United Nations

A/51/3


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

6 September 1996

ORIGINAL:
ENGLISH


                                                  A/51/3 (Part I)


General Assembly
Fifty-first session


                    REPORT OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL
                               FOR THE YEAR 1996*

(*  The Present document is part I of the preliminary version of the
report of the Economic and Social Council for 1996.  The final report
will be issued as Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifty-
first Session, Supplement No. 3 (A/51/3/Rev.1).

            The resolutions and decisions will be issued in final form in
Official Records of the Economic and Social Council, 1996, Supplement
No. 1 (E/1996/96).)

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               The report of the Council for the year 1996 is being issued in
three parts and in a new format.  Part I contains the foreword by
the President of the Council and chapters I-IV, relating to the
high-level, coordination and operational activities segments of the
work of the Council.  Part II contains chapters V-VII, which cover
the general segment, elections and organizational matters.  Part III
contains the annexes to the report.  The section of the report of
the Council relating to the resumed substantive session of 1996 will
be issued as part IV.

               The resolutions and decisions adopted by the Council are
included in the relevant sections of the report, corresponding to
the agenda items under which they were adopted, as are the summary
of the President on the high-level segment (chapter II) and the
agreed conclusions of the coordination segment (chapter III).

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                                   CONTENTS

Chapter                                                              Page

Foreword by the President of the Economic and Social Council ......    4

  I. MATTERS CALLING FOR ACTION BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OR BROUGHT TO
     ITS ATTENTION ................................................    6

 II. HIGH-LEVEL SEGMENT:

     INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGAINST THE ILLICIT PRODUCTION, SALE,
     DEMAND, TRAFFIC AND DISTRIBUTION OF NARCOTICS AND PSYCHOTROPIC
     SUBSTANCES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES ............................   12

III. COORDINATION SEGMENT:

     COORDINATION OF THE POLICIES AND ACTIVITIES OF THE SPECIALIZED
     AGENCIES AND OTHER BODIES OF THE UNITED NATIONS SYSTEM .......   23

     A. Coordination of the United Nations system activities for
        poverty eradication .......................................   23

     B. Implementation of the agreed conclusions of the 1995 
        coordination segment of the Council .......................   38

 IV.    OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES SEGMENT:

        OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES OF THE UNITED NATIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL
        DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION  ..................................   47

        A. Follow-up to policy recommendations of the
           General Assembly .......................................   47

        B. Coordination of activities on a system-wide basis:
           strengthening collaboration between the United Nations
           development system and the Bretton Woods institutions in the
           areas of social and economic development at all levels,
           including the field level  .............................   51

        C. Consideration of the reports of the Executive Boards of the
           United Nations Development Programme/United Nations
           Population Fund, the United Nations Children's Fund and
           the World Food Programme  ..............................   60

LIST OF RESOLUTIONS AND DECISIONS ADOPTED AT THE COORDINATION AND 
OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES SEGMENTS OF THE COUNCIL IN 1996 ............   63

  V.    GENERAL SEGMENT *
        (*  Chapter is contained in part II of the present report.)

        A.  Social, humanitarian and human rights questions:
            reports of subsidiary bodies, conferences and related
            questions
                     
        B.  Economic and environmental questions:  reports of
            subsidiary bodies, conferences and related questions

        C.  Regional cooperation in the economic, social and related
            fields                            

        D.  Permanent sovereignty over national resources in the
            occupied Palestinian and other Arab territories

        E.  Coordination questions

        F.  Non-governmental organizations

        G.  Programme and related questions in the economic,
            social and related fields

        H.  New and innovative ideas for generating funds

 VI.    ELECTIONS, APPOINTMENTS, NOMINATIONS AND CONFIRMATIONS *
        (*  Chapter is contained in part II of the present report.)

VII.    ORGANIZATIONAL MATTERS*
        (*  Chapter is contained in part II of the present report.)

                                  Annexes **
   (**  The annexes are contained in part III of the present report.)


  I.    Agendas of the organizational session for 1996 and the
        substantive session of 1996

 II.    Composition of the Council and its subsidiary and related bodies

III.    Intergovernmental organizations designated by the Council under
        rule 79 of the rules of procedure for participation in the
        deliberations of the Council on questions within the scope of
        their activities


              Foreword by Ambassador Jean-Marie Kacou Gervais,
                President of the Economic and Social Council


     The 1996 substantive session of the Council represented both an end and a
beginning.  It was the last occasion on which the Council conducted its
deliberations according to the format established by the General Assembly in
its resolution 48/162.  At the same time, the Council began the process of
implementing Assembly resolution 50/227, entitled "Further measures for the
restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in the economic, social
and related fields", in which the Assembly introduced a new framework for the
functioning of the Council.  I am pleased that the Council adopted significant
legislation in a number of areas during its substantive session and took steps
in the innovative direction charted by the Assembly in its resolution 50/227. 
I believe in particular that Member States can view with favour the outcomes
of the coordination and operational activities segments and the adoption of
important resolutions, among others, on non-governmental organizations, and
the follow-up to major United Nations conferences, collaboration with the
Bretton Woods institutions, prevention and control of human immunodeficiency
virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and humanitarian
assistance.

      In viewing the work of the various segments of the Council, it seems
clear that its high-level segment, while having a considerable potential for
success, still leaves much to be desired.  Without a doubt, the presence of
the executive heads of the international financial and trade institutions is
essential with respect to having a meaningful policy dialogue during the high-
level segment.  The absence of most of the executive heads at this year's
substantive session weakened the dialogue significantly.  As for the remainder
of the high-level segment, having a well-defined topical subject of high
international priority contributed to a more focused debate and to broader
ministerial participation.  The high-level segment still lacks two essential
ingredients, however - first, a clear and definitive outcome and second, a
vigorous and straightforward dialogue among the participants.  I trust that
the proposal to have agreed conclusions emanating from the high-level segment
beginning with next year will ensure a more definitive outcome.  With regard
to dialogue among the participants, I would note that, although the speeches
are an integral part of the high-level segment, the segment should not be
confined to statements alone.  Indeed, ways need to be found to ensure a more
disciplined presentation of statements by all concerned coupled with an
opportunity for structured but interactive dialogue.

      The trend of a well-functioning coordination segment continued and was
further strengthened this year.  The Council is gradually re-equipping itself
to play the coordinating role envisaged for it in the Charter of the United
Nations.  This year's agreed conclusions showed the Council's willingness to
assert its authority over its own subsidiary machinery in a constructive way. 
Harmonization and coordination of the work programmes of the Council's
functional commissions in the area of poverty eradication are an important
step towards achieving the same overall direction.  Not only is the Council
better placed to direct the work of its functional commissions, but the
commissions themselves will also be able to draw on each other's work in a
more coherent and synergistic way.  Likewise, the Council's conclusions
provide well-articulated guidance to the United Nations system for integrated
support for poverty eradication at the country level and for mainstreaming the
gender perspective into the work of the system.

      In the segment on operational activities of the United Nations for
international development cooperation, the Council undertook the monitoring
and guidance of the implementation of General Assembly resolution 50/120 on
the triennial comprehensive policy review of operational activities for
development.  The report of the Secretary-General on the subject proved to be
particularly helpful owing to its clearly defined focus on selected areas and
the identification of problems and related recommendations.  Furthermore, the
dialogue with executive heads and two field teams of the United Nations system
afforded the Council an opportunity to obtain further insights into the
requirements for guidance.  Consequently, the resolution adopted by the
Council contains a range of substantive provisions that promote further
reforms of operational activities in the key areas of harmonization of rules
and procedures, common administrative services and common premises and
strengthened monitoring and evaluation.  Moreover, the groundwork has been
laid for constructive consideration of some aspects of funding of operational
activities by the Council in 1997.

      In the general segment, the Council addressed a wide range of economic,
social, humanitarian, human rights and coordination questions and adopted a
number of substantial resolutions.  The decision and the resolution that it
adopted as part of the conclusion of its review of arrangements for
consultations with non-governmental organizations must stand out, however, as
the major achievement of this year's general segment.  Concerning the agenda
of the segment, it continues to be overburdened and fragmented and needs to be
streamlined.  This task has acquired new urgency since the Council will be
required, as of 1997, to complete its programme of work within four weeks.

      The coming year will be a critical one for the Council.  It will need to
maintain the momentum of reform initiated by the General Assembly in its
resolution 50/227 by implementing the provisions relevant to its work with
thoroughness and dispatch.  I am confident that the members of next year's
Council will be up to the task.  For my part, I shall ensure that the 1996
Bureau safeguards and passes on to the 1997 substantive session of the Council
the overall experience that we acquired in the initial phase of the
implementation of Assembly resolution 50/227, as well as the lessons learned
during the year.


                                  Chapter I

             MATTERS CALLING FOR ACTION BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OR
                          BROUGHT TO ITS ATTENTION


1.          In 1996, the Economic and Social Council adopted resolutions and
decisions that call for action by the General Assembly.  The relevant
paragraphs of those resolutions and decisions are summarized below.

OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES OF THE UNITED NATIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
COOPERATION:  CONSIDERATION OF THE REPORTS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARDS OF THE
UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME/UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND, THE
UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND AND THE WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME

            Commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the operations of the
            United Nations Children's Fund

            By decision 1996/226, the Council endorsed decision 1996/18 of the
Executive Board of the United Nations Children's Fund, in which the Executive
Board recommended to the General Assembly that it allocate a plenary meeting
during its fifty-first session (1996) to the commemoration of the fiftieth
anniversary of the operations of the Fund, and recommended its approval by the
Assembly at its fifty-first session.  For the complete text of the decision,
see chapter IV, section C.

SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN AND HUMAN RIGHTS QUESTIONS:  CRIME PREVENTION AND
CRIMINAL JUSTICE

            Action against corruption

      By resolution 1996/8, the Council recommended to the General Assembly
the adoption of the draft resolution contained therein.  For the complete text
of the resolution, see chapter V, section A.7.

            United Nations Declaration on Crime and Public Security

      By resolution 1996/9, the Council recommended to the General Assembly
the adoption of the draft resolution contained therein.  For the complete text
of the resolution, see chapter V, section A.7.

SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN AND HUMAN RIGHTS QUESTIONS:  NARCOTIC DRUGS 

      Special session of the General Assembly devoted to the combat against
      the illicit production, sale, demand, traffic and distribution of
      narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances and related activities 

      By resolution 1996/17, the Council decided to recommend to the General
Assembly to convene a special session, in order to consider the fight against
the illicit production, sale, demand, traffic and distribution of narcotic
drugs and psychotropic substances and related activities, and to propose new
strategies, methods, practical activities and specific measures to strengthen
international cooperation in addressing the problem of illicit drugs; also
decided to propose that the special session of the Assembly should be held for
three days in 1998; and requested the Secretary-General to present to the
Assembly at its fifty-first session a report containing recommendations on the
possible outcome of, and organizational matters relating to, the proposed
special session of the Assembly.  For the complete text of the resolution, see
chapter V, section A.8.

      Strengthening of the role of the International Narcotics Control Board
      and development of a unified information system for the collection and
      analysis of data concerning the nature, patterns and trends of the
      global problem of drug abuse

      By resolution 1996/20, the Council requested the General Assembly to
allocate sufficient resources, within the regular budget, to enable the
International Narcotics Control Board to carry out the functions assigned to
it, in accordance with the international drug control conventions.  For the
complete text of the resolution, see chapter V, section A.8.

      Action to strengthen international cooperation to control precursors and
      their substitutes used in the illicit manufacture of controlled
      substances, in particular amphetamine-type stimulants, and to prevent
      their diversion

      By section II of resolution 1996/29, the Council, inter alia, requested
the Secretary-General to propose to the General Assembly, in order to
implement the resolution, any modification in the programme of work of the
Secretariat that might be necessary for the allocation of adequate resources
to the United Nations International Drug Control Programme in the programme
budget of the United Nations for the biennium 1996-1997.  For the complete
text of the resolution, see chapter V, section A.8.

      Measures to combat diversion of psychotropic substances and to establish
      effective control over operations carried out by intermediaries in
      international trade of psychotropic substances

      By resolution 1996/30, the Council requested the Secretary-General to
propose to the General Assembly, in order to implement that resolution, any
modification in the programme of work of the Secretariat that might be
necessary for the allocation of adequate resources to the United Nations
International Drug Control Programme in the programme budget of the United
Nations for the biennium 1996-1997.  For the complete text of the resolution,
see chapter V, section A.8.

ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTIONS:  SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

      Institutional arrangements for the implementation of the Global
      Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from
      Land-based Activities

      By resolution 1996/1, the Council recommended to the General Assembly
the adoption of the draft resolution contained therein.  For the complete text
of the resolution, see chapter V, section B.1.

NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

      Non-governmental organizations

      By decision 1996/297, the Council decided to recommend that the General
Assembly examine, at its fifty-first session, the question of the
participation of non-governmental organizations in all areas of the work of
the United Nations, in the light of the experience gained through the
arrangements for consultation between non-governmental organizations and the
Council.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V, section F.

2.   The following resolutions and decisions adopted by the Council are also
brought to the attention of the General Assembly.

SOCIAL, HUMANITARIAN AND HUMAN RIGHTS QUESTIONS:  HUMAN RIGHTS QUESTIONS

            Situation of human rights in Burundi

      By decision 1996/254, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/1, endorsed the Commission's request to the Special
Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Burundi to report to the
General Assembly at its fifty-first session and to the Commission at its
fifty-third session.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V,
section A.4.

      Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Third Decade to Combat
      Racism and Racial Discrimination

      By decision 1996/255, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/8, requested the Secretary-General to take the
necessary measures in order to transmit to the General Assembly at its
fifty-first session the results of his consultations with Member States and
intergovernmental as well as non-governmental organizations on the possibility
of holding a world conference to combat racism, racial discrimination,
xenophobia and related contemporary forms of intolerance.  For the complete
text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

     Implementation of the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of
     Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief

     By decision 1996/260, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/23, approved the Commission's request to the
Secretary-General to provide the Special Rapporteur on religious intolerance
with all necessary assistance to enable him to carry out his mandate, to
submit an interim report to the General Assembly at its fifty-first session
and to report to the Commission at its fifty-third session.  For the complete
text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

      Human rights of persons with disabilities 

      By decision 1996/261, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/27, approved the Commission's request to the
Secretary-General to report biennially to the General Assembly on the progress
of efforts to ensure the full recognition and enjoyment of the human rights of
persons with disabilities.  For the complete text of the decision, see
chapter V, section A.4.

      Assistance to States in strengthening the rule of law 

      By decision 1996/267, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/56, approved the Commission's request to the
Secretary-General to submit a report to the General Assembly at its
fifty-first session on the results of the contacts established in accordance
with paragraph 9 of that resolution, as well as on any other developments
pertaining to the implementation of the recommendation of the World Conference
on Human Rights referred to in the penultimate preambular paragraph of the
same resolution.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V,
section A.4.

            Composition of the staff of the Centre for Human Rights 

      By decision 1996/272, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/65, approved the Commission's request to the Secretary-
General to submit a comprehensive report to the General Assembly at its
fifty-first session and to the Commission at its fifty-third session on the
implementation of the Commission's resolution, including measures adopted and
their results, and recommendations for improving the current situation.  For
the complete text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Human rights situation in southern Lebanon and West Bekaa 

       By decision 1996/274, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/68, approved the Commission's request to the
Secretary-General to report to the General Assembly at its fifty-first session
and to the Commission at its fifty-third session on the results of his efforts
in that regard.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V,
section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in Cuba 

       By decision 1996/275, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/69, endorsed the Commission's decision to extend the
mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cuba for
one year, and approved the Commission's request to the Special Rapporteur to
submit an interim report to the General Assembly at its fifty-first session
and to report to the Commission at its fifty-third session on the results of
his endeavours pursuant to the Commission's resolution.  For the complete text
of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in Iraq

      By decision 1996/277, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/72, endorsed the Commission's decision to extend for a
further year the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human
rights in Iraq, and approved the Commission's requests to the Special
Rapporteur to report periodically to the Commission on the situation of human
rights in Iraq and to submit an interim report on the situation of human
rights in Iraq to the General Assembly at its fifty-first session and a report
to the Commission at its fifty-third session.  For the complete text of the
decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in the Sudan 

       By decision 1996/278, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/73, endorsed the Commission's decision to extend the
mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the
Sudan for an additional year, and approved the Commission's request to the
Special Rapporteur to report his findings and recommendations to the General
Assembly at its fifty-first session and to the Commission at its fifty-third
session.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions 

      By decision 1996/279, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/74, approved the Commission's invitation to the Special
Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions to submit an
interim report to the General Assembly at its fifty-first session on the
situation worldwide in regard to summary or arbitrary executions and his
recommendations for more effective action to combat that phenomenon.  For the
complete text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in Afghanistan 

      By decision 1996/280, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/75, endorsed the Commission's decision to extend the
mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in
Afghanistan for one year, and approved the Commission's request to the Special
Rapporteur to report on the situation of human rights in Afghanistan to the
Commission at its fifty-third session and to consider submitting a report to
the General Assembly at its fifty-first session.  For the complete text of the
decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in Rwanda 

      By decision 1996/281, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/76, endorsed the Commission's decision to extend the
mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Rwanda
for an additional year and approved the Commission's requests to the Special
Rapporteur to make recommendations concerning situations in which technical
assistance might be appropriate and to report to the General Assembly at its
fifty-first session and to the Commission at its fifty-third session.  For the
complete text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in Nigeria 

      By decision 1996/284, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/79, approved the Commission's request to the two
thematic Special Rapporteurs who had requested a joint investigative visit to
Nigeria to submit to the Commission at its fifty-third session a joint report
on their findings, along with any observations of other relevant mechanisms,
in particular the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, and also approved the
Commission's request to them to submit an interim report to the General
Assembly.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in Myanmar

      By decision 1996/285, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/80, approved the Commission's decision to extend for
one year the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human
rights in Myanmar to establish or continue direct contacts with the Government
and people of Myanmar, including political leaders deprived of their liberty,
their families and their lawyers, and its request to him to report to the
General Assembly at its fifty-first session and to the Commission at its
fifty-third session.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V,
section A.4.

            Situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

      By decision 1996/287, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/84, endorsed the Commission's decision to extend the
mandate of the Special Representative on the situation of human rights in the
Islamic Republic of Iran for a further year and approved the Commission's
request to the Special Representative to submit an interim report to the
General Assembly at its fifty-first session on the situation of human rights
in the Islamic Republic of Iran, including the situation of minority groups
such as the Baha'is, and to report to the Commission at its fifty-third
session.  For the complete text of the decision, see chapter V, section A.4.

            Rights of the child

       By decision 1996/288, the Council, taking note of Commission on Human
Rights resolution 1996/85, approved the Commission's request to the
Secretary-General to provide the Special Rapporteur on the sale of children,
child prostitution and child pornography with all necessary human and
financial assistance, from within existing resources, to make the full
discharge of the mandate possible and to enable her to submit an interim
report to the General Assembly at its fifty-first session and a report to the
Commission at its fifty-third session.  For the complete text of the decision,
see chapter V, section A.4.


                               Chapter II

                          HIGH-LEVEL SEGMENT

       INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGAINST THE ILLICIT PRODUCTION, SALE,
       DEMAND, TRAFFIC AND DISTRIBUTION OF NARCOTICS AND PSYCHOTROPIC
                    SUBSTANCES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES


                             INTRODUCTION

1.    The high-level segment was held from 24 to 27 June 1996 (8th to 15th
meetings of the Council).  An account of the proceedings is contained in the
relevant summary records (E/1996/SR.8-15).  The Council had before it the
following documents:

      (a)   Annual overview report of the Administrative Committee on
Coordination for 1995 (E/1996/18 and Add.1);

      (b)   Report of the Secretary-General on international cooperation
against the illicit production, sale, demand, traffic and distribution of
narcotics and psychotropic substances and related activities (E/1996/57);

      (c)   World Economic and Social Survey, 1996 (E/1996/60).


                          ACTION TAKEN BY THE COUNCIL

2.          At the 52nd meeting, on 26 July 1996, the President of the Council
presented the summary and conclusions of the high-level segment (E/1996/89),
which read as follows:


             "Summary presented by Ambassador Jean-Marie Kacou Gervais,
                    President of the Economic and Social Council

                                "INTRODUCTION

         "The high-level segment of the Economic and Social Council was held
    from 24 to 27 June 1996.  The theme of the segment was 'International
    cooperation against the illicit production, sale, demand, traffic and
    distribution of narcotics and psychotropic substances and related
    activities'.  The segment was attended by a large number of ministers
    and other high-level representatives.  

          "During the segment, on 24 June 1996, the Council held an intensive
    policy dialogue on major issues in the world economy with
    Mr. Rubens Ricupero, Secretary-General of the United Nations Conference
    on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Mr. Prabhakar R. Narvekar, Deputy
    Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and Mr. Sven
    Sandstrom, Managing Director of the World Bank.  The absence of a
    representative of the World Trade Organization was noted with regret.


                            "I.  POLICY DIALOGUE

           "The policy dialogue with the Secretary-General of UNCTAD and
    responsible representatives of the heads of the World Bank and IMF
    focused on trends in the world economy; the issue of globalization;
    trade; debt; resource flows; and cooperation and coordination within the
    United Nations system.  Also addressed was the importance of
    international cooperation in combating the drug problem.


              "A.  The world economy and international cooperation

             "The evolution of world economic growth is encouraging, although
     many countries continue to have an economic performance below their
     potential.  Developing countries, as a group, are making a major
     contribution to the growth of the world economy.  Their growth, which
     seems in many cases - particularly in Asia and to some extent in Latin
     America - to be independent of the growth or lack of it in developed
     economies, is expected to continue to outpace that of the industrialized
     countries in 1996-1997.  Developing countries are contributing not only
     to world growth but also to macro-stabilization policies worldwide, in
     particular through greater internal price stability and significant
     deregulation of financial markets.  Growth, however, remains uneven,
     with a small number of developing countries growing rapidly, a larger
     number showing improved performance, and a third group, in particular
     the least developed and African countries, lagging behind.  Many
     developing countries continue to be faced with the problems of poverty,
     inadequate infrastructure, capital constraints and low levels of social
     development.  Many of the countries with economies in transition are
     moving towards a high growth path.  However, these countries will
     continue to need international assistance in the period ahead to
     overcome the problems of transition. 

         "Sound policies, structural changes and economic reforms must
     continue to be pursued by all countries, including developing countries,
     to sustain and accelerate growth and development.  At the same time, the
     importance of the external economic environment, particularly the
     effects of economic and trade policies and developments in developed
     countries, and of international economic cooperation, was underscored. 
     The suggestion was put forward that the main industrialized countries
     should coordinate policies of economic expansion to raise demand and
     combat unemployment, in the context of deepening trade liberalization. 
     The prospective growth environment for developing countries will depend
     not only on their continuing significant policy adjustments but also on
     sustained and strong momentum in global trade liberalization leading to
     rapid growth in world trade.  The acute problems of the least developed
     countries, whose number has increased, can be overcome only with
     decisive international action and assistance.  Partnership between
     developed and developing countries should be reinforced and extended to
     civil society as a whole.

          "Recent United Nations conferences have defined the framework for
     and resulted in commitments to intensify international cooperation for
     development.  Attention must now focus on implementation at the national
     and international levels.  Development strategy should be based on a
     country's plans, priorities and development needs, and should be
     country- specific, while recognizing that developing countries face many
     common constraints and problems.  International cooperation is necessary
     to assist developing countries in carrying out their development goals.  
           

                            "B.  Globalization

           "Globalization, in particular global financial integration, implies
     opportunities and challenges.  As we continue to assess the risks and
     benefits associated with globalization, it is time to address the issue
     of the post-globalization agenda.  Many developing countries and
     countries with economies in transition are liberalizing their trade and
     investment environment.  As a result, private capital flows to
     developing countries have increased substantially, and have complemented
     domestic savings and external assistance.  However, so far three
     quarters of these flows have gone to only 12 countries, and such flows
     can easily be suspended or reversed.  Therefore, current efforts to
     establish a system of financial cooperation capable of providing early
     warning and preventing the emergence of serious financial crises must be
     continued and intensified.  It was suggested that the international
     community should also give consideration, as appropriate and in
     cooperation with national Governments, to ways of dealing with the
     possible negative effects on developing countries of sudden outflows of
     private capital.  The developed economies should better integrate the
     international dimension into their macroeconomic and monetary policies,
     since these have a crucial impact on world growth and development.

          "Globalization discussions so far have mainly referred to trade in
     goods and services, and have tended to overlook technology, labour and
     migration flows.  It was suggested that labour mobility should be a part
     of the liberalization agenda.


                                    "C.  Trade

            "While all partners in the Uruguay round of multilateral trade
     negotiations have undertaken trade liberalization measures, many
     developing countries have adopted unilateral measures as well. 
     Liberalization efforts must be further deepened in all countries, taking
     into account the relevant internationally agreed provisions to address
     the special situations of developing countries.  

         "Economic cooperation and integration at the regional level are also
     important.  Intensified regional cooperation should not be pursued as an
     alternative to the global liberalization process but should contribute
     to an open and multilateral trading system. 


                                                                              
                         "D.  Debt and resource flows

            "Finding lasting solutions to the heavy debt burdens of the least
      developed countries is crucial in the fight against poverty.  Hope was
      expressed that a solution will be found as the World Bank and IMF
      continue their joint and ongoing efforts to bring the external debt
      problems of heavily indebted poor countries, including multilateral
      debt, to a sustainable level.

            "The provision of new and additional resources, both multilateral
      and bilateral, is required for achieving the commitments agreed to at
      recent major international conferences and summits.  The problem of
      declining official development assistance (ODA) has to be addressed
      urgently.  Adequate financial resources are required to enable
      international financial institutions to fulfil their mandate, and the
      recent disconcerting trends and developments in that area were noted.

           "Following the agreement on the replenishment of the International
      Development Association (IDA), the implementation of related commitments
      must be ensured.  Concern was expressed at the incomplete tenth
      replenishment of IDA and the prospects for the eleventh replenishment. 
      The IMF Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility has been established on
      a permanent basis; ways of financing it should be agreed upon as soon as
      possible.  A substantial increase in quotas is being considered in the
      IMF Eleventh General Review of Quotas.  Agreement on the broad outline
      of a new arrangement to double resources available under the General
      Arrangements to Borrow should be finalized and implemented.


                          "E.  Structural adjustment

          "Discussions have shown growing international consensus on the main
      elements of sound economic policies.  The proper design and effective
      implementation of structural adjustment programmes, which fully take
      into account the social dimension, remain a key challenge.  While recent
      improvement in growth in Africa suggests that well-designed structural
      adjustment programmes could restore growth, experience has vividly
      demonstrated that adjustment programmes must take into account the need
      to expand social investment, provide a social safety net and alleviate
      poverty.  Policies to protect social sectors should assure that the poor
      have a stronger say in designing plans and setting priorities.  Building
      Governments' capacities should be a priority as well as an appropriate
      role for civil society.  Efforts should be intensified to implement
      commitment 8 of the Copenhagen Declaration on Social Development  1/
      regarding structural adjustment programmes.


                    "F.  Cooperation and coordination within
                         the United Nations system

            "Progress has been made in the cooperation between the United
      Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions in a number of economic,
      social and environmental areas.  The United Nations System-wide Special
      Initiative on Africa and the inter-agency task forces of the
      Administrative Committee on Coordination (ACC) on the follow-up to major
      conferences, among others, provide useful avenues for enhanced
      cooperation between the Bretton Woods institutions and the rest of the
      United Nations system.  A call was made for developing further the
      cooperation between the United Nations system and the Bretton Woods
      institutions, and for both a closer policy dialogue at the
      intergovernmental level on global macroeconomic policy issues and
      promoting cooperation at the country level.  A number of speakers
      emphasized that strengthening the collaboration between the United
      Nations system and the Bretton Woods institutions should avoid, within
      the context of the United Nations operational system, new
      conditionalities and restrictive policies.  The ongoing reform of the
      multilateral financial institutions was noted.  The reform of UNCTAD, in
      particular the streamlining and simplification of its intergovernmental
      machinery and secretariat structure, and the clear, refocused and
      reinforced mandate given to it at its ninth session, were also welcomed.
      The need to explore ways to broaden and enhance coordination of monetary
      and financial institutions was emphasized.  

            "Many speakers noted that the high-level policy dialogue of the
      Council with heads of multilateral trade and financial institutions has
      proved to be very useful in facilitating discussion of international
      economic issues, including those arising from the process of
      globalization and liberalization.  Some participants suggested that the
      dialogue might gain from being more focused on selected themes. 
      Attention was drawn to the need to ensure that participation in the
      one-day policy dialogue should continue to be at the executive head
      level, as in previous years.  The President of the Council was
      encouraged to pursue this question with the parties concerned.


                          "G.  Drug abuse control

          "The need to integrate drug abuse control in the national and global
      policy agenda was emphasized.  A comprehensive and multidimensional
      approach to the problem is needed, with the effective involvement of all
      partners, including the international financial institutions.


          "II.  INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGAINST THE ILLICIT PRODUCTION,
                SALE, DEMAND, TRAFFIC AND DISTRIBUTION OF NARCOTICS AND
                PSYCHOTROPIC SUBSTANCES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

           "The report of the Secretary-General on international cooperation
      against the illicit production, sale, demand, traffic and distribution
      of narcotics and psychotropic substances and related activities
      (E/1996/57) provided the basic background documentation for the
      high-level segment debate.  The report provided a concise and
      comprehensive overview of the extent of drug trafficking and abuse
      worldwide, which was closely linked with the problems of organized crime
      and money laundering.  It emphasized the social and economic cost and
      consequences of drug abuse on society.  

           "The challenge posed to societies by drug abuse and illicit
      trafficking has many facets and dimensions:  it transcends national and
      geographical boundaries, affects different social and age groups, and
      stands at the crossroads of many social and economic issues.  Drug abuse
      has devastating social effects, including its harmful impact on youth,
      families, other social groups and the workplace, and adverse health
      consequences as well, including those resulting from the relationship
      between substance abuse and a number of major diseases and disorders and
      the spread of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency
      syndrome (HIV/AIDS).

         "From their activities and the laundering of their illicit proceeds,
      drug trafficking organizations derive sufficient economic power to
      undermine democratic institutions through corruption, and to distort
      economies through both the effects of the very large sums involved on
      financial systems and the takeover of legitimate businesses by drug
      traffickers.  There is a strong link among drug trafficking, money
      laundering, terrorism in all its forms, organized crime and traffic in
      arms, all of which are major threats to national and international
      security. 

           "The drug menace affects developed and developing countries alike. 
      The current trends and patterns of drug abuse and traffic have made
      difficult the categorization of countries as producer countries, transit
      States and consumer countries.

            "The scale of the problem calls for reaffirmation of the political
      will and the national commitment to concrete action, enhanced
      international cooperation founded on collective and shared
      responsibility, and international solidarity in the implementation of
      counter-strategies.  Initiatives to counter the drug problem should be
      undertaken with full respect for national sovereignty and territorial
      integrity.

            "A comprehensive, multidisciplinary and balanced approach to
      addressing the growing complexity of the drug phenomenon at the
      national, regional and international levels is an essential requirement.
      National drug strategies based on a balanced approach, whereby demand
      reduction and supply reduction are inseparable, mutually reinforcing
      elements of those strategies, are being increasingly adopted by
      Governments.  Prevention, treatment, and social rehabilitation measures
      must be an integral part of drug control strategies, as a complement to
      law enforcement measures targeting illicit traffic.

            "One of the prerequisites of closer cooperation in drug control is
      the universal ratification of the international drug control treaties: 
      the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961, the Convention on
      Psychotropic Substances of 1971 and the United Nations Convention
      against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances of
      1988.  The current drug control treaties and the Global Programme of
      Action adopted by the General Assembly at its seventeenth special
      session provide the necessary framework for international cooperation. 
      While these instruments can be fine-tuned, what is of paramount
      importance is the political will and the sustained commitment of
      Governments to ensure their effective implementation.  The adoption of
      strong domestic legislation and policies is an essential prerequisite of
      making full use of the opportunities for international cooperation
      provided by the international drug control treaties, particularly the
      1988 Convention.  During the high-level segment of the Economic and
      Social Council, Governments renewed their commitment to taking firm
      action along the lines of policies currently in place.

           "Legalization of the non-medical use of drugs was strongly opposed.
      Initiatives that diverge from the drug control policies of the
      international community undermine efforts to implement the drug control
      treaties.  It was recalled that throughout the world the overwhelming
      majority of young people have chosen not to use illicit drugs and that
      the population at large has repudiated illicit drugs.  

          "To make further progress in the implementation of the drug control
      instruments, it is important to take stock of measures taken by
      Governments, to gauge difficulties encountered in their implementation
      and to identify the areas where assistance is required.  This could be
      achieved through periodic reporting to the Commission on Narcotic Drugs
      on measures taken to further their implementation.  

           "It was considered important that Governments establish the
      necessary framework to ensure the coordination and coherence of action
      at the national level and establish comprehensive national drug control
      master plans promoted by the United Nations International Drug Control
      Programme (UNDCP) as a mechanism to ensure coordination in the
      implementation of drug control policies at the national level.

