United Nations

A/51/16


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

5 July 1996

ORIGINAL:
ENGLISH


                                                        A/51/16 (Part I)
                                                              

General Assembly
Fifty-first session


            REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE FOR PROGRAMME AND COORDINATION
                ON THE FIRST PART OF ITS THIRTY-SIXTH SESSION*

(*  The present document is a mimeographed version of the report of
the Committee for Programme and Coordination on the work of the first
part of its thirty-sixth session.  The final report will be issued as
Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifty-first Session,
Supplement No. 16 (A/51/16) and will include the report of the
Committee on the second part of the session (A/51/16 (Part II)).)


                                   CONTENTS

Chapter                                                       Paragraphs Page

ABBREVIATIONS ..........................................................   4

Part one:  Report of the Committee for Programme and
           Coordination on the first part of its
           thirty-sixth session held at United Nations
           Headquarters from 3 to 28 June 1996

 I.   ORGANIZATION OF THE SESSION ..........................     1 - 13    6

      A. Agenda ...........................................      2 - 5     6

      B. Election of officers .............................        6       6

      C. Attendance .......................................      7 - 11    7

      D. Documentation ....................................       12       8

      E. Adoption of the report of the Committee ..........       13       8

II.   PROGRAMME QUESTIONS ..................................    14 - 108   9

      A. Programme performance of the United Nations for
         the biennium 1994-1995 ...........................     14 - 21    9

      B. Proposed medium-term plan for the period 1998-
         2001:  Perspective ...............................     22 - 48   10

      C. Strengthening the role of evaluation findings in
         programme design, delivery and policy directives .     49 - 56   14

      D. In-depth evaluation of public information ........     57 - 75   15

      E. In-depth evaluation of peace-keeping operations:
         Termination phase .............................        76 - 94   19

      F. Triennial review of the in-depth evaluation of the
         Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for
         Refugees .........................................     95 - 108  22

III.  COORDINATION QUESTIONS ...............................   109 - 189  25

      A. Report of the Administrative Committee on 
         Coordination and preparations for the Joint 
         Meetings of the Committee for Programme and 
         Coordination and the Administrative Committee on 
         Coordination .....................................    109 - 133  25

      B. Implementation of the System-wide Plan of Action
         for African Economic Recovery and Development ....    134 - 159  28

      C. Proposed system-wide medium-term plan for the
         advancement of women, 1996-2001 ..................    160 - 189  33

IV.   REPORTS OF THE JOINT INSPECTION UNIT .................   190 - 204  38

 V.   CONSIDERATION OF THE PROVISIONAL AGENDA FOR THE
      THIRTY-SEVENTH SESSION OF THE COMMITTEE ..............   205 - 207  41

                                    Annexes

 I.   Agenda for the thirty-sixth session of the Committee .............  43

II.   List of documents before the Committee at the first part of its
      thirty-sixth session .............................................  44


                                 ABBREVIATIONS


ACABQ     Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions

ACC       Administrative Committee on Coordination 

CPC       Committee for Programme and Coordination 

ECA       Economic Commission for Africa 

ECE       Economic Commission for Europe 

ECLAC     Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

ESCAP     Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific 

ESCWA     Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia

FAO       Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 

ICSC      International Civil Service Commission 

ILO       International Labour Organization 

JIU       Joint Inspection Unit 

UNCTAD    United Nations Conference on Trade and Development 

UNDP      United Nations Development Programme 

UNESCO    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural
          Organization

UNFPA     United Nations Population Fund 

UNHCR     Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 

UNIDO     United Nations Industrial Development Organization 

UNIFEM    United Nations Development Fund for Women 


                                   Part One

            REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE FOR PROGRAMME AND COORDINATION
                 OF THE FIRST PART OF ITS THIRTY-SIXTH SESSION

                      Held at United Nations Headquarters
                            from 3 to 28 June 1996

                        I.  ORGANIZATION OF THE SESSION


1.   The Committee for Programme and Coordination (CPC) held an
organizational meeting (1st meeting) at United Nations Headquarters on
3 May 1996 and the first part of its thirty-sixth session at United
Nations Headquarters from 3 June to 28 June 1996.  It held 35 meetings
(2nd to 35th meetings) and a number of informal consultations.


                                  A.  Agenda

2.   The agenda for the thirty-sixth session as a whole, adopted by the
Committee at its 1st meeting, on 3 May 1996, is reproduced in annex I.

3.   In adopting the agenda, the Committee, in accordance with the
decision taken at its organizational meeting for 1996, decided to
consider at its thirty-sixth session the report of the Joint
Inspection Unit (JIU) entitled "Accountability, management improvement
and oversight in the United Nations system (Parts one and two)"
(A/50/503 and Add.1).  The Committee also decided that the report of
JIU entitled "Evaluation of the United Nations New Agenda for the
Development of Africa in the 1990s:  Towards a more operational
approach?" (A/50/885), as well as the comments of the
Secretary-General and of the Administrative Committee on Coordination
(ACC) thereon (A/50/885/Add.1), should be considered in conjunction
with agenda item 5 (b), entitled "Implementation of the System-wide
Plan of Action for African Economic Recovery and Development".

4.   In the absence of the report of the Secretary-General on the
administrative, structural and other aspects of the improvement of the
efficiency of the Organization, as mandated in General Assembly
resolution 45/254 A of 21 December 1990, the Committee decided to
defer to its thirty-seventh session the consideration of the question
of review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial
functioning of the United Nations.

5.   At its 2nd meeting, on 3 June 1996, the Committee decided not to
consider the question of preparations for the Joint Meetings of the
Committee for Programme and Coordination and the Administrative
Committee on Coordination, as the functions of the present joint
meetings of the two Committees are henceforth assigned to the Economic
and Social Council, in accordance with General Assembly resolution
50/227 of 24 May 1996.


                           B.  Election of officers

6.   At its 1st, 2nd and 3rd meetings, on 3 May and 3 and 4 June 1996,
the Committee elected the following officers by acclamation:

     Chairman:   Mr. Jorge Osella (Argentina)

     Vice Chairmen:   Mr. Sam Hanson (Canada)
                      Mr. De'sire' Nkounkou (Congo)
                      Mr. Shoji Ogawa (Japan)
               
     Rapporteur:  Mr. Volodymyr Yelchenko (Ukraine)


                                C.  Attendance

7.   The following States members of the Committee were represented:

     Argentina                       Japan
     Bahamas                         Mexico
     Belarus                         Netherlands
     Benin                           Norway
     Brazil                          Pakistan
     Cameroon                        Republic of Korea
     Canada                          Romania
     China                           Russian Federation
     Comoros                         Senegal
     Congo                           Togo
     Cuba                            Trinidad and Tobago
     Egypt                           Ukraine
     France                          United Kingdom of Great Britain and
     Germany                           Northern Ireland
     Ghana                           United States of America
     India                           Uruguay
     Indonesia                       Zaire
     Iran (Islamic Republic of)      

8.   The following States Members of the United Nations were
represented by observers:

     Algeria                         Malaysia
     Armenia                         Mongolia
     Australia                       Morocco
     Austria                         New Zealand
     Belgium                         Nicaragua
     Bolivia                         Panama
     Bulgaria                        Paraguay
     Chile                           Philippines
     Colombia                        Portugal
     Costa Rica                      South Africa
     Ecuador                         Sweden
     Ireland                         Thailand
     Italy                           Tunisia
     Kazakstan                       Turkey
     Kenya                           Uganda
     Latvia                          Zimbabwe

9.   The following specialized agencies and regional commissions were
represented:

     Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
     United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
     United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO)
     Economic Commission for Africa (ECA)
     Economic Commission for Europe (ECE)
     Economic Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean (ECLAC)
     Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)
     Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA).

10.  The following non-member State was represented by an observer: 
Palestine.

11.  Also present at the session were senior officials of the United
Nations Secretariat.  At the invitation of the Committee, Mr. Khalil
Issa Othman, Vice-Chairman of JIU, and Mr. F. Mezzalama, Inspector,
participated in the work of the Committee.


                               D.  Documentation

12.  The list of documents before the Committee at the first part of
its thirty-sixth session is set out in annex II.


                  E.  Adoption of the report of the Committee

13.  At its 35th meeting, on 28 June 1996, the Committee adopted the
draft report on the first part of its thirty-sixth session
(E/AC.51/1996/L.5 and Adds.1, 2, and 28 to 35).


                           II.  PROGRAMME QUESTIONS


A.  Programme performance of the United Nations for the
    biennium 1994-1995                                 

14.  At its 4th to 6th meetings, on 4 and 5 June 1996, the Committee
considered the report of the Secretary-General on the programme
performance of the United Nations for the biennium 1994-1995 (A/51/128
and Add.1).  Many delegations emphasized the importance and role of
the Committee's functions in programmatic and coordination matters and
in this regard fully supported its work.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

15.  The Committee commended the quality of the report and expressed
appreciation for its clarity and format of presentation.  It
considered the report a useful contribution to the improvement of the
programme planning and budgetary process.  The Committee acknowledged
the inherent limits of any purely quantitative approach to programme
performance and the margin of error implied in such an exercise.  The
Committee realized that a systematic exercise of measurement was the
only opportunity for systematic control of the effectiveness of
implementation of mandated activities to be carried out under a
programme budget, and the only tool of control available for some
programme managers.  It drew much authority from its status as a tool
of external control.

