United Nations

A/51/558


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

25 October 1996

ORIGINAL:
ENGLISH


                                                        A/51/558
                                                              

General Assembly
Fifty-first session
Agenda item 110 (b)


         HUMAN RIGHTS QUESTIONS:  HUMAN RIGHTS QUESTIONS, INCLUDING  
         ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES FOR IMPROVING THE EFFECTIVE ENJOYMENT
                   OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS

             Development of public information activities in the field
             of human rights, including the World Public Information
                           Campaign on Human Rights

                        Report of the Secretary-General


                                   CONTENTS

                                                              Paragraphs Page

  I.  INTRODUCTION .........................................     1 - 5     3  

 II.  PUBLIC INFORMATION ACTIVITIES OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER
      FOR HUMAN RIGHTS/CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS .............     6 - 55    4

      A. Publications programme ...........................      6 - 26    4 

         1.   Fact Sheet series ............................    11 - 15    5

         2.   Professional Training Series .................    16 - 21    6  

         3.   Human Rights Study Series ....................       22      7

         4.   Ad hoc publications ..........................       23      7

         5.   Reference material ...........................       24      7

         6.   New publications .............................       25      8

         7.   Periodicals ..................................       26      9

      B. Use of electronic means ..........................     27 - 31    9

      C. External relations programme .....................     32 - 43   10

         1.   Briefings ....................................       32     10

         2.   Exhibitions and human rights observances .....    33 - 36   10 

         3.   Fellowship programme .........................    37 - 39   11

         4.   Internship programme .........................    40 - 42   12 

         5.   Training courses and other technical
              cooperation activities with a public
              information element ..........................       43     12

      D. Coordination and cooperation within and outside
         the United Nations ...............................     44 - 55   12

         1.   Inter-agency cooperation .....................    45 - 48   13

         2.   Non-governmental organizations ...............    49 - 51   14

         3.   Academic and research institutions ...........    52 - 55   14

III.  DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INFORMATION .....................    56 - 85   15

      A. Activities in the field of human rights,
         January 1995 to August 1996 ......................     60 - 73   16

      B. Activities of Information Centres and Services ...     74 - 85   18

Annex.  Publications issued by the High Commissioner for Human Rights/
        Centre for Human Rights and available as from September 1996 ..   21


                               I.  INTRODUCTION


1.   In its resolution 49/187 of 23 December 1994, the General Assembly
reaffirmed that activities to improve public knowledge in the field of human
rights were essential to the fulfilment of the purposes of the United Nations
set out in Article 1, paragraph 3, of the Charter, and that carefully designed
programmes of teaching, education and information were essential to the
achievement of lasting respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.  It
also recognized the catalytic effect of initiatives of the United Nations on
national and regional public information activities in the field of human
rights.

2.   The World Public Information Campaign for Human Rights was launched by
the General Assembly in its resolution 43/128 of 8 December 1988, with the
objectives of increasing understanding and awareness of human rights and
fundamental freedoms and educating the public on the international machinery
available for the promotion and protection of those rights and freedoms and
the efforts of the United Nations to realize them.  

3.   In resolution 49/187, the General Assembly requested the
Secretary-General to submit to it at its fifty-first session a comprehensive
report on the implementation of that resolution for consideration under the
item entitled "Human rights questions".  The present report is submitted in
accordance with that request and contains information relating to the
activities of the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights
and the Department of Public Information. 

4.   The coordination of the United Nations education and public information
programmes in the field of human rights was specifically mentioned in General
Assembly resolution 48/141 of 20 December 1993, as part of the mandate of the
thereby created post of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.  The High
Commissioner for Human Rights has repeatedly stressed the importance he
attaches to the implementation of activities for increasing the awareness of
human rights among the general public.  In the context of the restructuring of
the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights (HCHR/CHR),
great emphasis is being placed on the setting up of a communication policy
that would enable all partners within and outside the United Nations to be
kept informed on an appropriate and regular basis of the activities undertaken
by the HCHR/CHR.  

5.   The United Nations High Commissioner was asked by the General Assembly
to coordinate the implementation of the Plan of Action for the United Nations
Decade for Human Rights Education, beginning on 1 January 1995, proclaimed by
the same body in its resolution 49/184 of 23 December 1994.  The Plan of
Action for the Decade focuses on stimulating and supporting local and national
activities in human rights education and, in certain cases, takes over some
activities previously initiated in the context of the World Public Information
Campaign for Human Rights.  In order to avoid repetition, an account of the
activities undertaken by the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for
Human Rights under the Decade is given in the report of the United Nations
High Commissioner for Human Rights on the implementation of the United Nations
Decade for Human Rights Education transmitted by the Secretary-General to the
General Assembly (A/51/506).


            II.  PUBLIC INFORMATION ACTIVITIES OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER
                 FOR HUMAN RIGHTS/CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

                          A.  Publications programme

6.   In resolution 49/187 the General Assembly requested the High
Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights (HCHR/CHR), in
cooperation with the Department of Public Information, to finalize a
comprehensive review of the programme of information and publications in the
field of human rights and encouraged the HCHR/CHR to continue its efforts
towards streamlining and focusing its publications programme. 

7.   In keeping with that directive, and in the context of its restructuring
process, the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights is
giving priority to strengthening and making more effective its publications
programme.  For this reason, a revision of the publications programme is being
undertaken in order to clearly establish a publications policy, giving
priority to the need to disseminate widely information about activities and
plans of the HCHR/CHR.  This revision also aims, to the extent possible, at
replacing publications in paper form by various electronic forms.  In this
regard, and as part of the United Nations Secretariat, the HCHR/CHR will
consider carefully the conclusions and recommendations of the comprehensive
survey of publications undertaken by the Joint Inspection Unit at the request
of the General Assembly in its resolution 50/206 of 23 December 1995.  The
HCHR/CHR has recently made its contribution to this survey by completing and
submitting the questionnaire designed by the Joint Inspection Unit. 

