of the United Nations system in providing
humanitarian assistance,
 
       Noting that, in certain circumstances, programmes of
impartially-provided humanitarian assistance and peace-keeping operations can
be mutually supportive,
 
       1. Encourages the Secretary-General to continue to strengthen the
capacity of the Organization ln order to ensure coordinated planning and
execution of humanitarian assistance programmes, drawing upon the specialized
skills and resources of all parts of the United Nations system, as well as
those of non-governmental organizations, as appropriate;
 
       2. Also encourages the Secretary-General to continue to address the
question of coordination, when necessary, between humanitarian assistance
programmes and peace-keeping or related operations, preserving the
non-political, neutral and impartial character of humanitarian action;
 
       3. Invites the Secretary-General to bring to the attention of
appropriate organs of the United Nations any situation requiring urgent
humanitarian assistance in order to prevent its deterioration, which might
lead to international friction or dispute;
 
                              VI
 
       RESOURCES AND LOGISTICAL ASPECTS OF PREVENTIVE DIPLOMACY
 
       Recognizing the need for adequate resources in support of the United
Nations efforts in preventive diplomacy,
 
       1. Invites Member States to provide political and practical support to
the Secretary-General in his efforts for the peaceful settlement of disputes,
including early-warning, fact-finding, good offices and mediation;
 
       2. Also invites Member States, on a voluntary basis, to provide the
Secretary-General with any necessary additional expertise and logistical
resources that he might require for the successful execution of these
functions of increasing importance;
 
                               VII
 
       ROLE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY IN PREVENTIVE DIPLOMACY
 
       Emphasizing that, together with the Security Council and the
Secretary-General, it has an important role in preventive diplomacy,
 
       Recognizing that, having an important role in preventive diplomacy, it
has to work ln close cooperation and coordination with the Security Council
and the Secretary-General in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations
and consistent with their respective mandates and responsibilities,
 
       Decides to explore ways and means to support the recommendations of the
Secretary-General ln his report entitled "An Agenda for Peace" to promote the
utilization of the General Assembly, ln accordance with the relevant
provisions of the Charter of the United Nations, by Member States so as to
bring greater influence to bear in pre-empting or containing any situation
which is potentially dangerous or might lead to international friction or
dispute; 
 
                             VIII
 
                         FUTURE WORK
 
       Bearing in mind that owing to time constraints lt could not examine all
the proposals contained ln the report of the Secretary-General entitled "An
Agenda for Peace",
 
       1. Decides to continue early in 1993 its examination of other
recommendations on preventive diplomacy and related matters contained in the
report of the Secretary-General entitled "An Agenda for Peace", including
preventive deployment, demilitarized zones and the International Court of
Justice, as well as implementation of the provisions of Article 50 of the
Charter of the United Nations, in conformity with the Charter and taking into
account the relevant developments and practices ln the competent organs of the
United Nations;
 
       2. Also decides to discuss and consider other proposals contained in
"An Agenda for Peace".
 
                                   B
 
 
     The General Assembly,
 
     Recalling its resolution 47/120 A of 18 December 1992 entitled "An Agenda
for Peace: preventive diplomacy and related matters",
 
     Reaffirming its resolution 46/59 of 9 December 1991, the annex to which
contains the Declaration on Fact-finding by the United Nations in the Field of
the Maintenance of International Peace and Security,
 
     Recalling also its resolution 46/182 of 19 December 1991 on the
strengthening of the coordination of humanitarian emergency assistance of the
United Nations,
 
     Recalling further its resolution 47/71 of 14 December 1992 on the
comprehensive review of the whole question of peace-keeping operations in all
their aspects,
 
     Emphasizing that, together with the Security Council and the Secretary-
General, it has an important role in preventive diplomacy,
 
     Recognizing that it has to work in close cooperation and coordination
with the Security Council and the Secretary-General in accordance with the
Charter of the United Nations and consistent with their respective mandates
and responsibilities,
                                        I
 
                           ROLE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
 
     Recalling the relevant provisions of the Charter of the United Nations
relating to the functions and powers of the General Assembly,
 
     Recalling also the report of the Secretary-General entitled "An Agenda
for Peace", which refers to the utilization of these functions and powers,
 
     l.  Resolves to make full and effective use of the functions and powers
set out in Articles 10 and 14 of the Charter of the United Nations, in
conformity with other relevant provisions of the Charter;
 
     2.  Decides to consider the use of existing or new machinery, including
subsidiary organs under Article 22 of the Charter, to facilitate consideration
of any situation coming within the scope of Article 14 of the Charter, with a
view to recommending measures for the peaceful adjustment of such a situation;
 