16.  The Committee expressed concern at the overall low level of
implementation, in particular, the sharp decline in the implementation
of high priority designated activities from the level in the biennium
1992-1993.  Taking into account the information given in
paragraphs 15, 16 and 20 of the report, as well as in the addendum to
the report, the Committee recognized that the present methodology did
not do justice to the departments affected by decisions taken during
the biennium by the relevant intergovernmental bodies.  Consequently,
the Committee requested the Secretary-General to refine the reporting
methodology for the next programme performance report, so as to
reflect better both the extent to which the activities of the
programme of work had actually been mandated throughout the period
concerned and, correspondingly, the extent to which they had actually
been implemented.  The Committee recommended that appropriate measures
be taken to ensure that programme managers adhered to the priorities
mandated by the General Assembly.  In that connection, the Committee
stressed the need for continued efforts to improve the rate of
implementation of the programme of ESCWA.  While noting the
detrimental effect of continuing high vacancies on the performance of
ESCWA, the Committee nevertheless was of the view that the vacancy
situation appeared to be chronic and deserved urgent attention.  In
that context, the Committee regretted that the vacancy rate in the
case of ESCWA was much higher than that approved by the General
Assembly and requested that immediate action be taken to face problems
in that regard that directly affected programme performance. 

17.  The Committee expressed concern over the relatively large number
of instances in which programme managers did not provide adequate
reasons for the outputs that were terminated under their respective
programmes.  In that context, the Committee reiterated that all
changes and additions introduced by programme managers in the course
of implementation should be submitted to the appropriate
intergovernmental bodies for consideration and approval, and stressed
the need for the preparation of programme budget implication
statements whenever additional activities are mandated by legislative
bodies.  These statements should indicate whether an activity of
equivalent cost could be deleted or postponed in the same programme by
the same intergovernmental body or else indicate the additional cost
involved.  The Committee stressed the need to ensure fully effective
implementation of all mandated activities.  Notwithstanding the
discretion granted to the Secretary-General through rule 105.2 of the
Regulations and Rules Governing Programme Planning, the Programme
Aspects of the Budget, the Monitoring of Implementation and the
Methods of Evaluation, the Committee reiterated the central role of
the General Assembly in changing or postponing activities and
programmes.

18.  The Committee noted that a substantial amount of regular budget
resources was being used to fund operational activities.  It also
noted that an increasing proportion of extrabudgetary resources were
being used to fund the implementation of activities of a
non-operational nature.  The Committee felt that a clearer
organizational distinction between those two areas of work would
provide more transparency in resource utilization and ensure that
resources of the regular budget were utilized to address the mandates
for which they were appropriated.

19.  The Committee expressed concern at the findings of the report on
publications and documentation (paras. 32-35).  It noted that a number
of departments were increasingly involved in the production and
dissemination of information material and services.  The Committee
recommended that that trend be rationalized in order to ensure that
information activities were undertaken in close coordination with the
Department of Public Information.  That was necessary to ensure a
unified policy in the area of public information and, in particular,
to avoid duplication of publications and documentation.  In that
respect, the Committee recommended, without prejudice to existing
rules and procedures in that matter, that no policy decision be taken
until the report of the Secretary-General on the publications policy
of the United Nations (A/C.5/48/10) was considered by the General
Assembly, and until the relevant intergovernmental bodies considered
it and took appropriate action on it.

20.  With regard to paragraph 15 of the report, the Committee noted
that more than 80 per cent of the outputs terminated had occurred in
the Department of Political Affairs, the Department for Policy
Coordination and Sustainable Development, the United Nations
Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the five regional
commissions combined.

21.  The Committee endorsed the findings and conclusions in section IV
of the report and the courses of action prescribed in paragraphs 36,
38, 41, 44 and 45.  In that regard, the Committee noted that the
report indicated in paragraph 37 that 181 outputs carried over from
the biennium 1992-1993 had been further postponed to the biennium
1996-1997.  The Committee agreed to recommend to the General Assembly
that it consider that issue in the context of its consideration of the
programme performance report at its fifty-first session.


B.  Proposed medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001:
    Perspective                                        

22.  At its 15th to 34th meetings, from 12 to 25 June 1996, the
Committee considered the proposed medium-term plan for the period
1998-2001.

23.  At the 15th meeting, on 12 June 1996, the Under-Secretary-General
for Administration and Management, on behalf of the Secretary-General,
introduced the proposed medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001
(A/51/6).  At the same meeting, the Controller made a statement.

24.   The Committee considered and analysed all 25 programmes of the
proposed medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001 at its 16th to 34th
meetings, from 12 to 25 June 1996.  The Committee decided to revert to
consideration of the 25 programmes at the second part of its
thirty-sixth session.


                          1.  General considerations

                                  Discussion

25.  Many delegations deeply regretted that the new format did not
follow the Regulations and Rules Governing Programme Planning, the
Programme Aspects of the Budget, the Monitoring of Implementation and
the Methods of Evaluation, approved by the General Assembly in its
resolutions 37/234 of 21 December 1982 and 38/227 of 20 December 1983,
nor did it strictly follow the guidelines recommended by the
Committee.

26.  Many delegations regretted that the Secretariat had not taken
fully into account previous decisions of the Committee on the
inclusion in the subprogrammes of all mandated activities.  Other
delegations recalled the view that the listing of activities was
recognized to be one of the shortcomings in the current medium-term
plan.

27.  Some delegations welcomed the congruence between programmatic and
organizational structures to enhance accountability and
responsibility; each programme would be carried out by one department
or office and each subprogramme would be implemented by an
organizational unit within the department or office, generally at the
level of a division.  One delegation noted that the programme for
Africa would be implemented by three different offices.  Other
delegations expressed a preference for a sectoral approach and in that
context observed that the format of the medium-term plan had yet to be
approved.

28.  Some delegations welcomed the efforts made to formulate objectives
more clearly and precisely.  Other delegations expressed reservations
on the general nature of the objectives and the lack of quantifiable
targets and expressed the view that efforts should continue to be made
to improve further the formulation of the medium-term plan.

29.  Many delegations expressed the view that legislative mandates
should be indicated in the narrative of the programmes, while others
preferred the legislative mandates to be listed in an annex to the
respective programmes.  Other delegations requested the
Secretary-General to review legislative mandates in accordance with
article III, rule 103.2 of the Regulations and Rules Governing
Programme Planning, the Programme Aspects of the Budget, the
Monitoring of Implementation and the Methods of Evaluation, and in
this connection, recalled that in accordance with its terms of
reference (Economic and Social Council resolution 2008 (LX)) of
14 May 1976, the Committee should assess the continuing validity of
legislative decisions of more than five years' standing.

30.  Many delegations deeply regretted the fact that the Secretariat
had not provided certain information repeatedly requested by them
during the debate.  Those delegations requested that such information
be provided to the Committee during the second part of its
thirty-sixth session.  

                                  Conclusions

31.  The Committee reiterated the importance Member States attached to
the medium-term plan, which constituted the principal policy directive
of the United Nations and provided the framework for the biennial
programme budgets, recalling and reiterating the importance of General
Assembly resolutions 37/234, 38/227, 41/213 of 19 December 1986 and
48/218 A 23 December 1993 and decision 50/452 of 22 December 1995 and
the Regulations and Rules Governing Programme Planning, the Programme
Aspects of the Budget, the Monitoring of Implementation and the
Methods of Evaluation and bearing in mind paragraph 33 below.  The
Committee also recalled its terms of reference in Economic and Social
Council resolution 2008 (LX).

32.  The Committee stressed the importance of ensuring that the
medium-term plan reflected all mandated programmes and activities and
agreed that legislative mandates for the work to be carried out should
be included in the approved version of the plan.

33.  The Committee agreed that if the new format of the medium-term
plan were adopted, it would be necessary, as recommended by the
Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ)
(A/49/958), to amend, as appropriate, the Regulations and Rules
Governing Programme Planning, the Programme Aspects of the Budget, the
Monitoring of Implementation and the Methods of Evaluation, which
govern the preparation of the medium-term plan.
  
34.  The Committee agreed with the view of the Secretary-General that
efforts to ensure that the United Nations of the twenty-first century
was equipped to rise to the challenges of that century depended on,
above all, continuous, predictable and assured political and financial
support from Member States.


                                2.  Perspective

                                  Discussion

35.  Many delegations deeply regretted that the Secretary-General had
not observed the structure of the perspective contained in document
A/51/6 (Perspective) as recommended by the Committee, namely the
presentation of five distinct sections dealing with persistent
problems, emerging trends, challenges to be faced by the international
community, the role of the Organization and the directions to be
pursued.  Some delegations expressed the view that the perspective was
a well-written, thoughtful, balanced and succinct document, providing
a clear over-arching statement on the work and role of the
Organization.

36.  Many delegations expressed the view that the perspective was not
balanced in reflecting the interests of all Member States, nor did it
accurately address the concerns of developing countries.  The
perspective did not give sufficient weight to the role of the
Organization in economic and social development.  They were also of
the view that some of the terminology used was inappropriate since no
consensus had yet been reached on many of the concepts described;
furthermore, they pointed out that the perspective had omitted other
important emerging trends, as well as a number of issues that were of
major importance for the developing countries.

37.      Many delegations noted that the perspective was
forward-looking and policy-oriented, addressing persistent problems,
emerging trends and many of the issues that were under consideration
by the international community.  They also noted that the
Secretary-General had taken into account the views expressed by the
Committee at its previous sessions and by Member States in the Fifth
Committee, as well as recommendations and views of Member States at
other international forums.

38.  Some delegations supported the idea that when discussing future
trends,  the perspective should include the objective of achieving
greater democratization of the Organization's work and the composition
of some of its bodies, particularly the Security Council.  Other
delegations felt that the composition of principal organs of the
Organization were not within the purview of the Committee.

39.  Many delegations stressed the importance of reflecting the
principles embodied in the Charter, the need to translate accurately
all mandates given by the General Assembly and the need to respect
national sovereignty.  They emphasized that the role of the
Organization could not be selective and must reflect the entire
membership.  Many delegations regretted that there appeared to be no
relation between the perspective and the current medium-term plan.

40.  Some delegations stressed the need to bear in mind that resources
were finite and that the Organization could not and should not be
expected to solve all the world's problems.  Many delegations stressed
the need to ensure that the Organization was provided with an adequate
level of resources for the implementation of its legislative mandates
and urged Member States to fulfil their financial obligations in full,
on time and without conditions.

