United Nations

A/52/39


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

19 December 1978, a high-level meeting of all States participating in the

ORIGINAL:
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                                                                   A/52/39
                                United Nations
                    Report of the High-level Committee on
                     the Review of Technical Cooperation
                           among Developing Countries
                  Official Records - Fifty-second Session
                        Supplement No.39 (A/52/39)
                                    NOTE
Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined
with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United
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                               ISSN 0255-2280
                                   CONTENTS
                                                           Paragraphs   Page
 I.   INTRODUCTION ..........................................   1 - 9      3
II.   ATTENDANCE AND ORGANIZATION OF WORK ...................  10 - 23     4
      A. Date and place of the session .....................   10 - 11     4
      B. Attendance ........................................   12 - 18     4
      C. Opening of the session and election of the
         President .........................................   19 - 20     6
      D. Adoption of the agenda and organization of work ...     21        6
      E. Election of officers other than the President .....   22 - 23     6
III.  REPORTS ON IMPLEMENTATION .............................  24 - 48     7
      A. Statement by the Associate Administrator of the
         United Nations Development Programme ..............   24 - 29     7
      B. Introduction of the reports by the Director of the
         Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among
         Developing Countries - highlights of progress
         reports ...........................................   30 - 48     8
      A. Overview ..........................................   49 - 67    12
      B. Review of progress made in implementing the Buenos
         Aires Plan of Action and the decisions of the
         High-level Committee and the implementation of the
         recommendations of the South Commission ...........   68 - 85    15
      C. Progress in the implementation of the new
         directions strategy for technical cooperation among
         developing countries ..............................   86 - 95    18
      D. Case studies of technical cooperation among
         developing countries experiences ..................   96 - 110   19
      E. Consideration of reports of the Administrator of
         the United Nations Development Programme ..........  111 - 112   21
 V.   ADOPTION OF THE REPORT ................................ 113 - 119   22
      A. Report of the Chairman of the Working Group to the
         High-level Committee ..............................  113 - 115   22
      B. Provisional agenda for the eleventh session of the
         High-level Committee ..............................    116       22
      C. Comments by the Director of the Special Unit for
         Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries ..  117 - 118   23
      D. Draft report of the High-level Committee ..........    119       23
VI.   CLOSURE OF THE SESSION ................................ 120 - 124   24
      A. Closing statement by the Associate Administrator of
         the United Nations Development Programme ..........  120 - 122   24
      B. Closing statement by the President ................  123 - 124   24
                                    Annexes
 I.   Decisions adopted by the High-level Committee at its tenth session  26
II.   List of documents before the High-level Committee at its tenth
      session ..........................................................  32
                               I.  INTRODUCTION
1.   In accordance with recommendation 37 of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action
for Promoting and Implementing Technical Cooperation among Developing
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) was convened at Geneva from 26 May
to 2 June 1980 to carry out an overall, intergovernmental review of technical
cooperation among developing countries (TCDC) within the United Nations
development system.  The report of the first session of the intergovernmental
body 2/ was considered by the General Assembly at its thirty-fifth session. In
its resolution 35/202 of 16 December 1980, the General Assembly decided to
change the name of the high-level meeting to High-level Committee on the
Review of Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries and requested the
Administrator of UNDP to convene the next session of the Committee under the
same organizational and procedural arrangements as had been made for the
high-level meeting.

2.   The second session of the High-level Committee met in New York from 1 to
8 June 1981 and its report 3/ was considered by the General Assembly at its
thirty-sixth session.  In accordance with the agreement reached at the
Committee's second session and endorsed by the Assembly at its thirty-sixth
session, the structure of the third session of the High-level Committee
consisted of the Committee in plenary meeting and only one working group, and
this practice has been followed at subsequent sessions.

3.   The third session of the High-level Committee met in New York from
31 May to 6 June 1983 and its report 4/ was considered by the General Assembly
at its thirty-eighth session.

4.   The fourth session was held in New York from 28 May to 3 June 1985.  Its
report 5/ was considered by the General Assembly at its fortieth session.

5.   The fifth session was held in New York from 18 to 22 May 1987 and its
report 6/ was adopted on 27 May 1987.  The General Assembly considered that
report at its forty-second session.

6.   The sixth session was held in New York from 18 to 22 September 1989 and
its report 7/ was adopted on 29 September 1989.  The General Assembly reviewed
that report at its forty-fourth session.

7.   The seventh session was held in New York from 28 to 31 May 1991 and its
report 8/ was adopted on 6 June 1991.  The General Assembly considered that
report at its forty-sixth session.

8.   The eighth session was held in New York from 25 to 28 May 1993 and its
report 9/ was adopted on 4 June 1993.  The General Assembly considered that
report at its forty-eighth session.

9.   The ninth session was held in New York from 30 May to 2 June 1995.  The
General Assembly considered that report 10/ at its fiftieth session.


                   II.  ATTENDANCE AND ORGANIZATION OF WORK


                       A.  Date and place of the session

10.  The tenth session of the High-level Committee on the Review of Technical
Cooperation among Developing Countries was held in New York from 5 to
9 May 1997.

11.  In accordance with paragraph 3 of General Assembly resolution 35/202, the
session was convened by the Administrator of the UNDP under the usual
procedural arrangements.


                                B.  Attendance

12.  The following States Members of the United Nations participating in UNDP
were represented at the session:

Algeria
Argentina
Armenia
Australia
Austria
Bangladesh
Benin
Bolivia
Brazil
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Chile
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Democratic People's Republic of Korea
Djibouti
Ecuador
Egypt
El Salvador
Eritrea
Fiji
France
Gabon
Gambia
Germany
Ghana
Guatemala
Guinea
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
India
Indonesia
Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Ireland
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Lebanon
Lesotho
Malawi
Malaysia
Mali
Malta
Mexico
Mongolia
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar
Nepal
Netherlands
Niger
Nigeria
Pakistan
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Republic of Korea
Russian Federation
Rwanda
Saint Lucia
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Singapore
South Africa
Suriname
Sweden
Syrian Arab Republic
Thailand
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Togo
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Uganda
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
United Republic of Tanzania
United States of America
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Venezuela
Viet Nam
Zambia
Zimbabwe

13.  In addition, the representatives of the Observer Missions of the Holy See
and Switzerland to the United Nations, which also participate in the work of
UNDP, attended the session. 

14.  The following regional commissions were represented:

     Economic Commission for Europe
     Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific
     Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

15.  The following United Nations bodies were also represented:

     United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
     United Nations Development Programme
     United Nations Environment Programme
     United Nations Population Fund
     United Nations Centre for Human Settlements

16.  Representatives of the following specialized agencies and related
organizations attended the session:

     International Labour Organization
     International Atomic Energy Agency
     Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
     World Health Organization
     Universal Postal Union
     United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization
     International Maritime Organization
     United Nations Industrial Development Organization
     World Intellectual Property Organization
     International Fund for Agricultural Development

17.  The following intergovernmental organizations, which have received a
standing invitation to participate as observers in the sessions and the work
of the General Assembly, were represented at the session:

     Latin American Economic System
     Organization of African Unity
     Organization of American States
     Organization of the Islamic Conference
     Pan American Health Organization

18.  Representatives of the following intergovernmental organizations attended
the session as observers:

     Arab Organization for Agricultural Development
     Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture
     South Pacific Forum Secretariat
     Statistical, Economic and Social Research Institute for the Islamic
     Countries


           C.  Opening of the session and election of the President

                            (Agenda items 1 and 2)

19.  The tenth session of the High-level Committee was opened, on behalf of
the Secretary-General, by the President of the ninth session,
Mr. Soemadi D. M. Brotodiningrat.

20.  Mr. Momodou Kebba Jallow, Permanent Representative of Gambia to the
United Nations, was elected President of the High-level Committee by
acclamation.


              D.  Adoption of the agenda and organization of work

                                (Agenda item 4)

21.  The High-level Committee adopted the agenda (TCDC/10/L.1) and the
organization of work (TCDC/10/L.2).  A general debate was held in the plenary
meetings, from 5 to 9 May, on items 5, 6 and 7.  The Working Group, which
began its work on 7 May, was assigned agenda items 5, 6 and 7 for substantive
discussion and recommendations to the Committee.  For a list of documents
considered by the Committee at its tenth session, see annex II to the present
report.