            "Several representatives informed the Council of measures taken by
      their Governments to fulfil their treaty obligations and counter the
      drug threat.  In that regard, new legislation had been adopted and penal
      codes amended to comply with the provisions of the international drug
      control treaties and facilitate the investigation and prosecuting of
      drug trafficking offences.  Regional and bilateral agreements and
      arrangements had been concluded to facilitate cooperation and strengthen
      the capacity of Governments to combat drug trafficking syndicates and
      counter cross-border traffic, money laundering and the diversion of
      precursors.  Several speakers outlined extensive demand reduction
      programmes to target domestic drug abuse problems and reported on
      successes that had been achieved in reducing demand.  The attention of
      the Council was drawn to a number of trends in drug abuse and
      trafficking, and several representatives stressed the problem of growing
      abuse of synthetic drugs with stimulant properties. 

           "Drug trafficking organizations are violent, brutal and ruthless
      with regard to those responsible for ensuring the enforcement of law and
      order.  Law enforcement officers should be provided with adequate
      specialized training to counter their operations.

           "Efforts to counter money laundering constitute an integral part of
      international drug control.  They are essential in order to target the
      economic power of drug traffickers and prevent the distorting effects on
      financial markets.  International action against money laundering should
      be enhanced through the full and effective implementation of the
      provisions on money laundering of the 1988 Convention, in particular
      article 5, and of the bilateral, regional and multilateral agreements or
      arrangements on money laundering.  A strong commitment by all
      Governments is required.  Some speakers suggested that consideration be
      given to the preparation of an international instrument on money
      laundering, while others emphasized the importance of implementing
      existing instruments.  It was suggested that a joint unit on money
      laundering could be established between UNDCP and the Crime Prevention
      and Criminal Justice Division of the Secretariat.  

           "It was essential for Governments to increase their efforts to
      reduce the production and supply of illicit drugs.  In this regard, it
      was emphasized that Governments should increase their efforts to prevent
      the diversion of precursors and essential chemicals frequently used in
      the illicit manufacture of illicit drugs, and strengthen international
      cooperation in this area, pursuant to article 12 of the 1988 Convention.
           
         "Alternative development programmes represent an essential component
      of international drug programmes.  UNDCP should play a catalytic role
      and consider providing seed money to initiate alternative development
      programmes.  Bilateral assistance agencies, programmes and funds of the
      United Nations system involved in providing technical assistance, as
      well as international financial institutions, should play a more active
      role in supporting alternative development programmes that accompany the
      elimination of drug crops.  Given the large expenditure required for
      alternative development, it is essential that there be complementarity
      and cooperation between the various agencies concerned.  Drug control
      activities should be included as an integral part of development
      strategies.  The commitment of the Government and the participation of
      the affected rural population in the decision-making process are also
      essential.

           "The need for a stronger effort to reduce demand for illicit drugs
      was stressed.  Civil society, including non-governmental organizations,
      should be mobilized to play a more active role in demand reduction,
      particularly in the field of primary prevention.  One of the important
      objectives was to increase awareness, particularly of children, youth
      and other vulnerable groups, to the risks of drug abuse.  Education
      among young people is crucial to demand reduction.

          "To give greater priority to demand reduction, a declaration on the
      guiding principles of illicit demand reduction was considered by several
      delegations to be important.  UNDCP was invited to continue to develop,
      as a matter of priority, the declaration on the guiding principles of
      reduction of illicit demand for drugs.  The declaration should serve to
      establish agreed principles, guidelines and common denominators
      acceptable to the international community.

          "The specialized agencies of the United Nations system, particularly
      the International Labour Organization, the United Nations Children's
      Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations
      Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the World Health
      Organization, had critical roles to play in reducing the illicit demand
      for drugs.  Particular reference was made to the importance of
      prevention through education programmes to protect youth and street
      children.  Demand reduction programmes should address the ethical and
      cultural dimensions of the problem in national educational policies and
      programmes. 

          "Many developing countries lacked the resources to implement fully
      the provisions of the international drug control treaties and apply law
      enforcement and control measures commensurate with the scale of the drug
      problem.  Drug abuse and trafficking constituted an additional burden
      which undermined their sustainable social and economic development. 
      UNDCP was invited to assist African States in the implementation of the
      Plan of Action on Drug Control Abuse and Illicit Drug Trafficking in
      Africa, to be adopted by the Organization of African Unity in July 1996.
      The ongoing efforts of UNDCP to include drug control elements in
      national development strategies as well as in international economic and
      social cooperation programmes were encouraged.  In that connection, it
      was stated that the international community should provide financial and
      technical assistance to developing countries.

           "Countries with economies in transition that have been adversely
      affected by the illicit traffic and drug abuse that provided organized
      criminal groups with the means to undermine the democratic process and
      hamper the emergence of a viable market economy also need to be assisted
      in their efforts to combat the drug menace.

           "Strong support was expressed for the regional and subregional
      approach of UNDCP which has been highly effective as a means to enhance
      cooperation and coordination of activities in drug control at the
      regional level, particularly in countering cross-border traffic.  UNDCP
      was invited to continue, as a priority, to support initiatives for
      closer regional and subregional cooperation.

            "As a centre of expertise, UNDCP should improve its capacity to
      collect and analyse data on the various aspects of the drug problem with
      a view to facilitating the provision of policy advice and assistance to
      Member States based on an assessment of the various aspects of the drug
      issue.  The development of the information management and analysis
      capacity of UNDCP was crucial to its leadership and coordination role
      within and outside the United Nations.  At the national level,
      Governments should improve their capacity to collect, analyse and
      disseminate data regarding the domestic drug problem.  National
      authorities should cooperate with UNDCP and the International Narcotics
      Control Board by responding to their requests for such information. 
      Some representatives referred to the country reports as the basis for
      reviewing the drug situation in the respective countries and stated that
      the evaluation of the drug situation and of measures to combat drugs
      should be limited to the United Nations bodies entrusted with evaluation
      responsibilities.

          "The United Nations system has a critical role to play in addressing
      the global threat of drug abuse and illicit traffic, particularly in the
      adoption and implementation of agreed standards and norms.  The drug
      issue should be a priority concern of all relevant United Nations
      agencies, programmes and funds, as well as of the international
      financial institutions.

          "The recent actions taken by the Administrative Committee on
      Coordination to ensure the increased commitment by specialized agencies,
      programmes and funds, as well as the international financial
      institutions, to include the drug dimension in their programmes of work
      were welcomed.

          "The United Nations System-wide Action Plan on Drug Abuse Control
      provides a vital tool for the coordination and enhancement of drug
      control activities within the system.  An increasing number of agencies
      in the United Nations system are now addressing the drug issue within
      their respective fields of competence.  Inter-agency coordination
      represents an important contribution to the fight against illicit drugs
      at the international level.  The coordinating functions of UNDCP at the
      policy and operational levels should be strengthened to ensure that the
      United Nations system can develop a concerted response to the drug
      problem.  Also essential is continued cooperation with the International
      Criminal Police Organization-Interpol, the Financial Action Task Force
      and other bodies outside the United Nations system with important
      functions in the fight against various aspects of the drug menace, as
      well as continued cooperation among those bodies.

           "The limited and reduced resources available to UNDCP from the
      United Nations regular budget were considered insufficient to meet the
      demands made on the Programme.  Dependence on a limited number of
      countries for voluntary contributions and a reduction in general purpose
      contributions have placed UNDCP in a vulnerable position.  UNDCP should
      be provided with adequate resources to fulfil its mandates and become a
      centre of excellence focusing on policies and their implementation.  In
      the short term, it is essential for more States to assume responsibility
      for the financial situation of UNDCP.  By providing it with resources
      commensurate with its mandate and exercising responsibility for its
      governance, they could demonstrate their commitment to UNDCP.

           "Strong support was expressed for the proposal emanating from the
      Commission on Narcotic Drugs concerning the convening of a special
      session of the General Assembly in 1998.  Such a session should serve to
      reaffirm the commitment to national and international drug control as a
      high priority and enable agreement to be reached on measures to
      strengthen international drug control on the basis of shared
      responsibility.  A number of Governments stated that it would also
      provide an occasion to consider measures to improve the functioning of
      the intergovernmental and technical bodies involved in international
      drug control.  Some speakers suggested that the Assembly could, on that
      occasion, give special attention to issues such as precursor control,
      abuse of and traffic in stimulants and their precursors, and the
      struggle against money laundering.  The active participation of all
      States and agencies in the preparation of the special session was
      considered essential to creating the political momentum and support that
      such a session required.  The high-level segment had contributed to its
      preparation and the Council could make a further contribution to the
      preparatory process.


                               "Conclusions

          "Some of the main conclusions emanating from the high-level segment
      are outlined below:

          "-  Confirmation of the high priority assigned by States to
              international drug control; determination to undertake
              concerted action at the multilateral level and ensure universal
              adherence to the international drug control treaties.

          "-  Reaffirmation of the commitment for drug control to remain one
              of the top priorities of the United Nations medium-term plan
              for the period 1998-2001.

          "-  Consideration of appropriate measures to improve the
              functioning of the intergovernmental and technical bodies
              involved in international drug control.

          "-  Reconfirmation of the leadership and coordination role of
              UNDCP, especially within the United Nations system; and
              provision to UNDCP of the resources required to fulfil its
              leadership and coordination function, as called for by the
              General Assembly.

          "-  Addressing drug control cooperation issues in the governing
              bodies of the agencies, programmes and funds of the United
              Nations system and the international financial institutions. 

          "-  Improvement and enhancement of the intergovernmental system for
              evaluating the implementation of the drug control instruments,
              with the support of Member States.

          "-  Mobilization and forging of strong partnerships with all actors
              of civil society, particularly non-governmental organizations,
              community-based organizations, sports associations and the
              private sector.

          "-  Practical implementation of the drug control instruments
              through the adoption of appropriate laws and the establishment
              of institutions for their enforcement at the national level,
              according to national policies and priorities.

          "-  Adoption of national drug control master plans, based on a
              balanced approach giving equal importance to measures to reduce
              the demand for and measures to reduce the supply of illicit
              drugs.

          "-  Adoption of appropriate mechanisms for coordination at the
              national level endowed with the necessary legal and political
              authority.

          "-  Encouragement of bilateral cooperation and multilateral
              agreements to combat drug trafficking and abuse.

          "-  Allocation at the national level of resources commensurate with
              the recognized dimension and gravity of the drug problem; and
              recognition of the need for international cooperation and
              assistance in this regard."


                                 Notes

1/  See Report of the World Summit for Social Development, Copenhagen,
6-12 March 1995 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.96.IV.8),
forthcoming, chap. I, resolution 1, annex I.


                              Chapter III

                           COORDINATION SEGMENT

                COORDINATION OF THE POLICIES AND ACTIVITIES OF
                THE SPECIALIZED AGENCIES AND OTHER BODIES OF  
                          THE UNITED NATIONS SYSTEM


                A.  Coordination of the United Nations system
                    activities for poverty eradication       

                                INTRODUCTION

1.          At its substantive session, the Council considered the question of
coordination of the United Nations system activities for poverty eradication
(agenda item 3 (a)) at its 18th to 23rd and 51st meetings from 1 to 3 and on
26 July 1996.  An account of the discussion is contained in the relevant
summary records (E/1996/SR.18-23 and 51).  The Council had before it the
following documents:

    (a)  Report of the twenty-ninth series of Joint Meetings of the Committee
for Programme and Coordination and the Administrative Committee on
Coordination, held on 16 October 1995 (E/1996/4 and Corr.1);

    (b)  Annual overview report of the Administrative Committee on
Coordination for 1995 (E/1996/18 and Add.1);

    (c)  Report of the Secretary-General on coordination of the policies and
activities of the specialized agencies and other bodies of the United Nations
system related to the following theme:  coordination of United Nations system
activities for poverty eradication (E/1996/61).


                       ACTION TAKEN BY THE COUNCIL

2.  At the 51st meeting, on 26 July 1996, the Vice-President of the Council,
Mr. Gerhard Henze (Germany), introduced the draft agreed conclusions
E/1996/L.30 on coordination of the United Nations system activities for
poverty eradication, and orally revised the text.  The Council then adopted
the draft agreed conclusions.  The text read as follows:


                        Agreed conclusions 1996/1

     "1.  The Economic and Social Council takes note with appreciation of the
     report of the Secretary-General on the coordination of United Nations
     system activities for poverty eradication (E/1996/61) and of the
     recommendations it contains to assist in the formulation of coordinated
     United Nations support for national poverty eradication activities.

     "2.  The international community reached a consensus and committed itself
     to the goal of poverty eradication at the major United Nations
     conferences and summits of the 1990s, as an ethical, social, political
     and economic imperative.  The World Summit for Social Development
     adopted a global and comprehensive approach, outlined a broad range of
     measures aimed at eradicating poverty and called upon Governments to
     formulate integrated poverty eradication strategies, including time-
     bound goals and targets in their national context.  While the United
     Nations system has an essential and complementary role to play in
     supporting Governments in their efforts to eradicate poverty, the
     primary responsibility for the assessment of poverty situations and for
     the formulation, strengthening and implementation of national poverty
     eradication plans and programmes lies with Governments and requires a
     strong political commitment at the national level.  The implementation
     of the global commitments by the international community is also
     required since not only is poverty a national problem but it also has
     origins in the international environment.  

     "3.  The problem of poverty exists in all countries, but with varying
     degrees of intensity.

     "4.  Poverty has various causes, including structural ones.  Poverty is a
     complex, multidimensional problem with origins in both the national and
     international domains.  No uniform solution can be found for global
     application.  Rather, country-specific programmes to tackle poverty and
     international efforts supporting national efforts, as well as the
     parallel process of creating a supportive international environment, are
     crucial for a solution to this problem.  Poverty is inseparably linked
     to a lack of control over resources, including land, skills, knowledge,
     capital and social connections.  Without those resources, people are
     easily neglected by policy makers and have limited access to
     institutions, markets, employment, and public services.  The eradication
     of poverty cannot be accomplished through anti-poverty programmes alone
     but will require democratic participation, and changes in economic
     structures in order to ensure access for all to resources, opportunities
     and public services, to undertake policies geared to more equitable
     distribution of wealth and income, to implement social protection for
     those who cannot support themselves, and to assist people confronted
     with unforeseen catastrophe, whether individual or collective, natural,
     social or technological.

     "5.  The Economic and Social Council recognizes that the goal of poverty
     eradication represents a major challenge for the United Nations system,
     owing to its importance as a global objective.  The United Nations
     system has an important role to play in the overall effort for poverty
     eradication and in assisting Member States in translating the global
     goals and commitments of the international conferences and the statutory
     mandates of each organization into concrete actions and activities at
     all levels.  Given the variety of the mandates and activities of
     organizations of the United Nations system in the area of poverty
     eradication, harmonization and coordination among those that intervene
     in the struggle to eradicate poverty are crucial.  The participation of
     the United Nations system, including United Nations funds, programmes
     and specialized agencies, in the overall efforts of poverty eradication
     is aimed at assisting Member States in translating the global goals and
     commitments of the international conferences into concrete actions,
     especially at the country level.


             "I.  COORDINATED UNITED NATIONS SUPPORT AND AVAILABILITY
                  OF RESOURCES FOR POVERTY ERADICATION ACTIVITIES AT
                  THE FIELD LEVEL

              "A.  Definition of a poverty eradication strategy

     "6.  There is no single best strategy for poverty eradication, and
     strategies differ from one country to another.  It is the primary
     responsibility of the Government of each country to conduct an
     assessment of its own poverty situation and define its own poverty
     eradication strategy.  The participation of civil society, including
     people living in poverty, the empowerment of local communities, and a
     genuine feeling of ownership by the Government and local communities are
     essential for poverty eradication strategies.  The United Nations system
     has an essential and complementary role to play in supporting the
     Government in this area, providing assistance to the Government where
     requested and orienting its support activities according to the
     priorities and development objectives pursued by the Government through
     collaborative exercises, such as the country strategy note (CSN), when
     the Government intends to apply this mechanism, or other existing
     coordination mechanisms where the CSN is not applied.


                        "B.  Resources for poverty eradication

     "7.  There has been a decline in concessional resources for multilateral
     development institutions, which makes it more difficult for them to
     respond to the massive challenge of assisting countries in poverty
     eradication.  In this context, particular concern was expressed at the
     incomplete fulfilment of commitments to the tenth replenishment of the
     International Development Association (IDA) and it was hoped that
     adequate resources would be available for the eleventh replenishment. 
     While it is the primary responsibility of the Government to mobilize
     resources for poverty eradication at the national level, the need for a
     substantial increase in resources for operational activities for
     development on a predictable, continuous and assured basis, commensurate
     with the increasing needs of developing countries, is recognized - as is
     the need to enhance the effectiveness, efficiency and impact of the
     activities of the United Nations system in the area of poverty
     eradication.  The quality and effectiveness of the use of resources are
     as important as the quantity of resources for poverty eradication.  Ways
     of securing predictable, continuous and assured funding should be
     explored, in particular in the context of the agreement reached by the
     General Assembly in its resolution 50/227.  