41.  Some delegations recalled that all Member States must meet all
their obligations to bear the expenses of the Organization,
particularly that apportioned by the General Assembly, and that that
apportionment should be established on the basis of criteria agreed to
and considered to be fair by Member States.  Those delegations also
believed that that issue did not fall within the jurisdiction of the
Committee.

42.  Many delegations requested that the perspective should be
rewritten to incorporate all the concerns of developing countries and
to take into account more fully the consensus reached in the
Declaration on the Occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United
Nations (resolution 50/6 of 24 October 1995).

43.  Some delegations considered it neither appropriate nor practical
to request the Secretary-General to rewrite the perspective.  They
believed that the Secretary-General had the right to express his views
which, they considered, took into account the challenges currently
facing the international community. Some delegations were of the view
that the Secretary-General's perspective was consistent with the
expressions of Member States in the Declaration on the Occasion of the
Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations.  They also noted that the
terminology used in the perspective could be found in the
recommendations of major international conferences and had been used
in the deliberations of the Economic and Social Council and the Second
and Third Committees of the General Assembly, as well as in several
working groups that were currently taking place on the agenda for
development and the agenda for peace.

44.  Many delegations emphasized that economic and social development
must remain a priority of the Organization and regretted that the
Secretary-General had not proposed priorities.  Other delegations felt
that the perspective had identified broad priority areas by means of
the emphasis given by the Secretary-General to the need to promote
peace and security, economic and social development and human rights,
to respond effectively to humanitarian emergencies and to encourage
respect for and the progressive development of international law. 
Furthermore, they pointed out that given the difficulty Member States
had in agreeing on priorities, the Secretary-General could not be
expected to be more specific.

45.  Many delegations jointly presented their views relating to the
perspective.  They rejected the perspective, expressed the view that
it should be rewritten and in that context presented guidelines for
the elaboration of the new perspective of the medium-term plan and
requested that the document containing the guidelines be included in
the report of the Committee.

46.  Some delegations attached importance to the statement made by the
Controller on 12 June 1996 in which he had set out a series of broad
priorities.  Other delegations felt that the Controller's statement
had not been intended to set out broad priorities for the Committee's
consideration.


                                  Conclusion

47.  The Committee recalled General Assembly decision 50/452 of
22 December 1995, in which the Assembly authorized the Secretary-
General to begin preparation of the medium-term plan on the basis of
recommendations of the Committee and ACABQ and taking into account
views expressed by Member States in the Fifth Committee.

48.  The Committee was unable to reach agreement on the content of
document A/51/6 (Perspective) and consequently was not able to
consider the document, as submitted, as an integral part of the
medium-term plan.  It therefore requested that the Secretary-General
be asked to present to the General Assembly at its fifty-first
session, through the Committee at the second part of its thirty-sixth
session, a short and concise document to be considered for inclusion
in the proposed medium-term plan outlining the broad areas of priority
for the period of the medium-term plan, based on the relevant
resolutions and decisions of the intergovernmental bodies of the
United Nations, taking into account the views expressed by Member
States as reflected in paragraphs 35 to 46 above.


C.  Strengthening the role of evaluation findings in programme
    design, delivery and policy directives                    

49.  At its 4th meeting, on 4 June 1996, the Committee considered the
report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on strengthening
the role of evaluation findings in programme design, delivery and
policy directives (A/51/88, annex).


                                  Discussion

50.  Delegations observed that the report showed both progress made in
improving evaluation and weaknesses that needed to be addressed and
that this mixed picture applied to all aspects of programme oversight
at the departmental level.  Delegations considered that the linkage
between evaluation findings and programme planning and budgeting
remained a problem that needed to be addressed by both the Office of
Internal Oversight Services and the Department of Administration and
Management.  Delegations welcomed the commitment made by the Office of
Internal Oversight Services to issue guidelines for oversight at the
departmental level.

51.  Some delegations welcomed the initiative by ECLAC regarding the
mechanism to obtain systematically independent evaluations of its
publications, which many of its members had acknowledged as being very
useful.  Mention was also made of the important decisions taken at the
twenty-sixth session of the Commission, in April 1996, inter alia, to
improve its indicators for evaluating Commission activities in terms
of performance, productivity and impact; to establish an ad hoc
working group to define priorities within the approved programme of
the Commission; and to elaborate strategical directions for the future
activities of the Commission.

52.  Delegations expressed their concern over the very low rate of
implementation of a number of programmes, in particular priority
subprogrammes, as noted in paragraph 17 of the report.  They also
regretted that there was not enough information with regard to the
reasons for postponing several activities or programmes.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

53.  The Committee commended the report, which it found to be
comprehensive and objective.

54.  The Committee noted that the compressed cycle of the in-depth
evaluation had increased evaluation coverage without sacrificing
quality.

55.  The Committee recommended to the General Assembly that the crime
prevention and criminal justice and international drug control
programmes be the subject of in-depth evaluations, and that reports
thereon be presented to the Committee at its thirty-eighth session, in
1998.  These two topics were not subject to in-depth evaluation.

56.  The Committee encouraged the Office of Internal Oversight Services
to develop guidelines on internal oversight within each unit at the
departmental level, covering the following issues:

     (a) Institutional arrangements for oversight, which in general
should be centralized in one unit reporting to the head of the
department;

     (b) Minimum common standards, including, for all important
publications, a requirement that the author department actively seek
reviews in technical and specialized journals and, where appropriate,
in the general press throughout the world;

     (c) Training and other services to be provided by the Office of
Internal Oversight Services.


                 D.  In-depth evaluation of public information

57.  At its 6th to 8th meetings, on 5 and 6 June 1996, the Committee
considered the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on
the in-depth evaluation of the Department of Public Information
(E/AC.51/1996/2, annex). 


                                  Discussion

58.  Many delegations found the report to be useful and were in general
agreement with most of the recommendations contained therein.  A
number of delegations stated that the report lacked in-depth analyses. 
Several delegations stated that the report was a good starting-point
for the process of review of the Department of Public Information, but
that, considering the findings, the recommendations could have been
more forceful.  Many delegations commended the excellent efforts of
the Department during the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations. 
They also noted the reference in the report to the reform efforts made
by the Department in recent years, efforts that should be encouraged
in order for the Department to accomplish fully the tasks assigned to
it by the General Assembly.  One delegation welcomed the role played
by the United Nations Information Centre operating in its capital,
particularly regarding the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary
of the United Nations.  Another delegation highlighted the statement
in the report that a major element of the work programmes of the
United Nations information centres related to the various United
Nations observances, which, according to JIU, were of limited value. 
That delegation also indicated that an examination of the allocation
of resources among the various activities in the work programmes of
the information centres would be useful, with a view to determining
the appropriate focus of the centres' activities.

59.  Some delegations stated that the Committee on Information should
have received and reviewed the evaluation prior to its consideration
by the Committee for Programme and Coordination.  Most delegations
stated that efforts to improve the public image of the United Nations
were crucial and that senior officials should participate positively
in this regard.  Several delegations stressed the need to ensure that
information disseminated was neutral and balanced.  A number of
delegations stressed the need to give effective public information
coverage to all priority areas approved by the General Assembly,
particularly those related to development and international
cooperation.

60.  Regarding the question of mandates given to the Department of
Public Information, some delegations stated that a review of the
numerous mandates of the Department was required and requested that a
full list of such mandates be provided by the Secretariat.  A number
of delegations considered that, without prejudice to priorities set by
the General Assembly, the Department should draw up a list of the
active mandates and propose an annual priority programme for
consideration by the Committee on Information; other delegations
considered that such information should be given in the context of the
priorities set by the General Assembly in the medium-term plan and its
revisions.  One delegation stated that the programme should be
flexible enough to accommodate unexpected events.  With regard to the
United Nations Blue Book Series, a number of delegations were
concerned about the addition by the Secretariat of outputs without
specific mandates, which might involve, in some cases, substantial
amounts of resources, including from peace-keeping operations budgets. 
Other delegations expressed appreciation for such outputs, which were
found to be useful.

61.  Several delegations stressed the importance of new technologies in
disseminating information, and commended the Department for its
initiatives in this area.  Other delegations noted that the Department
should facilitate access to information in countries where new
technologies were not widespread, and should be mindful of
technological gaps among Member States.  Many delegations emphasized
that access to United Nations documents through the use of new
technology should not substitute for the distribution of printed
documentation and should remain free of charge.  In that connection,
some delegations stressed the need for more active involvement of
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) offices, in cases where
there was no United Nations information centre, in the process of
dissemination of information about the United Nations.  Other
delegations noted that increased use of technology should bring
savings in the longer term.  Several delegations stressed the need to
ensure that all publications were in all six official languages.

62.  Many delegations stressed the need to establish standard
procedures for countering criticism, as well as the importance of an
established system to determine the needs of target audiences.  Many
delegations expressed concern about the lack of quality control
regarding United Nations publications and the continuing evidence of
duplication in that area.  Others expressed their satisfaction with
those publications.  Some delegations were concerned about the
cost-efficiency of Dag Hammarskjo"ld Library services.  Several
delegations stressed the continued usefulness of the services
provided.  Several delegations stated that those services should
answer the needs of all users.  Some delegations, recalling the
programmatic and coordination focus of the Committee, stated that the
issue of cost-effectiveness should not be the principal factor in its
decisions.  In that connection, they recalled the roles of the Fifth
Committee and ACABQ as bodies that deal with administrative and
budgetary questions.  Other delegations noted that if the Committee
for Programme and Coordination was making recommendations with
financial consequences, questions of cost-effectiveness were relevant. 
Some delegations felt that greater coordination in the delivery of
Library and related services provided by the Secretariat was required.

63.  Some delegations were pleased with the Department's statement that
reviews of the operations of the United Nations information centres
and the Library, as called for in the draft resolution adopted by the
Committee on Information in May, would address many of the concerns
raised about those two programmes.  Several delegations stressed the
importance of United Nations information centres.

