United Nations

A/51/473


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

10 October 1996

ORIGINAL:
SPANISH


                                                      A/51/473
                                                      S/1996/839


GENERAL ASSEMBLY                                            SECURITY COUNCIL
Fifty-first session                                         Fifty-first year
Agenda items 10, 11, 19, 24,
  27, 33, 34, 35, 44, 45, 46,
  47, 48, 60, 65, 66, 69, 71,
  75, 78, 87, 88, 89, 90, 94,
  96, 97, 98, 102, 103, 104,
  105, 106, 108, 109, 112, 113,
  115, 116, 119, 120, 140, 145,
  146, 151, 152, 158 and 159
REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
  ON THE WORK OF THE ORGANIZATION
REPORT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DECLARATION
  ON THE GRANTING OF INDEPENDENCE
  TO COLONIAL COUNTRIES AND PEOPLES
LAW OF THE SEA
NECESSITY OF ENDING THE ECONOMIC,
  COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL EMBARGO
  IMPOSED BY THE UNITED STATES OF
  AMERICA AGAINST CUBA
THE SITUATION IN THE MIDDLE EAST
ASSISTANCE IN MINE CLEARANCE
QUESTION OF PALESTINE
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
  NEW AGENDA FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF
  AFRICA IN THE 1990s
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE OUTCOME OF THE
  WORLD SUMMIT FOR SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
RESTRUCTURING AND REVITALIZATION OF
  THE UNITED NATIONS IN THE ECONOMIC,
  SOCIAL AND RELATED FIELDS
QUESTION OF EQUITABLE REPRESENTATION
  ON AND INCREASE IN THE MEMBERSHIP
  OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL AND RELATED
  MATTERS
STRENGTHENING OF THE UNITED NATIONS
  SYSTEM
PROHIBITION OF THE DEVELOPMENT AND
  MANUFACTURE OF NEW TYPES OF WEAPONS
  OF MASS DESTRUCTION AND NEW SYSTEMS
  OF SUCH WEAPONS:  REPORT OF THE
  CONFERENCE ON DISARMAMENT
AMENDMENT OF THE TREATY BANNING NUCLEAR
  WEAPON TESTS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, IN
  OUTER SPACE AND UNDER WATER
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE COMPREHENSIVE
  NUCLEAR-TEST-BAN TREATY
CONCLUSION OF EFFECTIVE INTERNATIONAL
  ARRANGEMENTS TO ASSURE NON-NUCLEAR-
  WEAPON STATES AGAINST THE USE OR
  THREAT OF USE OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS
GENERAL AND COMPLETE DISARMAMENT
CONVENTION ON PROHIBITIONS OR
  RESTRICTIONS ON THE USE OF CERTAIN
  CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS WHICH MAY BE
  DEEMED TO BE EXCESSIVELY INJURIOUS
  OR TO HAVE INDISCRIMINATE EFFECTS
CONSOLIDATION OF THE REGIME ESTABLISHED
  BY THE TREATY FOR THE PROHIBITION OF
  NUCLEAR WEAPONS IN LATIN AMERICA AND
  THE CARIBBEAN (TREATY OF TLATELOLCO)
QUESTIONS RELATING TO INFORMATION
INFORMATION FROM NON-SELF-GOVERNING
  TERRITORIES TRANSMITTED UNDER
  ARTICLE 73 e OF THE CHARTER OF
  THE UNITED NATIONS
ACTIVITIES OF FOREIGN ECONOMIC AND
  OTHER INTERESTS WHICH IMPEDE THE
  IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DECLARATION ON
  THE GRANTING OF INDEPENDENCE TO
  COLONIAL COUNTRIES AND PEOPLES IN
  TERRITORIES UNDER COLONIAL DOMINATION
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DECLARATION ON
  THE GRANTING OF INDEPENDENCE TO
  COLONIAL COUNTRIES AND PEOPLES BY THE
  SPECIALIZED AGENCIES AND THE
  INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS ASSOCIATED
  WITH THE UNITED NATIONS
MACROECONOMIC POLICY QUESTIONS
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND
  INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC COOPERATION
ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT
INTERNATIONAL DRUG CONTROL
ADVANCEMENT OF WOMEN
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE OUTCOME OF THE
  FOURTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON WOMEN
REPORT OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH
  COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES, QUESTIONS
  RELATING TO REFUGEES, RETURNEES AND
  DISPLACED PERSONS AND HUMANITARIAN
  QUESTIONS
PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF THE RIGHTS
  OF CHILDREN
ELIMINATION OF RACISM AND RACIAL
  DISCRIMINATION
RIGHT OF PEOPLES TO SELF-DETERMINATION
REVIEW OF THE EFFICIENCY OF THE
  ADMINISTRATIVE AND FINANCIAL
  FUNCTIONING OF THE UNITED NATIONS
PROGRAMME BUDGET FOR THE
  BIENNIUM 1994-1995
IMPROVING THE FINANCIAL SITUATION OF
  THE UNITED NATIONS
PROGRAMME BUDGET FOR THE
  BIENNIUM 1996-1997
SCALE OF ASSESSMENTS FOR THE
  APPORTIONMENT OF THE EXPENSES OF
  THE UNITED NATIONS
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
ADMINISTRATIVE AND BUDGETARY ASPECTS
  OF THE FINANCING OF THE UNITED
  NATIONS PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS
UNITED NATIONS DECADE OF
  INTERNATIONAL LAW
REPORT OF THE INTERNATIONAL LAW
  COMMISSION ON THE WORK OF ITS
  FORTY-EIGHTH SESSION
MEASURES TO ELIMINATE INTERNATIONAL
  TERRORISM
PROGRESSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE
  PRINCIPLES AND NORMS OF INTERNATIONAL
  LAW RELATING TO THE NEW INTERNATIONAL
  ECONOMIC ORDER
QUESTION OF THE ELABORATION OF AN
  INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION AGAINST
  ORGANIZED TRANSNATIONAL CRIME
ELIMINATION OF COERCIVE ECONOMIC
  MEASURES AS A MEANS OF POLITICAL AND
  ECONOMIC COMPULSION