8.   Since the last report, the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for
Human Rights has received around 3,000 letters from individuals, Governments,
academic institutions, non-governmental organizations and other human rights
institutions requesting human rights publications.  As requested by the
directives received from the Office of Conference Services at Headquarters
regarding the need to drastically reduce distribution of documents and
publications, the mailing list of the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights has been reviewed accordingly.  Priority has
been given to institutions active in the field of human rights, whereas
individual recipients are as limited as possible. 

9.   An account of the activities undertaken in relation to the translation
of regional and local language versions of the Universal Declaration of Human
Rights is given in the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for
Human Rights on the implementation of the United Nations Decade for Human
Rights Education submitted by the Secretary-General to the General Assembly. 

10.  The HCHR/CHR also contributed substantially during the reporting period
to the preparation of the general United Nations publications, such as The
United Nations and Human Rights, 1945-1995.


                             1.  Fact Sheet series

11.  The Fact Sheet series consists of booklets directed at a non-specialized
audience, addressing various aspects of United Nations activities in the field
of human rights, including international mechanisms for the promotion and
protection of human rights, or specific human rights issues.  Fact Sheets are
published in the six official languages of the United Nations and distributed
worldwide free of charge.  

12.  Since the last report to the General Assembly, four new Fact Sheets have
been issued:  No. 22 (Discrimination against Women:  The Convention and the
Committee) in all United Nations official languages; No. 23 (Harmful
Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children) in Arabic,
Chinese, English and Russian; No. 24 (The Rights of Migrant Workers) and No.
25 (Forced Evictions and Human Rights) in English only pending further
translation.  Fact Sheet No. 21 (The Human Right to Adequate Housing) is now
being translated into Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish.  New issues on
arbitrary detention and the mandate of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
are in preparation.

13.  Special attention has been paid during this period to the revision and
updating of existing issues.  In this regard, revised versions of Fact Sheets
No. 2 (The International Bill of Human Rights), No. 3 (Advisory Services and
Technical Cooperation in the Field of Human Rights) and No. 16 (The Committee
on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights) have already been published and
several others, including those of Fact Sheet No. 10 (The Rights of the
Child), No. 9 (The Rights of Indigenous Peoples) and the second revision of
Fact Sheet No. 6 (Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances) are now being
edited.  Fact Sheet No. 1 (Human Rights Machinery) has also been updated but
the text is on hold pending the outcome of the restructuring process currently
undergone by the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights. 

14.  Owing to increased demand, several Fact Sheets have been reprinted,
including No. 4 (Methods of Combating Torture) in English and French; No. 11
(Summary or Arbitrary Executions) in Arabic, French and Spanish; No. 7
(Communications Procedures) in French; No. 12 (The Committee on the
Elimination of Racial Discrimination) in French; No. 13 (International
Humanitarian Law and Human Rights) in Chinese and French; No. 14 (Contemporary
Forms of Slavery) in English and French; No. 17 (The Committee against
Torture) in French; No. 18 (Minority Rights) in French; No. 19 (National
Institutions for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights) in Arabic,
Chinese, English and French; and No. 21 (The Human Right to Adequate Housing)
in Arabic, Chinese, English, Russian and Spanish. 

15.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights has the
intention of putting the whole text - first in English and eventually in
French and Spanish - of all Fact Sheets in the Centre's home page on the
Internet once available.  This development will enhance the wide dissemination
of these publications, while contributing to reduce print runs and rationalize
expenses.  The complete list of Fact Sheets is contained in the annex.


                       2.  Professional Training Series

16.  An important teaching and educational tool is the established
Professional Training Series, designed primarily to provide support to the
training activities of the programme of advisory services and technical
assistance of the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights,
as well as to assist other organizations involved in human rights education
for professional groups. 

17.  The most recent development in this area has been the close cooperation
established with the International Training Centre of the International Labour
Organization in Turin, Italy, to make the training manuals a more pedagogical
tool.  Cooperation has included the design and production of new and revised
materials, as well as the organization of pilot courses to test the products. 
As a result of this collaboration the HCHR/CHR has undertaken the revision and
updating of the Manual on Human Rights Reporting, which has now been developed
into a training package composed of four distinctive elements:  the manual, a
trainer's guide and its annexes, including training tools, and a pocket guide
for participants.  Similar packages will be developed for the training manuals
now under preparation.

18.  Since the last report a new handbook on National Institutions for the
Protection and Promotion of Human Rights, No. 4 in the series, has been
published in English, Russian and Spanish and will be soon available in
French.  The fifth publication in the series, Human Rights for Law Enforcement
Officials and its pocket guide are now being printed.

19.  During the same period previous issues of the series have been
translated into other official languages, including No. 1 (Human Rights and
Social Work:  A Manual for Schools of Social Work and the Social Work
Profession) into Arabic, Russian and Spanish; No. 2 (Human Rights and
Elections:  A Handbook on the Legal, Technical and Human Rights Aspects of
Elections) into Arabic, French, Russian and Spanish; and No. 3 (Human Rights
and Pre-Trial Detention:  A Handbook on International Standards related to
Pre-Trial Detention) into French, Russian and Spanish. 

20.  Two further manuals, one for military officials and one for peacekeeping
officials, have already been tested in pilot-training courses and are now
being finalized.  In the context of the Programme of Action for the United
Nations Decade for Human Rights Education and in cooperation with relevant
experts and organizations, the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for
Human Rights has envisaged the preparation and publication of six new training
manuals - for prison officers, primary and secondary school teachers, legal
professionals, national and local non-governmental organizations, mass media
and for monitoring - and three handbooks on human rights and conflict
resolution, human rights and parliament, and human rights and constitutions. 
More detailed information on these developments is given in the report of the
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the implementation of the
United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education submitted by the
Secretary-General to the General Assembly. 

21.  As a part of the contribution of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
to the international operation in the former Yugoslavia, the High Commissioner
for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights published a Field Guide for
International Police Task Force Monitors of the Peace Implementation Operation
in Bosnia and Herzegovina and CIVPOL Officers of the United Nations
Transitional Administration in Eastern Slavonia.  Although not part of the
training manual series, this publication, which was designed to fulfil the
specific needs of the human rights training programme for international police
task force and civilian police monitors in the former Yugoslavia, is a good
example of the capacity and flexibility of the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights to prepare human rights training tools directed
to specific target audiences.