               E.  Election of officers other than the President

                                (Agenda item 3)

22.  The following officers were elected by acclamation:


     Vice-Presidents:  Ms. M. Patricia Durrant (Jamaica)
                       Ms. Helen Browne (Ireland)


     Rapporteur:  Mr. Sandagdorj Erdenebileg (Mongolia)

23.  The High-level Committee approved the President's recommendation that
Ms. Patricia Durrant (Jamaica) should serve as Chairman of the Working Group. 
It was subsequently agreed that the Chairman should also serve as Rapporteur
of the Working Group.


                        III.  REPORTS ON IMPLEMENTATION

                           (Agenda items 5, 6 and 7)


                A.  Statement by the Associate Administrator of
                    the United Nations Development Programme

24.  In his opening statement, the Associate Administrator of the United
Nations Development Programme noted the significant increase in the interest
in technical cooperation among developing countries (TCDC) and South-South
cooperation in the recent past as a strategy for ensuring the effective
participation of the developing countries in the emerging global economic
order.  He referred to the South-South Conference on Trade, Finance and
Investment, held at San Jose', Costa Rica, from 13 to 15 January 1997, and the
conference of Ministers for Foreign Affairs of the States members of the
Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, held in New Delhi in April 1997, which
identified practical initiatives to advance such cooperation.  He also
referred to the importance placed on South-South cooperation in the reform
proposals of the Secretary-General. 

25.  The Associate Administrator stated that the increased interest in TCDC
was partly due to the availability of relevant technical capacities in the
developing countries, especially in East Asia and Latin America.  He indicated
that increased levels of growth in the developing countries coupled with the
demographic revolution, which would locate an increased proportion of the
world's population in the South, were likely to shift the dynamics of growth
to the developing countries making TCDC all the more important as a strategy
of development.  He also stated that globalization demanded increased
cooperation among developing countries in order that the less developed among
them would not be marginalized.

26.  The Associate Administrator mentioned that in recognition of those
developments the High-level Committee at its ninth session had adopted the new
directions strategy focusing on such priority issues as trade and investment,
poverty eradication, environment, production and employment and macroeconomic
policy formulation and management; seeking operational integration between
TCDC and economic cooperation among developing countries (ECDC); identifying
TCDC pivotal countries and involving them in cooperative undertakings with
other developing countries; and expanding the TCDC-Information Referral System
database (INRES) into a multi-dimensional user-friendly information system.

27.  Regarding the implementation of the new directions strategy, the
Associate Administrator highlighted a number of initiatives supported by the
Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries in respect
of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island
Developing States, Asia-Africa cooperation in the context of the Bandung
Framework for Asia-Africa Cooperation and cooperation between Latin America
and the economies in transition in East Europe and Central Asia.  He also
referred to other efforts, such as the exchange of experiences among small
enterprises, replication of successful poverty eradication measures in Latin
America and the Caribbean, formation of technical networks on biosystematics
in South-East Asia, the Pacific region and East Africa, the establishment of
the International Network on Small Hydropower and the support provided to the
Group of 77 and China, the South Centre and the Third World Network to
identify policy options for trade and investment and to enable the developing
countries to respond to the challenges and opportunities of globalization.

28.  The Associate Administrator stated that the elaboration of the
programmatic framework for the promotion of TCDC enshrining the new directions
strategy was provided in the TCDC cooperation framework for the period
1997-1999.  The framework covered two broad areas of activities, namely,
support for sustainable human development and the promotion of TCDC.  The
effort would be facilitated by the separate allocation of resources for TCDC
by the Executive Board and the resources likely to be available through the
Trust Fund for South-South Cooperation, established in accordance with the
provisions of General Assembly resolution 50/119 of 20 December 1995.

29.  The Associate Administrator expressed the hope that the three main
reports providing information on implementation of TCDC and its promotion by
the United Nations development system, supplemented by the presentations to be
made by selected delegations on their TCDC experiences, would help the High-
level Committee to carry out an in-depth review of TCDC and to provide
guidance on the subject.


        B.  Introduction of the reports by the Director of the Special 
            Unit for Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries -
            highlights of the progress reports                         

30.  The Director of the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries introduced the following three reports submitted for the
consideration of the High-level Committee:

     (a)  Review of progress made in implementing the Buenos Aires Plan of
Action, the decisions of the High-level Committee and the recommendations of
the South Commission (TCDC/10/2);

     (b)  Progress made in the implementation of the new directions strategy
for technical cooperation among developing countries (TCDC/10/3);

     (c)  Consideration of reports of the Administrator of the United Nations
Development Programme (TCDC/10/4) on implementation of the guidelines for the
review of policies and procedures concerning technical cooperation among
developing countries and on organizational and supportive arrangements for
technical cooperation among developing countries.

Review of progress made in implementing the Buenos Aires Plan of Action,
the decisions of the High-level Committee and the recommendations of the
South Commission

31.  The report provides an analytical summary of the information received
from member Governments, organizations and agencies of the United Nations
development system and select intergovernmental and non-governmental
organizations on the policies and activities undertaken to promote and apply
TCDC during the biennium 1995-1996.  

32.  Despite internal institutional, attitudinal and resource constraints,
TCDC continues to be a modality widely used by developing countries in
bilateral, subregional, regional and interregional arrangements.  All
responding countries recognize the need to foster understanding of the concept
of TCDC and its procedures and mechanisms and to adopt effective TCDC
policies.  Sensitization workshops, strengthening of national focal points and
the identification of capacities and needs have received considerable emphasis
in most countries.     
 
33.  A number of countries allocated significant resources for TCDC activities
from their national budgets, and/or UNDP country allocations.  This is
particularly true of countries such as Benin, Bhutan, Brazil, Chile, China,
Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ghana, Haiti, Indonesia, India, Malaysia,
Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Samoa, Sri Lanka, Seychelles, the
Republic of Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Turkey. 

34.  A number of regional institutions such as the Latin American Economic
System (SELA), non-governmental organizations (NGOs) such as the Third World
Network, as well as intergovernmental organizations such as the South Centre
have played an active role in the promotion of TCDC and ECDC.

35.  Only three developed countries, namely, Austria, France and the
Netherlands, have indicated specific assistance in support of TCDC.  But many
developed countries directly or indirectly support TCDC; Japan, for example,
allocated $2 million for South-South cooperation during 1997. 

36.  In UNDP, an effort has been made by the regional bureaux and country
offices to integrate TCDC in national and regional technical cooperation
programmes.  In Africa-Asia cooperation efforts, Latin America and
Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) cooperation programmes, regional
programmes in Arab States and regional cooperation programmes in Asia and the
Pacific, the regional bureaux have played important roles, sometimes
initiating and on other occasions supporting cooperation programmes. 

37.  The Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries
continues to serve as a catalyst and an active partner with national
Governments and organizations and agencies of the United Nations system in
promoting and monitoring the global application of TCDC.  During the fifth
cycle the Special Unit supported in excess of 130 interventions globally in
four broad categories of activities:  (a) promotion and sensitization; (b)
enhancement of national capacities for the management of TCDC; (c) capacities
and needs matching exercises and subject-specific workshops; and (d) the
sponsorship of studies and evaluations in respect of TCDC activities.

38.  Other organizations and agencies of the United Nations development system
have similarly played an active role in supporting TCDC, both in terms of
articulating approaches to the concept in their respective areas of competence
and in executing specific TCDC projects.  For example, the United Nations
Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) has been particularly active in
the promotion of South-South trade and finance; the United Nations Industrial
Development Organization (UNIDO) in supporting Group of 77 initiatives for
cooperation; the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
in introducing a specific mechanism for use of technical resources of the
developing economies; and the International Labour Organization (ILO), the
United Nations Populations Fund (UNFPA) and the World Health Organization
(WHO) in applying the TCDC modality through decentralization of their
operations to the regions and subregions.  The regional economic commissions
have contributed significantly to advancing South-South cooperation by
promoting regional and subregional cooperation in different fields. 