     "8.  There is an urgent need to strive for the fulfilment of the agreed
     target of 0.7 per cent of the gross national product (GNP) of the
     developed countries for official development assistance (ODA) as soon as
     possible.  Mobilization of substantial new and additional resources from
     all sources, domestic and international, public and private, and from
     traditional and new sources would also be instrumental.  New ways of
     generating new public and private financial resources, inter alia,
     through the appropriate reduction of excessive military expenditures,
     including global military expenditures and the arms trade, and
     investments for arms production and acquisition, taking into
     consideration national security requirements, so as to allow possible
     allocation of additional funds for social and economic development,
     including poverty eradication, should be explored.  In the budgetary
     process, transparency and accountability should be ensured in the use of
     public resources, and priority should be given to providing and
     improving basic social services.  The Programme of Action of the World
     Summit for Social Development  1/ called upon interested developed
     and developing country partners to agree on a mutual commitment to
     allocate, on average, 20 per cent of ODA and 20 per cent of the national
     budget, respectively, to basic social programmes.  The Council takes
     note of the work that interested countries have undertaken in developing
     and operationalizing the 20/20 concept, most recently at meetings that
     led to the adoption of the Oslo Consensus on 20/20 (A/51/140, annex).

               "C.  Commitment to coordination of poverty eradication
                    activities

     "9.  In order to fulfil its supporting role, the United Nations system
     must actively pursue a coordinated and integrated approach - both at
     Headquarters and in the field, and between Headquarters and the field -
     to the implementation of the outcome of the recent conferences, which
     have all given priority to the goal of poverty eradication.  In
     accordance with the mandates of the organizations of the United Nations
     system and the policies defined by the executive boards, the executive
     heads of all the organizations of the United Nations system should
     ensure that their country-level representatives are fully committed to
     poverty eradication activities, to promoting joint action by the United
     Nations system and to participating in the resident coordinator system,
     including appropriate field-level committees and task forces, taking
     into account the complementarities and strengths of each organization. 

                       "D.  Common country assessment

     "10. The organizations of the United Nations system should assist the
     Government upon request, through collective efforts made within the
     resident coordinator system, in preparing, under the leadership of the
     Government, an assessment of the poverty situation in the country as the
     basis for a country-specific poverty eradication strategy, taking
     account of the work carried out by the country itself in social
     development assessment according to the Programme of Action of the World
     Summit for Social Development.  All the specialized agencies and related
     organizations of the United Nations system are invited to strengthen and
     adjust their activities, programmes and medium-term strategies, as
     appropriate, to take into account the follow-up to the World Summit for
     Social Development.  The common country assessment suggested by the
     Joint Consultative Group on Policy should be extended to the United
     Nations system, and integrated into the process for the formulation of
     the CSN, where appropriate and in agreement with the Government.  All
     joint efforts in information collection, research and analysis should
     take into account the statistical work on poverty measurement and other
     poverty indicators that has been carried out at the national level by
     countries themselves.

     "11. A common system-wide approach to support for monitoring by national
     Governments and assessing the achievement of goals and targets agreed to
     in international forums in the area of poverty should be developed under
     the auspices of the Administrative Committee on Coordination (ACC),
     bearing in mind the need to avoid duplication of effort.  Reporting from
     the United Nations system that would elaborate on issues that need to be
     addressed in relation to the implementation of paragraph 29 of the
     Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social Development, which
     deals with monitoring and assessment by Governments, would be useful.

              "E.  Increase of national capacity to develop indicators
                   and assess data

     "12. The United Nations system should provide technical cooperation and
     other forms of assistance to the developing countries, in particular in
     Africa and the least developed countries, in implementing the
     recommendations of the recent major conferences and summits, as
     appropriate, in particular the Copenhagen Declaration on Social
     Development  2/ and Programme of Action of the World Summit for
     Social Development.  The United Nations system should also consider and
     provide appropriate technical cooperation and other forms of assistance
     to the countries with economies in transition.  Upon the request of the
     Government, the United Nations system should provide assistance in
     further developing and sustaining national capacity to gather and
     analyse information and to develop indicators for poverty analysis.  The
     capacity of the United Nations system in this area should be fully
     utilized in formulating guidelines to develop definitions, indicators
     and instruments for impact assessment and for monitoring poverty
     programmes, including gender-sensitive indicators, in accordance with
     the outcomes of major recent conferences and summits with a view to
     assisting countries in those areas.  ACC is requested to ensure
     coordination in this area and active steps should be taken to avoid
     duplication.


                            "F.  Gender analysis

     "13. The United Nations system should integrate the gender perspective
     into the formulation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of
     policies and programmes on poverty eradication and pay particular
     attention to the collection of gender-disaggregated data.


                       "G.  Country strategy note (CSN)

     "14. The overall coordination of the poverty eradication activities of
     the United Nations system at the country level should take into account
     the CSN when Governments intend to apply this mechanism, which remains a
     voluntary initiative of recipient countries that should be formulated by
     interested recipient countries in accordance with their development
     plans and priorities, with the assistance of and in cooperation with the
     United Nations system.  

     "15. In countries where the CSN is either not yet available or not
     pursued, the United Nations system should, with the consent of the
     national Government, work through existing coordination mechanisms in
     support of national poverty eradication plans and programmes.  

     "16. Poverty eradication activities are a high priority of the United
      Nations system and should be supported and coordinated through the
      resident coordinator system.  Country coordination of the poverty
      eradication activities of the organizations of the United Nations system
      requires that those organizations actively participate in the resident
      coordinator system.  The resident coordinator system should play its
      role in full collaboration and consultation with the Government, taking
      into account that the ultimate responsibility of coordination in the
      country is that of the Government.  The Government has also the primary
      responsibility in priority-setting.

      "17. In accordance with national plans and priorities, United Nations
      agencies, funds, programmes and bodies represented at the field level
      should, through the resident coordinator system and under the leadership
      and facilitation of the resident coordinator, actively work towards
      expanding and improving coordination and promote United Nations joint
      activities related, as appropriate, to the formulation, implementation,
      monitoring and evaluation of poverty eradication activities.  In order
      to promote coordination and a better division of labour, special efforts
      must be made to ensure that resident coordinators, at the earliest
      possible stage of formulation, are informed of planned poverty programme
      activities and other relevant activities of the United Nations agencies,
      funds, programmes and bodies.


                        "H.  Field-level committee

      "18. The field-level committee should review all major programmes and
      projects of the United Nations system, sectoral strategies and
      evaluation exercises in the area of poverty eradication in order to
      ensure their complementarity, provide guidance and advice on proposals
      for new initiatives, and facilitate the identification of programmes and
      projects for possible complementary financing and coordinated
      implementation, on the understanding that the results of the review
      carried out by the committee should be submitted to national Governments
      for final approval through the national focal points.  The field-level
      committee should also promote the dialogue between the United Nations
      system and the Government, including other relevant stakeholders, for
      effective coordination of poverty eradication initiatives at the country
      level.


                             "I.  Thematic groups

      "19. The organizations of the United Nations system should promote the
      establishment of ad hoc thematic groups, with the joint participation of
      United Nations system officials and government authorities, in order to
      launch initiatives and debate on poverty eradication, and to promote
      appropriate measures to ensure that goals are actively pursued.  Under
      the overall leadership of the Government, greater use could be made of
      thematic groups and other informal forums at the field level to enhance
      the dialogue between Governments and all relevant development partners,
      including bilateral and multilateral donors and civil society, including
      non-governmental organizations.


                          "J.  Programme approach

      "20. In order to achieve effective integration with national poverty
      eradication programmes defined along cross-sectoral lines, extended use
      should be made of the programme approach modality, under the leadership
      of the recipient Government.  The programme approach should also be
      followed at the sectoral level, particularly in those sectors that have
      the greatest impact on people living in poverty, who should be empowered
      by Governments to participate in the design and implementation of
      programmes.


                  "K.  Cooperation with the Bretton Woods institutions

      "21. High priority should be devoted to strengthening the collaboration
      between the United Nations system and the Bretton Woods institutions in
      the areas of social and economic development at all levels, taking into
      account that such strengthening should preserve the fundamental
      characteristics of the operational activities of the United Nations
      system on poverty eradication activities in line with General Assembly
      resolution 50/120, including their universal, voluntary and grant
      nature, their neutrality and their multilateralism.  If the Government
      concerned so desires, consideration should be given to achieving greater
      complementarity between the policy framework papers and country
      assistance strategies on the one hand, and the CSN, where it exists, on
      the other, so that coordination for the implementation of poverty
      eradication strategies could be enhanced.

      "22. A clear agreement should be reached with all relevant institutions
      to suitably use round-table meetings and consultative group meetings for
      the coordination of poverty eradication activities, to the extent
      possible, in a consistent development strategy.  Cooperation between the
      United Nations Development Programme and the World Bank in the
      preparation, discussion and follow-up to round-table meetings and
      consultative groups should be strengthened, as appropriate.


                       "L.  Inter-agency coordination efforts

      "23. In the overall context of poverty eradication, the Council takes
      note of the work of ACC in promoting the implementation of outcomes of
      major global conferences in an integrated and thematic manner.  It
      supports the approach to coordinated effort adopted in the creation of
      the ad hoc inter-agency task forces on the follow-up to conferences,
      which should take into account the mandates emanating from
      intergovernmental processes.  The results of the work of the ad hoc task
      forces as well as the inter-agency committees, including the
      Inter-Agency Committee on Sustainable Development and the Inter-Agency
      Committee on Women, should be reported through ACC to the Council in the
      context of the consideration of poverty eradication and other future
      theme(s) in the coordination segment and to its functional commissions
      within their respective mandates.  These inter-agency efforts should
      also promote coherent support by the United Nations system on economic
      and social policy at the national level and produce clear guidelines for
      implementation by the resident coordinator system and other interested
      parties for the operationalization of programmes and platforms for
      action.  Such inter-agency coordination efforts should maintain the
      fundamental characteristics of the operational activities of the United
      Nations system as spelt out in paragraph 21 above.

      "24. Close and organic linkages should be drawn between inter-agency
      task forces and the rest of the ACC machinery as well as between
      relevant Secretariat departments responsible for policy design and the
      funds and programmes.  Duplication should be avoided in the work of the
      task forces, particularly on the development of indicators, by ensuring
      a coherent approach under the auspices of ACC.  Other ongoing work
      should also be taken into account, particularly the work being done in
      developing countries.  All task forces should apply a gender perspective
      to their own work.

      "25. The Task Force on an Enabling Environment for Social and Economic
      Development with the World Bank as its lead agency should focus on all
      aspects of the relevant chapter of the Programme of Action of the World
      Summit for Social Development, including the national and international
      environments, as well as the results of other related recent United
      Nations conferences.  It should reflect the contributions of all
      relevant agencies, funds and programmes of the United Nations system: 
      United Nations, United Nations Children's Fund, United Nations
      Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Development
      Programme, United Nations Population Fund, United Nations International
      Drug Control Programme, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner
      for Refugees, International Labour Organization, United Nations
      Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, International Civil
      Aviation Organization, World Health Organization, International Monetary
      Fund, United Nations Industrial Development Organization, International
      Atomic Energy Agency and United Nations Development Fund for Women.  The
      work of the Task Force on Employment and Sustainable Livelihoods, with
      the International Labour Organization as its lead agency, should
      contribute to poverty eradication, inter alia, by promoting more
      coordinated and effective programmes to generate productive employment. 
      The Economic and Social Council would welcome broader dissemination of
      the report of ACC, which should be discussed and considered by the
      Council.

      "26. The United Nations System-wide Special Initiative on Africa is
      complementary to the United Nations New Agenda for the Development of
      Africa in the 1990s  3/ and is also designed to facilitate its
      implementation and the implementation of the outcomes of major United
      Nations conferences as they relate to Africa.  The Special Initiative
      might also become an impetus for the implementation of all elements of
      the New Agenda, including the mobilization of adequate resources, and
      should be considered in the context of the mid-term review of the
      implementation of the New Agenda.


               "II.  MAINSTREAMING THE GENDER PERSPECTIVE IN UNITED
                     NATIONS ACTIVITIES FOR POVERTY ERADICATION

      "27. In recent years, the number of women living in poverty has
      increased disproportionately to the number of men, particularly in the
      developing countries.  Women, moreover, are affected by poverty in a
      number of distinctive ways, and face particular obstacles, including
      discrimination, in seeking to overcome it.  Failure to fully integrate a
      gender perspective in the design and implementation of poverty
      eradication programmes will prevent those programmes from achieving
      their goals.

      "28. Practical steps should be undertaken to integrate the gender
      perspective, first, into the coordinated follow-up to major United
      Nations conferences and summits and, second, in all activities and
      documentation on poverty eradication, especially in connection with the
      International Year for the Eradication of Poverty and the forthcoming
      first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty.  This should
      include, in accordance with the final outcomes of recent major
      conferences and summits:

          "(a)  A conscious and cohesive effort by the United Nations system,
      including the Bretton Woods institutions, to promote an active and
      visible policy of mainstreaming a gender perspective in the formulation
      and implementation of both macroeconomic and micro-economic policies,
      and of all programmes aimed at poverty eradication;

           "(b)        Regular exchange of information and experience, and
      collaboration, among United Nations organizations concerned with poverty
      eradication, as well as between these organizations and those concerned
      more specifically with women;

            "(c)    Use of data disaggregated by sex in research, analysis and
            monitoring;

            "(d)  Review of existing statistical indicators from a gender
            perspective and an elaboration of consistent and standardized
            indicators capable of measuring the extent to which the gender
            dimension is present in activities, taking into account the work
            carried out by different countries, in particular by developing
            countries, in statistical work on poverty measurement and other
            poverty indicators;

            "(e)  Gender impact analysis of the design and implementation of
            policies and programmes;

            "(f)  Integration of a gender perspective into the monitoring and
            evaluation of results, especially with respect to operational
            activities;

            "(g)  Dissemination of information on the mainstreaming of a
            gender perspective on a regular basis and in a standardized form; 

            "(h)  To this end, placing of greater emphasis on the need to
            provide appropriate training on gender issues to United Nations
            personnel, including personnel at the field level.  

            "29. Efforts should be made to increase the participation of women
            in activities relating to the design, planning, implementation and
            monitoring of United Nations policies and programmes on poverty
            eradication.  More specifically, the gender perspective should be
            fully integrated, and the participation of women should be
            ensured, in the United Nations activities related to the
            eradication of poverty in the context of the coordinated follow-up
            to major United Nations conferences and summits and in all
            activities relevant to poverty eradication, including the
            International Year for the Eradication of Poverty and the
            forthcoming first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of
            Poverty.  It is also necessary to incorporate a coherent method of
            including both the mainstreaming of the gender perspective and
            specific programmes to achieve equality between men and women in
            the operational activities aimed at poverty eradication, and
            related staffing and decision-making spheres of the system.

            "30. Close collaboration should be established between focal
            points in all units of the Secretariat related to poverty and
            women/gender units in order to reduce duplication and overlap in
            the mainstreaming of a gender perspective as well as to develop a
            coherent approach consistent with their mandates.  Greater
            coherence is needed in the joint efforts for information
            collecting, research, analysis and operational activities.  

            "31. The Council should ensure that its future monitoring of
            United  Nations system activities in poverty eradication reflects
            a gender perspective.  The system-wide medium-term plan for the
            advancement of women, 1996-2001, together with the comments of the
            Commission on the Status of Women, the Committee for Programme and
            Coordination and other relevant bodies, should be linked to these
            efforts of mainstreaming a gender perspective into policies and
            programmes in the area of poverty eradication and should serve as
            a general framework for the coordination of system-wide efforts
            for the advancement of women, including those aimed at eradicating
            poverty among women.

            "32. The Council welcomes the creation of the recent ACC
            Inter-Agency Committee on Women, which will address the
            cross-cutting nature of gender issues.  Effective mechanisms
            should be put in place by the organizations of the United Nations
            system to enable the Inter-Agency Committee to fulfil its task of
            advising ACC on how to ensure effective coordination and
            cooperation of the United Nations system in the
            implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action  4/ as well as
            in the mainstreaming of a gender perspective.  The Council should
            be informed regularly about the work of the Committee.

            "33. The United Nations resident coordinators, the field-level
            committees and the thematic working groups, where they exist, must
            be fully sensitized, including through appropriate training on
            gender issues, to the need to integrate a gender perspective into
            the design and implementation of activities aimed at assisting
            national efforts to combat poverty.