                         3.  Human Rights Study Series

22.  The Human Rights Study Series reproduces studies and reports on
important human rights issues prepared by experts of the Commission on Human
Rights and the Subcommission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of
Minorities.  Eight studies in the series have been published so far (see
annex).  Since the last report to the General Assembly two new Study Series
have been issued:  Study Series No. 7 (The Right to Adequate Housing) in
Arabic, Chinese, English, French and Russian, and Study Series No. 8 (Sexual
Exploitation of Children) in English only, pending further translation.  The
Compilation and Analysis of Legal Norms Applicable to Internally Displaced
Persons, which will be No. 9 of the Series, is now being edited.


                            4.  Ad hoc publications

23.  Ad hoc publications consist mainly of reports and proceedings of
conferences, workshops and other events held under the auspices of the High
Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights.  There are now 17
titles on the series (see annex).  The report of the Fourth Workshop on
Regional Human Rights Arrangements in the Asian and Pacific Region is being
edited. 


                            5.  Reference material

24.  The reference publications of the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights, which are United Nations sales publications,
are directed at a more specialized audience.  They include:

     (a) United Nations Action in the Field of Human Rights, which appears
every five years, is the standard United Nations reference work in the field
of human rights.  The last issue, covering the period 1989 to 1993, is
available in English and French;

     (b) Human Rights:  A Compilation of International Instruments contains
the texts of the basic international instruments in the field of human rights.

The publication consists of two volumes, each divided into two parts.  Volume
I, containing the universal instruments, has been published in all six
official languages.  Volume II, a multilingual publication which reproduces
the regional instruments in their original languages, is now being updated;

     (c) Human Rights International Instruments:  Chart of Ratifications. 
Two issues of this periodical appeared in 1995 and one in 1996.  The current
issued contains information updated to 30 June 1996;

     (d) Human Rights:  Status of International Instruments includes detailed
information on ratifications, reservations, objections and declarations in
relation to the human rights instruments contained in the Compilation as of
1 September 1987.  An updated version of the Status of International
Instruments is being prepared and will be published next year;

     (e) The Yearbook on Human Rights has been discontinued until a more
careful revision of its role and contents is undertaken and adequate resources
assigned for its timely production;

     (f) Official Records of the Human Rights Committee (formerly Yearbook of
the Human Rights Committee) is available in English and French up to the
1983-1984 issue, as is volume I of the 1985-1986 issue.  Volume I of the 1987
issue and volume I of the 1987-1988 issues are available only in English. 
Since the last report to the General Assembly, the English versions of volume
II of the 1985-1986, 1987 and 1987-1988 issues have been published, as well as
volumes I and II of the 1988-1989 and 1989-1990 issues, and volume I of the
1990-1991 issue;

     (g) Human Rights Committee, Selected Decisions under the Optional
Protocol.  Volume I, Second to Sixteenth Sessions is out of stock; volume II,
Seventeenth to Thirty-second Sessions, is available in Spanish; the English
version is out of stock and only a few copies of the French version are still
available.  A reprint of volume I and of the English and French versions of
volume II would be highly desirable if the necessary resources are made
available.  A compilation of volume III of the Selected Decisions is under
preparation.


                             6.  New publications

25.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights is
preparing a new series of publications entitled "Notes of the United Nations
High Commissioner for Human Rights", which has already been approved by the
Working Committee of the Publications Board.  The series aims at fulfilling
the mandate of the High Commissioner for Human Rights as coordinator of the
United Nations Human Rights Programme, as well as to encourage debate on the
aspects of the programme falling under his direct mandate.  The series fills a
real gap on the human-rights publications programme and has been designed to
be composed of three parts:  a short introduction to the subject under debate,
a personal interview with the High Commissioner for Human Rights on the issue
and an annex with a list of the major relevant documents and resolutions.  The
first issue of the series, The High Commissioner for Human Rights:  An
Introduction, is now being printed.


                                7.  Periodicals

26.  The decision to discontinue the publication of the Human Rights
Newsletter, in 1992, and the Bulletin of Human Rights, in 1993, as a result of
the revision of the information programme and in view of the lack of personnel
available for their production, left the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights with no external periodicals.  To fill this
gap, in November 1995 the High Commissioner's office started to produce
internally the High Commissioner News, a four-page monthly publication on the
activities of the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights
distributed to all those included in the mailing list for the United Nations
human rights publications.  It is now envisaged to transform this four-page
periodical into a professional quarterly publication of around 20 pages long,
in order to better inform a wider human- rights community.


                          B.  Use of electronic means

27.  The need to rationalize expenses and, therefore, to maximize the impact
of information and educational tools necessarily places electronic means at
the core of any future information programme of the High Commissioner for
Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights.  The pertinence of replacing
publications in paper form by other electronic forms is to be carefully
analyzed in the context of the revision of the information and publications
programme.  Since the last report to the General Assembly some achievements
have been made in this important domain. 

28.  A majority of staff members have access to United Nations e-mail which
enables correspondence with New York and other United Nations offices.  In
addition to internal United Nations e-mail, Internet addresses have been
provided to all those connected to the Central Local Area Network (LAN)
enabling full communication with anyone who is a participant of the Internet
throughout the world.  Two thirds of staff members have full Internet access. 
These developments have improved access to the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights, facilitating not only the dissemination of
information but also the reception of requests.  

29.  An Internet Committee was established to make recommendations on the
content and structure of the information to be presented on the Internet. 
Based on the recommendations of the Committee a Web site prototype for the
High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights was designed. 
Information is now being included in the prototype which is expected to become
operational before the end of the year. 