39.  It is difficult to assess accurately the exact level of resources
allocated by the United Nations development system in support of TCDC. 
However, it is estimated that UNDP allocated approximately $50 million during
the biennium 1995-1996.

40.  Despite the considerable progress made in recent years in promoting TCDC,
a number of policy-related, institutional, attitudinal and procedural problems
would need to be addressed if the full potential of TCDC is to be realized. 
Firstly, many developing countries still need consciously to integrate TCDC as
a central element of their national development strategy.  Secondly, they need
to put in place appropriate institutional arrangements to support the
effective functioning of TCDC focal points with both human and financial
resources.  Thirdly, considerable attitudinal barriers still need to be
overcome.  Finally, financing of TCDC would need to be substantially increased
by all development partners through allocations from national budgets of
developing countries, earmarked aid of donor countries for triangular
cooperation and mainstreaming of TCDC in the activities of multilateral donor
agencies.

Progress made in the implementation of the new directions strategy for
technical cooperation among developing countries

41.  The report presents a brief outline of the new directions strategy and
identifies initiatives that have been implemented in support of the strategy. 
Specific examples of such initiatives relate to support provided for the
implementation of the small island developing States technical assistance
programme; follow-up to the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements
(Habitat II) in terms of exchange of successful urban management experiences;
cooperation between Latin American countries and the economies in transition
in East Europe and Central Asia; the replication of successful poverty
eradication experiences in Latin America; and the establishment of
biosystematics networks in East Asia, the Pacific and East Africa.

42.  An example of targeting the private sector is the programme of exchange
of experiences among small enterprises while the increased links with NGOs is
reflected in the support provided to the Third World Network.  These
initiatives reflect a conscious strategy of incorporating new actors in the
implementation of TCDC.  An effort to reorient capacity and needs matching
exercises is reflected in the Haiti exercise and the follow-up action in
respect of the Bangladesh exercise.  The establishment of the International
Network on Small Hydropower in Hangzhou province in China represents a
noteworthy achievement in the area of the environment.  A TCDC/ECDC linkage is
also reflected in the support provided to the South-South Conference on Trade,
Finance and Investment held at San Jose', Costa Rica, in January 1997.

43.  A number of countries have been identified as pivotal countries to serve
as catalysts for the promotion of TCDC as envisaged in the new directions
strategy.  As an important element of the new directions strategy, TCDC-INRES
is being updated and expanded into a multi-dimensional user-friendly
information system.

44.  The TCDC technical cooperation framework for 1997-1999 will serve as the
main instrument for implementing the new directions strategy.  It will be
facilitated by the separate allocation of funds by the Executive Board of UNDP
and the establishment by the General Assembly of the Trust Fund for
South-South Cooperation.  An allocation of $2 million by the Government of
Japan for South-South cooperation has been used to fund a number of projects.

45.  The framework document envisages activities in two broad categories,
namely, support for sustainable human development objectives and promotion of
TCDC.  It also sets out the principles and criteria that will govern the
implementation of the various programmes and projects to be carried out within
this framework.

Consideration of reports of the Administrator of the United Nations
Development Programme

46.  The report is in two parts.  The first part deals with the implementation
of the guidelines for the review of TCDC policies and procedures by the United
Nations development system.  The organizations of the United Nations
development system have found the guidelines to be effective and they have
facilitated the expansion of the use of TCDC.  A number of these organizations
have benefited from sensitization efforts and decentralization arrangements
and many of them are continuing to elaborate these guidelines in accordance
with their particular needs. 

47.  In view of the continued validity of these guidelines, it was decided to
acquire more experience with them before reporting to the Administrative
Committee on Coordination.  They will, however, be reviewed in the meeting of
the agency focal points following the High-level Committee meeting.

48.  The second part deals with organizational and supportive arrangements for
TCDC.  Information on staffing of the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation
among Developing Countries and the resources available for programming during
the biennium is provided.  During the 1992-1996 cycle, the Unit allocated
$11.4 million for the funding of various projects.  In 1996 it also received
an allocation of $2 million from Japan.  For 1997-1999 the resource
availability is estimated at $16.9 million and additional funds are expected
from the Trust Fund for South-South Cooperation.


                      IV.  SUMMARY OF THE GENERAL DEBATE


                                 A.  Overview

49.  The general debate was initiated by the Permanent Representative of the
United Republic of Tanzania to the United Nations, who spoke in his capacity
as Chairman of the Group of 77 and China at the United Nations.  He stressed
the increasing significance of TCDC as an effective mechanism for facilitating
the exchange of experiences among developing countries and for promoting
collective action in support of their overall development as well as ensuring
their effective participation in the evolving global economy.  He stated that
with the apparent weakening of the commitment to development cooperation on
the part of the traditional partners, TCDC and South-South cooperation
represented the best hope for the developing countries in the context of the
emerging global order, although it should not be seen as a substitute for
traditional development cooperation.  He highlighted some of the TCDC
achievements of the past 20 years.  He noted that, in general, the exchange of
experiences among developing countries had demonstrated the efficiency, cost-
effectiveness and relevance of TCDC as an instrument of development
cooperation.  TCDC projects and programmes had also generated increasing
improvement in national ownership in formulating, implementing, monitoring and
evaluating development activities.  There was a growing awareness of the TCDC
modality and its potential and an increasing commitment to identifying
priorities to enhance the effectiveness of that form of cooperation.  He
noted, however, that structural and cultural rigidities and, most importantly,
the lack of financial resources had adversely affected the progress in the
utilization of the TCDC modality.

50.  He stated that the international community was slowly recognizing that
the future belonged to South-South cooperation and commended the Government of
Japan for its efforts to support such cooperation.  He observed that it was
encouraging that both the South-South Conference on Trade, Finance and
Investment, held at San Jose', Costa Rica, in January 1997, and the Conference
of Ministers for Foreign Affairs of the States members of the Movement of
Non-Aligned Countries, held in New Delhi in April 1997, had formulated
important blueprints for action on the part of the developing countries, and
indeed the international community as a whole, in seeking to advance South-
South cooperation.

51.  He urged developed countries and the United Nations system to increase
support for TCDC.  He said that lack of awareness and lingering scepticism
regarding the efficacy of the TCDC modality had prevented the optimal
utilization of the modality.

52.  He concluded by advancing four specific proposals:

     (a)  Convening of a special one-day session of the High-level Committee
in 1998, possibly during the General Assembly, to commemorate the twentieth
anniversary of the adoption of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action;

     (b)  Holding of a United Nations conference on South-South cooperation to
address, inter alia, the challenges presented by globalization;

     (c)  Maintenance of the separate identity of the Special Unit for
Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries within UNDP and its provision
with adequate resources to carry out its mandate and the new directions
strategy;

     (d)  Reaffirmation of the importance of the role of the High-level
Committee and possible expansion of its mandate to include a review of ECDC.

53.  Most developing countries indicated their support for the views expressed
by the Permanent Representative of the United Republic of Tanzania to the
United Nations on behalf of the Group of 77 and China.

54.  The representative of the Netherlands, speaking on behalf of the European
Union as well as Bulgaria, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Norway, Romania and
Slovenia, stated that TCDC and South-South cooperation were important tools
for promoting development cooperation.  He emphasized nevertheless that the
responsibility for TCDC lay first and foremost with the developing countries
themselves.  Donor countries, therefore, needed to play a supportive role in
fostering the increased use of the TCDC modality in development cooperation. 
He expressed the view that activities at the regional and subregional level
offered good prospects for TCDC.

55.  He supported the concept of networking and stated that it provided a good
basis for solving common problems.  He stated that Internet accessibility
could facilitate the dissemination of relevant information and that it should
be added to the list of priorities for TCDC.  Population was seen as an issue
of some strategic significance because of its relevance to the achievement of
sustainable human development goals.  Networking and the use of Internet
facilities were also seen as eminently suitable for the application of TCDC,
which could prove more fruitful than other forms of development cooperation.