               Letter dated 30 September 1996 from the Permanent
               Representative of Colombia to the United Nations 
                      addressed to the Secretary-General


     In my capacity as Chairman of the Coordinating Bureau of the
Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, I have the honour to transmit
herewith the communique' of the Meeting of Ministers for Foreign
Affairs and Heads of Delegation of the Movement of Non-Aligned
Countries to the fifty-first session of the General Assembly, held in
New York on 25 September 1996.

     I should be grateful if this communique' and its annex could be
circulated as a document of the General Assembly under agenda items
10, 11, 19, 24, 27, 33, 34, 35, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 60, 65, 66, 69,
71, 75, 78, 87, 88, 89, 90, 94, 96, 97, 98, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106,
108, 109, 112, 113, 115, 116, 119, 120, 140, 145, 146, 151, 152, 158
and 159, and of the Security Council.


                                            (Signed)  Julio LONDON~O PAREDES  
                                                              Ambassador
                                                      Permanent Representative


                                     ANNEX

                                                          [Original:  English]

          Communique' of the Meeting of Ministers for Foreign Affairs and
          Heads of Delegation of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries
          to the fifty-first session of the General Assembly, held in
                         New York on 25 September 1996


1.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation of the
Non-Aligned Countries met in New York on 25 September 1996, within the
framework of the fifty-first session of the General Assembly, for the purpose
of coordinating their efforts and establishing guidelines to enable the
members of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries to work as a group on matters
of common interest and concern.

2.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation expressed
their satisfaction over the preparation and holding of the solemn
commemoration of the thirty-fifth anniversary of the establishment of the
Movement of Non-Aligned Countries and the adoption of the Declaration of the
Non-Aligned Movement on the occasion of the thirty-fifth anniversary of its
founding, in which it emphasized the validity and relevance of the principles
of the Movement including the 10 Bandung principles and recognized solidarity
as the cornerstone of action by the non-aligned countries for dealing with
both present and future challenges.  They urged all countries to continue to
exercise this solidarity within the United Nations.

3.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation welcomed the
report of the Chairman on the activities of the Movement and expressed the
view that those activities contributed appreciably not only to the
strengthening of the vital role of the Movement within the international
community, but also to the promotion of unity and solidarity among its
members.  They expressed their firm determination to sustain the progress
achieved since the Eleventh Conference of Heads of State or Government of the
Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, held at Cartagena, Colombia, from 18 to 20
October 1995.

4.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation stressed the
need for the full implementation of the conclusions and decisions of the
Eleventh Summit and expressed their determination to continue to carry out and
support the directives and mandates on all the issues contained in the final
documents of the Summit and the Call from Colombia.

5.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation expressed
their satisfaction regarding the message conveyed by the Chairman of the
Movement of Non-Aligned Countries to the Chairman of the group of seven, in
keeping with the mandate contained in the Call from Colombia, adopted by the
Heads of State or Government at the Eleventh Summit.  They emphasized the
importance for the Movement to continue its actions with the group of seven in
the areas dealt with in the Chairman's message, including those relating to
external debt, development assistance, international trade, investment,
illegal drugs, environment and reform of the international monetary and
financial system.  They noted with satisfaction the outcome of the meeting
between the Chairman of the group of seven and the Chairman of the Movement of
Non-Aligned Countries, as reported by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of
Colombia through her letter dated 20 August 1996.

6.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation welcomed the
results of the meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology, held at
Cartagena on 15 and 16 May 1996, and the adoption of the Cartagena document on
methodology.

7.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation noted with
concern the continued imbalances and inequalities in the field of information
and communication and the serious implications that the negative situation
portends for the non-aligned countries.  In that regard they welcomed the
outcome of the Fifth Conference of Ministers of Information and Communication
of Non-Aligned Countries, held in September 1996 at Abuja, Nigeria.  At the
Conference, the Ministers agreed, inter alia, on the need for intensive
research efforts by non-aligned countries, in the development of communication
technology and interregional and intraregional cooperation through mechanisms
of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries geared to that end, as a means of
redressing the imbalance through an enhanced inflow of information from
developing countries.