30.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights has
developed a full-text information retrieval and database system for the treaty
bodies which at present contains mainly information concerning the Committee
on the Rights of the Child.  The time-frame in which the system will become
operational for all treaty bodies depends on the availability of resources for
data entry and downloading of full-text documents.  Despite various
resolutions of the Commission on Human Rights, the Economic and Social Council
and the General Assembly inviting States Members to make one-time
contributions for the establishment of the database, as of 1 July 1996, only
US$ 111,643 have been received of the total 1990 estimated cost, US$ 508,500. 
The system is currently used by staff of the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights and members of the Committee on the Rights of
the Child who have been equipped with laptop computers.  Access to the
database has also been granted to UNICEF.  The bulk of the information
contained on it will be linked to the Web site. 

31.  A CD-ROM containing 14,000 bibliographical references to United Nations
documents and publications from 1980 to 1994 and the full text of 95
international instruments was produced by the United Nations Library in Geneva
in cooperation with the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human
Rights.  An updated version of this CD-ROM is being prepared by the Library
but has not been produced yet due to lack of financial resources.


                       C.  External relations programme

                                 1.  Briefings

32.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights
(HCHR/CHR) organizes briefings on United Nations activities in the field of
human rights and on specific human rights issues for students, diplomats,
journalists, public officials, professors and non-governmental organizations. 
The HCHR/CHR also provides lectures for the briefings organized by the
Department of Public Information.  More than 100 such briefings were delivered
by officers of the Centre during the reporting period.


                 2.  Exhibitions and human rights observances

33.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights
participated in an Open House day organized at the Palais des Nations on 15
October 1995 as part of the activities to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary
of the United Nations.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights participated in
a round table on the future of the United Nations, while the High Commissioner
for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights displayed stands with its
publications and presented a live musical based on the Universal Declaration
of Human Rights.  Also in the context of the commemoration of the fiftieth
anniversary of the United Nations, the High Commissioner for Human Rights
organized a high-level human rights forum in New York on 25 October 1995.  In
a first panel entitled "The United Nations Human Rights Agenda:  The Next
Fifty Years", a group of world leaders discussed the status of human rights. 
The second panel gathered senior United Nations officials on the topic
"Women's Rights as Human Rights". 

34.  On the occasion of the celebration of Human Rights Day, on
10 December 1995, the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human
Rights, in cooperation with the Department of Public Information, organized a
round table on the subject:  "Is tolerance a sufficient condition for the
respect of human rights?" in which members of the international community
representing five different cultural areas of the world participated.  The
Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights acted as moderator.  The round
table was preceded and followed by two dancing spectacles. 

35.  In connection with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial
Discrimination, on 21 March 1995, an art exhibition was displayed at the
Palais des Nations.  In 1996, and on the same occasion, the High Commissioner
for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights organized a round table on "Racism at
the Eve of the XXIst Century" with the participation of the Assistant
Secretary-General for Human Rights and the Chairman of the Committee on the
Elimination of Racial Discrimination.  An account of the activities undertaken
in the context of the Third Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination
is given in the report of the Secretary-General to the Commission on Human
Rights (E/CN.4/1996/71).  

36.  On 9 August 1996, in the context of the celebration of the International
Day of the World's Indigenous People, a round-table discussion on the issue of
"Health and indigenous peoples" was held with the participation of the
Chairperson of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations. 


                           3.  Fellowship programme

37.  The General Assembly made direct provision for the human rights
fellowship programme in its resolution 926 (X) of 14 December 1955.  Under the
terms of that resolution, assistance provided by the Secretary-General is to
be rendered in agreement with Governments on the basis of their requests. 
Fellowships are awarded only to candidates nominated by their Governments, and
are financed under the regular budget for advisory services.  Every year the
Secretary-General sends out invitations to Member States to submit
nominations.  Governments are reminded that nominees should be directly
involved in functions affecting human rights, such as the administration of
justice, or in the implementation of international human rights instruments at
the national level. The Secretary-General also draws their attention to
concerns expressed by the General Assembly, in many of its resolutions, with
respect to the rights of women, and encourages the nomination of women
candidates.

38.  During the reporting period, there has been a substantial increase in
interest in the fellowship programme, on the part of many countries.  In 1995,
a particularly large number of applications for fellowships was received. 
Indeed, applications have tripled over the past three years, making the
selection procedure extremely competitive.  For 1995, 79 Governments nominated
169 candidates, of whom 29 were selected, 13 of them women.  The
Secretary-General has attempted within limits of the available resources, to
ensure a broad distribution of the fellowships among the nationalities of the
applicants, with priority being given, inter alia, to applicants from
developing countries, taking into consideration the allocation of a fair share
to women, in conformity with relevant General Assembly resolutions.

39.  Following the conclusion of the 1993 fellowship programme, the High
Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights conducted a
comprehensive evaluation, which resulted in the elaboration of a plan for the
programme's revision.  Among the changes adopted for subsequent fellowship
programmes was the decision to hold the next sessions at the International
Labour Organization's training centre at Turin, Italy, and to devote the
programme to reporting under international human-rights institutions.  


                           4.  Internship programme

40.  During the reporting period, the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights (HCHR/CHR) offered some 80 internships to
graduate students to enable them to gain first-hand knowledge of United
Nations actions and procedures in the field of human rights, through active
participation in the work of the Centre under the direct supervision of its
staff members.  The HCHR/CHR offers a unique experience in the field of the
protection of human rights and an inside look at the United Nations human
rights machinery.  The internship programme has also proved to be beneficial
to the HCHR/CHR, easing the normally overloaded Professional's day-by-day
work.  The internship does not consist of a predefined programme and interns
are placed according to the needs of the HCHR/CHR and to their area of
interest. 

41.  No funding has been available for the programme, internships being
awarded without financial commitment of any kind on the part of the HCHR/CHR
or the United Nations bodies.  This lack of funds to support interns has
resulted in particularly low participation by students from developing
countries (some 90 per cent of the interns come from developed countries). 
The need for funding of interns from developing countries remains an important
consideration.