     3.  Also decides to consider appropriate ways and means consistent with
the Charter to improve cooperation among the competent United Nations organs
in order to strengthen the role of the United Nations in the promotion of
peace, including the possibility that the General Assembly receives reports,
as appropriate, from the Secretary-General on matters related to the items on
its agenda or on other matters within its competence;
 
                                     II
 
                  PREVENTIVE DEPLOYMENT AND DEMILITARIZED ZONES
 
     Taking note of paragraphs 28 to 33 on preventive deployment and
demilitarized zones contained in the report of the Secretary-General entitled
"An Agenda for Peace", within the larger context of preventive diplomacy, as
well as the views expressed on these issues by Member States,
 
     Stressing that the implementation of any concepts and proposals on
preventive deployment and demilitarized zones contained in "An Agenda for
Peace" should be undertaken in accordance with the provisions of the Charter
of the United Nations, in particular its purposes and principles, and other
relevant principles of international law,
 
     Welcoming the instances of effective use of United Nations preventive
deployment and the establishment of demilitarized zones,
 
     Stressing the importance of appropriate consultations with Member States
and transparency in any decision-making concerning the undertaking of
preventive deployment or the establishment of a demilitarized zone,
 
     Recognizing that a United Nations preventive deployment or the
establishment of demilitarized zones could promote the prevention or
containment of conflicts, the continuance of which is likely to endanger the
maintenance of international peace and security,
 
     Emphasizing that respect for the principles of sovereignty, territorial
integrity and political independence of States and non-intervention in matters
which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any State is crucial
to any common endeavour to promote international peace and security,
 
     Bearing in mind that, as each situation in which preventive deployment
may be undertaken or a demilitarized zone established has its own special
characteristics, it is of the utmost importance to make decisions on such
measures on a case-by-case basis with due regard to all relevant factors and
circumstances, including consultations with Member States,
 
     Recognizing the need to preserve the impartiality of the United Nations
when engaged in preventive deployment or in the establishment of demilitarized
zones,
 
     Recognizing also that preventive deployment and the establishment of
demilitarized zones are evolving concepts,
 
     1.  Acknowledges the importance of considering, on a case-by-case basis,
the use of preventive deployment and/or the establishment of demilitarized
zones as a means to prevent existing or potential disputes from escalating
into conflicts and to promote efforts to achieve the peaceful settlement of
such disputes, the continuance of which is likely to endanger the maintenance
of international peace and security;
 
     2.  Reaffirms that a United Nations preventive deployment and/or the
establishment of a demilitarized zone should be undertaken with the consent of
and, in principle, on the basis of a request by the Member State or Member
States involved, having taken into account the positions of other States
concerned and all other relevant factors;
 
     3.  Also reaffirms that a United Nations preventive deployment and/or the
establishment of a demilitarized zone should be undertaken in accordance with
the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations, in particular its
purposes and principles and other relevant principles of international law,
also taking into account relevant General Assembly and Security Council
resolutions;
 
     4.  Invites the competent organs of the United Nations, within their
respective mandates, to consider implementing preventive deployment and/or the
establishment of a demilitarized zone with the objective of preventing
conflict and of promoting efforts to achieve the peaceful settlement of
disputes, and to continue to examine practical, operational and financial
aspects of such preventive deployment and demilitarized zones with a view to
increasing their efficacy and effectiveness;
 
                                        III
 
                     USE OF THE INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE
                      IN THE PEACEFUL SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES
 
     Emphasizing the role of the International Court of Justice under the
Charter of the United Nations in the peaceful settlement of disputes,
 
     l.  Encourages States to consider making greater use of the International
Court of Justice for the peaceful settlement of disputes;
 
     2. Recommends that States consider the possibility of accepting the
jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice, including through the
dispute settlement clauses of multilateral treaties;
 
     3.  Notes that the use of chambers of the International Court of Justice
for dealing with particular cases submitted to the Court by the parties is a
means of providing increased use of the Court for the peaceful settlement of
disputes;
 
     4.  Requests States to consider making, if possible on a regular basis,
contributions to the Trust Fund of the Secretary-General to assist States in
resolving their disputes through the International Court of Justice, and
invites the Secretary-General to report periodically both on the financial
status and the utilization of the Fund;
 
     5.  Recalls that the General Assembly or the Security Council may request
the International Court of Justice to give an advisory opinion on any legal
question, and that other organs of the United Nations and specialized
agencies, which may at any time be so authorized by the General Assembly, may
also request advisory opinions of the Court on legal questions arising within
the scope of their activities;
 