8.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed
their rejection of unilateral measures of coercion as a means of exerting
pressure on non-aligned countries and other developing countries.  They also
rejected the adoption of extraterritorial unilateral measures as contrary to
international law and the norms and principles that govern peaceful relations
among States and as they threaten the sovereignty of those States.

9.   The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation also expressed
the urgent need for the international community to call upon certain developed
countries immediately to eliminate laws and regulations with adverse
extra-territorial impacts and other forms of coercive economic measures
against developing countries.  They emphasized that such actions not only
undermined the principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations and
international law, such as the sovereign equality of States, non-intervention
and non-interference in their internal affairs, but also severely menaced
freedom of trade and investments, which are also spelled out in many
international legal instruments, including the principles establishing the
World Trade Organization (WTO).

10.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed
that the General Assembly, owing to its universal character and in accordance
with the functions and powers granted to it by the Charter, is the highest
deliberative and decision-making organ within the United Nations system.  They
emphasized that the strengthening of the role and function of the General
Assembly is a basic premise of the current process of restructuring and
revitalization.  In this connection, they took note of the recommendation of
the High-Level Open-ended Working Group on the Strengthening of the United
Nations System on the need to continue its work in 1997, and reaffirmed their
will to participate actively in the work of the Working Group, in accordance
with the mandate given to that Working Group by the General Assembly in its
resolution 49/252 of 14 September 1995.

11.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation renewed their
support for the proposal presented by the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries on
13 February 1995 to the Open-ended Working Group on the Question of Equitable
Representation on and Increase in the Membership of the Security Council and
other matters related to the Security Council.  They also expressed their
support for the document entitled "Question of the veto", presented by the
Movement to the Working Group.

12.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation took note of
the report of the Open-ended Working Group on the Question of Equitable
Representation on and Increase in the Membership of the Security Council and
other matters related to the Security Council, presented to the General
Assembly at its fiftieth session.  They noted that the deliberations in the
Open-ended Working Group revealed a convergence of views on a number of
issues, but important differences still existed on many others.  They
reaffirmed that members of the Movement would continue to participate actively
in the deliberations of the Open-ended Working Group based on the mandate
given by the Cartagena Summit in October 1995.

13.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation recalled that
the Movement had participated actively in the discussion on the issues
addressed by the Secretary-General in An Agenda for Peace and its Supplement
as well as in the work that has been carried out by the sub-groups of the
Open-ended Working Group on An Agenda for Peace.  They noted the progress
achieved by the sub-groups on coordination and United Nations-imposed
sanctions; in that regard, they stressed that sanctions should not affect
humanitarian aspects of civilian populations.  They also reiterated their
commitment to continue searching for agreement on issues of preventive
diplomacy and peacemaking and underscored in that regard that preventive
diplomacy of the Organization must be based on the use of peaceful diplomatic
means and efforts and should be carried out on the basis of the principles
enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations.  They further reaffirmed their
commitment to continue searching for agreement on the issue of post-conflict
peace-building on the basis of the Charter and the principles of the non-
aligned movement.

14.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation supported the
suggestion of the Secretary-General on the need for the Security Council to
establish a mechanism to study, including in the context of the implementation
of Article 50 of the Charter, all the aspects related to sanctions and their
real impact.  They concurred that the application of sanctions in accordance
with the Charter has profound consequences, not only for the target countries,
but also for the neighbouring States and trading partners.  The economic
problems encountered by such States in the wake of sanctions imposed on any
other State should be addressed promptly through adequate compensation.  They
pointed out that sanctions should be lifted as soon as their objectives are
fulfilled, and any attempts to impose or extend their application for the sake
of attaining certain political objectives is to be rejected.  Furthermore,
they considered that many critical aspects needed clarification before
sanctions were imposed.  They affirmed that to this end, serious study should
be given to ways of minimizing the possible unintended and long-term effects
on the target countries and to reduce to a minimum any damage or impact on
neighbouring countries or third parties.  The study should consider the need
for clearly defined objectives, such as a timetable, and humanitarian
considerations, such as the effect on the civilian population.

15.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed
that the primary responsibility for international peace and security rested
with the United Nations.  They recognized once again the importance of United
Nations peacekeeping operations and reaffirmed their conviction that such
operations must be strictly in accordance with the principles and purposes
contained in the Charter and guided by the principles adopted at the Eleventh
Ministerial Conference of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries (Cairo, 1994).

In that regard they encouraged members of the Movement of Non-Aligned
Countries to participate actively in the Special Committee on Peacekeeping
Operations (Committee of 34).

16.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation expressed
their concern over the financial situation in which the United Nations
currently finds itself and reaffirmed that the primary cause of those
difficulties was the failure on the part of certain developed countries to
discharge fully and on time their obligation to pay their assessed
contribution to the regular budget and peacekeeping operations.  They exhorted
those Member States to pay their arrears, as well as current dues, in full, on
time and without conditions, as proof of their political will to honour their
obligations under the Charter - obligations which apply to all Members.