42.  In 1996 the HCHR/CHR's internship programme went through a serious
revision.  The maximum number of interns at a particular time has been fixed
to 46 and particular attention is devoted to a fair geographical
representation.  It was decided that candidates to the internship programme
should have at least a BA degree or a "licence" in a discipline such as
international law, political science, history or social sciences.  Good
command of at least two of the six United Nations official languages and
drafting ability in either English or French is necessary.  In any case,
preference is given to those candidates with specific human rights background.

The duration of an internship has now been established from three to six
months.  Interns are recruited in October, for the period from January to
June, and in March, for the period from July to December. 

          5.  Training courses and other technical cooperation activities
              with a public information element

43.  An account of the training courses, seminars and workshops organized by
the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights is given in the
report of the Secretary-General to the Commission on Human Rights on advisory
services in the field of human rights (E/CN.4/1996/90).


                D.  Coordination and cooperation within and outside
                    the United Nations

44.  In paragraph 14 of its resolution 49/187, the General Assembly called
upon the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights to
coordinate the substantive activities of the World Public Information Campaign
for Human Rights pursuant to the direction of the General Assembly and the
Commission on Human Rights, and to serve as liaison with Governments, regional
and national institutions, non-governmental organizations and concerned
individuals in the development and implementation of the activities of the
Campaign.  In paragraph 13, it also called upon the United Nations High
Commissioner for Human Rights to coordinate and harmonize human rights
information strategies within the United Nations system.


                          1.  Inter-agency cooperation

45.  As part of its ongoing efforts to coordinate its activities with those
of other United Nations bodies and in keeping with the terms of General
Assembly resolution 47/128, the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for
Human Rights (HCHR/CHR) convenes each year in Geneva an inter-agency meeting
on human rights issues.  These meetings allow participants to review joint
projects and to exchange information on a number of ongoing activities in the
field of human rights carried out by the respective organizations.  They also
provide an opportunity to identify further forms of cooperation between the
HCHR/CHR and the organizations concerned.  Information, documentation and
education in the field of human rights is one of the items on the agenda of
these meetings. 

46.  In implementing its publications programme, the HCHR/CHR cooperates with
other bodies and organizations of the United Nations system, and with
non-governmental organizations.  Examples of this cooperation are the manuals
on human rights training for law-enforcement officials; the Fact Sheets on
discrimination against women and on human rights and migrant workers were both
submitted to the relevant agencies for comments.

47.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights actively
participated with other bodies and agencies of the United Nations system in
the preparation and celebration of the Fourth World Conference on Women, held
in Beijing in September 1995, and the Second United Nations Conference on
Human Settlements (Habitat II), held in Istanbul in June 1996.  The main
objective of the HCHR/CHR in both World Conferences was to safeguard the human
rights language accepted at the United Nations World Conference on Human
Rights, held in Vienna in June 1993, and the adherence of the final documents
to the established human rights standards.  This objective was in both cases
accomplished.  During the World Conference on Women, the High Commissioner for
Human Rights distributed a paper with his comments on the Draft Platform for
Action and staff members of the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for
Human Rights participated in a panel discussion organized by CEDAW and UNIFEM
entitled "Dialogue on CEDAW".  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre
for Human Rights also took part, and continues to do so, in the inter-agency
meetings on women, including those devoted to the drafting of a system-wide
medium-term plan for the advancement of women. 

48.  In the case of Habitat II, the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre
for Human Rights, together with the Centre for Human Settlements organized in
January 1996 an Expert Group Meeting on the Human Right to Adequate Housing
which was held in Geneva in preparation for the World Conference.  A paper
containing the comments of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on the
Habitat Agenda was distributed at the third and last session of the
Preparatory Committee of the Conference.  During the Conference, in the
context of inter-agency coordination for the follow-up to the Habitat Agenda,
the High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights made a
presentation on the strategy for the implementation of the human rights
aspects contained in the Agenda and organized two round tables, one on "The
Human Right to Adequate Housing" and another one on "Indigenous people,
shelter and land", which were chaired by the High Commissioner for Human
Rights and the Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, respectively.


                      2.  Non-governmental organizations

49.  Non-governmental organizations continue to cooperate actively with the
United Nations bodies dealing with human rights, providing them with
information and expertise.  They also contribute effectively to the
implementation of the activities of the World Campaign, especially in the
areas of information, education and dissemination of United Nations materials
and publications.  The General Assembly made reference to the valuable action
of non-governmental organizations in paragraph 13 of resolution 49/187, in
which it requested the Secretary-General to take advantage, as much as
possible, of the collaboration of non-governmental organizations in the
implementation of the World Public Information Campaign for Human Rights,
including in the dissemination of human rights materials.

50.  Some 8,000 letters have been received by the High Commissioner for Human
Rights/Centre for Human Rights (HCHR/CHR) during 1995 and 1996 from
non-governmental organizations throughout the world, requesting publications,
information and participation by the Centre in various events (seminars,
workshops, conferences, celebrations).  These letters were replied to
individually and the requested information provided.  Some of the letters
contained requests to be included on the mailing list for information on human
rights or documents of the Commission and the Subcommission on Prevention of
Discrimination and Protection of Minorities.  

51.  After the World Conference on Human Rights, a non-governmental
organizations liaison officer has been appointed within the High Commissioner
for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights to improve communications between the
HCHR/CHR and non-governmental organizations, including the organization of
briefings and the development of a database on worldwide human rights
non-governmental organizations.


                    3.  Academic and research institutions

52.  The High Commissioner for Human Rights/Centre for Human Rights
(HCHR/CHR) regularly cooperates with the International Institute for Human
Rights at Strasbourg, France, where three staff members of the HCHR/CHR gave
lectures in English, French and Spanish for a one-week period during the
Institute's annual human rights courses in the summer of 1995 and 1996. 
Within the context of the Institute's annual human rights courses, 20 human
rights fellows spend two weeks in the HCHR/CHR in order to deepen their
knowledge of the United Nations system of promotion and protection of human
rights.

53.  The HCHR/CHR continued its cooperation with the African Commission on
Human and Peoples' Rights; the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights at San
Jose'; the International Institute of Humanitarian Law at San Remo, Italy; the
International Institute of Higher Studies in Criminal Sciences, at Siracussa,
Italy; the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at
Lund, Sweden; and the Graduate Institute of International Studies at Geneva. 