                "III.  A HARMONIZED AND INTEGRATED APPROACH TO
                       INTERGOVERNMENTAL CONSIDERATION OF     
                       POVERTY ERADICATION                    

            "34. In view of its complex and multidimensional nature, the goal
            of poverty eradication requires consideration in many forums
            within the United Nations system.  It must be ensured that
            intergovernmental consideration is harmonized in order to achieve
            coherent outcomes, and that it covers the different dimensions and
            aspects of poverty in a complementary way.  A more structured and
            action-oriented intergovernmental dialogue on poverty eradication
            within the Council and its subsidiary machinery, taking into
            account other forums, in particular policy-making organs of
            specialized agencies, should contribute to ensuring a more
            coherent set of policy guidelines for the United Nations system
            and more focused support by the Council to the General Assembly.  

            "35. Within the context of the relevant provisions of the Charter
            of the United Nations, the specific roles of the General Assembly,
            the Council and functional commissions in the context of poverty
            eradication must be clearly identified to avoid duplication of
            discussions.  The Assembly should establish the broad policy
            framework.  The Council should provide overall guidance and
            coordination to the United Nations system, focus attention on
            major policy issues that require a prioritized and
            coordinated response from the United Nations system as a whole,
            integrate the work of its functional commissions and support the
            Assembly in its policy guidance role.  Functional commissions have
            been assigned, inter alia, specific responsibilities for follow-up
            to and review of the implementation of commitments made at recent
            major United Nations conferences within their own fields of
            competence.


              "A.  Strengthening the role of the Economic and Social
                   Council in providing an integrated approach to
                   poverty eradication

            "36. The Economic and Social Council is the central
            intergovernmental mechanism for coordinating integrated and
            comprehensive activities of the United Nations system in the field
            of poverty eradication.  It will focus on the provision of
            comprehensive guidelines and coordination of the work of other
            organs to ensure a multidimensional, integrated and
            gender-sensitive approach to poverty eradication in accordance
            with, inter alia, the provisions of the Programme of Action of the
            World Summit for Social Development, the Platform for Action,
            adopted by the Fourth World Conference on Women, and General
            Assembly resolution 50/227.  In its consideration of cross-cutting
            elements common to major international conferences, and its
            overall review of the implementation of the programme of action of
            a United Nations conference, the Council will give due priority to
            poverty eradication. 

            "37. The Council will carry out an overall review of the theme of
            poverty eradication at a date to be determined, as a contribution
            to the review of the outcome of the World Summit for Social
            Development.  In accordance with their programmes of work as
            approved by the Council, the relevant functional commissions
            should, in 1999-2000, prepare technical and focused inputs for the
            Council's overall review of poverty eradication. 

            "38. The report of ACC and the results of the work of the ad hoc
            inter-agency task forces and inter-agency standing committees
            established by ACC for follow-up to conferences as they pertain to
            poverty eradication should be reviewed during the coordination
            segment when the Council considers poverty eradication.  Other
            aspects of the ACC report should be considered during the general
            segment under the appropriate agenda items.  


                          "B.  Functional commissions

            "39. In accordance with the agreed conclusions adopted at its
            substantive session of 1995,  5/ the Council shall ensure, on a
            continuing basis, coordination of the items of the multi-year
            programmes of the functional commissions related to poverty
            eradication and a better division of labour among them, based on
            their respective mandates.

            "40. As the functional commission with the primary responsibility
            for the follow-up to and review of the implementation of the World
            Summit for Social Development, the Commission for Social
            Development, in support of the Council's function, should provide
            an integrated approach to national and international poverty
            eradication strategies and other areas covered by its mandate. 
            Ongoing efforts to enhance the role of the Commission for Social
            Development and to improve its functioning in the context of the
            follow-up to the Summit, should be pursued and deepened, based,
            inter alia, on the recommendations and decisions
            adopted at the 1996 special session of the Commission.  Adequate
            Secretariat support to the Commission should be ensured.  Task
            managers should be identified for specific issues, so as to
            involve more closely the concerned specialized agencies and other
            parts of the United Nations system in supporting the work of the
            Commission.

            "41. The other relevant functional commissions have valuable
            contributions to make in addressing poverty eradication from their
            particular perspective and within their own mandate, while
            avoiding unnecessary duplication and overlap, and should focus on 
            the linkages between their own field of competence and poverty
            eradication.  This should be done as set out below.

            "42. The Commission on Sustainable Development should focus its
            work related to poverty in accordance with paragraph 6 of its
            decision 4/2 on combating poverty.  6/  The Commission on
            Sustainable Development should rely on inputs from the Commission
            for Social Development, the Commission on the Status of Women and
            the Commission on Population and Development, as necessary, in
            order to enhance the implementation of those recommendations of 
            chapter 3 (Combating poverty) of Agenda 21  7/ that correspond to
            core areas of the World Summit for Social Development, the Fourth
            World Conference on Women and the International 
            Conference on Population and Development, respectively.

            "43. The Commission on the Status of Women has a special role to
            play in intergovernmental consideration of poverty eradication. 
            While assisting the Council in reviewing and appraising progress
            in and promoting the inclusion of a gender perspective in policies
            and programmes of other functional commissions and system wide,
            the Commission on the Status of Women, in its discussion on
            poverty, should continue to focus on women in poverty.  The
            Commission on the Status of Women should play a
            catalytic role in reviewing and promoting the follow-up to the
            recommendations on gender equality and women's empowerment in the
            context of poverty eradication of the International Conference on
            Population and Development, the Fourth World Conference on Women,
            the World Summit for Social Development, the United Nations
            Conference on Environment and Development and other conferences. 
            The Commission for Social Development should draw upon the work of
            the Commission on the Status of Women in the evaluation of
            measures adopted by the Summit that relate to various aspects of
            gender equality.

            "44. The Commission on the Status of Women should determine, in
            consultation with other functional commissions, the best way to
            cooperate in reviewing the implementation of the Beijing Platform
            for Action in their respective areas in general, and under poverty
            in particular.  Relevant functional commissions should consider
            having in their agendas a review of the gender implications of
            policies falling under their competence.  

            "45. The Commission on Human Rights, in the context of its work on
            poverty, should focus on the relationship between all human
            rights, including the right to development, and poverty, notably
            extreme poverty.  In this context, it should make the maximum use
            of relevant work of other commissions and the Council.  The
            Commission on Human Rights could consider providing an input to
            the Commission on the Status of Women on ensuring women's equal
            enjoyment of their human rights, in particular those relating to
            economic resources.  

            "46. The Commission on Population and Development should address
            issues relating to poverty and population in the context of the
            outcome of the International Conference on Population and
            Development.

            "47. The Commission on Science and Technology for Development
            should continue to take into account the relationship between
            science and technology and poverty eradication and the
            contribution of advances in science and technology to poverty
            eradication and meeting the basic needs of all, subject to any
            changes that may be required, taking into account the review of
            the role and working methods of the Commission and its
            relationship with other bodies in the context of the
            implementation of General Assembly resolution 50/227.  

            "48. The Commission on Narcotic Drugs and the Commission on Crime
            Prevention and Criminal Justice should provide appropriate inputs
            into the consideration of poverty-related issues by the Commission
            for Social Development, notably in its discussion of social
            integration and participation of all people, scheduled for 1998,
            and into other relevant functional commissions as appropriate.

            "49. The mechanisms established by ACC for the follow-up to
            conferences should support the work of functional commissions on
            poverty-related issues within their mandates and priorities, and
            the executive boards of funds and programmes should become more
            closely involved with their work.  The work of the newly created
            Inter-Agency Committee on Women should complement and reinforce
            the work of the Commission on the Status of Women.

            "50. Other commissions, committees and expert bodies of the
            Council should also contribute, as appropriate, to the work of the
            functional commissions with responsibilities for specific aspects
            of poverty eradication.


               "C.  Consideration of common themes by the functional
                    commissions or by the Council

            "51. The Economic and Social Council should discuss issues of the
            enabling national and international environment in the economic,
            social and related fields, including the mobilization of
            resources.  The functional commissions should focus their
            consideration of those issues, as they relate to poverty
            eradication, on aspects that fall within their 
            respective areas of competence.  The Council will contribute to
            the preparation of the General Assembly review on the theme of
            poverty eradication, with inputs from all functional commissions
            in their respective areas, as part of its consideration of the
            enabling environment.


                      "1.  Integrated national strategies for
                           poverty eradication

            "52. The elaboration of integrated strategies against poverty
            falls primarily within the responsibility and competence of Member
            States. The Commission for Social Development should foster an
            exchange of national experiences in the formulation and
            implementation of poverty eradication strategies, plans,
            programmes and priorities, and take these into account in
            formulating its views.  The Commission for Social 
            Development should present its views on this matter when it
            reports to the Council on its review of the outcome of the World
            Summit for Social Development.


                 "2.  Basic social services as a crucial instrument
                      for poverty eradication

            "53. The Commission for Social Development will examine the theme
            of 'Social services for all' in 1999 in the context of its
            multi-year programme of work with particular focus on education. 
            This examination could also serve as an input into the overall
            review of the International Conference on Population and
            Development in 1999. The Commission on Population and Development
            will not need to conduct a separate discussion of education but
            should continue to examine education and awareness programmes
            targeted at population objectives.

            "54. Other functional commissions should contribute, as
            appropriate, to the examination of this theme by the Commission
            for Social Development through the provision of focused inputs. 
            For example, the Commission for Social Development could draw upon
            the work of the Commission on Human Rights on the promotion and
            protection of human rights. Similarly, it could draw upon the work
            of the Commission on Sustainable Development concerning
            environmental health and safe drinking water and sanitation. 
            Also, the Commission for Social Development could draw upon
            the work of the Commission on Population and Development on access
            to health care, including reproductive health care, and on the
            work of the Commission on the Status of Women on the theme of
            education.

            "55. The Commission for Social Development, in cooperation with
            the relevant specialized agencies and United Nations
            organizations, should assist the Council in reviewing the
            achievement of goals and targets set by the United Nations
            Conference on Environment and Development, the International
            Conference on Population and Development, the Fourth World
            Conference on Women and the World Summit for Social Development in
            the areas of child and maternal health, basic education, and other
            areas of basic social services, in the effort to combat poverty,
            drawing upon the work undertaken by other bodies in charge of
            promoting and reviewing the implementation of these targets for
            other conference follow-up.  Promoting and reviewing the
            implementation of the targets in the area of shelter and urban
            infrastructure could be left to the Commission on Human
            Settlements and those in the area of water and sanitation to
            the Commission on Sustainable Development.

                                                                              
                                "3.  Productive employment

            "56. The Commission for Social Development will examine productive
            employment and sustainable livelihoods in 1997.  When dealing with
            the sub-theme of 'Improving access to productive resources and
            infrastructure', the Commission should focus on measures that
            increase such access by people living in poverty.  The Commission
            for Social Development should build on the work to be undertaken
            by the Commission on the Status of Women in 1997 on 'Women and the
            economy' and by the Commission on Sustainable Development on
            environmentally related aspects of employment.  The work of the
            ACC Inter-Agency Task Force on Employment and Sustainable
            Livelihoods should be fully taken into account in the preparations
            for the discussions in the Commission for Social Development.


              "4.  Vulnerability, social integration and participation
                   of people living in poverty

            "57. The Commission for Social Development has an important role
            concerning the issue of measures for vulnerable groups and social
            protection, as well as participation.  It is to carry out an
            overall review of the theme of promoting social integration and
            participation of all people in 1998.  The Commission for Social
            Development, in preparing for and addressing this theme, should
            take into account the relevant parts of the results of other major
            conferences and follow-up work being undertaken by the relevant
            commissions as well as by relevant inter-agency bodies.  All
            relevant functional commissions, including the Commission on Human
            Rights and the Commission on the Status of Women, as well as the
            Commission on Human Settlements, should provide inputs to
            this examination.

                                                                              
                                   "5.  Statistics

            "58. The Council encourages the Statistical Commission to pursue
            its work on the statistical implications of the World Summit for
            Social Development and other recent major international
            conferences.  Close links should be developed between its work and
            the ongoing elaboration of sustainable development indicators,
            including the work of ACC and its subsidiary machinery.  The
            Statistical Commission is invited to share the results of the work
            of the Expert Group on Poverty Statistics and the report on the
            seminar to be held on poverty statistics as inputs for 
            the Commission for Social Development and the Council for the
            review of recommendations of chapter II (Eradication of poverty)
            of the Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social
            Development.  The Statistical Commission should also provide an
            input to the Commission on the Status of Women for its review of
            the implementation of the recommendations on poverty measurement
            made by the Fourth World Conference on Women.  The
            Statistical Commission should also provide inputs to other
            relevant functional commissions on the recommendations on poverty
            measurement made by various United Nations conferences and
            summits.  ACC should fully support this work.  Duplication should
            be avoided in the work of commissions related to the issue of
            poverty measurement.  In the work related to developing indicators
            of social development, the work carried out by different
            countries, in particular developing countries, should
            be taken into account.  The capacity of the United Nations system
            for providing policy and technical support and advice, upon
            request, to improve national capacities in this regard, should
            also be strengthened."

                  B.  Implementation of the agreed conclusions of the
                      1995 coordination segment of the Council

                                                                              
                                   INTRODUCTION

3.         The Council considered the question of the implementation of the
agreed conclusions of the 1995 coordination segment of the Council (agenda
item 3 (b)) at its 23rd, 31st, 35th, 47th, 51st and 52nd meetings, on 3, 11,
16, 24 and 26 July 1996.  An account of the discussion is contained in the
relevant summary records (E/1996/SR.23, 31, 35, 47, 51 and 52).  The Council
had before it the report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of the
agreed conclusions on the theme of the 1995 coordination segment of the
Council relating to coordinated follow-up by the United Nations system and
implementation of the results of the major international conferences organized
by the United Nations in the economic, social and related fields (E/1996/59).
                                                                              

                          ACTION TAKEN BY THE COUNCIL

4.         Under agenda item 3 (b), the Council adopted two resolutions.

                                                                              
                                 Resolutions

             1996/36.  Follow-up to the major international United Nations
                       conferences and summits, including the
                       implementation of their respective programmes of
                       action

           The Economic and Social Council,

           Recalling General Assembly resolution 45/264 of 13 May 1991, on
restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in the economic, social
and related fields, and Assembly resolutions 46/235 of 13 April 1992, 48/162
of 20 December 1993 and 50/227 of 24 May 1996, on further measures for the
restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in the economic, social
and related fields,

           Recalling also its agreed conclusions 1995/1 on coordinated
follow-up by the United Nations system and implementation of the results of
the major international conferences organized by the United Nations in the
economic, social and related fields,  8/

           Recognizing the efforts made by the Secretary-General through the
Administrative Committee on Coordination for establishing coordinating
inter-agency mechanisms in support of the follow-up of the major international
conferences and summits, including the implementation of their respective
programmes of action,

           Taking note of the report of the Secretary-General entitled
"Coordination of the policies and activities of the specialized agencies and
other bodies of the United Nations system:  implementation of the agreed
conclusions on the theme of the 1995 coordination segment of the Council",  9/

           1.         Decides that the Council shall continue to ensure, on a
regular basis, the harmonization and coordination of the multi-year work
programmes of relevant functional commissions by promoting a clear division of
labour among them and providing clear policy guidance to them;

           2.         Invites the Administrative Committee on Coordination to
take into consideration the decisions, resolutions and agreed conclusions of
the Council and its functional commissions as the basis for inter-agency
follow-up of the major United Nations conferences in the economic, social and
related fields, including the selection of cross-cutting themes for its work;

           3.         Also invites the Administrative Committee on
Coordination to present the reports on the work of its task forces on an
enabling environment for economic and social development, basic social
services for all, and employment and sustainable livelihoods, as well as
inter-agency committees on sustainable development and women and gender
equality to the substantive session of 1997 of the Council and to identify
policy and coordination issues to be addressed by the Council and the General
Assembly;

           4.         Further invites the Administrative Committee on
Coordination to consider specific areas to enhance system-wide coordination in
the themes identified for the coordination segment of the Council and to bring
system-wide coordination issues to the attention of the Council and to make
recommendations thereon;

           5.         Calls upon all relevant organizations of the United
Nations system to integrate the results of the major international conferences
in the economic, social and related fields into their programmes of work and
to contribute relevant information, analyses and assessments to the
consolidated report of the Secretary-General in support of the Council's own
thematic reviews;

           6.         Requests the Secretary-General, in accordance with
agreed conclusions 1995/1, to present reports in a timely manner and in a
concise format, clearly identifying the issues and outlining options for
action and their implications in order to facilitate decision-making by the
Council and its subsidiary bodies;

           7.         Reiterates the importance of the provisions on
mobilization of resources contained in agreed conclusions 1995/1 8/ for the
effective implementation of the results of the major international conferences
in the economic, social and related fields.
                                                                              
                                                   51st plenary meeting
                                                           26 July 1996


              1996/41.  Follow-up to General Assembly resolution 50/227:
                        initiation of reviews

           Recalling General Assembly resolutions 45/264 of 13 May 1991,
46/235 of 13 April 1992, 48/162 of 20 December 1993 and 50/227 of 24 May 1996,
as well as Council agreed conclusions 1995/1  10/ and Council decision
1996/203 of 9 February 1996,