64.  In the course of the debate, delegations made observations on a
number of recommendations contained in the report.

65.  Recommendations 1 and 2.  A number of delegations considered that
the recommendations should include explicit reference to
"governmental" agencies of information, as stated in General Assembly
resolution 13(I). 

66.  Recommendation 4.  A number of delegations considered that the
recommendation did not address many of the problems described in the
report, in particular the weaknesses of feedback mechanisms and the
work of the Programme Evaluation and Committee Liaison Unit.  Some
delegations stated that they could only accept recommendation 4.C on
the understanding that the Secretariat had to publish all materials
listed in the programme budget as approved by the General Assembly. 
Other delegations strongly supported the recommendation.

67.  Recommendation 6.  Some delegations had strong reservations on the
development of a radio broadcasting capacity, stating that such
capacity should be based on a demonstrated demand, and that its
managerial and cost-benefit implications should be looked into before
any decision was made.  Other delegations, however, stressed that the
needs and demands of developing countries should be taken into account
in any cost-benefit approach.  One delegation suggested that the
United Nations could strengthen its relations with radio broadcasting
stations of interested Member States with a view to providing
information on United Nations matters.

68.  Recommendation 9.  Several delegations considered that the central
role of the Spokesperson should not be compromised by direct access of
the press to United Nations senior officials.  Other delegations
considered it essential that such officials maintain an appropriate
relationship with the press.

69.  Recommendation 14.  Many delegations had strong reservations on
section B of this recommendation and felt its implementation could
create a number of difficulties.  Other delegations recalled that the
Committee on Information, at its eighteenth session, in paragraph 12
of draft resolution B, had welcomed the action taken by some Member
States with regard to financial and material support to United Nations
information centres in their respective capitals and had invited the
Secretary-General, through the Department of Public Information, to
consult Member States, where appropriate, on the possibility of
providing the centres with additional and voluntary support on a
national basis.

70.  Recommendations 15 and 16.  Some delegations considered that these
recommendations should be implemented taking into account the various
national interests and contexts.  Another delegation stressed the need
to ensure that collaboration with non-governmental organizations
strictly adhere to the requirements of the relevant General Assembly
resolutions on the matter.

71.  Recommendation 17.  Several delegations questioned the use of
extrabudgetary funds in that context and stated that the restriction
of the recommendation to Headquarters, Geneva and Vienna was
discriminatory with respect to guided visits.  In that regard, one
delegation requested the Department to look at the possibility of
introducing guided visits to the United Nations Office at Nairobi.

72.  Recommendation 20.  Some delegations questioned the usefulness of
establishing a revolving fund and made reservations thereon.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

73.  The Committee recognized the importance of the Department's
activities and expressed its appreciation for the report, which it
found to be useful.

74.  The Committee endorsed recommendations 1 to 13, 14.A, 15, 16, 18
and 19, with the following modifications and understandings:

     Recommendation 1

     The words "established agencies of information" were replaced by
     the words "established governmental and non-governmental agencies
     of information".

     Recommendation 2.B

     The words "public and private information agencies" were replaced
     by the words "governmental and non-governmental information
     agencies".

     Recommendation 4.C 

     On the understanding that the Secretariat would publish all
     materials listed in the programme budget as approved by the
     General Assembly.

     Recommendations 15 and 16 

     On the understanding that these recommendations should be
     implemented taking into account the various national interests and
     contexts and that collaboration with non-governmental
     organizations would strictly adhere to the requirements of the
     relevant General Assembly resolutions on the matter.

75.  The Committee decided that the report, together with its
conclusions and recommendations thereon, should be transmitted to the
Committee on Information at its nineteenth session for consideration
and appropriate action.  The Committee invites the extended bureau of
the Committee on Information to follow up the recommendations endorsed
above.


               E.  In-depth evaluation of peace-keeping operations:
                   termination phase

76.  At its 2nd and 3rd meetings, on 3 and 4 June 1996, the Committee
considered the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on
the in-depth evaluation of peace-keeping operations:  termination
phase (E/AC.51/1996/3, annex).

                                  Discussion

77.  Delegations agreed with the emphasis in the report on learning
from experience, and considered that a systematic approach to building
up and maintaining institutional memory was crucial and would generate
savings in the future.  Many delegations also noted that translating
the lessons of experience into improved policies and procedures was
important and required that regular, predictable financing should be
provided to the Lessons Learned Unit of the Department of Peace-
keeping Operations, as recommended by the Special Committee on
Peace-keeping Operations (A/51/130, para. 50).  Other delegations
considered that the appropriate concept was "predictable funding". 
Several delegations stated that the lessons learned in peace-keeping
should be distributed in all official languages to all Member States
and on a regular basis to all bodies concerned, including the Special
Committee, for their consideration and approval.  Several delegations
stated that the "lessons learned" process should not be limited to the
Department of Peace-keeping Operations but should apply to all
departments and organizations involved.

78.  Many delegations stated that the broad approach taken to the
termination phase was helpful.  Others considered that the report
should have concentrated on the specific elements of the problems of
the termination phase as such.  Some delegations expressed their
disappointment at the rather loose way in which that important subject
had been addressed.  Other delegations stated that greater
consideration should have been given to drawing lessons from
experience with the termination of problematic missions.  Given the
complex nature of the termination phase, delegations emphasized the
importance of a coordinated framework to integrate the efforts of the
various entities involved without prejudice to the different ways of
funding the activities concerned.  Some delegations welcomed the
findings of the report on peace-building.  Other delegations pointed
out that the question of peace-building and related matters was being
dealt with by other bodies, such as the General Assembly's Informal
Open-ended Working Group on An Agenda for Peace, stressed that there
was currently no agreement on the question, and regretted its
inclusion in the report.  Several delegations stated that the proposed
review of policy concerning the disposition of assets was timely; some
considered that there was a need to apply a cost-benefit approach.

79.  With regard to the major components enumerated in table 2 of the
report, several delegations reiterated that there was no legislative
basis for that listing of components.  They deeply regretted the
inclusion in the report of concepts which had not been approved by the
General Assembly and were still being negotiated in the Working Group
on An Agenda for Peace.  Other delegations noted that since the
components could be included in peace-keeping operations if the
Security Council so mandated, and had been so included in the past, it
was appropriate that they be listed and that capacity for action in
those areas be maintained.  Some delegations noted problems of
translation in the Spanish version of table 2 and considered that the
words intervencio'n inmediata should be replaced by the words
despliegue ra'pido.  Some delegations strongly rejected the
affirmation that civil society was the backbone of a political system,
and stressed in that regard the central and important role that
Government played in maintaining the political system in each country.

80.  In the course of the debate, some delegations made observations on
a number of the recommendations in the report.

81.  Recommendation 1.  Some delegations considered that the
recommendation should include the Special Committee on Peace-keeping
Operations, to which the present report should be submitted.

82.  Recommendation 3 (a).  Some delegations considered that the
following phrase should be added:  "and present them for consideration
and approval, as appropriate, to the relevant intergovernmental
bodies, including the Special Committee on Peace-keeping Operations".

83.  Recommendation 3 (c).  Several delegations emphasized that the
secondments proposed in the recommendation should be resorted to only
if the regular and predictable financing recommended by the Special
Committee on Peace-keeping Operations in its report to the General
Assembly was not forthcoming; other delegations expressed their
concern about the implications of recommendation 3 (c).  They
regretted the growing imbalance within the Department of Peace-keeping
Operations between posts financed from the regular budget and the
support account for peace-keeping operations, and the number of
military officers on loan.  They also noted that the use of loaned
personnel should be temporary, and urged the Secretary-General and the
competent bodies of the General Assembly to take steps to correct the
imbalance by providing necessary financing for posts currently
occupied by officers on loan and by recruitment for those posts, in
accordance with established procedures.  They stressed that the
planning function of activities of the Department of Peace-keeping
Operations needed regular and predictable financing.  In that context,
they requested the Secretary-General to make every effort to ensure
respect for the principle of equitable geographical representation. 
Other delegations noted the primary importance of Article 101,
paragraph 3, of the Charter of the United Nations.  Many delegations
recalled the detailed report that the Secretary-General had to submit
to the General Assembly on various aspects of the question, and
expressed the view that the recommendation should be further discussed
after the consideration of that report.

84.  Recommendation 4.  Several delegations proposed the deletion of
the phrase "of multi-component peace-keeping missions".  They also
stressed that demobilization, resettlement and reintegration of
uprooted populations were not activities to be implemented by the
Department of Peace-keeping Operations, which did not have a mandate
for them.  Those delegations stressed that they agreed only to the
general principle of designation of the centres but emphasized that
evaluation of the above-mentioned activities was not within the
Department's mandate, so that the recommendation should be elaborated,
stressing that those activities were within the competence of such
other bodies as the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for
Refugees (UNHCR) and the Department of Humanitarian Affairs.

85.  Recommendations 6, 7, 9 and 11.  Many delegations emphasized that,
in the absence of agreement on the concepts, policies and practices
relating to peace-building as an integral part of peace-keeping, or on
the role and scope of involvement of UNDP in peace-keeping missions,
discussions on the recommendations should await the outcome of the
work of the Working Group on An Agenda for Peace.  Those delegations
rejected the concept of peace-building as an integral part of
peace-keeping operations.  Other delegations particularly welcomed the
findings and recommendations of the report on peace-building.  They
stressed that peace-building should be an integral part of all
peace-keeping operations and that failure to adopt a planned and
coordinated approach to it risked squandering an often fragile peace
and with it significant investments by the international community.

86.  Recommendations 8, 10 and 13.  Some delegations stated that any
actions on those recommendations should be based on decisions of
relevant intergovernmental bodies.