17.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation took note of
the decision of the High-Level Open-ended Working Group on the Financial
Situation of the United Nations to continue its efforts to seek to improve the
financial situation of the Organization in the coming year, and expressed the
hope that its deliberations would enable the General Assembly to take
immediate and urgent action to make the United Nations solvent by ensuring
that Member States in arrears pay their dues, and to take other appropriate
measures by consensus to place the Organization on a sound financial basis.

18.  In that regard, the Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of
Delegation reiterated that the principle of the capacity to pay must remain
the fundamental criterion underlying any review of the methodology for
apportionment of the expenses of the Organization.  They also stressed that
any review of the methodology should be based on consensus and consultation
and not on the basis of unilateral measures.

19.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation also
reaffirmed that the principles contained in the special scale of assessments
established in General Assembly resolution 3101 (XXVIII) of 11 December 1973
for the apportionment of the costs of peacekeeping operations must be adopted
on a permanent basis.  In that regard, they stressed that the scale for the
financing of those operations must clearly reflect the special
responsibilities of the permanent members of the Security Council and the
economic situations faced by other countries or groups of countries,
particularly developing countries.

20.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation stressed the
need to continue to provide the United Nations with adequate resources to
cover all programmes and activities mandated by the Member States without
discrimination, and, while welcoming the effort at improving efficiency and
cost-effectiveness, they also emphasized that this should not be at the
expense of curtailment or postponement of mandated programmes and activities,
especially activities for promoting development.

21.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation acknowledged
with appreciation the efforts of the Secretary-General and the Secretariat
aimed at promoting the role of the Organization in all fields in spite of the
deep financial constraints.  In that regard, they expressed their concern for
the decrease in the resources devoted to that purpose.  The Ministers for
Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reiterated their support for the
international civil service and the need to improve the conditions of service
so that the United Nations can attract and maintain the best staff at the
service of the whole international community with the widest possible
geographical representation and gender equality.

22.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reiterated the
continued validity of the fundamental right of all peoples to self-
determination, the exercise of which, in the case of peoples under colonial or
alien domination and foreign occupation, is essential to ensure the
eradication of all those situations and to guarantee universal respect for
human rights and fundamental freedoms.  They strongly condemned the ongoing
brutal suppression of the legitimate aspirations for self-determination of
peoples under colonial or alien domination and foreign occupation in various
regions of the world.

23.  Considering the fact that the goals of decolonization are yet to be
fully achieved, the Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation
reaffirmed the call for the international community to defend and protect the
interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories in their
progress towards self-determination consistent with General Assembly
resolution 1514 (XV) of 14 December 1960 and other relevant resolutions, in
particular Assembly resolution 46/181 of 19 December 1991, endorsing the Plan
of Action for the International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism by
the year 2000.  In that regard, the Ministers called upon the administering
Powers of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to take appropriate action to
promote the political, constitutional, economic, social and educational
advancement of the inhabitants of the Territories concerned to enhance and
facilitate their evolution towards self-determination in accordance with the
Charter of the United Nations.  They further called for the effective
coordination between United Nations agencies and the administering Powers in
facilitating development assistance to the peoples of the remaining Non-Self-
Governing Territories and taking practical steps towards the implementation of
the Plan of Action in order to attain the goal of ending colonialism by the
end of the century.

24.  In the context of the implementation of resolution 1514 (XV), the
Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reiterated that any
attempt aimed at the partial or total disruption of the national unity and the
territorial integrity of a country is incompatible with the purposes and
principles of the Charter of the United Nations.

25.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed the
importance of the Conference on Disarmament as the sole multilateral
negotiating body in disarmament.

26.  In the post-cold-war era there is no justification whatsoever, if there
was ever any, to maintain nuclear arsenals, and much less to add new ones as a
continuation of the arms race.  The time has come for all stockpiles of those
deadly weapons of mass destruction to be destroyed once and for all.  The
non-proliferation regime will not be successful without a clear perspective on
nuclear disarmament.  In that regard they stressed once again the need for the
Conference on Disarmament to establish, on a priority basis, an ad hoc
committee to commence negotiations on a phased programme of nuclear
disarmament and for the eventual elimination of nuclear weapons within a time-
bound framework.

27.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation noted the
adoption of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, as contained in
document A/50/1027, by the General Assembly in its resolution 50/245 of
10 September 1996.

28.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation of the
Non-Aligned Countries once again urged the nuclear-weapon States to conclude
at an early date an international instrument that would offer unconditional
and legally binding assurances to all non-nuclear-weapons States against the
use or threat of use of nuclear weapons.  They emphasized that such an
international instrument would constitute a provisional measure, pending the
complete elimination of nuclear weapons.

29.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation stressed the
importance of the advisory opinion of 8 July 1996 of the International Court
of Justice on the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons.  They
considered the advisory opinion an important step underlining the status of
international law concerning the illegality of the threat or use of nuclear
weapons.  They welcomed the Court's unanimous decision to the effect that
there existed an obligation to pursue in good faith and bring to a conclusion
negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict
and effective international control.  They emphasized the importance of the
early commencement of serious negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament as
called for by the Court.