           Reaffirming the role assigned to the Council in the implementation
of General Assembly resolution 50/227,

           Conscious of the specific call made by the General Assembly for
relevant intergovernmental bodies to fully implement the measures contained in
its resolution 50/227,

           Noting that, according to paragraph 67 of annex I to General
Assembly resolution 50/227, the Council should regularly review the agenda of
its general segment,

           Noting also that, pursuant to paragraph 70 of annex I to General of
Assembly resolution 50/227, the Council is to undertake a review of the
mandates, composition, functions and working methods of its functional
commissions and expert groups and bodies,

           Recalling General Assembly resolution 50/113 of 20 December 1995,
in which the Assembly mandated the special session of the Assembly, scheduled
in June 1997, to review, inter alia, the future role of the Commission on
Sustainable Development, including its relationship with the United Nations
Environment Programme,

           Noting that, pursuant to paragraph 71 of annex I to General
Assembly resolution 50/227, the Council should consider, as a matter of
priority, the role, working methods and relationship with other bodies of the
Commission on Science and Technology for Development, the Committee for
Development Planning, the Committee on New and Renewable Sources of Energy and
on Energy for Development, and the Committee on Natural Resources,

           Taking into consideration that, in accordance with paragraphs 74
and 75 of annex I to General Assembly resolution 50/227, the Council should
provide for the review of the regional commissions with a view to
strengthening and enhancing their effectiveness,

           Noting that the globalization and interdependence that characterize
the world economy have greatly increased the tasks of the regional commissions
in their role of assisting their Member States to cope with opportunities and 
challenges as well as risks,

           Noting also that the agreements and commitments adopted at the
recent United Nations conferences have further compounded the tasks of the
regional commissions in assisting Member States in implementing such
agreements and commitments,

           Noting with satisfaction the efforts undertaken by a number of
regional commissions to initiate a significant reform process, including the
setting of priorities based on a dialogue with their intergovernmental bodies,

           1.         Decides to consider as a matter of priority, at its
resumed substantive session to be held before the end of 1996, the possible
changes in and/or adjustments to its agenda with a view to ensuring that all
issues included in General Assembly resolution 50/227 will be examined by the
Council;
                                                                              

                               A.  General segment

           2. Also decides to consider, also as a matter of priority, at the
resumed substantive session, a review of the agenda of the Council's general
segment in accordance with paragraph 67 of annex I to General Assembly
resolution 50/227;


                B. Functional commissions and expert groups and bodies

           3. Reaffirms that the review of the mandates, composition,functions
and working methods of its functional commissions and expert groups and bodies
should be completed by the fifty-second session of the General Assembly;

           4.         Requests the Secretary-General to prepare a
comprehensive document compiling information on the mandates, composition,
functions and working methods of the functional commissions and expert groups
and bodies and to submit it to the Council not later than February 1997;

           5.         Decides to begin consideration during its substantive
session of 1997 of the role, working methods and relationship with other
bodies of the Commission on Science and Technology for Development, the
Committee for Development Planning, the Committee on New and Renewable Sources
of Energy and on Energy for Development, and the Committee on Natural
Resources;

           6.         Requests the President of the Council to establish
arrangements for informal open-ended consultations during the Council's
substantive session of 1997 in order to better prepare for further work of the
Council on this issue;

           7.         Decides to include in the provisional agenda of its
substantive session of 1997 an item entitled "Implementation of General
Assembly resolution 50/227";

           8.         Also decides to further consider the review of the
functional commissions and expert groups and bodies comprehensively during a
resumed substantive session in the fall of 1997 and to take decisions at that
time;
                                                                              

                           C.  Regional commissions

           9.         Requests the regional commissions to continue
undertaking their own reviews, as called for in General Assembly resolution
50/227, and to report to the Council at its substantive session of 1997;

           10.        Reaffirms the need for the above-mentioned reviews and
reform processes currently being undertaken by the regional commissions to be
carried out, aiming at improving the effectiveness and efficiency of these
bodies by eliminating unnecessary duplication or overlapping of work and by
ensuring a better structural relationship among themselves and with the
Council;

           11.        Decides that the Council will take a decision at its
substantive session of 1997 concerning further action on how to achieve the
objectives set out in paragraphs 74 and 75 of annex I to General Assembly
resolution 50/227, taking into account the above-mentioned reviews.
                                                                              
                                                                              
                                                52nd plenary meeting
                                                        26 July 1996


                                  PROCEEDINGS

Follow-up to General Assembly resolution 50/227:  initiation of reviews

5.         At the 31st meeting, on 11 July, the representative of Canada on
behalf also of Norway,  11/ and the Russian Federation introduced a draft
resolution (E/1996/L.21) entitled "Follow-up to General Assembly resolution
50/227:  initiation of reviews", which read as follows:

                      "The Economic and Social Council,

                      "Recalling General Assembly resolutions 45/264 of 13 May
           1991 and 46/235 of 13 April 1992, Economic and Social Council
           decision 1996/203 of 9 February 1996, the implementation of the
           agreed conclusions 1995/1, and the pertinent measures called for in
           Assembly resolution 50/227 of 24 May 1996,

                      "Conscious of the specific call made by the General
           Assembly for relevant intergovernmental bodies to fully implement
           the measures contained in its resolution 50/227,

                      "Reaffirming the central role assigned to the Economic
           and Social Council in the implementation of Assembly resolution
           50/227,

                      "Noting, in particular, the requirements for the Council
           to review the mandates, composition, functions and working methods
           of its functional commissions and expert groups and bodies, to
           consider as a matter of priority the role, working methods and
           relationship with other bodies of the Commission on Science and
           Technology for Development, the Committee for Development Planning,
           the Committee on New and Renewable Sources of Energy, and the
           Committee on Natural Resources, and to provide for the review of
           the regional commissions with a view to strengthening and enhancing
           their effectiveness, 

                    "Recognizing the potential contribution of the Council's
           review of the four bodies mentioned above to the review of the
           implementation of Agenda 21 to be conducted by the General Assembly
           at its special session of 1997,

                      "Noting with satisfaction the internal reviews already
           under way in a number of regional commissions,


                     "A.  Functional commissions and expert groups and bodies

                      "1.         Decides to convene a resumed session of the
           Economic and Social Council for five days in early 1997 to consider
           the role, working methods and relationship with other bodies in the
           Commission on Science and Technology for Development, the Committee
           for Development Planning, the Committee on New and Renewable
           Sources of Energy and Energy for Development, and the Committee on
           Natural Resources;

                      "2.         Requests the Secretary-General, in order
           that the Council may properly prepare for the resumed session, to
           submit, no later than 1 January 1997, a report on the role, working
           methods and relationship with other bodies of the four bodies
           mentioned above, identifying, inter alia:

                      "(a)          The principal outputs and/or products
           emanating from each body;

                      "(b)          The other functional commissions and/or
           expert groups and bodies that make use of those outputs;

                      "(c)          Other forums within the United Nations
           system in which similar issues are discussed;

                      "(d)          The issues in each body's purview that
           require an intergovernmental or expert contribution, and the nature
           of that contribution;

                      "(e)          The source of expert and secretariat
           support for each body;

                      "3.         Resolves to take any further decisions that
           may be required on the matter of the four bodies mentioned above at
           its substantive session of 1997;

                      "4.         Decides to include in the provisional agenda
           of its substantive session of 1997 the sub-item entitled 'Review of
           the mandates, composition, functions and working methods of
           functional commissions and expert groups and bodies';
                                                                              

                                    "B.  Regional commissions

                      "5.         Reaffirms the need to provide for a review
           of the regional commissions with a view to strengthening and
           enhancing their effectiveness as action-oriented and
           policy-oriented bodies;

                      "6.         Requests the executive secretaries of the
           regional commissions to undertake and/or complete internal reviews,
           including priorities for management and functional assessments, and
           to report to the Council at its substantive session of 1997;

                      "7.         Requests the Secretary-General to prepare a
           report, drawing on the internal reviews of the regional
           commissions, in order that the Council may properly prepare for its
           substantive session of 1997;

                      "8.         Decides to include in the provisional agenda
           of its substantive session of 1997 the sub-item entitled 'Review of
           the regional commissions'."

6.         At the 52nd meeting, on 26 July, the Council had before it the text
of the draft resolution (subsequently issued in document E/1996/L.50) entitled
"Follow-up to General Assembly resolution 50/227:  initiation of reviews"
which was submitted by the Vice-President of the Council, Mr. Karel Kovanda
(Czech Republic) on the basis of informal consultations held on draft
resolution E/1996/L.21.

7.         At the same meeting, the Secretary of the Council read out a
statement of the programme budget implications of draft resolution
E/1996/L.50.

8.         The Council then adopted the draft resolution.  See Council
resolution 1996/41 (para. 4 above).

9.         In the light of the adoption of draft resolution E/1966/L.50, draft
resolution E/l996/L.21 was withdrawn by its sponsors.

10.        After the adoption of the draft resolution, statements were made by
the representatives of Canada, Ireland (on behalf of the States Members of the
United Nations that are members of the European Union), the United States of
America and Costa Rica (on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations
that are members of the Group of 77 and China) and the observer for Algeria.

Strengthening collaboration between the United Nations development system and
the Bretton Woods institutions

11.        At the 35th meeting, on 16 July, the representative of the United
States of America introduced a draft resolution (E/1996/L.22) entitled
"Strengthening collaboration between the United Nations development system and
the Bretton Woods institutions".  The draft resolution was considered under
item 4 (b) (see chap. IV below, paras. 10-13).

Implementation of and follow-up to the major international United Nations
conferences and summits

12.        At the 47th meeting, on 24 July, the representative of Costa Rica
(on behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the
Group of 77 and China) introduced a draft resolution (E/1996/L.39) entitled
"Implementation of and follow-up to the major international United Nations
conferences and summits", which read as follows:

                      "The Economic and Social Council,

                      "Recalling General Assembly resolution 45/264 of 13 May
           1991, on restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in
           the economic, social and related fields, and resolutions 48/162 of
           20 December 1993 and 50/227 of 2 July 1996, on further measures for
           the restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in the
           economic, social and related fields,

                      "Recalling also its agreed conclusions 1995/1 on
           coordinated follow-up by the United Nations system and
           implementation of the results of the major international
           conferences organized by the United Nations in the
           economic, social and related fields,

                      "Recognizing the efforts made by the United Nations
           Secretariat through the Administrative Committee on Coordination
           for establishing a coordinating inter-agency mechanism in support
           of the implementation and follow-up of the major international
           conferences and summits, 

                      "Taking note of the report of the Secretary-General
           entitled 'Coordination of the policies and activities of the
           specialized agencies and other bodies of the United Nations system:
           implementation of the agreed conclusions on the theme of the 1995
           coordination segment of the Council',  12/

                      "Noting with regret the continued decline in official
           development assistance devoted to the implementation and follow-up
           of the major international conferences organized by the United
           Nations in the economic, social and related fields,

                      "1.         Reaffirms its decision to adopt a multi-year
           programme of work for the integrated follow-up to and the
           coordinated implementation of the major international conferences
           organized by the United Nations in the economic, social and related
           fields, taking into account the multi-year programmes of work
           adopted by the functional commissions;

                      "2.         Requests the Secretary-General to present a
           report to the 1997 substantive session of the Council, containing
           an analysis of the multi-year programmes of work of the relevant
           functional commissions, along with recommendations for better
           harmonizing and coordinating their respective multi-year work
           programmes with that of the annual substantive session of the
           Council;

                      "3.         Invites the Administrative Committee on
           Coordination to take into consideration the decisions, resolutions
           and agreed conclusions of the Council and its subsidiary bodies in
           the selection of cross-cutting themes as the basis for inter-agency
           follow-up of the major United Nations conferences in the economic,
           social and related fields;

                      "4.         Invites also the Administrative Committee on
           Coordination to present the report of its task forces on an
           enabling environment for economic and social development, basic
           social services for all, employment and sustainable livelihoods,
           and women to the substantive session of the Council in 1997 and to
           identify policy and coordination issues to be addressed by the
           Council and the General Assembly;

                      "5.         Calls upon all organizations of the United
           Nations system to integrate the results of the major international
           conferences in the economic, social and related fields into their
           programmes of work and to contribute relevant information, analyses
           and assessments to the consolidated report of the Secretary-General
           in support of the Council's own thematic reviews;

                      "6.         Requests the Secretary-General, in
           accordance with agreed conclusions 1995/1, to present reports in a
           timely manner and in a concise format, clearly identifying the
           issues and outlining options for action and their implications in
           order to facilitate decision-making by the Council and its
           subsidiary bodies;

                      "7.         Urges all member States to honour their
           commitments, particularly with respect to the provision of adequate
           resources, to ensure full implementation of the results of the
           major international conferences in the economic, social and related
           fields and to continue considering the vital issue of mobilizing
           new and additional resources, including new and innovative sources
           of financing, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the
           programmes of action of the major international conferences;

                      "8.         Urges also all member States and the United
           Nations system to facilitate transfer of technology to developing
           countries on concessional and preferential terms so as to enable
           them to meet the agreed goals and targets of the international
           conferences."

13.        At the 51st meeting, on 26 July, the Vice-President of the Council,
Mr. Gerhard Henze (Germany), introduced a draft resolution (E/1996/L.43)
entitled "Follow-up to the major international United Nations conferences and
summits, including the implementation of their respective programmes of
action", submitted on the basis of informal consultations held on draft
resolution E/1996/L.39.

14.        At the same meeting, the Council adopted draft resolution
E/1996/L.43.  See Council resolution 1996/36 (para. 4 above).

15.        In the light of the adoption of draft resolution E/1996/L.43, draft
resolution E/1996/L.39 was withdrawn by its sponsors.

16.        After the adoption of the draft resolution, the representative of
Canada made a statement.
                                                                              

                                        Notes

1/   Report of the World Summit for Social Development, Copenhagen,
6-12 March 1995 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.96.IV.8) forthcoming,
chap. I, resolution 1, annex II.

2/   Ibid., annex I.

3/   General Assembly resolution 46/151, annex, sect. II.

4/   Report of the Fourth World Conference on Women, Beijing,
4-15 September 1995 (A/CONF.177/20 and Add.1), chap. I, resolution 1,
annex II.

5/   See A/50/3, chap. III, para. 22.

6/   See Official Records of the Economic and Social Council, 1996,
Supplement No. 8 (E/1996/28), chap. I, sect. C, decision 4/2.

7/   Report of the United Nations Conference on Environment and
Development, Rio de Janeiro, 3-14 June 1992, vol. I, Resolutions Adopted by
the Conference (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.93.I.8 and
corrigendum), resolution 1, annex II.

8/   See A/50/3, chap. III, para. 22.

9/   E/1996/59.

10/  See A/50/3, chap. III, para. 22.

11/  In accordance with rule 72 of the rules of procedure of the Economic
and Social Council.

12/  E/1996/59.
                                                                              

                                    Chapter IV

                                                                             
                           OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES SEGMENT
                                                                    
                  OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES OF THE UNITED NATIONS FOR
                        INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION


1.          At its substantive session, the Council considered the question of
operational activities of the United Nations for international development
cooperation (agenda item 4).  At the 26th and 27th meetings, on 9 July 1996,
it held an informal dialogue with the United Nations system country teams from
Egypt and Malawi.  An account of the Council's discussion is contained in the
relevant summary records (E/1996/SR.26 and 27).


           A.  Follow-up to policy recommendations of the General Assembly

2.          At its substantive session, the Council considered the question of
follow-up to policy recommendations of the General Assembly (agenda item 4
(a)) at its 24th, 25th, 29th and 52nd meetings, on 8, 10 and 26 July 1996.  An
account of the discussion is contained in the relevant summary records
(E/1996/SR.24, 25, 29 and 52).  The Council had before it the following
documents:

     (a)  Note by the Secretary-General drawing the attention of the Council
to the report of the Joint Inspection Unit entitled "United Nations system
common premises and services in the field" contained in document A/49/629
(E/1996/43);

     (b)  Comments of the Administrative Committee on Coordination on the
report of the Joint Inspection Unit contained in document A/49/629
(A/51/124-E/1996/44);

     (c)  Report of the Secretary-General on progress in the implementation of
General Assembly resolution 50/120 (E/1996/64);

     (d)   Note by the Secretary-General on comprehensive statistical data on
operational activities for development for the year 1994 (E/1996/64/Add.2 and
Corr.1 and 2).