     6. Decides to keep under examination all the recommendations of the
Secretary-General concerning the International Court of Justice, including
those related to the use of the advisory competence of the Court;
 
                                           IV
 
           SPECIAL ECONOMIC PROBLEMS ARISING FROM THE IMPLEMENTATION OF
                       PREVENTIVE OR ENFORCEMENT MEASURES
 
     Recalling Article 50 of the Charter of the United Nations, which entitles
States that find themselves confronted with special economic problems arising
from the carrying out of preventive or enforcement measures taken by the
Security Council against any other State, to consult the Council with regard
to a solution to those problems,
 
     Recalling also the recommendation of the Secretary-General in his report
entitled "An Agenda for Peace" that the Security Council devise a set of
measures involving the financial institutions and other components of the
United Nations system that can be put in place to insulate States from such
difficulties and his view that such measures would be a matter of equity and a
means of encouraging States to cooperate with decisions of the Council,
 
     Recalling further the statement made on 30 December 1992 by the President
of the Security Council, in which the Council expressed its determination to
consider this matter further and invited the Secretary-General to consult with
the heads of international financial institutions, other components of the
United Nations system and Member States of the United Nations, and to report
to the Council as early as possible,
 
     Recalling its resolution 47/120 A entitled "An Agenda for Peace:
preventive diplomacy and related matters", in which it decided to continue
early in 1993 its examination of other recommendations contained in the report
of the Secretary-General entitled "An Agenda for Peace", including
implementation of the provisions of Article 50 of the Charter, in conformity
with the Charter and taking into account the relevant developments and
practices in the competent organs of the United Nations,
 
     Stressing the importance of economic and other measures not involving the
use of armed forces in maintaining international peace and security, in
accordance with Article 41 of the Charter,
 
     Recalling Article 49 of the Charter, which requires the Members of the
United Nations to join in affording mutual assistance in carrying out the
measures decided upon by the Security Council,
 
     Noting that the implementation of Article 50 of the Charter has been
addressed recently in several forums, including the General Assembly and its
subsidiary organs and the Security Council,
 
     Recognizing that, in the conditions of economic interdependence that
exist today, the implementation of preventive or enforcement measures under
Chapter VII of the Charter against any State continues to create special
economic problems for certain other States,
 
     Recalling that Member States have engaged previously in consultations
with bodies established by the Security Council regarding special economic
problems confronted by them as a result of the implementation of preventive or
enforcement measures against Iraq and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
(Serbia and Montenegro),
 
     Concerned that certain States continue to be confronted with adverse
economic problems owing to the implementation of preventive and enforcement
measures under Chapter VII of the Charter,
 
     Recognizing the need for appropriate means to find solutions to these
problems as soon as possible,
 
     1.  Decides to continue its examination of ways to implement Article 50
of the Charter of the United Nations, with a view to finding solutions to the
special economic problems of other Member States when preventive or
enforcement measures are decided upon by the Security Council against a State;
 
     2.  Invites the Security Council to consider what could be done within
the United Nations system and involving international financial institutions
with regard to solutions to the special economic problems of States arising
from the carrying out of the measures imposed by the Council and to consider,
inter alia, the following measures:
 
     (a) Strengthening of the consultative process for studying, reporting on
and suggesting solutions to the special economic problems, with a view to
minimizing such economic problems through consultations with States adversely
affected or, as appropriate, with States likely to be adversely affected as a
result of their implementing the preventive or enforcement measures, as well
as with the Secretary-General, the principal organs, programmes and agencies
of the United Nations, and international financial institutions;
 
     (b) Other measures, in consultation with Member States and, as
appropriate, with international financial institutions, such as voluntary
funds to provide assistance to States experiencing special economic problems
arising from carrying out the measures imposed by the Security Council,
additional credit lines, assistance for the promotion of exports of the
affected countries, assistance for technical cooperation projects in such
countries and/or assistance for the promotion of investment in the affected
countries;
 
     3.  Also invites the committees of the Security Council and other bodies
entrusted with the task of monitoring the implementation of preventive and
enforcement measures to take into account, in discharging their mandates, the
need to avoid unnecessary adverse consequences for other Member States,
without prejudice to the effectiveness of such measures;
 
     4.  Requests the Secretary-General to report annually to the General
Assembly on the implementation of Article 50 of the Charter;
 
                                       V
 
                          POST-CONFLICT PEACE-BUILDING
 
     Noting that post-conflict peace-building is a new and evolving concept,
 
     Recognizing the need for sustained cooperative efforts by the United
Nations to deal with the underlying economic, social, cultural and
humanitarian causes and effects of conflicts in order to promote a durable
foundation for peace,
 