54.  Cooperation also continued throughout 1995 and 1996 with the Arab
Institute for Human Rights at Tunis and the African Centre for Democracy and
Human Rights at Banjul.  The HCHR/CHR also gave briefings at the request of
various human rights and academic institutions, including the Liverpool
Institute of Public Administration and Management (United Kingdom), the
Institut des hautes e'tudes commerciales de Lie`ge (Belgium), the Amsterdam
School of International Relations and Erasmus University (Netherlands), Lund
University (Sweden), the Fe'de'ration e'tudes franc'aises des clubs UNESCO
(France), the Human Rights Institute of the University Carlos III, University
Complutense, University of Barcelona and the Humanitarian Institute of Sevilla
(Spain). 

55.  Finally, the HCHR/CHR provided a staff member to the Academy of
International Law and the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights to give
lectures at the training course on the international law of human rights held
at The Hague. 


                    III.  DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INFORMATION

56.  As part of the Department of Public Information (DPI) mandate for
information programmes and activities, it coordinates and initiates public
information activities for the World Public Information Campaign for Human
Rights.  The Department's multimedia activities ensure the effective coverage
of United Nations human rights activities as well as worldwide distribution of
relevant materials on human rights.  This work has special importance within
the framework of the three ongoing decades:  the Third Decade for the
Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003), the United
Nations Decade for Human Rights Education (1995-2004) and the United Nations
Decade of the World's Indigenous People (1995-2004).

57.  In the 1996-1997 programme budget, the Department continues its efforts
under the thematic heading of human rights.  It also carries out other
mandated programmes in related areas such as social and economic development,
the question of Palestine, self-determination, decolonization and the
advancement of women.  The Department's related activities are regularly
reported to the General Assembly and to other intergovernmental bodies under
each specific area or theme.

58.  The multimedia approach of the Department in the field of human rights
consists of the production of print materials such as brochures, pamphlets,
backgrounders, booklets, fact sheets, feature articles, posters and
information kits.  These publications are distributed in official United
Nations languages at Headquarters and through the network of 68 United Nations
Information Centres (UNICs) and Services (UNISs), and eight United Nations
Offices, as well as other channels. 

59.  During 1995 and 1996 major events including the World Summit for Social
Development (6-13 March 1995), the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations
(1995), the Fourth World Conference on Women (4-15 September 1995), the Ninth
United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of
Offenders (29 April-8 May 1995) and the Second United Nations Conference on
Human Settlements (Habitat II, 3-14 June), as well as the launching of the
International Decade of the World's Indigenous People (1995-2004) and of the
International Decade for Human Rights Education (1995-2004), offered further
opportunities to generate awareness and understanding of human rights issues
and to promote the principles of respect for human rights and tolerance, as
stated in the Charter of the United Nations.  All these events are taking
place within the context of the World Campaign on Human Rights.  In addition,
activities planned in conjunction with the calendar of international days,
especially Human Rights Day, are used to showcase and to generate interest in
the work of the United Nations in the field of human rights.  In this respect,
the outreach activities undertaken by the UNICs and UNISs have had a
significant impact.


             A.  Activities in the field of human rights, January 1995
                 to August 1996

60.  A series of backgrounders on human rights issues, intended for the use
of the media, general public, non-governmental organizations, government
officials, the United Nations system and educational groups continue to be
produced and widely disseminated.

61.  During 1995 and 1996 the Department of Public Information pursued its
information campaign on human rights issues by publishing a variety of print
materials:

     "Challenges of Human Rights and Cultural Diversity" (DPI/1627) was
issued in English (20,000 copies), French (10,000) and Spanish (10,000);

     "Children's Rights" (DPI/1765); "Women and Violence" (DPI/1772) and
"Independence of the Judiciary:  A Human Rights Priority" (DPI/1837) were
printed in English (20,000 each), French (8,000 each) and Spanish (8,000 each)
and also widely distributed;

     A brochure on the "United Nations and Human Rights" (DPI/1774)
explaining the role of the different human rights bodies and of the High
Commissioner for Human Rights was published in English (20,000), French
(8,000), and Spanish (8,000), to accompany a Wall Chart on United Nations
Human Rights Mechanisms (DPI/1549);

     A poster on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (DPI/1653) was
printed in English (20,000), French (10,000) and Spanish (10,000) and widely
distributed.  Because of the great demand for this poster, DPI is considering
reprinting it;

     The "Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action" (DPI/1394 Rev.1) was
reprinted in English, French and Spanish and continued to be distributed.  

62.  These materials as well as press releases, statements of the Secretary-
General and United Nations documents are distributed electronically to the
network of Information Centres and Services.  They were also posted on the
United Nations Web site on the Internet (http:\\www.un.org).

63.  The next issue of Notes for Speakers, a reference tool for those making
presentations about the work of the United Nations, will present a round-up on
United Nations conferences.  This publication includes a special section on
the World Conference on Human Rights.

64.  Public information on the role of the Organization and its human rights
activities is also disseminated through films, radio and television programmes
produced regularly by the Department.  These programmes are broadcast by
national radio and television stations around the world.  The Department
continues to produce radio documentaries on human rights as part of the
regular 15-minute weekly radio series that it produces in the official
languages as well as other languages such as Bangla, Dutch, French Creole,
Hindi, Indonesian, Kiswahili, Portuguese and Urdu. 

65.  "UN in Action", a television programme produced weekly by the Department
in English for CNN "World Report" (and in additional languages for wider
distribution) has featured issues related to human rights in a number of
programmes.  The CNN programmes are broadcast in more than 120 countries. 
Some of the television programmes produced in 1995 and 1996 include:  "The
Judicial System in Rwanda", "Ghana's Free Press", "Human Rights in Guatemala"
and "UN Helps with Reform of Haiti's Prisons".