56.  He drew attention to five important issues:

     (a)  TCDC should be integrated in the overall work of the United Nations
development agencies;

     (b)  A regional approach to TCDC would increase the chances for
successful cooperation, in view of similarities of geography, language and
sociocultural circumstances;

     (c)  The impact of TCDC would increase if the funds available to United
Nations development agencies were to be used in a more focused manner, rather
than spent on a large number of small projects with the risk of diluting their
impact;

     (d)  Regional and subregional offices of UNFPA, ILO, UNICEF, FAO and UNDP
should be encouraged to harmonize their efforts and to work together more
closely; and

     (e)  In order to make the work of the High-level Committee more
productive and interactive, consideration should be given to improving its
present format and working procedure.

57.  There was general satisfaction among delegations with the renewed
interest in TCDC in recent years, but it was recognized that the rich
potential of the modality was far from being fully realized.  The developing
countries had made considerable progress in establishing national focal points
for TCDC and in using the modality, particularly in bilateral exchanges among
themselves.  However, in a number of countries, national TCDC policies were
still not well articulated nor was the TCDC modality fully utilized as the
preferred option in development cooperation.  Financial constraints and
attitudinal barriers also served as major impediments to the expansion of the
application of the TCDC modality.

58.  Most delegations underscored the primary responsibility of the developing
countries in promoting and applying the TCDC modality.  Consequently, the main
responsibility for identifying appropriate partners, determining specific
methods of cooperation and establishing achievable goals lay with the
developing countries themselves.  For that reason, they needed to set up
internal structures and procedures for ensuring that first consideration was
given to TCDC in formulating technical cooperation programmes, as is required
by Economic and Social Council resolution 1992/41.

59.  Most delegations recognized that in the context of globalization TCDC
could serve as a powerful force for ensuring the equitable participation of
the developing countries in the world economic system.  Developed countries
were therefore urged to promote TCDC and to provide financial support for its
application.

60.  Most delegations welcomed the strategic thrust of the TCDC interventions
within the framework of the new directions strategy.  The focus on high-
priority issues such as macroeconomic policy, trade, investment, debt
management, employment creation, poverty eradication and the environment was
considered essential for sustainable human development.  It was generally
acknowledged that such a focus would provide a major development boost to the
developing countries.  Some delegations suggested that informatics, population
dynamics, education and health care should also receive increased attention in
the context of efforts to promote TCDC.

61.  Most delegations supported triangular cooperation arrangements and urged
donor country funding of such programmes.  It was felt that third-party
funding for TCDC would significantly expand the application of the modality
and that it should therefore be institutionalized.  Some delegations felt that
the cost-effectiveness of TCDC should be more widely publicized in order to
ensure that it was better appreciated by the donors.

62.  The increased use of information technology was recognized by many
delegations as a powerful tool for promoting TCDC.  In that context, the
conversion of TCDC-INRES into a multidimensional information system was warmly
welcomed.  Information on successful examples of TCDC projects would also
contribute to increased awareness of the importance of the modality.  Some
delegations felt that Internet accessibility for the developing countries
would constitute a worthwhile investment for TCDC.

63.  Most delegations supported the forging of a closer operational linkage
between TCDC and ECDC.  Consequently, the need for TCDC to be more thoroughly
integrated into the broader strategy of South-South cooperation was stressed.

64.  Most delegations emphasized the importance of involving the private
sector and NGOs in TCDC, since a broad base of support and participation was
necessary for TCDC to be effective.  The increasing involvement of those new
actors in TCDC activities was also noted by many delegations.  The relevance
of the role of the media in promoting TCDC was also mentioned in that context.

65.  Many delegations referred to the marginalization of the least developed
countries and the difficult economic situation confronting them.  In
particular, concern was expressed regarding the difficult development problems
and challenges facing Africa.  It was proposed that special attention be given
to ways to enable those countries to benefit from TCDC.

66.  Most delegations stressed the need to maintain the Special Unit for
Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries as a separate unit within
UNDP and for the Unit to be provided with adequate resources to enable it to
carry out its mandate.  Most delegations welcomed the establishment of the
Trust Fund for South-South Cooperation and urged donors to provide generous
contributions to the fund.

67.  One of the special features of the general debate in the High-level
Committee was the effort to promote a more interactive pattern of exchange
among delegations by inviting comments on issues raised in the statements of
the various delegations.  One of the issues that was raised during the
exchange was the meaning of South-South cooperation and the terminology used
to denote its various aspects.  South-South cooperation was considered to be
the generic concept of which TCDC and ECDC were two integrally related
elements.  It was explained that TCDC involved the exchange of technical
expertise, training and the pooling of technical resources among developing
countries whereas ECDC referred to wider economic cooperation arrangements. 
Another important exchange that took place during the debate related to the
integration of TCDC in the technical cooperation programmes of the United
Nations development system.  It was agreed that the Special Unit should
continue to monitor the mainstreaming of TCDC in all programmes of the system.

The need for increased assistance to the least developed countries in the
context of TCDC also featured in the exchange.  Finally, it was proposed that
consideration might also be given to the possibility of focusing on special
themes or topics during future sessions of the High-level Committee.


          B.  Review of progress made in implementing the Buenos Aires
              Plan of Action and the decisions of the High-level
              Committee and the implementation of the recommendations
              of the South Commission

68.  Most delegations provided information on their TCDC and South-South
cooperation policies and activities and others, especially the regional
commissions and other United Nations development system agencies, supplemented
the detailed information already provided in the report of the Administrator
of the United Nations Development Programme (TCDC/10/2).

69.  Many delegations agreed with the recommendations that developing
countries still needed to formulate national policies and to put in place or
strengthen established structures and national focal points.  A number of
delegations shared the view that TCDC must be consciously internalized by the
developing countries and its use given first consideration in formulating
technical cooperation programmes.  TCDC programmes should support efforts by
developing countries to adapt to the newly emerging global economy and to
respond to the increasing shift towards a liberalized global trading regime.

70.  A number of agencies and organizations of the United Nations system
reported that their programmes have supported centres of excellence for South-
South cooperation; stimulated private-sector development; fostered regional
cooperative agreements, such as those relating to research, development and
training in nuclear science and technology.  These initiatives were undertaken
through training programmes, seminars, facilitation of regional cooperation
agreements, establishing networks and regional training centres.

71.  The main constraints to the promotion of TCDC, as reported by many
delegations and agencies, included structural and cultural differences; lack
of financial resources; insufficient awareness of the benefits and potentials
of TCDC; limited access to information; inadequate human resources; and lack
of coordination among the various government agencies involved in technical
cooperation.  One delegation stated that the difficult economic and social
situation and the weakness of international efforts to coordinate TCDC were
among the many factors hindering the full implementation of the Buenos Aires
Plan of Action.

72.  Several delegations expressed their appreciation for the FAO Framework
Agreement on the Use of Experts for TCDC.

73.  One delegation stated that his Government had taken a number of
initiatives towards making South-South cooperation and TCDC, in particular, a
mechanism of choice and policy strategy in its national development and
comparative programmes.  In this context, a national coordinating committee
comprising government ministries and the private sector had been set up to
oversee the overall implementation of TCDC.  Many delegations reported the
improvement in national ownership in formulating, implementing, monitoring and
evaluating TCDC programmes and activities.  Awareness and recognition of the
potentiality of TCDC modality has grown steadily.

74.  Many delegations urged the United Nations development system to increase
its efforts in the promotion and implementation of TCDC and intensify the use
of the TCDC modality as an important instrument of programme delivery.

75.  Some delegations emphasized that South-South cooperation and TCDC should
not be based on conditionality, should show respect for national priorities
and should reflect full participation of all institutions and actors.

76.  One delegation stressed that TCDC must involve, respond to and be
accountable to the people who would live with the results and therefore their
participation in the decision-making process was important.

77.  A number of delegations believed that a regional approach to TCDC would
increase the chances for successful cooperation.  Special attention should,
therefore, be given towards strengthening subregional and regional integration
and horizontal cooperation within the South-South context.  One delegation
pointed to the need for system-wide coordination of all TCDC activities,
particularly within the United Nations system.

78.  Some delegations emphasized the need to intensify the efforts towards
broadening the base of support and participation, especially by the private
sector, NGOs and the media, in promoting TCDC.