87.  Recommendation 14 (c).  Some delegations expressed the view that
the proposed retention of military personnel to assist in securing the
assets of a mission after the end of its political mandate would
require the prior approval of the Security Council.

88.  Recommendation 16.  Some delegations cautioned that in
implementing the recommendation care must be taken not to infringe
upon national sovereignty, and proposed that the question of drafting
guidelines for field operations in countries experiencing continuing
civil strife should be examined by the Special Committee on
Peace-keeping Operations.  Other delegations fully supported the
recommendation.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

89.  The Committee expressed appreciation for the report and agreed
with the emphasis in the report on learning from experience.

90.  The Committee endorsed recommendations 2, 5, 12, 14 (a) and (b)
and 15 (b).

91.  There was no agreement in the Committee on recommendations 3 (c),
6, 7, 9, 11 and 16.  The Committee therefore recommended that they be
examined further by the relevant intergovernmental bodies.  With
respect to recommendation 7, the Committee did not intend by that
action to prohibit the Lessons Learned Unit of the Department of
Peace-keeping Operations from assessing experience with any mandated
activities of completed peace-keeping missions.

92.  The Committee endorsed recommendations 1, 3 (a) and (b), 4, 14 (c)
and 15 (a) with the following modifications and understandings:

     Recommendation 1

     The words "the Special Committee on Peace-keeping Operations" were
     inserted before the words "and the Inter-Agency Working Group".

     Recommendation 3

     In the chapeau, the word "multi-component" was deleted.

     Recommendation 3 (a)

     The words "and present them for consideration and approval, as
     appropriate, to the relevant intergovernmental bodies, including
     the Special Committee on Peace-keeping Operations" were added at
     the end of the subparagraph.

     Recommendation 4

     The words "of multi-component peace-keeping missions" were
     deleted.  With that change the recommendation was endorsed, on the
     understanding that that was an endorsement of the general
     principle of designation of responsibility centres and did not
     imply that the Department of Peace-keeping Operations had
     responsibility for any functions beyond those in its mandate.

     Recommendation 14 (c)

     The words "with the prior approval of the Security Council" were
     added at the end of the first sentence.

     Recommendation 15 (a)

     The words "after a peaceful transfer of power to constituted
     government" and the words "and the continuing peace-building
     requirements of the new situation created by the mission" were
     deleted.

93.  The Committee took note of recommendations 8, 10 and 13, on the
understanding that any actions on those recommendations should be
based on decisions of the relevant intergovernmental bodies.

94.  The Committee requested that the report, together with the
conclusions and the recommendations of the Committee on it, should be
transmitted to the Informal Open-ended Working Group of the General
Assembly on An Agenda for Peace, the Special Committee on
Peace-keeping Operations and other intergovernmental bodies addressing
the questions raised in the report, for consideration and appropriate
action.


         F.  Triennial review of the in-depth evaluation of the Office
of
             the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

95.  At its 3rd and 4th meetings, on 4 June 1996, the Committee
considered the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on
the triennial review of the implementation of the recommendations made
by the Committee at its thirty-second session on the evaluation of
UNHCR (E/AC.51/1996/4, annex).


                                  Discussion

96.  Delegations welcomed the report and found that it provided an
informative statement of progress made by UNHCR to implement the
recommendations made by the Committee.  Many delegations stressed that
such reviews were evidence of the usefulness of the work of the
Committee; the report showed that its recommendations had helped UNHCR
in improving its effectiveness.  Generally, delegations were satisfied
with progress in the cooperation of UNHCR with other programmes and
agencies of the United Nations system and with implementing partners. 
Some delegations expressed concern, however, about the lack of
coordination in the field of programme implementation at the country
level between UNHCR and UNDP resident coordinators.

97.  One delegation expressed its support for the work of the
inter-agency task force on internally displaced persons, established
in 1993, and urged it to reach a consensus on a better mode of
distribution of tasks.  Another delegation stated that the attention
paid by UNHCR to regional approaches to durable solutions, involving
further development agencies, had been found useful.  One delegation
considered that there was a need to define a methodology for action
during conflicts and in the post-conflict period.  One delegation
expressed the view that the comprehensive approach followed at the
recent conference of the Commonwealth of Independent States was a
useful model that could be applied in other regions.  Another
delegation stressed the importance of international solidarity with
the countries hosting refugees and the need to share their burden.

98.  It was noted by one delegation that the increase of flows from
some regions and countries necessitated greater cooperation with both
countries of origin and transit countries.  Several delegations stated
that cooperation should be expanded and formalized with a larger
number of memoranda of understanding; some other delegations stated
that cooperation and the conclusion of such memoranda should include
organizations outside the United Nations system, such as the
International Organization for Migration.

99.  In the area of human rights, the collaboration of UNHCR with the
human rights mechanisms of the United Nations system was noted;
however, several delegations expressed disappointment that the
memorandum of understanding with the Centre for Human Rights had not
been finalized.  Delegations were encouraged by the contribution of
UNHCR to the system-wide early-warning system; a number were
concerned, however, by the lack of a coherent international mechanism
in the collection and dissemination of information.  One delegation
stressed that UNHCR would benefit from an early-warning capacity and,
for that reason, had a responsibility in the development of an
international mechanism.  One delegation regretted that it was given
no precise information on the development of the common working group.

100.     Several delegations stressed, in regard to recommendation 6,
that any agreement with non-governmental organizations in their
relations with UNHCR should fully respect the relevant legislative
basis.

101.     Regarding programming and administrative controls,
delegations noted the progress accomplished.  Several delegations
stressed that administrative controls of implementing partners should
be strengthened, and that assessments of their capacity should be
centrally maintained by UNHCR for internal purposes.  Delegations
noted support provided by UNHCR to implementing partners through
training organized at the regional and local levels; a number of
delegations stated that this effort benefiting implementing partners
and local authorities needed to be increased, in particular with
regard to refugee law.

102.     Some delegations called attention to the need to respect
fully the principle of equitable geographical distribution in
contracting personnel, including those contracted on secondment.

103.     Many delegations were concerned by the apparent lack of
progress in the training of UNHCR staff.  Several delegations stated
that they were encouraged by the attention given by UNHCR to strategic
planning; one delegation observed that UNHCR should ensure that its
policies and guidelines were better reflected in its country
programmes.

104.     Some delegations regretted the use in the Spanish version of
the report of the word intervencio'n in reference to the participation
of UNHCR in certain activities (paras. 4 and 5) and requested its
replacement by the word participacio'n.  In this connection, they also
requested that the words intervencio'n ra'pida in paragraph 9 be
replaced by the words respuesta ra'pida.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

105.     The Committee expressed appreciation for the report, which it
found to be comprehensive.

106.     The Committee noted that its recommendations had helped UNHCR
to improve its effectiveness.

107.     The Committee recommended that the triennial review, together
with the Committee's discussion and its conclusions and
recommendations thereon, should be submitted to the Executive
Committee of UNHCR for its consideration and appropriate action.

108.     The Committee took note of the report and recommended that
follow-up action on the issues raised in it should be taken by UNHCR
and other relevant organizations, and that oversight review of those
actions should be undertaken by the Office of Internal Oversight
Services, as appropriate, as part of its overall internal oversight
function.


                         III.  COORDINATION QUESTIONS


          A.  Report of the Administrative Committee on Coordination and
              preparations for the Joint Meetings of the Committee for
              Programme and Coordination and the Administrative
              Committee on Coordination

109.     At its 11th and 12th meetings, on 10 June 1996, the Committee
considered the annual overview report of ACC for 1995 (E/1996/18 and
Add.1) and the report of the twenty-ninth series of Joint Meetings of
the Committee for Programme and Coordination and the Administrative
Committee on Coordination, held on 16 October 1995 (E/1996/4 and
Corr.1).


                                  Discussion

110.     The Committee focused its discussion on a number of issues,
including the role of the Committee itself and the closely related
issue of the Joint Meetings of the Committee for Programme and
Coordination and the Administrative Committee on Coordination, the
Forum on the Future of the United Nations, African economic recovery
and development, drug abuse control, the functioning of ACC and
administrative questions.

111.     Many delegations recognized the potential of ACC in
strengthening the coordination of activities of the organizations of
the United Nations system, in particular in the follow-up to major
international conferences through the establishment of ad hoc
inter-agency task forces with timebound goals for the implementation
of the outcomes of conferences.

112.     Many delegations strongly reaffirmed the role of CPC in
providing expert advice to the Economic and Social Council and the
General Assembly on programme and coordination issues of the United
Nations and, in this context, strongly reiterated the need to
strengthen the role of the Committee.

113.     Other delegations questioned the usefulness of the Committee
as it presently operated and concluded that it needed to review its
working procedures with a view to being more effective and efficient.

114.     Many delegations strongly stressed the need to ensure that
the organizations of the United Nations system received all the
resources needed for the implementation of their programmes of work,
and urged all Member States, particularly the major contributor, to
fulfil their financial commitments on time, in full and without
conditions.

115.     Many delegations regretted the abolition of the Joint
Meetings of the Committee for Programme and Coordination and the
Administrative Committee on Coordination.  They also expressed their
concern that this decision could have implications for the future role
of CPC itself.  They considered that the Committee was the only
intergovernmental committee providing expert advice to the General
Assembly and the Economic and Social Council on coordination
questions.  Other delegations welcomed the decision to suspend the
Joint Meetings and supported the proposal that the remaining
coordination functions of the Committee be moved to the Economic and
Social Council.

116.     In the discussions on the report of ACC, a number of members
of the Committee expressed their appreciation for the effort
undertaken by the Secretary-General in organizing the Forum on the
Future of the United Nations.  At the same time, several others
expressed concern about some of the concepts discussed at the Forum,
such as those related to regional groupings, new approaches to the
concepts of security, new threats to peace and the involvement of
civil society at the level of the decision-making process in the
United Nations.  In this context, they regretted that the
Secretary-General included such concepts in the report, without having
any mandates from the General Assembly.