66.  The Department's half-hour television interview programme "World
Chronicle" has featured a number of speakers such as the Executive Director of
the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) on the issue of children and human
rights; the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Chairman of the Human
Rights Committee, and the Chairperson of the United Nations Committee on the
Elimination of Discrimination against Women.  Radio, television and print
public service announcements have also been used by the Department to
disseminate information about the work of the United Nations.

67.  The Department has continued to organize exhibits on human rights
topics; to undertake press coverage of all intergovernmental meetings on human
rights at New York and Geneva; to hold press conferences and briefings,
seminars, round tables and other activities to inform the media about the
Organization's human rights work; and to reply to hundreds of public inquiries
on human rights issues.  The Department's Public Inquiries Unit and the Focal
Point on Human Rights also respond to numerous requests for human rights
publications.  From January 1995 to August 1996 the Visitor's Service at
Headquarters arranged for 116 briefings on human rights issues, including
special briefings on racial discrimination and women, for a total of 8,627
persons.  It also arranged for special film/video screenings for other
visitors.  During the same period, 627 DPI press releases in English and 594
in French were issued on human rights issues.

68.  The Department continues its close cooperation and collaboration with
non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and coordinates inter-agency promotional
activities.  In 1995-1996 the Department covered human rights issues in
several of its weekly NGO briefings at Headquarters.  Each briefing attracted
some 150 participants representing many non-governmental organizations that
are in association with the Department and in consultative status with the
Economic and Social Council.

69.  Within the framework of the Decade for Human Rights Education, the
Department collaborated with the Centre for Human Rights on a survey of the
various language versions of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
available around the world.  DPI opened its files to the Centre for Human
Rights and requested all United Nations Information Centres and Services to
send information on, and copies when available, of the different language
versions available in their offices to the Centre for Human Rights.

70.  This year DPI organized its annual training programme for young
broadcasters and journalists from developing countries, from 16 September to
24 October 1996.  The six-week programme introduces participants to the work
of the United Nations.  The journalists attended the fifty-first session of
the General Assembly, to cover United Nations activities including human
rights.  The training programme is co-sponsored by the Friedrich Ebert
Foundation.  This year 18 broadcasters and journalists from Africa, Asia, the
Middle East, Latin America and Eastern Europe were selected for the programme.

71.  DPI also organized a Palestinian Media Practitioners Training Programme
from 15 September to 8 November 1996 for 10 Palestinian journalists
representing print, radio and television media.

72.  Special events to observe international days or years are another means
of promoting the work of the United Nations.  Some of them offer special
opportunity to advocate for and promote human rights.  These events are
organized by the Department at Headquarters and in the field by the United
Nations Information Centres and Services, that undertake numerous special
activities at the national and regional levels.  Some of the latter activities
include translating and printing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in
local languages; producing reprints and new language versions of human rights
instruments; and maintaining reference collections on human rights materials
in their libraries.

73.  The International Year of Tolerance (1995) provided another channel for
DPI public information activities in the field of human rights.  A DPI
backgrounder (DPI/1626) presenting the objectives of the Year was released in
English (20,000 copies), French (10,000) and Spanish (10,000).  A "UN in
Action" television programme entitled "UNICEF Uses Puppets to Teach Tolerance
in Burundi" was among other related programmes produced.  The United Nations
Information Centres and Services also undertook special activities.


              B.  Activities of Information Centres and Services

74.  Because of its proximity to the Centre for Human Rights, UNIS Geneva has
a special role to play in the promotion of the work of the United Nations in
the field of human rights, including the activities of the High Commissioner. 
It continues to cover, through print, radio and audio-visual programmes, the
activities undertaken by the treaty bodies and other specialized meetings held
at Geneva.  Its activities also include placement in the media of opinion-
editorial articles and the organization of press conferences as well as media
interviews for the High Commissioner for Human Rights.  The interviews have
been arranged with different media organizations, including the BBC World
Service (radio), BBC World Service Television, CNN, the Tribune de Gene`ve and
other newspapers such as the International Herald Tribune or El Pai's.  Press
briefings as well as press conferences and interviews featuring human rights
officials are held regularly at the United Nations Office at Geneva.  UNIS
Geneva continues to organize specific events aimed at highlighting human
rights issues on international days. 

75.  The following information highlights a few of the main activities
undertaken by selected Centres and Services from January 1995 through
August 1996.

76.  Bangkok.  UNIS Bangkok organized, for 150 students of the Rajaphat
Institute, a lecture on "Promotion, Protection, Prevention:  Creating a
Culture of Human Rights".  In early 1996, UNIS briefed 25 students of the
University of New South Wales on the work of the Economic and Social
Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).  The DPI video "New Horizons for
Human Rights" was shown at the briefing.

77.  Bogota.  UNIC Bogota briefed 1,000 police officers at "Escuela de
Policia General Santander".  Information materials were distributed and the
film entitled "Declaration of Human Rights" was shown to the audience.

78.  Bucharest.  UNIC Bucharest translated into Romanian the message of the
Secretary-General for Human Rights Day and disseminated it as a press release
to the media and educational institutes, among others.  The message was
published in several newspapers and some excerpts were read on the TV evening
news.

79.  Buenos Aires.  UNIC Buenos Aires organized a seminar on "Inter-religious
Encounter:  A Prayer for Peace" to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the
United Nations and the International Year of Tolerance.  A total of 700 people
representing the media and non-governmental organizations attended.  For Human
Rights Day, the UNIC prepared a special press kit which was distributed among
media and local NGOs.

80.  Dar-es-Salaam.  UNIC Dar-es-Salaam arranged for the message of the
Secretary-General to be broadcast on several local radio stations:  Radio One,
Radio Tanzania Dar-es-Salaam and Radio Tumaini.  The message was also read on
Independent TV and Dar-es-Salaam TV, and published in the Daily News.

81.  Mexico City.  UNIC Mexico City provided media information on the visit
of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to Mexico this year.  UNIC staff
coordinated arrangements for his lecture in Queretaro.  His visit was widely
covered by the national media.