                                                                              
                       ACTION TAKEN BY THE COMMITTEE

3.          Under agenda item 4 (a), the Council adopted one resolution and
one decision.
                                                                              

                                  Resolution

          1996/42.  Progress on the implementation of General Assembly
                    resolution 50/120

            The Economic and Social Council,

            Recalling General Assembly resolutions 44/211 of 22 December 1989,
46/219 of 20 December 1991, 47/199 of 22 December 1992 and 50/120 of 20
December 1995, in which the Assembly invited the Council, at its substantive
session of 1996, to consider, inter alia, the issues of harmonization and
administrative services, common premises and monitoring and evaluation, on the
basis of progress reports by the Secretary-General, including appropriate
recommendations,

            Recalling also General Assembly resolutions 48/162 of 20 December
1993 and 50/227 of 24 May 1996,

            Having considered the report of the Secretary-General on progress
on the implementation of General Assembly resolution 50/120 on the triennial
policy review of operational activities for development of the United Nations
system, and on the management process for implementation requested in
paragraph 52 of Assembly resolution 50/120,  1/

    1.   Welcomes the report of the Secretary-General; 1/

    2.   Strongly reaffirms that the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of
the operational activities of the United Nations system must be enhanced by,
inter alia, a substantial increase in their funding on a predictable,
continuous and assured basis, commensurate with the increasing needs of
developing countries, as well as through the full implementation of General
Assembly resolutions 47/199, 48/162, 50/120 and 50/227;

     3.  Reaffirms the need for simplification and harmonization of rules and
procedures in order to increase the overall effectiveness, efficiency and
impact of the operational activities for international development of the
United Nations development system, as well as the need to facilitate and
increase national execution, bearing in mind the need not to overburden the
host Government; to this end, the United Nations development system is
requested to report to the Economic and Social Council at its substantive
session of 1997 on progress made towards the following:

     (a)  Improving the definition and guidelines for the programme approach,
bearing in mind the need to further simplify and harmonize procedures and to
allow sufficient flexibility for their application at the field level;

     (b)  Promoting a common understanding of capacity-building concepts and
their operationalization, as well as on ways of enhancing the sustainability
of capacity-building;

     (c)  Facilitating and increasing synergies between the activities of the
funds and programmes of the United Nations system through the use of
harmonized and synchronized programming and, as far as possible, enhancing
collaboration in all areas of programming, including evaluations and mid-term
reviews;

     (d)  Developing and implementing an agreed methodology to establish
common country databases in consultation with national Governments;

     4.  Urges the funds and programmes of the United Nations system to
finalize work on the harmonization of their budget presentations in time for a
final decision to be made by their respective executive boards in advance of
the biennium 1998-1999, and to include in this work a common presentational
framework for the budget based on agreed definitions and usage of budget terms
and the identification of additional steps required for further harmonization
and improved transparency;

     5.  Emphasizes the need to accelerate efforts to complete a common
manual based both on a building-block approach and on a need to integrate and
clarify existing guidelines, including the operationalization of the outcomes
of the recent series of major United Nations conferences;

     6.  Expresses concern at the lack of progress made towards the use of
common administrative services and requests the funds and programmes of the
United Nations system, with due concern given to effectiveness, efficiency and
the impact of their activities, to:

     (a)  Simplify and harmonize administrative and financial procedures in a
systematic way and at all levels, so that common administrative services can
be established where feasible;

     (b)  Work towards increased delegation of decision-making authority and
accountability to the country level and, where appropriate, the regional
level, and their harmonization among funds and programmes;

     (c)  Set measurable targets and time-frames for the achievement of common
administrative services, including the identification of priority areas for
enhanced efforts, such as telecommunications, and financial and personnel-
related services;

     (d)  Develop guidelines on how to establish and operate a common services
account;

     7.  Reaffirms the need to raise the target for common premises on a
case-by-case basis, taking into account cost-benefit analysis and operational
sustainability, using lessons learned during the implementation of this
request and avoiding an increased burden on host countries; requests the funds
and programmes of the United Nations system to develop a plan of action,
administrative arrangements and a time-frame for the implementation of this
request; and encourages the United Nations specialized agencies and regional
offices to share those common premises where practicable;

     8.  Stresses the importance of strengthening the monitoring and
evaluation activities of the United Nations development system; also stresses
the significance of promoting at the country level, under the leadership of
Governments, close monitoring and evaluation collaboration among national
Governments, the United Nations development system and relevant development
partners and, in this context, reiterates the need for the United Nations
development system to support, when requested by Governments, the
strengthening of national evaluation capacities; and requests that joint
evaluations of operational activities, including thematic evaluations and
coordinated programme reviews, be undertaken, making the fullest possible use
of national capacity in this area;

    9.  Reaffirms the need for the United Nations development system to
increase its consideration and application of lessons learned from monitoring
and evaluation activities, and calls for a system-wide effort to monitor and
report on the frequency and quality of programmed and completed evaluations,
the identification and use of lessons learned, and the number of joint
evaluations planned and undertaken;

   10.  Requests the Secretary-General to ensure that the Economic and
Social Council and the governing bodies of individual funds and programmes and
specialized agencies are provided with information on evaluation activities
that is quantifiable and comparable, and that specifies an evaluation's type,
coverage, scope, timing, and compliance;

   11.  Urges all funds, programmes and agencies of the United Nations
development system to identify measurable targets to strengthen their
monitoring and evaluation capabilities, to incorporate those targets into
their respective management plans to implement General Assembly resolution
50/120 and to intensify their cooperation in the development of monitoring and
evaluation methodologies;

   12. Requests the Secretary-General, in his progress report on the
implementation of General Assembly resolution 50/120, for submission to the
Economic and Social Council at its substantive session of 1997, to consider,
inter alia, capacity-building, field- and regional-level coordination and
resources; and also requests the Secretary-General, in the context of field-
and regional-level coordination, to highlight the problems encountered, make
appropriate recommendations and discuss the functioning of thematic groups and
field-level committees, and, in regard to resources, to include an analytical
assessment of the implications on operational activities for development of
the recent trends in core and non-core resources and to make recommendations
on how to increase core resources and effectively implement section I of
annex I to Assembly resolution 50/227.
                                                                              

                                                                              
                                                    52nd plenary meeting
                                                            26 July 1996


                                       Decision

            1996/227.  Reports considered by the Economic and Social
                       Council in connection with the question of
                       follow-up to policy recommendations of the
                       General Assembly

            At its 29th plenary meeting, on 10 July 1996, the Economic and
Social Council took note of the following documents:

     (a)  Note by the Secretary-General drawing the attention of the Council
to the report of the Joint Inspection Unit entitled "United Nations system
common premises and services in the field" contained in document A/49/629;  2/

     (b)  Comments of the Administrative Committee on Coordination on the
report of the Joint Inspection Unit contained in document A/49/629.  3/


                            PROCEEDINGS

Progress on the implementation of General Assembly resolution 50/120

4.          At the 52nd meeting, on 26 July, the Council had before it a draft
resolution (E/1996/L.45) entitled "Progress on the implementation of General
Assembly resolution 50/120", submitted by the delegation of Canada.

5.          At the same meeting, the Vice-President of the Council, Mr. Karel
Kovanda (Czech Republic), informed the Council of the results of informal
consultations held on the draft resolution and orally revised the text as
follows:

     (a)  The third preambular paragraph was converted into an operative
paragraph (operative paragraph 2), and the words "from all sources", which
followed the words "a substantial increase in their funding", were deleted;

     (b)  In operative paragraph 12, the words "decline in core resources,
where this has occurred, and of the increase in non-core resources, where this
has occurred; and further requests the Secretary-General to make
recommendations on how best to implement" were replaced by the words "recent
trends in core and non-core resources and to make recommendations on how to
increase core resources and effectively implement".

6.          Also at the 52nd meeting, the Council adopted draft resolution
E/1996/L.45, as orally revised.  See Council resolution 1996/42 (para. 3
above).


             B.  Coordination of activities on a system-wide basis:
                 strengthening collaboration between the United
                 Nations development system and the Bretton Woods
                 institutions in the areas of social and economic
                 development at all levels, including the field
                 level

7.          At its substantive session, the Council considered the question of
coordination of activities on a system-wide basis:  strengthening
collaboration between the United Nations development system and the Bretton
Woods institutions in the areas of social and economic development at all
levels, including the field level (agenda item 4 (b)), at its 16th to 18th,
31st, 35th and 52nd meetings, on 28 June and 1, 11, 16 and 26 July 1996.  An
account of the discussion is contained in the relevant summary records
(E/1994/SR.16-18, 31, 35 and 52).  The Council had before it a note by the
Secretariat on the coordination of activities on a system-wide basis: 
strengthening collaboration between the United Nations development system and
the Bretton Woods institutions in the areas of social and economic development
at all levels, including the field level (E/1996/72 and Corr.1).


                          ACTION TAKEN BY THE COUNCIL

8.          Under agenda item 4 (b), the Council adopted one resolution.


                                    Resolution

            1996/43.  Strengthening collaboration between the United
                      Nations development system and the Bretton
                      Woods institutions

            The Economic and Social Council,

            Recalling General Assembly resolutions 50/120 of 20 December 1995
on the triennial policy review of operational activities for development of
the United Nations system and 50/227 of 24 May 1996 on further measures for
the restructuring and revitalization of the United Nations in the economic,
social and related fields,

            Recognizing the importance of strengthening the collaboration
between the United Nations development system and the Bretton Woods
institutions at the intergovernmental, intersecretariat and country levels,

            Recognizing also the importance of joint initiatives between the
United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions in coordinating efforts for
the implementation and follow-up of the commitments of the major United
Nations international conferences and summits,

            Reaffirming that the recipient Government should play a leading
role in the overall coordination of collaboration at the country level,

            Concerned about the potentially serious impact on development of
the decline in resources allocated to the operational activities for
development of the United Nations system,

            Concerned also about the incomplete fulfilment of commitments to
the tenth replenishment of the International Development Association, and
hoping that adequate resources will be made available for the eleventh
replenishment,

            Taking into account the ongoing deliberation on an agenda for
development in which issues relating to the strengthening of the relationship
between the United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions are being
addressed,

            Recalling Chapters IX and X of the Charter of the United Nations,
with particular reference to the provisions setting forth the powers and
functions of the Economic and Social Council with respect to making
recommendations and coordinating United Nations system activities within the
scope of its competence,

            Reaffirming the importance of strengthening cooperation,
communication and collaboration between the Council and its relevant
subsidiary bodies, on the one hand, and the Bretton Woods institutions, on the
other, in order to maximize the effectiveness of their respective development
programmes and activities,

            Noting the need to improve the Council's high-level sessions with
the international financial and trade institutions by better preparing for and
focusing the high-level dialogue, thereby advancing such cooperation,
communication and collaboration and enhancing the quality, outcomes and value
of the exchange of views,

     1.  Takes note of the note by the Secretariat on the coordination of
activities on a system-wide basis:  strengthening collaboration between the
United Nations development system and the Bretton Woods institutions in the
areas of social and economic development at all levels, including the field
level;  4/

     2.  Considers that the strengthening of collaboration between the United
Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions requires an integrated approach,
encompassing a closer policy dialogue at the intergovernmental level on
relevant areas of international development policy issues, taking into account
their respective competencies;

     3.   Looks forward to the report and accompanying recommendations to be
prepared jointly by the United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions in
accordance with paragraph 86 of annex I to General Assembly resolution 50/227,
on an early exploratory review to assess mechanisms, programmes and
relationships at the field, headquarters and intergovernmental levels, with a
view to identifying areas in which communication, cooperation and coordination
could be improved;

     4.  Recommends the scheduling of a high-level special meeting at a time
proximate to the semi-annual meetings of the Bretton Woods institutions with a
view to benefiting, to the extent possible, from ministerial participation and
from the participation of heads of financial and trade institutions and other
relevant organizations, as called for by the General Assembly in paragraph 88
of annex I to its resolution 50/227;

     5.  Requests the Secretary-General to consult the heads of the financial
institutions by early 1997 in order to explore the possibilities and practical
modalities of scheduling such a meeting; at a session of the Council to be
held in early 1997, the Council should discuss the format, timing and possible
agenda for the first such meeting;

     6.  Decides to explore concrete modalities for strengthening the
exchange of information on development issues between the United Nations and
the Bretton Woods institutions;

     7.  Also decides that, prior to the annual high-level policy dialogue
between the Council and the international financial and trade institutions,
and allowing sufficient time for preparation, the Secretariat should
communicate to the financial and trade institutions a report on the relevant
issues to be discussed at the session, with a primary focus on the agreed
theme; and that communication should be prepared in part based on the
submission of issues and questions that Member States could be invited to
suggest to the Secretariat, which would then be taken into account in the
preparation of the Secretariat's report to the institutions;

     8.  Recommends, in order to better focus the policy dialogue, exploring
the possibility of having joint reports prepared by the Secretariat of the
United Nations, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the
Bretton Woods institutions and the World Trade Organization;

     9.  Invites the financial and trade institutions participating in the
high-level segment of the Council in 1997 to furnish relevant reports and
studies on the selected theme, within their respective mandates and areas of
expertise, and on important developments in the world economy and in
international economic cooperation;

    10.  Invites the Bretton Woods institutions to strengthen their
cooperation with the United Nations Secretariat on issues falling within their
respective competencies, such as multilateral external debt, challenges and
opportunities of global financial integration and financing for development;

    11.  Decides to encourage cooperative working relations between the
relevant units of the Bretton Woods institutions and the regional commissions,
including, inter alia, improved arrangements for data collection and
information exchange;

    12.  Also decides that full implementation of existing agreements, the
strengthening of existing mechanisms and the exploration of new avenues and
mechanisms of cooperation between the Bretton Woods institutions and other
bodies of the United Nations system should be encouraged and undertaken within
the framework provided by the resolutions of the General Assembly and the
Economic and Social Council through, inter alia, participation in relevant
meetings, information-gathering, information exchange, research, policy
analysis and operational activities;

    13. Stresses that the recipient Government should play a leading role in
the overall coordination of the collaboration between the United Nations and
the Bretton Woods institutions at the country level and that this
collaboration should be on the basis of country-driven activities;

    14.  Also stresses that the fundamental characteristics of the
operational activities of the United Nations system should be, inter alia,
their universal, voluntary and grant nature, their neutrality and their
multilateralism, as well as their ability to respond to the needs of
developing countries in a flexible manner; and the operational activities of
the United Nations system should be carried out for the benefit of the
developing countries, at the request of those countries and in accordance with
their own policies and priorities for development.  The United Nations
development system should take into account the specific needs and
requirements of the countries with economies in transition;

    15.  Considers that efforts should be made to promote, in consultation
and agreement with Governments, complementarity between the country strategy
notes, where they exist, the policy framework papers of the Bretton Woods
institutions and the World Bank's country assistance strategies;

    16.  Emphasizes that the United Nations development system and the
Bretton Woods institutions should expand, whenever appropriate, their
collaboration in co-financing field programmes and projects and should
continue to explore innovative ways to combine and maximize their resources,
under the overall guidance of the national Governments, in support of
development activities at the field level;

    17.  Invites the United Nations development system and the Bretton Woods
institutions to improve their cooperation in the preparation, discussion and
follow-up of round-table meetings and consultative groups to promote policy
discussions, as appropriate;

    18.  Stresses that the United Nations development system and the Bretton
Woods institutions have to take full account of the exchange of experiences
and lessons learned and that, in the course of their work, staff exchanges and
information-sharing, in particular the sharing of evaluation methodologies and
results, should be encouraged.
                                                                              

                                                  52nd plenary meeting
                                                          26 July 1996


                                                                              
                                   PROCEEDINGS

Strengthening collaboration between the United Nations development system and
the Bretton Woods institutions

9.   At the 31st meeting, on 11 July, the representative of Costa Rica, on
behalf of the States Members of the United Nations that are members of the
Group of 77 and China, introduced a draft resolution (E/1996/L.20) entitled
"Strengthening collaboration between the United Nations development system and
the Bretton Woods institutions", which read as follows:

                        "The Economic and Social Council,

                       "Recalling General Assembly resolution 50/120 of 20   
          December 1995, on the triennial policy review of operational
          activities for development of the United Nations system,

                        "Recalling also Economic and Social Council resolution
          1995/50, in which the Council decided to place the subject on the
          agenda of its 1996 substantive session,

                        "Reaffirming the goals contained in section VIII of
          annex I to General Assembly resolution 50/227 of 24 May 1996,
          concerning the relationship between the United Nations and
          international finance and trade institutions, and General Assembly
          resolutions 50/91 and 50/92 of 20 December 1995, dealing,
          respectively, with challenges and opportunities of global financial
          integration and enhancing international cooperation towards a
          durable solution to the external debt problem of developing
          countries, 

                       "Taking into account the ongoing deliberations on an
          agenda for development, in which issues relating to the
          strengthening of the relationship between the United Nations and the
          Bretton Woods institutions are being addressed,

                        "Considering that the broad mandate of the United
          Nations development system, including the United Nations Conference
          on Trade and Development, and its expertise in dealing in an
          integrated manner with economic and development issues,
          globalization and interdependence provide a good basis for
          strengthening further cooperation with the Bretton Woods
          institutions,