30.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation supported the
holding of the fourth special session of the United Nations General Assembly
devoted to disarmament with the objective of setting the future course of
action in the field of disarmament and related security matters and, in this
context, emphasized the importance of multilateralism in the process of
disarmament, bearing in mind the historical significance of the Final Document
of the Tenth Special Session of the General Assembly, the first special
session devoted to disarmament, and principles, guidelines and priorities
envisaged therein, as well as the need to preserve and build upon the
achievements of the first special session devoted to disarmament.  In that
connection, they instructed the Coordination Bureau to entrust the Working
Group on Disarmament with the preparation of actions with a view to the
holding of the fourth special session at an appropriate time before the turn
of the century and the related coordination during the preparatory process.

31.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation welcomed the
adoption by the Disarmament Commission, by consensus, at its 1996 substantive
session, of the document entitled "Guidelines for international arms transfers
in the context of General Assembly resolution 46/36 H of 6 December 1991".

32.  They expressed their great concern at the acts of terrorism and
subversion, which, under various pretexts and disguises, result in the most
flagrant violation of human rights and seek to destabilize the prevailing
constitutional order and political unity of sovereign States.

33.  They welcomed with satisfaction the adoption by the General Assembly of
the Declaration on Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism (resolution
49/60 of 9 December 1994) and urged that it be implemented.  They reiterated
their condemnation of all acts, methods and practices of terrorism, as they
have adverse consequences, inter alia, on the economy and social development
of States.  They declared that terrorism affects also the stability of nations
and the very basis of societies, especially pluralistic societies.  They also
called for the urgent conclusion and the effective implementation of a
comprehensive international convention for combating terrorism.

34.  They further urged all States to cooperate to enhance international
cooperation in the fight against terrorism, wherever by whomever against
whomever it occurs at the national, regional and international levels, and to
observe and implement the relevant international and bilateral instruments,
taking into account the report of the Ninth United Nations Congress on the
Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, held at Cairo in 1995.

35.  They affirmed that criminal acts intended or calculated to provoke a
state of terror in the general public, a group of persons or particular
persons for whatever purpose were in any circumstance unjustifiable, whatever
the considerations or factors that may be invoked to justify them.

36.  They reaffirmed that all States were under the obligation, in accordance
with the purposes and principles and other provisions of the Charter of the
United Nations and other relevant international instruments, codes of conduct
and other rules of international law, to refrain from organizing, assisting or
participating in terrorist acts in the territories of other States or
acquiescing in or encouraging activities within the territories directed
towards the commission of such acts, including allowing the use of national
territories and territories under their jurisdiction for planning and training
for that purpose.  They solemnly reaffirmed their unequivocal condemnation of
any political, diplomatic, moral or material support to terrorism.

37.  They reaffirmed the Movement's principled position under international
law on the legitimacy of the struggle of peoples under colonial or alien
domination and foreign occupation for national liberation and self-
determination which did not constitute terrorism.

38.  They called once again for the endorsement in principle of the call for
the definition of terrorism to differentiate it from the legitimate struggle
of peoples under colonial or alien domination and foreign occupation for
self-determination and national liberation.

39.  They stressed the need to combat terrorism in all its forms and
manifestations regardless of race, religion or nationality of the victims or
perpetrators of terrorism.

40.  The Ministers and Heads of Delegation welcomed the entry into force of
the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and the establishment of
the International Seabed Authority in Jamaica.  They urged countries that had
not yet done so, to ratify the Convention and its implementing agreements. 
They reaffirmed that the Convention and the agreements represented significant
achievements of the international community through multilateral efforts in
creating a legal order for the seas and the oceans that will, inter alia,
facilitate international communications, promote the peaceful uses of the seas
and oceans, the equitable and efficient utilization of their resources, the
conservation of their living resources and the protection and preservation of
the marine environment.

41.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed the
position on Palestine and the Middle east adopted by the Heads of State or
Government of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries at the Cartagena Summit. 
They expressed their concern over the deterioration of the situation in the
region and in particular the difficulties being experienced in the peace
process as a result of Israeli refusal to implement the agreements reached. 
They stated their unconditional support for the legitimate struggle of the
Palestinian people to secure their inalienable rights to self-determination
and independence and reiterated their demand for the full withdrawal of Israel
from all the occupied Palestinian and other Arab lands, including Jerusalem,
southern Lebanon, Western Bekaa and the Syrian Golan.  The Ministers for
Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation expressed their concern at the recent
Israeli action of opening a tunnel in the vicinity of Al-Haram Al-Sharif in
occupied East Jerusalem.  They also called for the immediate reversal of this
action, which endangered the foundations of the Holy Sites existing above the
tunnel.

42.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reconfirmed
their support for the peace process on the basis and terms of reference of the
Madrid Peace Conference to achieve a just and comprehensive peace in the
Middle East based on international legitimacy, Security Council resolutions
242 (1967), 338 (1973), 425 (1978) and the principle of land for peace, which
ensure the Israeli withdrawal from the occupied Syrian Golan to the 4 June
1967 line, and they called upon Israel to resume peace negotiations with Syria
from the point at which they were stopped and to respect the obligations and
guarantees reached at the previous negotiations.