117.     Some delegations noted explanations made by the
representative of the Secretariat that the Forum had been an event
undertaken by the Secretary-General in observance of the fiftieth
anniversary of the United Nations, and that the issues raised at the
Forum were part of an informal occasion of reflection and
self-assessment covering a number of evolving new political, economic
and social challenges in today's world, and did not represent
decisions for the United Nations.

118.     On the issue of African economic recovery and development,
some delegations welcomed the launching of the United Nations
System-wide Special Initiative on Africa and noted that it represented
an operational arm of both the New Agenda for the Development of
Africa in the 1990s, and the System-wide Plan of Action for African
Economic Recovery and Development.  A number of members expressed
concern about the omission of some key issues from the Special
Initiative, such as, the issues of refugees in Africa, professional
training, proliferation of mines and unemployment.  Some delegations
noted explanations made by the representative of the Secretariat that
the Special Initiative did not include all priority areas, but rather
included a number of specific areas where joint and/or coordinated
action by several organizations of the United Nations system was
possible.

119.     Other delegations stressed the need for a coherent and
coordinated effort by all the agencies of the United Nations system in
the implementation of the Special Initiative.  A number of delegations
welcomed the active participation of the donor community in the
Special Initiative, in particular the Bretton Woods institutions, and,
in this regard, those delegations stressed the need to take immediate
and concrete action.

120.     On the subject of the follow-up to international conferences,
members welcomed the establishment of the three inter-agency task
forces based on the three interrelated themes of basic services for
all (under the chairmanship of the Executive Director of the United
Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)), the enabling environment for social
and economic development (with the World Bank as lead agency) and
employment and sustainable livelihoods (with the International Labour
Organization (ILO) as lead agency).  Other delegations regretted that
insufficient attention had been paid to the objectives of those task
forces or to an analysis of the results of their work so far.  A
number of Committee members, however, expressed concern that the
financial resources required for adequate follow-up to major
international conferences were being sharply reduced.  Other members
stressed the importance of making efficient use of the scarce
resources available.  Effectiveness should be enhanced and work
prioritized.

121.     On the same issue, several delegations reiterated the central
role of each Government in coordinating the follow-up activities to
the conferences, which had to be on the basis of national priorities
and strategies.

122.     On the issue of procedures for presenting reports, some
delegations emphasized that no decisions should be taken unilaterally. 
In that regard, they stressed that any decision on the matter should
be examined in the context of the overall review of publication
policy.

123.     On the issue of procedures for presenting reports (para. 59),
several delegations emphasized that any decisions on the matter should
not be taken until the report of the Secretary-General on the
publications policy of the United Nations (A/C.5/48/10) had been
considered by the General Assembly, and until the relevant
intergovernmental bodies had taken appropriate action on it.

124.     Some delegations welcomed the detailed information contained
in the report in connection with assistance provided by the
organizations of the United Nations system to countries invoking
Article 50 of the Charter of the United Nations, and requested the
Secretariat to continue to provide the Committee with further
information on this matter in the future.

125.     On the issue of international drug abuse control, a number of
delegations stated that the issue of "drug demand" should also have
been reflected in the report as part of the ongoing work by ACC in
that area.  In reply, some delegations noted explanations by the
representative of the Secretariat that that aspect of the problem had,
in fact, been included in the United Nations system-wide activities on
the subject, and would be adequately reflected in the report to the
Economic and Social Council.  He further informed the Committee that
the issue of international cooperation against the illicit production,
sale, demand, traffic and distribution of narcotics and psychotropic
substances and related activities was a priority issue for the
organizations of the United Nations system, as evidenced by the fact
that the issue had been chosen as the topic to be discussed during the
high-level segment of the 1996 substantive session of the Economic and
Social Council.

126.     On the issue of the coordination of operational activities
for development, some delegations called for the strengthening of the
resident coordinator system at the country level in accordance with
the provisions of General Assembly resolutions 47/199 of 22 December
1992 and 50/120 of 20 December 1995, in particular with reference to
the follow-up to major international conferences and the work of the
ad hoc inter-agency task forces.  Some delegations also requested that
more information on the country strategy notes be included in future
in the report.

127.     With reference to the issue of access to resources, some
delegations expressed the view that resources were becoming
increasingly scarce and that it was, therefore, necessary for
organizations of the United Nations system to focus more on how to
utilize better the scarce resources available.  Other delegations were
of the view that it was essential for organizations of the United
Nations system to be able to have access to a predictable and adequate
level of financial and human resources, if they were to be able to
implement effectively their programmes of work.

128.     With reference to administrative questions, many delegations
disagreed with the proposals by ACC to change the composition of the
International Civil Service Commission (ICSC).  A number of
delegations supported the concern expressed in the report of ACC
regarding the critical need to restore the competitive conditions of
service of the Professional staff of the organizations of the United
Nations system in order to enable the organizations to attract and
retain staff of the highest calibre.  Other delegations, however,
stated that they believed that the current conditions of service of
staff were adequate and that evidence of recruitment and retention
difficulties must be provided before any increase could be justified.

129.     A number of delegations agreed with the statement of ACC on
the status of women in the secretariats of the United Nations system. 
They stressed the importance of increasing the number of women
candidates for recruitment and promotion at all levels and of
recruiting and promoting qualified women on a competitive basis,
giving due regard to Article 101, paragraph 3, of the Charter.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

130.     The Committee took note of the annual overview report of ACC
and the report of the twenty-ninth series of Joint Meetings of the
Committee for Programme and Coordination and the Administrative
Committee on Coordination.  The Committee, nevertheless, stressed the
need for documentation to be placed before the Committee with
sufficient time to enable the Committee to study it, and for more
information to be given on achievement by ACC of its objectives, to
permit a better assessment of its effectiveness. 

131.     The Committee noted the efforts of the Secretary-General, as
Chairman of ACC, in the establishment and launching of the United
Nations System-wide Special Initiative on Africa early in 1996.  The
Committee also expressed the hope that the inter-agency task forces
established to ensure improved coordination of the follow-up to
international conferences, would take the Special Initiative into
consideration in the implementation of their work.

132.     The Committee, in stressing the importance of the continued
attention by the Secretary-General to efforts of assistance to
countries invoking Article 50 of the Charter of the United Nations,
requested that information continue to be provided to it on this
subject in the future.

133.     The Committee stressed the need to provide the organizations
of the United Nations system with adequate resources to implement
their programmes of work, and also stressed the legal obligation of
all Member States to fulfil their financial commitments on time and in
full.


             B.  Implementation of the System-wide Plan of Action for
                 African Economic Recovery and Development

134.     At its 12th to 14th meetings, on 10 and 11 June 1996, the
Committee considered the progress report of the Secretary-General on
the implementation of the System-wide Plan of Action for African
Economic Recovery and Development (E/AC.51/1996/6 and Corr.1).  In
that connection, the Committee also considered the report of JIU
entitled "Evaluation of the United Nations New Agenda for the
Development of Africa in the 1990s:  Towards a More Operational
Approach?" (A/50/885) and the comments of the Secretary-General and
ACC thereon (A/50/885/Add.1).


                                  Discussion

135.     While pointing out that very little had been done to
implement the System-wide Plan of Action, many delegations welcomed
the United Nations System-wide Special Initiative on Africa as an
important vehicle for its implementation.  They stated that the New
Agenda as such had not been followed by action and found disturbing
the information given in the JIU report that the New Agenda was little
known at the field level.  While many delegations acknowledged that
the Special Initiative gave new impetus to the New Agenda as its
operational wing, some  expressed doubts at the impact of yet another
initiative that might not be followed by action.  Other delegations
emphasized that for the Special Initiative to succeed, it should not
be imposed from outside, but must have strong African ownership and
focus on practical and sustainable actions that reflected national
priorities.

136.     In the view of a number of delegations, the Special
Initiative carried a complex message that would have a bearing on all
levels inside Africa as well as within the donor community and the
entire United Nations system.  The Special Initiative should also be
brought to the attention of the Group of Seven for its support.  It
could fill the programmatic weaknesses of the New Agenda and could
constitute a valuable contribution to the sustainable development of
Africa.  It should build on economic reforms and lead to operational
programmes by making optimal use of United Nations resources and
closely coordinating all the United Nations bodies involved.  The main
prerequisites for its success were involvement of civil society,
massive use of the media and convincing all the parties involved of
the gains to be obtained.  Some delegations expressed their hope that
the Special Initiative would be successful, provided it was met by the
necessary political will of the donor countries, and requested the
presentation of an oral or written progress report to the Committee at
its next session.

137.     A number of delegations expressed appreciation for the work
carried out at Headquarters by the units implementing Programme 45. 
Other delegations were not convinced that the present Secretariat
structure was right and endorsed the JIU suggestion that it be reduced
to a single liaison point.  As regards the Inter-agency Task Force on
African Economic Recovery and Development a delegation requested that
the Committee be more informed on the Task Force and also that it
should make a presentation to the Committee at its next session, and
eventually be merged with other task forces of the Administrative
Committee on Coordination.

138.     Whereas some delegations expressed appreciation for the
progress report in that it established very well the linkage between
the System-wide Plan of Action and the Special Initiative, some others
questioned its usefulness, as it did not give any concrete information
and contained no evidence that the System-wide Plan of Action had
benefited Africa.  They said that it just confirmed existing fears
that the New Agenda had not been effective.

139.     Some members asked whether any resources had already been
mobilized for the implementation of the Special Initiative, and to
what extent there would be additional resources rather than only
redirection of resources.  A number of delegations expressed concern
at the proliferation of so many initiatives on Africa without having
tangible results on the ground.