79.  A number of delegations expressed the view that the full realization of
TCDC objectives could only be assured in a wider framework of international
development cooperation.  The true value of TCDC could only be seen if it
helped developing countries achieve sustained economic growth and development.
Some delegations believed it prudent to broaden the funding base for TCDC by
tapping resources from intergovernmental, non-governmental and private sector
organizations.  It was felt that more innovative and flexible funding
mechanisms should be developed to achieve that goal.  In that connection, the
contributions from Japan and the Republic of Korea to the Trust Fund for
South-South Cooperation were highly appreciated.

80.  Great concern was expressed by a number of delegations regarding the
inactive TCDC focal points in a number of least developed countries and the
absence of focal points in a number of other countries.  This had impeded
their awareness of TCDC opportunities, thus precluding access to opportunities
offered by the more advanced developing countries.  In this context, some
delegations urged the United Nations development system to intensify efforts
to address the special needs and difficulties of the least developed
countries, small island States and the landlocked developing countries and to
help strengthen their capacities for undertaking TCDC activities.  Some
delegations stressed the importance of viable infrastructure and efficient
transit transportation, which were crucial for encouraging trade.

81.  Some delegations called for a more systematic approach to carrying out
capacity and needs matching exercises so as to ensure that resulting
cooperation programmes were better monitored and effectively implemented.

82.  Some delegations stressed the need to concentrate limited resources on
strategic initiatives that could generate significant and long-term impacts on
the economic development of the cooperating countries.

83.  Some delegations emphasized the need for innovative means and new
initiatives for implementing the existing agreements among developing
countries emanating from recent meetings, such as the Conference of Ministers
for Foreign Affairs of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, held in New
Delhi in April 1997, and the South-South Conference on Trade, Finance and
Investment, held at San Jose', Costa Rica, in January 1997, in order to ensure
that all parties fully benefited from existing mechanisms.  One delegation
stated that it is the responsibility of the developing countries to establish,
define and implement their own agenda.  Another delegation made it clear that
"no one can do for us in the South what we are not prepared to do for
ourselves".  The TCDC modality could and should express that determination to
act.

84.  Several delegations supported the forging of a closer operational linkage
between ECDC and TCDC.  Many delegations expressed the view that TCDC, ECDC
and South-South cooperation were fundamentally related, although they had
originated in different forms, and that the operational integration of TCDC
and ECDC was needed.  The greater integration of TCDC/ECDC within an
integrated programme under the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries was welcomed by a number of delegations.  Furthermore,
South-South cooperation was an essential mechanism for promoting accelerated
economic growth, development and self-reliance.  The TCDC modality was an
important vehicle for the strengthening and enhancement of South-South
cooperation.  Greater efforts should, therefore, be made at all levels to
increase awareness of the TCDC modality, to sensitize all actors of its
existence and to highlight the cost-effectiveness in an economic sense and the
appropriateness and adaptability in technological terms.

85.  Most delegations supported the proposal for the celebration of the
twentieth anniversary of the adoption of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action in
1998.


           C.  Progress in the implementation of the new directions
               strategy for technical cooperation among developing 
               countries                                           

86.  Many delegations reiterated their full commitment to the new directions
strategy for TCDC endorsed by the High-level Committee in its decision 9/2
adopted at its ninth session in 1995.  One delegation noted that the new
directions provided a new boost to TCDC and served as a "philosophical
compass" for the implementation of TCDC in the current international economic
and political climate.  In that regard, a large number of delegations
supported closer operational integration between TCDC and ECDC.  Another
delegation noted that TCDC was not merely a modality of cooperation, but also
a philosophy of self-help and a means to empowerment of the South and was part
of a larger development paradigm involving national development efforts and
establishing appropriate international synergies.

87.  A number of delegations reported on their TCDC activities relating to the
implementation of the new directions strategy.  Some delegations, particularly
those representing countries in East, South-East and South Asia, Latin America
and Africa, with relatively large bilateral TCDC programmes offered to other
developing countries, provided information on the different types of TCDC
activities they had implemented with other developing countries both in their
region and in other regions.

88.  A number of delegations pointed to continuing constraints that had
hampered full implementation of the new directions strategy.  One critical
constraint had been the lack of adequate financial resources, both from
national budgets and from traditional sources of development assistance to
support TCDC activities and another was the ineffective functioning of TCDC
national focal points.

89.  The concept of pivotal countries, expounded by the new directions
strategy, featured in the debate.  A number of delegations sought
clarification on the special arrangements contemplated by the Special Unit for
Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries to assist the pivotal
countries to serve as catalysts for further promotion and application of TCDC.
One delegation suggested a meeting of the selected pivotal countries in order
to clarify the position and prepare an action plan.

90.  Many delegations commended the establishment of the Trust Fund for South-
South cooperation and hoped that it would meet a part of the resource gap that
inhibited greater TCDC and ECDC.  They appealed for increased contributions to
the Trust Fund by donor countries as well as by more advanced developing
countries.

91.  Some delegations reported that the lack of access to information on
capacities of other developing countries and the lack of knowledge of TCDC
mechanisms were important constraints that need to be overcome in order to
realize fully the potential of TCDC.  In that connection, a number of
delegations also requested the United Nations development system to assist
them in a more proactive manner in integrating TCDC into the development
activities supported by the agencies and organizations.

92.  Some delegations commended the United Nations agencies that had supported
TCDC activities through access to information and TCDC funding schemes.  The
Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries was
commended for its catalytic financial support for TCDC activities in many
areas of priority of developing countries.  It was particularly encouraged to
continue its efforts in expanding the information on capacities of developing
countries contained in the TCDC-INRES and its plan to develop a multi-
dimensional TCDC database to contain information on experts, centres of
excellence and successful and replicable TCDC experiences and best practices
in the agreed areas of focus.

93.  A number of delegations supported the expansion of triangular cooperation
arrangements.  It was specifically suggested that regional and international
financial development institutions should also participate in the triangular
cooperation arrangements.  Many were of the view that this form of cooperation
offered real possibilities in addressing their development priorities.

94.  Some delegations recalled that TCDC or South-South cooperation involved
an important principle of shared cost by the developing countries themselves. 
Implementation of South-South cooperation in its many forms was ultimately the
responsibility of the developing countries.

95.  Finally, some delegations expressed the view that it would be useful if
some further guidelines were provided to developing countries on implementing
new directions strategy and disseminating them widely to all concerned.  Such
guidelines might include a definition of roles by Governments, NGOs, the
private sector and the United Nations development system, and an indication of
all possible sources of funds.


           D.  Case studies of technical cooperation among
    
developing countries experiences           

96.  In keeping with the decision of the High-level Committee at its ninth
session, the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among Developing
Countries, in consultation with the Bureau of the Committee at its ninth
session, invited a number of countries and intergovernmental organizations to
prepare and present case studies on their experiences in implementing TCDC to
the Committee at its tenth session.

97.  Accordingly, the Latin American Economic System (SELA), Trinidad and
Tobago, on behalf of the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS), and eight
countries, namely, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, China, Senegal, Tunisia, Turkey
and the United Republic of Tanzania, made presentations of their experiences
with TCDC.  The main issues and recommendations that emerged from the
presentations of the case studies are summarized below.

98.  Although most developing countries had long-standing bilateral TCDC
relations, in the wake of recent trends towards globalization, TCDC was
increasingly being recognized as an important instrument for enabling
countries of the South to participate effectively in the newly emerging global
order.

99.  The case studies indicated that developing countries had sought to
promote a genuine sense of interdependence among themselves in the
understanding that each country had resources and capacities to offer as well
as needs to be satisfied by others.  In respect of such problems as poverty,
unemployment and indebtedness faced by many developing countries, the studies
showed that many countries had taken the initiative to formulate clear
policies and appropriate institutional arrangements in order to ensure a
coordinated approach to those problems within the framework of TCDC.

100. It was emphasized that national focal points played a decisive role in
the success or failure of TCDC.  In Latin America the national focal points
regularly coordinated their policies and programmes on a regional basis and
that had contributed significantly to the promotion of TCDC in the region.

101. While stressing the need for self-reliance and solidarity in harnessing
the capacities that existed among developing countries, most of the case
studies acknowledged that TCDC was a complementary instrument rather than a
substitute for North-South cooperation.  For that reason, Bangladesh, Senegal,
Turkey and other countries favoured broad-based partnerships that included
triangular relations with traditional donors and developing countries.