43.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed the
views expressed by the Heads of State or Government at the Eleventh Summit of
the Movement regarding international drug control.  They once again strongly
condemned the demand for and illegal trafficking in narcotics and psychotropic
substances, including their production, distribution and sale.  They also
expressed their concern over the increasing tendency of certain States to
resort to one-sided qualifications of the policies of other States, thus
serving interests of their own.  They rejected the continued use of unilateral
mechanisms of evaluation, qualification and certification, as they are
inconsistent with the principles of the sovereign equality of States and of
non-intervention and undermine multilateral instruments and mechanisms
established for this purpose.

44.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reiterated
their support for the convening, in 1998, of a special session of the General
Assembly dedicated to the fight against the illicit production, sale, demand,
trafficking and distribution of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances and
drug-related offences, from which new strategies should arise to tackle in an
integral manner the problem of illegal drugs, and concrete mechanisms should
be formulated for international cooperation for the fight against that
phenomenon.

45.  Reaffirming the Declaration on the Right to Development, adopted by the
General Assembly at its forty-first session, the Ministers for Foreign Affairs
and Heads of delegation welcomed the establishment of an intergovernmental
group of experts charged with elaborating a strategy for the application and
promotion of the right to development, considered in its integral and
multidimensional aspects - a strategy that takes into account the conclusions
of the Working Group on the Right to Development established by the Commission
on Human Rights and the conclusions of the World Conference on Human Rights,
held at Vienna in 1993, the International Conference on Population and
Development, held at Cairo in 1994, the World Summit for Social Development,
held at Copenhagen in 1995, the Fourth World Conference on Women, held at
Beijing in 1995, and the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements, held
at Istanbul in 1996.  They were confident that the new group of experts would
receive from the Secretariat all the necessary assistance for performing its
mandate.

46.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation took note of
the recent resumption of the work of the Third Committee working group and
urged it to finalize in the earliest time possible its second mandate, namely
the formulation of recommendations to the General Assembly for ongoing
adaptation of the machinery of the United Nations in the sphere of human
rights in full compliance with the provisions of part II, paragraph 17, of the
Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action.  They also expressed their
intention to instruct their delegates to carry through the necessary
negotiations, based on the proposals stated by the Movement in a document of
20 November 1995 - proposals which were submitted to the working group at its
session of 29 November 1995.

47.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation also called
for the streamlining and rationalization of the human rights machinery,
including the reporting obligations under the various human rights instruments
and complaints procedures which have proliferated and led to unnecessary
duplication.

48.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation stated that,
while the world economy was showing some signs of growth, it had fallen short
of expectations, and future prospects remained uncertain.  They regretted the
continuing and sharp accentuation of inequalities between developing countries
and developed countries and the deterioration of the international economic
environment in terms of access to markets, as well as the sharp decline in
concessional finance for development.  They also expressed their concern at
the diversion of even scanty concessional resources for development to short-
term emergency humanitarian assistance projects and the absence of serious
efforts to tackle the issue of access to and transfer of technology on
concessional and preferential terms to developing countries.

49.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation welcomed the
relatively high growth rates experienced by some developing countries over the
past years, which represented a significant contribution to the global economy
while also helping to offset the low rates recorded by the developed
countries.  They also asserted that this achievement should be acknowledged by
the international community, ensuring an effective role for developing
countries in policy formulation and decision-making at the global level.

50.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reiterated
their profound concern that the developing countries were shouldering a
disproportionate share of the burden of adjustment in face of the rapid
changes and transformations in the global economy.  They called upon the
developed countries to make every effort to coordinate their macroeconomic
policies, including through multilateral institutions in which developing
countries are represented, so as to stimulate the world economy through
increased demand, stabilized markets and further liberalized trade, and
thereby provide a conducive international economic environment for
development.

51.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation expressed
their satisfaction with the results achieved at the ninth session of the
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), as well as with
the position stated by the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries at the session. 
In the contemporary context, UNCTAD has a consensus-building role for the
purposes of inserting the development dimension into the consideration of all
trade-related issues.  They reaffirmed the need to consolidate UNCTAD as the
focal point of the United Nations to deal with topics related to trade and
development and to offer support to developing countries with a view to
facilitating their participation in the world economy on an equitable basis.

52.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation emphasized the
importance for the analytical work and policy research conducted by UNCTAD of
facilitating an integrated consideration of issues related to trade,
investment, technology, services and development.  They also underlined the
role of UNCTAD as a forum for discussions aimed at considering strategies and
development policies, promoting a constructive dialogue among countries and
responding to the changing needs of developing countries.  From its unique
development perspective, UNCTAD should also be encouraged to contribute to the
preparation of the agenda for future multilateral negotiations.  The Ministers
welcomed the mandate given to UNCTAD to identify and analyse implications for
development of issues relevant to a possible multilateral framework on
investment, taking into account the interests of developing countries.