140.     A number of delegations pointed out that the international
community should seek the views of the African Governments and people
in setting up programmes rather than imposing them.  It was said that
often funds were being used for items that were of no immediate use in
the field, and that the solutions to the problems had to come from the
Africans themselves.  A number of delegations welcomed the intention
of the donor community to take an active participation in the Special
Initiative, and, in that regard, they stressed the need to take
immediate and concrete actions.  Each country should be able to set
its own pace in establishing democracy.  It was also important to
provide resources to Africa without attaching stringent conditions to
their use.  Rather than telling African countries what to do, they
should be asked what they wanted to do because only people-centred
development carried hope for peace and security.

141.     Many delegations were grateful for the initiatives undertaken
by some major donor countries, in particular Japan and France, to
assist Africa.  Some delegations pointed out that coordination within
the international community was still at a rather low level.  While a
lot of assistance was provided on a bilateral basis, foreign direct
investment needed to be encouraged.  It was necessary to make the
development process sustained and sustainable.

142.     Many delegations commended the JIU report, but several
questioned some of its findings.  Some delegations expressed concern
about the report and considered some of the conclusions controversial,
reminding the Committee of doubts expressed by some delegations about
requesting a study at the Committee's thirty-fourth session.  Some
delegations expressed concern about the methodology used to produce
the report.  It was found lacking in detail:  no figure was presented
to assess the flow of resources and substantiate the conclusion.  In
addition, the methodology was also found lacking in balance.  No
contact had been organized by the inspectors with any donor Government
or creditor.  Other delegations found it an excellent, hard-hitting
and clear report.  Its findings were in some cases disturbing, but it
was precisely because of its disturbing character that it fulfilled
its purpose.  Other delegations noted that some recommendations had
financial implications that were even not mentioned in the report. 
Others noted a lack of recommendations for specific action.  A number
of delegations pointed out that the May 1996 Conference of Ministers
of the States members of ECA had not studied or endorsed any
recommendation of the report.  A draft resolution commending the
report was withdrawn by the Technical Committee of the Whole.  Many
delegations observed that various recommendations, in particular
recommendations 10, 11, 13 and 14, were made on purely political
matters, which were outside the functions and powers of JIU, as
recently reminded by the General Assembly in its resolution 50/233 of
7 June 1996 on JIU.

143.     In the course of the debate, delegations made concrete
observations on the following recommendations in the JIU report.

144.     Recommendation 1 (b).  While one delegation welcomed the idea
of annual reporting by each organization of the United Nations system
to its governing body, another delegation proposed that rather than
asking ACC to report annually to the Economic and Social Council,
Africa be covered in connection with specific topical discussions,
such as poverty.

145.     Recommendation 2:

     (a) One delegation asked what was meant by JIU's recommendation
that the organizations reduce their reliance on resident coordinators.

     (c) One delegation questioned the pertinence of the last part of
recommendation 2 (c) regarding the application of the norms and
standards endorsed by African Member States.

146.     Recommendation 3:

     (a) One delegation welcomed the use of informatics for policy
advocacy and awareness campaigns.

     (b) Further clarification was requested on the suggestion that a
United Nations system joint information service should be established
in each United Nations information centre in Africa, and the proposal
was considered unrealistic as the centres did not have enough
resources to carry out the tasks foreseen.  It was also suggested that
the resident coordinator system could be used to disseminate
information.

147.     Recommendation 4 (a) and (b).  While agreeing with
recommendation 4 (a), some delegations asked what the role of the
States would be in promoting the two umbrella projects mentioned,
which office would be responsible for them and how they would be
financed.

148.     Recommendation 5:

     (a) and (c) One delegation stressed the need for coordination
among bilateral donors in support of Africa.

     (a), (c) and (d) One delegation asked where the emphasis should be
put in connection with inter-agency cooperation and coordination.

     (c) Another delegation suggested that the responsibility for that
should be with the Economic and Social Council.

     (c) One delegation did not support the establishment of an African
development conference or of a standing inter-agency working group on
the commodity sector.

149.     Recommendation 6 (e) (i).  One delegation felt that it was up
to the States, rather than the development organizations, to decide on
the location of field offices, in order to avoid political
implications.

150.     Recommendation 7.  Whereas one delegation suggested that
reference be made to the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action
rather than to the African Platform for Action, another delegation
emphasized that the African Platform for Action also maintained its
validity after the Beijing Conference, particularly as its
recommendations had been taken into account in formulating the global
platform for action.

151.     Recommendation 8 (a).  Most delegations did not express
support for this recommendation.  A number of delegations underscored
the outstanding work carried out by the Headquarters units of
Programme 45, and expressed surprise at the recommendation to redirect
resources allocated to these units to the Inter-agency Task Force on
African Economic Recovery based at ECA.  They requested and received
an explanation on the statement in the report that 85 per cent of the
resources allocated to the New Agenda were being used at Headquarters
instead of in the field.  It was stressed that the resources under
Programme 45 were allocated for policy formulation, mobilization of
international support, advocacy and global awareness, and not for
operational activities, which were supported under the  System-wide
Plan of Action.  One delegation welcomed the suggestion to replace
Programme 45 in the next medium-term plan.  This delegation expressed
doubts about the restructuring of the ECA secretariat at such an early
stage and advocated that UNDP, rather than the Department for
Development Support and Management Services, played a more prominent
role in civil service and judicial reforms in Africa.  Another
delegation supported the suggestion made in the JIU report to reduce
the Headquarters units to a liaison function.

152.     Recommendation 9 (b).  A number of delegations did not
support the relocation of the United Nations Centre for Peace and
Disarmament in Africa in view of the financial and political
implications.

153.     Recommendation 10 (b).  Some delegations gave no support to
the setting up of the Pan-African Institute for Peace and Democracy,
bearing in mind the operational cost factor.

154.     Recommendation 11.  One delegation took the view that the
root causes of instability were poverty and lack of development.

155.     Recommendation 12.  One delegation expressed its reservations
to recommendation 12. 

156.     Recommendation 13 (b).  One delegation questioned the
practicality of the recommendation made in 13 (b) and suggested
instead more frequent consultations. 
157.     Recommendation 14.  Some delegations considered the
recommendation out of context and untimely.  One delegation wondered
whether the recommendation was not contrary to ILO Convention No. 105
concerning the abolition of forced labour.  With reference to the use
of development armies, one delegation felt that what was needed was to
educate the military and to seek preventive action in conflict
situations.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

158.     The Committee took note of the progress report on the
implementation of the revised System-wide Plan of Action and
implementation of the Special Initiative launched on 15 March 1996 as
the vehicle for implementing the system-wide plan.  While welcoming
the potential of the Special Initiative as an operational wing of and
a complement to the New Agenda focusing on a limited number of
priority issues facing Africa, the Committee expressed strong concern
about the prevailing trend to flood Africa with new initiatives that
were hardly implemented.  Noting that the organizations of the United
Nations system, including, in particular, the World Bank, had
committed themselves to working together, coordinating their efforts
and pooling resources, making full use of their means for media
awareness, through the Special Initiative, the Committee urged them to
produce tangible results and requested that a report on the
implementation of the Special Initiative be submitted to it at its
spring session in 1997 and thereafter, as it may decide.

159.     The Committee took note of the report of JIU, which it found
a useful basis for discussion, and of the comments of the
Secretary-General and of ACC.  It decided to endorse the following
recommendations, subject to the observations made during the
deliberations:

     Recommendation 2

     This recommendation is endorsed bearing in mind the need to
     maintain and reinforce the external control on the use of United
     Nations system funds involved.

     Recommendation 4 (a)

     Recommendation 4 (b)

     (i) The words "recognized most competent on the basis of their
         previous achievements" were inserted after "private sectors".

     Recommendation 5 (b)

     The words "and commitments at the global level" were deleted.

     Recommendation 6 (b), (d) and (e) (ii)

     Recommendation 6 (g)

     The words "The organizations should replace" were replaced by the
     words "The organizations should aim at replacing".

     Recommendation 7


C.  Proposed system-wide medium-term plan for
    the advancement of women, 1996-2001      

160.     At its 14th meeting, on 11 June 1996, the Committee
considered the report of ACC on the proposed system-wide medium-term
plan for the advancement of women, 1996-2001 (E/1996/16).  The
Committee also had before it, for its information, resolution 40/10,
adopted by the Commission on the Status of Women at its fortieth
session (11-22 March 1996), on the same subject (E/AC.51/1996/5,
annex).


                                  Discussion

161.     Some delegations suggested that the words "under parental
supervision" be inserted after the words "girls and boys" in line 6 of
paragraph 92 of document E/1996/16.

162.     In the section on women and health, in the same document,
some delegations strongly objected to the reference to the term
"individuals" in paragraphs 71 and 93, and insisted on the deletion of
this word from the text since it was not agreed to in other forums.

163.     One delegation questioned the relevance of the inclusion of
the words "there should be complementarity between policy reform and
direct intervention" in paragraph 23 of the document and requested
their deletion since they seemed to be out of context.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

164.     The Committee welcomed the preparation of the second system-
wide medium-term plan on the advancement of women and, aware of the
indicative nature of the plan, appreciated the efforts of those United
Nations entities that had contributed to its elaboration.  It noted
with appreciation that the plan, while following the structure of the
Platform for Action adopted at the Fourth World Conference on Women,
also included elements from other recent United Nations conferences
and summits, and from other relevant intergovernmental mandates.  The
increased focus on system-wide collaboration and cooperation in the
follow-up to conferences was commended.

165.     The Committee supported and reiterated the extensive and
thorough comments that had been adopted by the Commission on the
Status of Women on the draft of the plan (resolution 40/10, annex). 
Those comments by the substantive body dealing with women and gender
issues were considered to be a valuable input to the work of the
Committee.

166.     The Committee expressed its support for the system-wide
mainstreaming of a gender perspective.  Noting the valuable work done
in that regard by the Commission on the Status of Women, it was
stressed, however, that responsibility for mainstreaming was incumbent
upon all United Nations machinery.  It also expressed support for
capacity-building for mainstreaming at the national level,
particularly in developing countries.  It recognized the catalytic
role of the Division for the Advancement of Women in gender
mainstreaming, and underscored the need to strengthen the capacity of
the Division in implementing the Platform for Action and the system-
wide plan.