     Recalling the provisions of Article 55 of the Charter of the United
Nations, 
 
     Recognizing also that the concept of post-conflict peace-building is
aimed at the creation of a new environment to forestall the recurrence of
conflicts,
 
     Bearing in mind that each situation in which post-conflict peace-building
may be undertaken is unique and therefore should be considered on a
case-by-case basis,
 
     Bearing in mind also that post-conflict peace-building should complement
efforts at peacemaking and peace-keeping in order to consolidate peace and
advance a sense of confidence and well-being among people and States,
 
     1.  Acknowledges the usefulness of the proposals of the Secretary-General
contained in paragraphs 55 to 59 of his report entitled "An Agenda Peace",
particularly in relation to the range of activities for post-conflict
peace-building;
 
     2.  Emphasizes that post-conflict peace-building should be carried out in
accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, in particular the
principles of sovereign equality and political independence of States,
territorial integrity, and non-intervention in matters that are essentially
within the domestic jurisdiction of any State;
 
     3.  Recalls that each State has the right freely to choose and develop
its political, social, economic and cultural systems;
 
     4.  Stresses that activities related to post-conflict peace-building
should be carried out within a well-defined time-frame;
 
     5.  Also stresses that post-conflict peace-building be undertaken on the
basis of agreements ending conflicts or reached after conflicts, or at the
request of the Government or Governments concerned;
 
     6.  Emphasizes the need for measures to promote peace and cooperation
among previously conflicting parties;
 
     7.  Stresses the need for coordinated action by relevant components of
the United Nations system, including the contributions that the international
financial institutions can make in the area of socio-economic development in
post-conflict peace-building;
 
     8.  Also stresses the importance for post-conflict peace-building of
contributions from diverse sources, including components of the United Nations
system, regional organizations, Member States and non-governmental
organizations;
 
     9.  Requests the Secretary-General to inform the General Assembly of
requests relating to post-conflict peace-building by the Government or
Governments concerned, or emanating from peace agreements ending conflicts or
reached after conflicts by parties concerned;
 
     10. Affirms its readiness to support, as appropriate, post-conflict
peace-building;
 
                                         VI
 
               COOPERATION WITH REGIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AND ORGANIZATIONS
 
     Recognizing the importance of the role of regional organizations and
arrangements in dealing with such matters relating to the maintenance of
international peace and security as are appropriate for regional action, and
the need to enhance, in this respect, cooperation between such organizations
and arrangements and the United Nations,
 
     Recalling Chapter VIII of the Charter of the United Nations and its
acknowledgement of the role of regional arrangements and agencies in dealing
with such matters relating to the maintenance of international peace and
security as are appropriate for regional action, provided that such
arrangements or agencies and their activities are consistent with the purposes
and principles of the United Nations,
 
     Taking into account the experience gained and the favourable results
achieved by regional organizations in the peaceful settlement of disputes in
different parts of the world,
 
     l.  Recognizes that regional organizations, arrangements and agencies
can, in their fields of competence and in accordance with the Charter of the
United Nations, make important contributions to the maintenance of
international peace and security, preventive diplomacy, peacemaking,
peacekeeping and post-conflict peace-building;
 
     2.  Encourages regional organizations, arrangements and agencies to
consider, as appropriate, in their fields of competence, ways and means for
promoting closer cooperation and coordination with the United Nations with the
objective of contributing to the fulfilment of the purposes and principles of
 
     3.  Also encourages the Secretary-General to continue his efforts at
promoting cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations,
arrangements and agencies, in accordance with the Charter;
 
                                    VII
 
                           SAFETY OF PERSONNEL
 
     Recalling its resolution 47/72 of 14 December 1992 on protection of
peace-keeping personnel, and all other relevant resolutions,
 
     Bearing in mind the concern expressed by the Secretary-General over the
safety of United Nations personnel in his report entitled "An Agenda for
Peace",
 
     Also recalling the relevant resolutions of the Security Council,
 
     Taking note with appreciation of the statement made on 31 March 1993 by
the President of the Security Council on the protection of United Nations
forces and personnel,
 
     Noting with appreciation the work done by the Special Committee on
Peace-keeping Operations on the issue of the status and safety of United
Nations peace-keeping personnel,
 
     Gravely concerned about the growing number of fatalities and injuries
among United Nations peace-keeping and other personnel resulting from
deliberate hostile actions in dangerous areas of deployment,
 
     1.  Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General on the security of
United Nations operations;
 
     2.  Decides to consider further steps to enhance the status and safety of
United Nations personnel involved in United Nations operations, taking into
account the need for concerted action by all relevant bodies of the United
Nations in this regard.