53.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation emphasized the
importance and greater relevance of the United Nations Industrial Development
Organization (UNIDO) and underscored its role as a specialized agency with a
central coordination task within the United Nations system in the field of
industrial development.  They underlined the reform process undertaken by
UNIDO to enhance its effectiveness as a forum for supporting and promoting
industrial development, as well as for providing specialized technical
cooperation services.  They affirmed their commitment to support and
strengthen UNIDO so as to enable it to exercise fully its development mandate.

54.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation underlined the
position expressed by the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries during the United
Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II), especially on matters
related to international cooperation, the right to adequate housing and the
role of the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements.  They pointed out
that the results attained at the Conference took into account the interests of
the developing countries and expressed their will to work constructively and
promote a firm political commitment on the part of the international community
to the full implementation of the Habitat Agenda.

55.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation called for
urgent and immediate generation of political will in the international
community to follow up and implement the recommendations of recent United
Nations conferences, in particular commitments to new and additional financing
for development and creation of a favourable international economic
environment, inter alia, through transfer of technology and enhanced trade
access of products from developing countries.  They stressed that only a
change in attitude towards the re-establishment of international cooperation
in areas truly crucial for the economic growth of developing countries would
lend legitimacy to the implementation and follow-up of the conferences.  They
underscored the fundamental role of the United Nations General Assembly as the
supreme intergovernmental organ for policy formulation and evaluation in
development areas and as having the high responsibility of ensuring the
implementation of the recommendations of the conferences.  A strong political
commitment by the international community was also needed to implement a
strengthened international cooperation for development.

56.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed
that in the era of globalization and interdependence there could be no
alternative other than to revitalize the dialogue between the developed and
developing countries to strengthen global cooperation for development based on
mutual benefit and shared responsibilities.  They further reaffirmed that the
international community must accept the imperative need for global partnership
if peace and prosperity were to be effectively advanced.

57.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation underlined
that the renewal of the dialogue on strengthening international economic
cooperation for development through partnership, could serve as an essential
mechanism to strengthen further the efforts of the international community in
implementing all major United Nations consensus agreements on development and
the agreed commitments and outcomes of the major United Nations conferences,
as well as in implementing relevant major United Nations resolutions.  The
dialogue could also serve as a mechanism for discussing emerging and urgent
issues relevant to the strengthening of global partnership for development.

58.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed
that an Agenda for Development must respond to the needs of the developing
countries.  They also reaffirmed that an Agenda for Development should provide
a unique opportunity for placing development at the forefront of international
agenda and for embarking on a process of constructive dialogue.  They pointed
out that the subsequent implementation of an Agenda for Development should be
reflected in a reduction of the existing fundamental imbalances and in the
solution of problems in critical areas of the international economy.  In that
regard, they noted the status of negotiations of the Agenda and supported
General Assembly decision 50/490 of 16 September 1996 that the Ad Hoc Open-
ended Working Group of the General Assembly on an Agenda for Development,
should continue its work at the fifty-first session of the Assembly, with a
view to concluding its work on the elaboration of the Agenda as soon as
possible.  The adoption of the Agenda would greatly help the United Nations in
resuming its rightful role as enshrined in the Charter.  Therefore they
emphasized that an Agenda for Development must lead to a strengthening of the
role of the United Nations in development and intensify the relationship
between the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, the World Trade
Organization and other multilateral institutions concerned with development
matters.

59.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation emphasized
that only an integral strategy for debt-reduction including all types of
indebtedness - multilateral, bilateral and commercial - and covering all
developing countries would make it possible to reduce the problem to
manageable levels.  This objective must be achieved in the short term, with
the immediate implementation of reduction mechanisms in order to enable the
indebted countries to regain their economic growth rates and to free up the
resources they need to attend to their economic and social priorities.  It is
essential that, for the three types of the debt, reduction cover both the debt
service and its volume.  They stressed that the solution to the debt problem
must go much further than the establishment of transitory relief measures and
be based on a genuine joint effort between debtors and creditors without
selectivity, taking into account all the dimensions of the problem and
ensuring a net transfer of financial resources to indebted countries.  They
expressed their hope that the annual meeting of the World Bank and the
International Monetary Fund, scheduled for October 1996, would yield positive
results and effective formulas for arriving at solutions to the debt problem.

60.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation stated their
support for the World Food Summit, convened by the Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United Nations (FAO) at Rome in November 1996 and stressed
the importance of the adoption, in close cooperation with the Group of 77, of
a common position and coordinated action by the Ministers of Agriculture of
the Non-Aligned Countries within the framework of the Summit, in accordance
with the mandate of the Final Document adopted at the Eleventh Conference of
Heads of State or Government of the Movement.  To that end, they supported the
idea of holding a meeting of Ministers of Food and Agriculture of the Non-
Aligned Countries.  They expressed their concern over the deterioration of the
food and agriculture situation in developing countries, reaffirmed the need to
achieve food security and sustainable agricultural policies as fundamental
objectives of development and asserted that the right to food was a
fundamental human right, the respect and promotion of which constitute a moral
imperative for the international community.  In that regard, they affirmed the
importance of economic and social policies that would promote the full
participation and empowerment of people, especially of women.  Moreover, they
strongly rejected the use of food as an instrument of economic or political
pressure.