82.  Ouagadougou.  UNIC Ouagadougou provided a one-hour lecture on children's
rights to 10 officers of the Ministry of Social Affairs.  The United Nations
video "Doctors in the Sky" was screened at the end of the lecture.

83.  Tokyo.  UNIC Tokyo organized jointly with the Japanese Government an
international symposium and an exhibit on human rights.  UNIC provided
posters, photos and information materials.  A total of 10,000 people from
non-governmental and governmental organizations attended.

84.  Windhoek.  On the occasion of Human Rights Day, the Centre organized the
launch of the book Human Rights Education and Advocacy in Namibia in the
1990s.  The book is a report of a human rights workshop jointly organized by
the University of Namibia, UNESCO and UNIC Windhoek in mid-1993.  The launch
was followed by a panel discussion on human rights.

85.  DPI will continue to provide press, radio and television coverage of the
Commission on Human Rights and the treaty bodies and to give special attention
to the many human rights issues.  The proclamation of the three related human
rights Decades provides a unique opportunity for DPI and its partners among
media and various sectors and actors in society to promote worldwide United
Nations efforts in the field of human rights.


                                 Annex

      PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS/
      CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND AVAILABLE AS FROM SEPTEMBER 1996


FACT SHEETS

No. 1    Human Rights Machinery (on hold)

No. 2    The International Bill of Human Rights (Rev.1)

No. 3    Advisory Services and Technical Cooperation in the Field of Human
         Rights (Rev.1)

No. 4    Methods of Combating Torture

No. 5    Programme of Action for the Second Decade to Combat Racism and
         Racial Discrimination

No. 6    Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (Rev.1)

No. 7    Communication Procedures

No. 8    World Public Information Campaign for Human Rights

No. 9    The Rights of Indigenous Peoples

No. 10   The Rights of the Child

No. 11   Summary or Arbitrary Executions

No. 12   The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

No. 13   International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

No. 14   Contemporary Forms of Slavery

No. 15   Civil and Political Rights:  The Human Rights Committee

No. 16   The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Rev.1)

No. 17   The Committee against Torture

No. 18   Minority Rights

No. 19   National Institutions for the Promotion and Protection of Human
         Rights

No. 20   Human Rights and Refugees

No. 21   The Human Right to Adequate Housing

No. 22   Discrimination against Women:  The Convention and the Committee

No. 23   Harmful Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and
         Children

No. 24   The Rights of Migrant Workers

No. 25   Forced Eviction and Human Rights


                         PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SERIES

No. 1    Human Rights and Social Work:  A Manual for Schools of Social Work
         and the Social Work Profession

No. 2    Human Rights and Elections:  A Handbook on the Legal, Technical and
         Human Rights Aspects of Elections

No. 3    Human Rights and Pre-Trial Detention:  A Handbook of International
         Standards relating to Pre-Trial Detention

No. 4    National Human Rights Institutions:  A Handbook on the Establishment
         and Strengthening of National Institutions for the Promotion and
         Protection of Human Rights


                           HUMAN RIGHTS STUDY SERIES

No. 1    Right to Adequate Food as a Human Right

No. 2    Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination based on
         Religion or Belief

No. 3    Freedom of the Individual under Law:  an Analysis of Article 29 of
         the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

No. 4    Status of the Individual and Contemporary International Law:  
         Promotion, Protection and Restoration of Human Rights at National,
         Regional and International Levels

No. 5    Study on the Rights of Persons belonging to Ethnic, Religious and
         Linguistic Minorities

No. 6    Human Rights and Disabled Persons

No. 7    The Right to Adequate Housing

No. 8    Sexual Exploitation of Children


                              AD HOC PUBLICATIONS

European Workshop on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:  Past-Present-
Future (Milan, Italy, 7-9 September 1988)

The Administration of Justice and Human Rights for East European Countries: 
Report of a United Nations Training Course (Moscow, 21-25 November 1988)

The Teaching of Human Rights:  Report of an International Seminar (Geneva,
5-9 December 1988)

The Effects of Racism and Racial Discrimination on the Social and Economic
Relations between Indigenous Peoples and States:  Report of a Seminar (Geneva,
16-20 January 1989)

Application of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights under
the Optional Protocol by the Human Rights Committee

The African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights

Report of an International Consultation on AIDS and Human Rights (Geneva,
26-28 July 1989)

United Nations Training Course on International Norms and Standards in the
Field of Human Rights (Moscow, 27 November-1 December 1989)

Second Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination:  Global Compilation
of National Legislation against Racial Discrimination

The Realization of the Right to Development:  Global Consultation on the Right
to Development as a Human Right (Geneva, 8-12 January 1990)

Political, Historical, Economic, Social and Cultural Factors contributing to
Racism, Racial Discrimination and Apartheid:  Report of a Seminar (Geneva,
10 January-14 December 1990)

Manual on Human Rights Reporting

The First Twenty Years:  Progress Report of the Committee on the Elimination
of Racial Discrimination

Workshop on International Human Rights Instruments and Reporting Obligations: 
Preparation of Reports to United Nations Human Rights Treaty Bodies (Moscow,
26-30 August 1991)

Teaching and Learning about Human Rights - A Manual for Schools of Social Work
and the Social Work Profession

African Seminar on International Human Rights Standards and the Administration
of Justice (Cairo, 8-12 July 1992)

United Nations Workshop for the Asia-Pacific Region on Human Rights Issues
(Jakarta, 26-28 January 1993)


                              OTHER PUBLICATIONS

ABCs of Teaching Human Rights

Field Guide for International Police Task Force Monitors of the Peace
Implementation Operation in Bosnia and Herzegovina and CIVPOL Officers of the
United Nations Transitional Administration in Eastern Slavonia

Human Rights:  A Compilation of International Instruments (vol. I, parts I
and II)

Human Rights:  Status of International Instruments

Human Rights:  International Instruments.  Chart of Ratifications as at
30 June 1994

Human Rights Bibliography

Official Records of the Human Rights Committee

Selected decisions of the Human Rights Committee under the Optional Protocol

United Nations Reference Guide in the Field of Human Rights

United Nations Action in the Field of Human Rights


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