                        "Recognizing that strengthening the collaboration
          between the United Nations development system and the Bretton Woods
          institutions at the intergovernmental, intersecretariat and country
          levels, as complementary to and support for the existing United
          Nations mechanism, is particularly important for effectively
          promoting international cooperation for development, 

                        "Also recognizing that the significant number of
          practical examples of such collaboration is an encouraging sign of
          the efforts already undertaken and of the existing potentialities
          for further increasing such collaboration,

                        "Recognizing further the importance of joint
          initiatives between the United Nations and the Bretton Woods
          institutions in coordinating efforts for the implementation and
          follow-up of the commitments of the major United Nations
          international conferences and summits,

                        "Reaffirming that United Nations development
          assistance should continue to maintain its characteristics of
          neutrality and non-conditionality and that the recipient Government
          should play a leading role for the overall coordination of
          collaboration at the country level,

                        "Deeply concerned about the significant decline in
          resources allocated to the operational activities for development of
          the United Nations system, the incomplete tenth replenishment of the
          International Development Association and prospects for the eleventh
          replenishment at significantly reduced real levels, which has a
          negative impact on the effectiveness of the United Nations and the
          Bretton Woods institutions in pursuing collaboration and their role
          in the field of development,

                        "1.         Takes note of the report by the
          Secretariat on strengthening collaboration between the United
          Nations system and the Bretton Woods institutions  5/ in the areas
          of social and economic development at all levels, including the
          field level;

                        "2.         Considers that the strengthening of
          collaboration between the United Nations and the Bretton Woods
          institutions requires a comprehensive approach, encompassing a
          closer policy dialogue at the intergovernmental level on global
          macroeconomic policy issues and new initiatives and measures at the
          country level;

                        "3.         Also considers that such a policy dialogue
          will be an important element in promoting coherence, while
          encouraging a plurality of analyses and views, on issues related to
          sustained economic growth and sustainable development, improving,
          therefore, the overall framework for cooperation between the United
          Nations development system and the Bretton Woods institutions at all
          levels, including the field level;

                        "4.         Emphasizes that the dialogue at the
          country level should be undertaken under the overall guidance of the
          national Government;

                        "5.         Stresses that, in the collaboration
          between the United Nations development system and the Bretton Woods
          institutions, the United Nations development system should continue
          to maintain its characteristics of neutrality and non-conditionality
          and that the recipient Government should play a leading role for the
          overall coordination of the collaboration at the country level;

                        "6.         Recognizes that concrete modalities for
          collaboration between the United Nations system and the Bretton
          Woods institutions at the country level should be on the basis of
          country-driven activities, arising from the needs of developing
          countries;

                        "7.         Further recognizes that any programmes or
          projects arising from such collaboration should be fully consistent
          with national plans and strategies;

                        "8.         Reaffirms the importance of an integrated
          approach so as to facilitate coordination between the United Nations
          and the Bretton Woods institutions in the implementation and
          follow-up of the commitments of major United Nations international
          conferences and summits;

                        "9.         Decides that full implementation of
          existing agreements, the strengthening of existing mechanisms and
          the establishment of formal agreements, where necessary, between the
          Bretton Woods institutions and other specialized agencies through,
          inter alia, memoranda of understanding, covering issues such as
          participation in relevant meetings, information-gathering,
          information exchange, research, policy analysis and operational
          activities, should be encouraged and undertaken within the framework
          provided by General Assembly and Economic and Social Council
          resolutions;

                        "10.        Further decides to promote joint meetings
          of the Council and both the Development Committee of the World
          Bank/International Monetary Fund and the Interim Committee of the
          International Monetary Fund, aiming at strengthening the exchange of
          views between those bodies on development issues.  Such meetings
          shall be scheduled at a time proximate to the semi-annual meetings
          of the Bretton Woods institutions, beginning in 1997, with a view to
          benefiting from high-level ministerial participation and the
          participation of heads of financial institutions and other relevant
          organizations.  In that regard, the financial institutions and other
          relevant organizations should be invited, as and when appropriate,
          to prepare reports and studies to enhance the discussions.  For that
          purpose, the Secretary-General will propose, in consultations with
          the heads of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, to
          the Council at its 1997 organizational session, the issues, date and
          modalities for the first joint meeting;

                        "11.        Decides also to encourage cooperative
          working relations between the relevant units of the Bretton Woods
          institutions and the regional commissions, including, inter alia,
          joint research on the effects of opening regional economies,
          collaboration in the areas of industrialization and physical and
          economic infrastructure, and arrangements for data collection and
          information exchange;

                        "12.        Invites the Bretton Woods institutions to
          prepare special reports and studies for the Council and the General
          Assembly on issues falling within their competence, in accordance
          with article V of the Agreement between the United Nations and the
          International Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the
          International Monetary Fund;

                        "13.        Invites the financial and trade
          institutions participating in the high-level segment of the Council
          in 1997 to furnish relevant special reports and studies on the
          selected theme, within their respective mandates and areas of
          expertise, and on important developments in the world economy and in
          international economic cooperation;

                        "14.        Also invites the Bretton Woods
          institutions to prepare special reports for the General Assembly at
          its fifty-first session on the issue of the multilateral external
          debt problem of the developing countries and on the issue of
          challenges and opportunities of global financial integration;

                        "15.        Invites further the heads of the Bretton
          Woods institutions and the United Nations Secretary-General, in
          accordance with General Assembly resolution 50/227, to provide the
          General Assembly at its fifty-second session with a report and
          recommendations on how those institutions can improve their own
          efforts to support the effective implementation of development
          projects at the field level, taking into account the guidelines in
          paragraph 86 of that resolution."


10. At the 35th meeting, on 16 July, the representative of the United States
of America introduced a draft resolution (E/1996/L.22) entitled "Strengthening
collaboration between the United Nations development system and the Bretton
Woods institutions", which read as follows:

                        "The Economic and Social Council,

                        "Recalling Chapters IX and X of the Charter of the
           United Nations, with particular reference to the provisions setting
           forth the powers and functions of the United Nations Economic and
           Social Council with respect to making recommendations and
           coordinating United Nations system activities within the scope of
           its competence,

                        "Recalling also General Assembly resolution 50/227 of
           24 May 1996, 

                        "Noting that various funds, programmes, commissions
           and other subsidiary bodies of the Council carry out development
           programmes and activities, and that the Council provides policy
           guidance to and coordinates the programmes and activities of those
           subsidiary bodies,

                        "Noting that the international financial and trade
           institutions also conduct development programmes and activities,
           often in the same countries and intended to serve the same people
           as those carried out by the Council's subsidiary bodies,

                        "Reaffirming the importance of strengthening
           cooperation, communication and collaboration between the Council
           and its subsidiary bodies, on the one hand, and the international
           financial and trade institutions, on the other, in order to
           maximize the effectiveness of their respective development
           programmes and activities,

                        "Concerned that while the development programmes and
           activities of the financial and trade institutions and of the
           Council's subsidiary bodies are generally complementary or mutually
           supportive, there are instances in which improvements in their
           relationships may be indicated,

                        "Noting in that connection that the Council and its
           subsidiary bodies could benefit from a direct exchange of views and
           experiences, drawing upon the particular expertise and comparative
           advantage of the financial and trade institutions, 

                        "Noting that the programmes and activities of the
           international financial and trade institutions could benefit in a
           similar fashion from any improvements in the operation,
           coordination and effectiveness of supportive Council programmes
           that might be brought about by the Council as a result of enhanced
           cooperation, collaboration and communication with those
           institutions,

                        "Reaffirming the importance of the Council's
           high-level session with the international financial and trade
           institutions as a forum for advancing such enhanced cooperation,
           communication and collaboration, and for exchanging views on how
           the various participants could support one another's efforts,

                        "Noting the need to improve the Council's high-level
           sessions with the international financial and trade institutions by
           better preparing for and focusing the high-level dialogue, thereby
           enhancing the quality, outcomes and value of the exchange of views,

                        "1. Looks forward to the report and accompanying
            recommendations, to be prepared jointly by the United Nations and
            the Bretton Woods institutions, as set forth by the General
            Assembly in its resolution 50/227 of 24 May 1996,  6/ on an
            exploratory review to assess mechanisms, programmes and
            relationships at the field, headquarters and 
            intergovernmental levels, with a view to identifying areas in
            which communication, cooperation and coordination could be
            improved;

                        "2.         Looks forward to the scheduling of a
            high-level meeting proximate to the semi-annual meetings of the
            Bretton Woods institutions with a view to benefiting, to the
            extent possible, from high-level ministerial participation and
            from the participation of heads of financial and trade
            institutions and other relevant organizations, as
            called for by the General Assembly in its resolution 50/227 of
            24 May 1996;

                        "3.         Requests the Secretary-General to consult
            the heads of the financial institutions by early 1997 in order to
            explore the possibilities and practicalities of scheduling such a
            meeting.  At a session of the Council, to be held in early 1997,
            the Council should discuss the format, timing and possible agenda
            for the first such meeting;

                        "4.         Decides that, prior to the annual
            high-level policy dialogue between the Council and the
            international financial and trade institutions, and allowing
            sufficient time for preparation, the Secretariat should
            communicate to the financial and trade institutions a
            report summarizing the relevant issues and questions to be
            discussed at the session, with a focus on an agreed theme.  That
            communication should be prepared in part based on the submission
            of issues and questions that member States could be invited to
            suggest to the Secretariat, which would then be taken into account
            in the preparation of the Secretariat's report to the
            institutions."

11.         At the 52nd meeting, on 26 July, the Vice-President of the
Council, Mr. Karel Kovanda (Czech Republic), introduced a draft resolution
(E/1996/L.48)  which he submitted on the basis of informal consultations held
on draft resolutions E/1996/L.20 and L.22.

12.         At the same meeting, the Council adopted draft resolution
E/1996/L.48.  See Council resolution 1996/43 (para. 8 above).

13.         In the light of the adoption of draft resolution E/1996/L.48,
draft resolutions E/1996/L.20 and L.22 were withdrawn by their sponsors.


            C.  Consideration of the reports of the Executive Boards
                of the United Nations Development Programme/United
                Nations Population Fund, the United Nations
                Children's Fund and the World Food Programme

14.         At its substantive session, the Council considered the reports of
the Executive Boards of the United Nations Development Programme/United
Nations Population Fund, the United Nations Children's Fund and the World Food
Programme (agenda item 4 (c)) at its 28th and 29th meetings, on 10 July 1996. 
An account of the discussion is contained in the relevant summary records
(E/1996/SR.28 and 29).  The Council had before it the following documents:

            (a)         Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations
Children's Fund on the work of its first regular session of 1996 (22-25
January 1996) (E/1996/32, Part I);  7/

            (b)         Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations
Children's Fund on the work of its second regular session of 1996 (9-12 April
1996) (E/1996/32, Part II); 7/

            (c)         Reports of the Secretary-General containing a summary
of decisions adopted by the executive boards of the United Nations funds and
programmes and of actions taken by the organizations of the United Nations
system on operational activities of the United Nations system for development
(E/1996/64/Add.1 and 3);

            (d)         Annual report of the United Nations Population Fund to
the Economic and Social Council (E/1996/68);

            (e)         Annual report of the United Nations Children's Fund to
the Economic and Social Council (E/1996/69);

            (f)         Report of the Executive Board of the World Food
Programme (E/1996/73);

            (g)         Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations
Development Programme/United Nations Population Fund on its annual session for
1996 (E/1996/74);  8/

            (h)         Extract from the report of the Executive Board of the
United Nations Children's Fund on its 1996 annual session (E/1996/L.19);

            (i)         Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations
Development Programme/United Nations Population Fund on its first regular
session, New York, 15-19 January 1996 (DP/1996/11); 8/

            (j)         Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations
Development Programme/United Nations Population Fund on its second regular
session, New York, 25-29 March 1996 (DP/1996/17). 8/


                      ACTION TAKEN BY THE COUNCIL

15.         Under agenda item 4 (c), the Council adopted two decisions.


                                 Decisions

              1996/226. Commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the
                        operations of the United Nations Children's Fund

            At its 29th plenary meeting, on 10 July 1996, the Economic and
Social Council endorsed decision 1996/18  9/ adopted by the Executive Board of
the United Nations Children's Fund at its second regular session of 1996 and
recommended its approval by the General Assembly at its fifty-first session.


               1996/228. Reports of the Executive Boards of the
                         United Nations Development Programme/ 
                         United Nations Population Fund, the   
                         United Nations Children's Fund and the
                         World Food Programme                  

            At its 29th plenary meeting, on 10 July 1996, the Economic and
Social Council took note of the following documents:

    (a)  Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations Children's Fund
on the work of its first regular session of 1996 (22-25 January 1996); 10/

    (b)  Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations Children's Fund
on the work of its second regular session of 1996 (9-12 April 1996); 11/

    (c)  Reports of the Secretary-General containing a summary of decisions
adopted by the executive boards of the United Nations funds and programmes and
of actions taken by the organizations of the United Nations system on
operational activities of the United Nations system for development; 12/

    (d)  Annual report of the United Nations Population Fund to the Economic
and Social Council;  13/

    (e)  Annual report of the United Nations Children's Fund to the Economic
and Social Council;  14/

    (f)  Report of the Executive Board of the World Food Programme; 15/

    (g)  Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations Development
Programme/United Nations Population Fund on its annual session for 1996; 16/

    (h)  Extract from the report of the Executive Board of the United Nations
Children's Fund on its 1996 annual session;  17/

    (i)  Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations Development
Programme/United Nations Population Fund on its first regular session, New
York, 15-19 January 1996;  18/

    (j)  Report of the Executive Board of the United Nations Development
Programme/United Nations Population Fund on its second regular session, New
York, 25-29 March 1996;  19/


                                      Notes

1/  E/1996/64 and Add.1 and 2 and Add.2/Corr.1 and 2, and Add.3.

2/  E/1996/43.

3/  A/51/124-E/1996/44.

4/  E/1996/72 and Corr.1.

5/  E/1996/72 and Corr.1.

6/  See annex I to the resolution, para. 86.

7/  To be issued in Official Records of the Economic and Social Council,
1996, Supplement No. 12 (E/1996/32/Rev.1).

8/  To be issued in Official Records of the Economic and Social Council,
1996, Supplement No. 13 (E/1996/33).

9/  See E/1996/32 (Part II), chap. III.  For the final text, see
Official Records of the Economic and Social Council, 1996, Supplement No. 12
(E/1996/32/Rev.1).

10/ E/1996/32 (Part I).  For the final text, see Official Records of the
Economic and Social Council, 1996, Supplement No. 12 (E/1996/32/Rev.1).

11/ E/1996/32 (Part II).  For the final text, see Official Records of
the Economic and Social Council, 1996, Supplement No. 12 (E/1996/32/Rev.1).

12/ E/1996/64/Add.1 and 3.

13/ E/1996/68.

14/ E/1996/69.

15/ E/1996/73.

16/ E/1996/74.  For the final text, see Official Records of the Economic
and Social Council, 1996, Supplement No. 13 (E/1996/33).

17/ E/1996/L.19.

18/ DP/1996/11.  For the final text, see Official Records of the
Economic and Social Council, 1996, Supplement No. 12 (E/1996/33).

19/ DP/1996/17.  For the final text, see Official Records of the
Economic and Social Council, 1996, Supplement No. 13 (E/1996/33).


               LIST OF RESOLUTIONS AND DECISIONS ADOPTED AT THE
               COORDINATION AND OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES SEGMENTS
                          OF THE COUNCIL IN 1996

                                                                              
                                RESOLUTIONS

Resolution                                          Date of     Chapter and
  number                    Title                  adoption      section a/

1996/36      Follow-up to the major                26.7.1996        III.B
             international United Nations
             conferences and summits, including
             the implementation of their
             respective programmes of action

1996/41      Follow-up to General Assembly         26.7.1996        III.B
             resolution 50/227:  initiation of
             reviews

1996/42      Progress on the implementation of     26.7.1996         IV.A
             General Assembly resolution 50/120

1996/43      Strengthening collaboration           26.7.1996         IV.B
             between the United Nations
             development system and the Bretton
             Woods institutions


                                DECISIONS

Decision                                             Date of     Chapter and
 number               Title                         adoption      section a/

1996/226     Commemoration of the fiftieth         10.7.1996        IV.C
             anniversary of the operations of
             the United Nations Children's Fund

1996/227     Reports considered by the Economic    10.7.1996        IV.A
             and Social Council in connection
             with the question of follow-up to
             policy recommendations of the
             General Assembly

1996/228     Reports of the Executive Boards of    10.7.1996        IV.C
             the United Nations Development
             Programme/United Nations Population
             Fund, the United Nations Children's
             Fund and the World Food Programme
             considered by the Economic and
             Social Council


________________________

     a/ Chapter and section of the present report in which the text of the
resolution or decision appears.
                                                                              

                                      ----- 

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