102. Presentations by Brazil, China, Tunisia and Turkey indicated that the
more advanced developing countries had become an important factor in the
emerging TCDC partnerships.

103. It was recognized that the promotion of development cooperation among
developing countries needed to be made more inclusive by encouraging closer
collaboration between Governments, the private sector and the NGO community.

104. Recognizing the decline in official development assistance (ODA), a
number of countries called for innovative approaches to resource mobilization
among developing countries.  For example, China and Turkey had made plans to
pool resources by working jointly in organizing workshops and seminars on
personnel management and public administration for their mutual benefit.  For
its part, Brazil had a new mechanism to support TCDC in the form of a
cooperation fund designed to benefit States members of the Organization of
American States (OAS) that sought Brazilian technical cooperation.

105. The case studies suggested that, as more developing countries became
providers of expertise to other countries in the South, the importance of
triangular cooperation had become all the more salient in South-South
cooperation.  For example, France has contributed financial assistance to
enable Senegal to provide magistrates in the Comoros and Djibouti and French
language teachers to Seychelles.

106. Turkey commended the FAO approach to the use of experts from developing
countries while Brazil reported having used that model successfully in various
projects on agriculture, forestry and fishing.

107. It was recommended that the TCDC modality should be integrated in the
technical cooperation programmes of the United Nations system.  To that end,
Turkey proposed that closer collaboration should be forged between national
TCDC focal points and UNDP country offices.  It was also suggested that UNDP
projects in selected countries that were ongoing or awaiting approval should
be reviewed with a view to identifying the need for experts and training that
could be met by utilizing capacities in developing countries.  It was also
recommended that practical steps be taken to make TCDC the preferred modality
in operational activities of UNDP.  That could be done by instituting a series
of operational guidelines:  (a) the decision to use the TCDC modality should
be taken at the time of preparing country programmes; (b) TCDC should be
inscribed as an item under all major components of any project; and (c) the
approval procedure for every programme or project should specifically
ascertain the applicability of the TCDC modality.

108. Many countries stressed the need to concentrate development efforts on
strategic areas that could have a significant impact on the development
prospects of developing countries.  In that regard, most case studies
emphasized trade and investment, debt, economic management, environment,
poverty alleviation, small and medium-sized enterprises, technology transfer,
employment creation and the coordination of macroeconomics policy.

109. It was emphasized that capacities and needs-matching exercises supported
by TCDC should continue to be demand driven.  Moreover it was recommended that
the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries should
continue to monitor the implementation of the agreements concluded among
countries participating in such exercises.

110. The case studies on a select number of countries and organizations
provided a useful opportunity for the sharing of TCDC experiences in the
context of the deliberations of the High-level Committee.  The presentations
were also welcomed as an important innovation in the organization of the work
of the Committee.


             E.  Consideration of reports of the Administrator of the
                 United Nations Development Programme

111. In the interventions of several agencies, there was a heightened
appreciation of the increased application of TCDC policies and procedures in
their respective work programmes during the reporting period.  Several cited
examples of TCDC instrumentalities, such as networking among institutions and
the documentation of best practices in their operational activities and their
concerted efforts in using the capacities of the developing countries.  Some
agencies highlighted attempts to forge the operational integration of TCDC in
the context of their ECDC activities.  The continued validity of the
guidelines was emphasized.  The usual agency focal points meeting timed to
follow the High-level Committee meeting is scheduled in May 1997.

112. In consideration of the organizational and supportive arrangements for
TCDC, there was unanimity among the delegations on the need to preserve the
separate identity of the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries within UNDP.  It was noted that .05 per cent of the UNDP
overall programme resources was allocated for the programming of TCDC
activities during the period 1997-1999.


                          V.  ADOPTION OF THE REPORT


                A.  Report of the Chairman of the Working Group
                    to the High-level Committee                

113. At its sixth meeting on 9 May 1997, the Committee considered the report
of the Chairman of the Working Group to the High-level Committee.  In addition
to its normal business of considering decisions, the Working Group was
assigned three tasks following the discussions in the plenary meetings.  These
additional tasks involved consideration of (a) the commemoration of the
twentieth anniversary of the adoption of Buenos Aires Plan of Action for
Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries, (b) the linkage between TCDC
and ECDC, and (c) the format of the meeting of the High-level Committee.  The
Working Group carried out its mandate by formulating two draft decisions and
additional recommendations on the format of the meeting.  Decision 10/1 of the
High-level Committee, part A, paragraphs 13, 14, and 16, along with the
recommendations on the format of the meeting, covered the three items
specifically assigned to the Working Group.

114. The Working Group recommended that the Bureau and the Special Unit for
Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries, in considering the duration
of the eleventh session, should take into account the following suggestions
without prejudice to the policy-making function of the High-level Committee: 
(a) an interactive plenary meeting with short focused interventions; (b)
presentation of a limited but representative number of case studies reflecting
the themes in the new directions strategy (including at least one on the
experience of least developed countries) and involving participating
countries, and where relevant, United Nations organizations and agencies, the
international financial institutions and organizations such as the
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the South
Centre, as well as independent experts.  The High-level Committee meeting
should be organized sufficiently in advance to allow appropriate
representation and preparation by delegations.  Those making presentations
should arrange to circulate the case studies well in advance;  (c) a working
group to consider the outcome of the meeting (drafts could be prepared in
advance of the meeting on the basis of the documentation provided and informal
consultations); and (d) a concluding plenary.

115. The decisions including the recommendations on the format of the meeting
were adopted by the meeting (decisions 10/1 and 10/2).  Turkey suggested that
prior to the commemorative meeting in 1998 an attempt might be made to prepare
an analytical inventory of the major TCDC activities carried out since the
adoption of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action.


                B.  Provisional agenda for the eleventh session
                    of the High-level Committee                

116. Breaking with the tradition of the past, the Bureau proposed and the
meeting approved that, in view of the adoption of the new format for the next
meeting of the High-level Committee and the recommendation to the General
Assembly to hold a commemorative meeting on TCDC during its fifty-third
session, the agenda for the eleventh meeting should be prepared and circulated
by the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme after
consultation with the Bureau of the High-level Committee well before the
eleventh meeting of the Committee.

               C.  Comments by the Director of the Special Unit
                   for Technical Cooperation among Developing  
                   Countries                                   

117. The Director of the Special unit for Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries acknowledged the many suggestions made by the delegations
that would be beneficial for the implementation of the technical cooperation
framework for TCDC for the period 1997-1999.  He also welcomed the interactive
nature of the debate in the meeting and the new practice of presenting case
studies which allowed delegations to exchange information on their experiences
in implementing TCDC programmes.  He stated that the debate was constructive
and served to clarify the concept of TCDC both as a philosophy and a modality.

He thought that the debate had also clarified the meaning of ECDC and TCDC and
their relationship to the generic concept of South-South cooperation.

118. He considered the task of preparing an inventory of TCDC activities since
1978 to be somewhat daunting, but agreed that a compilation of major TCDC
initiatives during the period, including successes or failures, could be very
instructive.  He welcomed the invitation from Chile to hold a meeting of
pivotal countries for TCDC to agree on the measures that will be necessary to
allow these countries to serve as effective catalysts for the promotion of
TCDC.  He emphasized that the promotion of TCDC and the wider application of
the modality ultimately depended on the commitment and political will of the
developing countries.  At the same time, the United Nations development system
and the donors also needed to be supportive of the efforts of the developing
countries.  As for the Special Unit, he assured the Committee that it would
not only continue to be supportive but also play a proactive role under the
new directions strategy.


                 D.  Draft report of the High-level Committee

119. At its sixth meeting, on 9 May 1997, the Committee authorized its
Rapporteur to complete its report, taking into account any amendments or
comments received from delegations.