61.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation underlined the
importance of the World Trade Organization (WTO) for the international trading
system and stressed the role and contribution that developing countries have
already made in the establishment of WTO and in the adoption of the Uruguay
Round package.  They stressed the necessity that all member States of WTO
fully implement the Uruguay Round agreement so that expected trade and welfare
gains to developing countries are actually realized.  They also noted with
concern the persistent call by some countries, in particular developed
countries, to enlarge the WTO agenda by including new issues that do not
belong to its mandate, as is the case with labour issues, or have not been the
subject of preliminary studies that justify their inclusion in the future work
of WTO.  The Ministers stressed that the International Labour Organization was
the appropriate forum to deal with labour issues in accordance with the
decisions adopted by the International Labour Conference.  They reiterated
that the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries should oppose any attempt to
include at the inaugural World Trade Organization Ministerial Conference
issues that were not trade-related.  They underlined that UNCTAD should
continue to facilitate the integration of developing countries in the
international trading system in a complementary manner with WTO and to promote
development through trade and investment.

62.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation underscored
that the inaugural World Trade Organization Ministerial Conference, which will
take place in Singapore in December 1996, should give priority to the analysis
and review of the implementation and timely fulfilment of the Uruguay Round
agreements, with particular consideration to their impact on the developing
countries economies, especially those of the least developed countries.  They
expressed the need for the Conference to adopt specific measures aimed at
mitigating the adverse consequences of those agreements on the developing
countries.  They also emphasized the importance of ensuring the universality
of WTO and, in this context, called for expedition in the accession process of
applying developing countries, including those that are not members of the
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.  They furthermore underscored that in
the review of the application for membership no political consideration should
be invoked to impede accession of developing countries.  In that context, the
Ministers recognized the importance of the inaugural Ministerial Conference
and affirmed their commitment to ensure its success.  

63.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation observed that
while environmental problems of developed countries are associated with
unsustainable patterns of consumption and production, those afflicting
developing countries are, to a large extent, the result of poverty and
underdevelopment and of their technical and financial limitations.  They
stated their decision to promote the preparation of the special session of the
General Assembly, to be held in 1997 for the purpose of an overall review and
appraisal of the implementation of commitments, recommendations and agreements
reached at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development.  They
emphasized with grave concern that, while the Conference, Agenda 21 and other
international instruments on environmental subjects invoked a new spirit of
partnership and cooperation, four years after the Conference the required new
and additional financial resources had not been allocated and the transfer of
environmentally sound technologies on concessional and preferential terms,
scientific and technical cooperation and the appropriate dissemination of
information had not materialized.

64.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation took note of
the important and positive role played by the Joint Coordinating Committee of
the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries and the Group of 77 during the past
years in advancing the common positions of the developing countries.  They
agreed that the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries should jointly sponsor draft
resolutions to be presented by the Group of 77 at the fifty-first session of
the General Assembly on the following agenda items:  trade and development,
cooperation for industrial development, environment and sustainable
development, human settlements, population and development, external debt
crisis and development, food and sustainable agricultural development, an
Agenda for Development and renewal of the dialogue on strengthening
international economic cooperation for development through partnership.

65.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation reaffirmed
their commitment to further strengthen South-South cooperation, and reiterated
their conviction that it constituted an integral and essential part of the
efforts of the developing countries to promote economic growth, increase
technological capacities and accelerate development.  In that regard, new
political and economic realities call for a greater partnership and for
pursuing new opportunities for strengthening South-South cooperation.  They
therefore reaffirmed their support for the holding of a United Nations
conference on South-South cooperation.

66.  While noting that there has been increased interest and willingness to
strengthen South-South cooperation, the Ministers for Foreign Affairs and
Heads of Delegation asserted that further efforts were needed to ensure that
their commitments materialized.  They noted with appreciation the steps
undertaken by the Government of Indonesia in further implementing the decision
adopted at the Eleventh Summit on the establishment of the Centre for South-
South Technical Cooperation as a vital and effective means of promoting and
accelerating development among developing countries.  They reiterated their
conviction that South-South cooperation should be promoted through the sharing
of development experiences among developing countries.

67.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation underlined the
vital role of energy, particularly for rapid economic growth and development
of the developing countries, and encouraged the non-aligned countries to
enhance their cooperation in that field through, inter alia, joint investments
and projects in the context of South-South cooperation.  In that connection,
they called upon the developed countries and the multilateral financial
institutions to support such activities through the provision of financial,
technical and technological resources.  Considering the increasing need of the
developing countries for energy, they also reiterated that according to
international agreements, the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes was
the inalienable right of all countries, and as such should be promoted.

68.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation expressed
their gratitude and appreciation to the Government of India for the offer to
host the next Ministerial Meeting of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries at
New Delhi in 1997, and, in that regard, committed themselves to actively
participate in such an important meeting.

69.  The Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation of the
Non-Aligned Countries welcomed the admission of Ukraine as an Observer of the
Movement.


                                    ----- 


                                     Note

*    Malta has a reservation on paragraph 11 regarding the wording "renewed
their support for" and "They also expressed their support for". 

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Date last posted: 28 December 1999 17:35:10
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