                          VI.  CLOSURE OF THE SESSION


             A.  Closing statement by the Associate Administrator
                 of the United Nations Development Programme     

120. In his closing statement, the Associate Administrator thanked the
President, the Bureau and the members of the High-level Committee for the
inspiration and direction that they had provided during the meeting.  He
particularly expressed thanks to the delegates who had come from the various
capitals to share their practical experience and insight in dealing with
issues related to TCDC.  He reiterated the commitment and support of UNDP to
implement the recommendations and decisions of the Committee and stated that
the Special Unit in particular would give due attention to them in
implementing the new directions strategy.

121. The Associate Administrator welcomed the innovative way in which the
tenth meeting conducted its business.  The experiment with the new format for
the plenary debate had encouraged more interaction and dialogue among
delegations.  The case study presentations had been very useful in stimulating
an exchange of experiences among members of the Committee.  He thought that
the decision to deal in future with thematic issues would contribute to a much
more focused and constructive discussion of issues before the Committee.

122. He noted the interest of the delegations in promoting closer linkage
between TCDC and ECDC and their increasing importance in the emerging global
economic order.  He was also gratified by the decision of the Committee to
request that the President of the General Assembly convene a commemorative
meeting to mark the twentieth anniversary of the adoption of Buenos Aires Plan
of Action and hoped that it would serve to underscore the importance of TCDC
at this stage of the evolution of international economic cooperation.


                    B.  Closing statement by the President

123. The President congratulated the delegations and the secretariat on the
results of the eleventh meeting of the High-level Committee and thanked all
concerned for their active participation.  He was particularly appreciative of
the work and efforts of the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries.  He noted in particular the harmony and enthusiasm with
which the Committee had transacted its business.  He thanked specifically the
Chairman of the Group of 77 and China and the representative of the European
Union for their continued commitment to TCDC.

124. He stated that the new directions strategy had breathed new life into
TCDC.  Its wider application was being facilitated by greater awareness about
the value of the modality.  He recognized that the spirit of the United
Nations pervaded the work of the High-level Committee and also of its Bureau. 
He considered that the message of the meeting was one of commitment by all
members to international economic cooperation in which South-South cooperation
was a crucial element.


                                     Notes

     1/ Report of the United Nations Conference on Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries, Buenos Aires, 30 August-12 September 1978 (United
Nations publications, Sales No. E.78.II.A.11 and corrigendum), chap. I.

     2/ Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-fifth Session,
Supplement No. 39 (A/35/39 and Corr.1).

     3/ Ibid., Thirty-sixth Session, Supplement No. 39 (A/36/39).

     4/ Ibid., Thirty-eighth Session, Supplement No. 39 (A/38/39).

     5/ Ibid., Fortieth Session, Supplement No. 39 (A/40/39).

     6/ Ibid., Forty-second Session, Supplement No. 39 (A/42/39).

     7/ Ibid., Forty-fourth Session, Supplement No. 39 (A/44/39).

     8/ Ibid., Forty-sixth Session, Supplement No. 39 (A/46/39).

     9/ Ibid., Forty-eighth Session, Supplement No. 39 (A/48/39).

    10/ Ibid., Fiftieth session, Supplement No. 39 (A/50/39).


                                    ANNEX I

                 Decisions adopted by the High-level Committee
                             at its tenth session


            10/1.  Review of progress made in implementing technical
                   cooperation among developing countries

               A.  Review of progress made in implementing the Buenos
                   Aires Plan of Action and the decisions of the
                   High-level Committee and implementation of the
                   recommendations of the South Commission report

     The High-level Committee,

     Reaffirming the validity and relevance of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action
for Promoting and Implementing Technical Cooperation among Developing
Countries, a/

     Taking note of the declaration adopted by the Ministers for Foreign
Affairs of the Group of 77 and China at their twentieth annual meeting, held
in New York in September 1996, b/

     Taking note also of the Declaration and the Plan of Action adopted by the
South-South Conference on Trade, Finance and Investment, held at San Jose',
Costa Rica, in January 1997,

     Taking note further of the final document of the Twelfth Ministerial
Conference of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, held in New Delhi, India,
in April 1997,

     Taking note of the report prepared by the Special Unit for Technical
Cooperation among Developing Countries within the United Nations Development
Programme, c/

     1.   Reaffirms the great potential of technical cooperation among
developing countries, which has now gained widespread acceptance as an
innovative and effective instrument of technical cooperation, and urges
developing countries that have not yet done so to elaborate national policies
and strategies for technical cooperation among developing countries so as to
give full effect to this form of cooperation;

     2.   Welcomes the significant efforts made by both developing countries
and the United Nations development system to increase the application of
technical cooperation among developing countries in development cooperation
and its increasingly important role in bilateral and multilateral relations,
including, inter alia, the expanded use of capacity and needs-matching
exercises, which have culminated in a significant number of bilateral
agreements, as well as activities related to training, transfer of technology,
reconstruction and the exchange of experience in various fields within the
framework of interregional cooperation;

     3.   Welcomes also the efforts made by other countries to increase their
involvement in the application of technical cooperation among developing
countries;

     4.   Notes with appreciation the actions already taken towards the
expansion of the technical cooperation among developing countries Information
Referral System database into a multidimensional information system, including
data on individual experts, institutional capacities, centres of excellence,
as well as replicable best practices in developing countries, recognizes the
constraints of the effective use of this database, in this regard, calls upon
the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries to take
measures, including capacity-building, aimed at enabling the least developed
countries to access international information networks, for example the
Internet, so that they can effectively utilize the technical cooperation among
developing countries Information Referral System database;

     5.   Commends the developing countries that have allocated resources from
their national budgets for technical cooperation among developing countries
through bilateral and multilateral channels, and have made available their
institutional facilities, expertise and centres of excellence for this
purpose;

     6.   Encourages developing countries that have not yet done so to
establish national focal points for technical cooperation among developing
countries and where focal points have already been established to ensure that
the focal points are adequately staffed and also appropriately equipped to
enable them to function effectively and efficiently;

     7.   Reiterates that South-South cooperation should not be viewed as a
substitute for but rather as a complement to North-South cooperation and, in
that connection, emphasizes the need to effectively promote triangular
approaches to facilitate South-South programmes and projects;

     8.   Encourages developed countries that already provide support for
technical cooperation among developing countries in the context of triangular
arrangements or through bilateral and multilateral channels to continue to
increase their financial support for technical cooperation among developing
countries, including contributions to the Trust Fund for South-South
Cooperation, and calls upon other developed countries to do likewise;

     9.   Reiterates the recommendations of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action
that international institutions and developed countries, in designing,
formulating and executing projects for technical cooperation in developing
countries, give priority to the use of local capabilities, consultancy and
expertise and, where not available, to the technical resources from other
developing countries;

     10.  Requests the organizations of the United Nations system to take
appropriate measures to improve the incorporation of technical cooperation
among developing countries into their programmes and projects and to intensify
efforts towards the mainstreaming of this modality in the operational
activities for development of the United Nations system, and encourages other
relevant international institutions to undertake similar measures;

     11.  Calls upon organizations of the United Nations system, particularly
the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Conference on
Trade and Development, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization
and other relevant organizations to make concerted efforts, within their
mandates and agreed programmes, to assist the developing countries to utilize
technical cooperation among developing countries for the promotion of small-
and medium-sized enterprises, which constitute an essential component in the
development strategies of most developing countries;

     12.  Calls upon the Administrator of the United Nations Development
Programme to continue efforts to mobilize greater donor support in order to
increase the allocation of resources for technical cooperation among
developing countries including the expansion of the Perez-Guerrero Trust
Fund's core capital and support to the South Centre in accordance with
decisions taken by the High-level Committee at its ninth session;

     13.  Recommends that the intergovernmental processes of the United
Nations system, in accordance with their mandates and agreed work programmes,
as well as the High-level Committee, foster closer linkages on policy and
operational aspects between technical cooperation among developing countries
and economic cooperation among developing countries;

     14.  Also recommends that a new format and working methods be applied to
the conduct of future meetings in order to lead to a more interactive debate
and a more concrete outcome to the deliberations of the High-level Committee,
taking into account the suggestions of the Committee as contained in the
report of the tenth session;

     15.  Welcomes the important focus that will be given to economic and
technical cooperation among developing countries in the operational activities
for development segment of the substantive session of the Economic and Social
Council of 1997, and strongly recommends that the report of the High-level
Committee on its tenth session and the report on new directions for technical
cooperation among developing countries d/ constitute part of the background
documents for the consideration of this item;

     16.  Notes with interest that 1998 will be the twentieth anniversary of
the adoption of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action, and recommends that during
its fifty-third session the General Assembly hold a commemorative meeting to
mark the occasion and to mobilize further support for the effective
implementation of the new directions strategy for technical cooperation among
developing countries;

     17.  Requests the Administrator of the United Nations Development
Programme to submit to the High-level Committee at its eleventh session a
comprehensive and analytical biennial report on the progress made in the
implementation of the Buenos Aires Plan of Action as well as the present
decision.


             B.  Review of the progress made in the implementation
                 of the new directions strategy for technical
                 cooperation among developing countries

     The High-level Committee,

     Reaffirming General Assembly resolution 50/119 of 20 December 1995 and
related resolutions of the Economic and Social Council on economic cooperation
among developing countries and technical cooperation among developing
countries,

     Recalling its decision 9/2 of 2 June 1995 adopting the main
recommendations contained in the report on new directions for technical
cooperation among developing countries,

     Reaffirming that South-South cooperation constitutes an important element
of international cooperation for development, and reiterating that developing
countries have a primary responsibility for promoting technical cooperation
among developing countries and that the developed countries and the United
Nations system as well as other international organizations should assist and
support such activities,

     1.   Recognizes that, while some progress has been made in the
implementation of the new directions strategy for technical cooperation among
developing countries, further progress can be achieved more effectively
through, inter alia, the availability and provision of adequate resources,
strengthening the participating institutions and enhancing the awareness of
and the commitment to the technical cooperation among developing countries
modality;

     2.   Recommends that the intergovernmental processes of the United
Nations system, in accordance with their mandates and agreed work programmes,
as well as the High-level Committee, foster closer linkages on policy and
operational aspects between technical cooperation among developing countries
and economic cooperation among developing countries;

     3.   Further urges the United Nations development system to address
effectively and operationalize the implementation of other recommendations
contained in the new directions strategy, in particular, new funding
arrangements, expansion of the technical cooperation among developing
countries Information Referral System database, identification of pivotal
countries for technical cooperation among developing countries, promotion of
triangular cooperation arrangements and dissemination of best practices in
technical cooperation among developing countries;

     4.   Commends the efforts being made to promote improved, expanded and
diversified linkages with the private sector, non-governmental organizations
and civil society;

     5.   Welcomes, in the context of follow-up to the Programme of Action on
Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, and within the
framework of the Small Island Developing States Technical Assistance
Programme, the completion of a comprehensive directory of experts on small
island developing States and the identification of critical areas in the
programme of action for implementation, through the application of the
technical cooperation among developing countries modality;

     6.   Welcomes also the establishment of the Trust Fund for South-South
Cooperation by the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme,
notes with appreciation the contribution of some developed countries to the
Trust Fund, and urges the international donor community to contribute
generously;

     7.   Welcomes the cooperation framework for technical cooperation among
developing countries (1997-1999) e/ and its focus on poverty eradication,
environment, production and employment and trade, investment and macroeconomic
management;

     8.   Welcomes the decision of the Executive Board of the United Nations
Development Programme to allocate .05 per cent of its overall programme
resources to technical cooperation among developing countries during the
period 1997-1999;

     9.   Calls upon developing, developed and other countries, their
intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as the
organizations and agencies of the United Nations system, to give their full
support to the effective implementation of the technical cooperation among
developing countries framework, including support for innovative national,
regional and interregional programmes and projects and the expanded
utilization of the technical cooperation among developing countries modality
in the operational activities for development of the United Nations system;

     10.  Reiterates its request to the Administrator of the United Nations
Development Programme to instruct resident representatives to increase the
application of the technical cooperation among developing countries modality
in technical cooperation activities in accordance with Economic and Social
Council resolution 1992/41 of 30 July 1992;

     11.  Calls upon the Administrator of the United Nations Development
Programme to ensure that the separate identity of the Special Unit for
Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries within the United Nations
Development Programme is maintained and decides to review periodically the
impact and functioning of the Special Unit in promoting, monitoring and
coordinating technical cooperation among developing countries on a system-wide
basis;

     12.  Requests the Administrator of the United Nations Development
Programme to include in his biennial report to the High-level Committee at its
eleventh session information on the progress made in the implementation of the
present decision.


           10/2.  Overall framework for the promotion and application
                  of technical cooperation among developing countries

     The High-level Committee,

     Recalling its decision 9/3 of 2 June 1995,

     Taking note of the guidelines for the review of policies and procedures
concerning technical cooperation among developing countries approved by the
Administrative Committee on Coordination,

     Taking note also of the report of the Administrator of the United Nations
Development Programme, f/

     1.   Takes note of the views and comments expressed at the tenth session
of the High-level Committee on making the application of the guidelines more
effective in order to ensure greater use of the technical cooperation among
developing countries modality in the United Nations system, which now forms a
new current in development cooperation;

     2.   Commends the United Nations agencies that have taken measures to
apply the guidelines approved by the Administrative Committee on Coordination
and urges the organizations and agencies that have not yet done so to take
similar measures in order to ensure uniformity and consistency in the
application of the guidelines;

     3.   Requests the Administrator of the United Nations Development
Programme to carry out consultations on the guidelines with the organizations
and agencies of the United Nations system, taking into account the views
expressed by Member States and the new directions strategy for technical
cooperation among developing countries, and to submit the recommendations on
the subject to the General Assembly at its fifty-second session, through the
Economic and Social Council, for further consideration and approval, with a
view that recommendations will be submitted to the fifty-third session of the
General Assembly in the context of the triennial policy review of operational
activities for development of the United Nations system;

     4.   Notes with appreciation the increased financial resources allocated
for technical cooperation among developing countries by the Executive Board of
the United Nations Development Programme for the programming period of
1997-1999 and, in the light of the expanding utilization of this modality,
requests the Executive Board to review periodically the volume of resources
allocated for the promotion of technical cooperation among developing
countries, as well as the impact of the technical cooperation among developing
countries modality on the implementation of the programmes of the United
Nations Development Programme and incorporate the outcome of the reviews in
the report of the High-level Committee for consideration;

     5.   Stresses the need to further mobilize additional financial
resources, from all sources, with a view to assisting the Special Unit for
Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries to further implement and
operationalize the new directions strategy for technical cooperation among
developing countries;

     6.   Requests the Administrator of the United Nations Development
Programme, in relation to the mandated functions and increasing
responsibilities of the Special Unit for Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries, to ensure that the Special Unit is adequately staffed to
enable it to execute its responsibilities effectively;

     7.   Also requests the Administrator of the United Nations Development
Programme to report to the High-level Committee at its eleventh session on the
implementation of the present decision.


                                   Notes

a/ Report of the United Nations Conference on Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries, Buenos Aires, 30 August-12 September 1978 (United
Nations publication, Sales No. E.78.II.A.11 and corrigendum), chap. I.

b/ A/51/471, annex.

c/ TCDC/10/2.

d/ TCDC/10/3.

e/ Decision 95/23 of the Executive Board of the United Nations Development
Programme and the United Nations Population Fund (E/1995/34).

f/ TCDC/10/4.


                                   ANNEX II

               List of documents before the High-level Committee
                             at its tenth session


TCDC/10/L.1    Provisional annotated agenda, including list of documents

TCDC/10/L.2    Adoption of the agenda and organization of work

TCDC/10/1      (Not issued)

TCDC/10/2      Review of progress made in implementing the Buenos Aires Plan
               of Action, the decisions of the High-level Committee and the
               recommendations of the South Commission

TCDC/10/3      Progress made in the implementation of the new directions
               strategy for technical cooperation among developing countries

TCDC/10/4      Consideration of reports of the Administrator of the United
               Nations Development Programme:

               (a) Implementation of the guidelines for the review of policies
                   and procedures by the United Nations development system
                   concerning technical cooperation among developing
                   countries;

               (b) Organizational and supportive arrangements for technical
                   cooperation among developing countries, such as
                   administrative, legal, information and financial
                   arrangements


 

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Date last posted: 10 January 2000 10:05:30
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