167.     The Committee agreed to ensure, in its examination of the
medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001, that the mainstreaming of a
gender perspective was reflected in the individual programmes of the
medium-term plan.  It emphasized the responsibility of programme
managers for progress in gender mainstreaming.  The Committee took
note of the proposal that international legal instruments concerning
the protection of women receive priority ratification by Member
States.

168.     In the light of its joint responsibility for monitoring the
implementation of the system-wide plan, and the anticipated mid-term
review to be conducted by the Commission on the Status of Women and
the Economic and Social Council in 1998, the Committee agreed to
conduct a progress review at some stage during the next four years,
preferably in 1998, or in 2000.  It also noted that the Commission on
the Status of Women was expected to monitor annually progress in the
implementation of the plan within the framework of its long-term
programme of work.

169.     The Committee stressed the need for a coordinated and
collaborative approach by the United Nations system in the
implementation of the Platform for Action and the system-wide medium-
term plan for the advancement of women, and for an integrated approach
in the follow-up to all recent United Nations conferences and summits. 
At the same time, the Committee underlined the individual
responsibility and accountability of agencies for implementing those
parts of the Platform for Action and the system-wide plan falling
within their specific mandate.  It also stressed the necessity of
mainstreaming a gender perspective in the planning and programming of
all United Nations agencies.  It commended the plan's emphasis on
avoiding overlapping and duplication of efforts.  It emphasized the
need to refine and improve research and data collection.

170.     The Committee took note of the recent establishment of a
standing ACC committee on women and gender issues, and of its role in
the implementation of the system-wide plan and reporting thereon.  The
importance of being able to monitor progress against agreed indicators
was noted as being important for the proper implementation of the
plan.  The Committee also recognized that some of the issues raised on
its implementation would be taken up in that context.  It expressed
support for the efforts undertaken by the Senior Adviser to the
Secretary-General on gender issues.

171.     Reiterating the comments made in the Commission on the Status
of Women, the Committee stressed that the plan should be more
strategic and include outputs that could be measured and properly
evaluated at the end of the period covered by the plan, rather than a
list of activities to be undertaken.  It emphasized that all
departments of the United Nations Secretariat had a role in the
implementation of the critical areas of concern of the Platform for
Action.

172.     The Committee agreed that greater emphasis needed to be
placed on outputs and results to be achieved from the implementation
of the activities contained in the plan.  In that regard, it observed
the absence of benchmarks for assessing progress in implementation and
it agreed that future revisions to the plan must redress that
omission.

173.     The Committee recommended that consideration be given to the
desirability of designating lead agencies in activities where there
was a multitude of participating entities in order to avoid
duplication of efforts.  It underlined the critical importance of
interaction between research and operational activities, and
consequently between research-oriented United Nations bodies and
operational entities.

174.     The Committee underlined the important role of civil society,
including non-governmental organizations, in implementing the Platform
for Action.  Consequently, and to the extent possible, the plan should
pay more attention to their role.  It should also reflect additional
measures for sharing responsibilities between men and women as a
component of implementation.

175.     The Committee agreed that, in outlining technical and other
assistance to developing countries, the plan should be more focused to
ensure that useful and practical assistance was provided.  It
highlighted the need to use agreed language from conferences.

176.     The Committee recommended that various intergovernmental
bodies study the system-wide plan, noting that comments in addition to
those of the Commission on the Status of Women would constitute
valuable input into the implementation of the plan.

177.     Referring to particular sections of the system-wide plan, as
well as to comments adopted by the Commission on the Status of Women,
the Committee made the following observations.

Women and poverty

178.     The Committee reiterated the need to focus attention on the
underlying causes of women's poverty, and that resources allocated to
development policies and programmes aimed at the eradication of
poverty should not be diverted to emergency relief assistance.  It
emphasized the need for participation of all relevant entities,
including regional commissions, in addressing poverty.  Insufficient
attention was being paid to the situation of rural women in the
section on women and poverty and throughout the plan.

179.     The relevance of commitments 2 and 10 of the Copenhagen
Declaration on Social Development (A/CONF.166/9, chap. I), as well as
paragraph 25 of chapter II of the Programme of Action of the World
Summit for Social Development, to poverty eradication efforts within
the framework of the plan was emphasized.

Women and health

180.     The Committee emphasized the need to update the language in
the section on women and health to reflect accurately the language
from the International Conference on Population and Development and
the Platform for Action.  It stressed the need to reaffirm the
principle of women's equal access to health services.  It expressed
concern at the lack of attention given to gender and human
immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)
and to female genital mutilation.  It noted the role of adult
education in eliminating female genital mutilation.

Violence against women

181.     The Committee expressed support for operational activities in
the prevention and elimination of violence against women, and for
further collaboration and exchange of information among United Nations
entities active in this area.  The impetus provided by the Beijing
Conference to address violence against women should be more fully used
by all actors.  The recently established Trust Fund in Support of
Actions to Eliminate Violence against Women in the United Nations
Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), in accordance with General
Assembly resolution 50/166 of 22 December 1995, should be utilized to
support operational activities that are consistent with the proposed
actions in the system-wide plan.  Additional efforts to address
violence against women migrant workers could be envisaged.

Women and the economy

182.     The Committee welcomed initiatives to study gender aspects
with regard to export processing zones and special economic zones.

Women in power and decision-making

183.     Noting the continuing underrepresentation of women in
managerial and decision-making posts in the United Nations system, the
Committee underlined the need to expand opportunities for women to
fill vacancies.  Notwithstanding annual resolutions of the General
Assembly on the improvement of the status of women in the Secretariat,
agreed goals remained to be achieved.  It was also pointed out that
the equal treatment of women in appointment and promotion must be in
accordance with Article 101.3 of the Charter of the United Nations.

Human rights of women

184.     The Committee welcomed efforts to support the ratification of
the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination
against Women, and of relevant ILO conventions.  It also encouraged
efforts to strengthen the Committee on the Elimination of
Discrimination against Women.

Women and the media

185.     Activities relating to paragraph 243 (f) of the Platform for
Action (A/CONF.177/20, chap. I, annex II) should be envisaged in the
plan.

Institutional arrangements

186.     The Committee expressed support for the need to develop
further methods for accountability and evaluation of progress in
implementing the Platform for Action and eliminating gender
discrimination, particularly at the field level, but also at the
policy level.

187.     The Committee welcomed the particular role accorded to
regional commissions in implementation, and pointed out the
comparative advantage of regional and subregional offices in providing
support to Governments.  Furthermore, it underlined the desirability
of increased regional cooperation among United Nations agencies.  The
lack of information in the system-wide plan on activities of ECA was a
cause for concern.

Financial arrangements

188.     The Committee recommended that consideration be given to the
preparation of a table showing actual and pledged resources in support
of implementation of the activities in the plan.  Recognizing the
indicative nature of the plan, efforts should be made by the
implementing agencies to provide more specific information, including
an assessment of the level of allocated resources, during the course
of the review of the plan.

189.     Regarding resource mobilization for the purpose of
implementing the Platform for Action within the framework of the
consensus reached at the Conference, the Committee noted that due
account needed to be given to existing regulations and rules
concerning the redeployment of resources.  It underlined the primary
responsibility of Governments for implementing the Platform for
Action.


                   IV.  REPORTS OF THE JOINT INSPECTION UNIT


190.     At its 8th to 10th meetings, on 6 and 7 June 1996, the
Committee considered the report of JIU entitled "Accountability,
management improvement and oversight in the United Nations system"
(A/50/503 and Add.1).


                                  Discussion

191.     Delegations expressed their appreciation to JIU for a good
and timely report tackling an extremely complex, but very important,
problem addressing mounting concerns of Member States.  Many
delegations expressed appreciation and broad agreement with this first
comprehensive and wide-ranging study and its recommendations.  Others
pointed to the abstract and general character of the report, leading
in certain cases to recommendations of a general nature, as well as to
the lack of a comprehensive approach to management improvement within
the United Nations system.  One delegation thought that that was
inevitable owing to the nature of the report, while another considered
it as a historic baseline for possible future studies.  In view of
General Assembly resolution 50/233 of 7 June 1996 on JIU, delegations
noted that the report was voluminous and urged the Unit to observe the
limits established in that resolution.

192.     Satisfaction was expressed regarding the system-wide positive
trend highlighted in the report of the enhancement of the role of
oversight bodies and the distinct roles of internal and external
oversight bodies in the work of the organizations and agencies of the
United Nations system.  One delegation emphasized that the report
confirmed that agencies and organizations should adopt the Office of
Internal Oversight Services model, which had proved its worth in the
United Nations Secretariat.  Another delegation disagreed with that
opinion.  Some other delegations expressed the opinion that the Office
of Internal Oversight Services mandate extended only to the
Secretariat and that other bodies of the United Nations system had to
adopt their own system of accountability, management improvement and
oversight.  In that context, those delegations reiterated the
independence of each body and the Organization and also emphasized
that the scope of application of the Office of Internal Oversight
Services was restricted to the United Nations Secretariat.  Other
delegations regretted the inclusion of managerial concepts in the
report (para. 153), which might be considered as promotion of private
sectors within the Organization.  Those delegations expressed their
deep concern at that kind of suggestion, emphasizing the political,
universal and intergovernmental character of the Organization, which
did not allow it to apply that managerial consideration in its work. 
Other delegations noted that even intergovernmental bodies needed to
be well managed.  One delegation highlighted the report's finding that
those organizations that had been the most dynamic in pursuing
management reforms were those that were funded voluntarily or had had
severe funding cuts.  The same delegation also indicated that
additional resources were not necessarily the solution to management
reform, while another delegation was not in agreement with that view.

193.     With regard to section VII of the report, many delegations
highlighted the role of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and
Budgetary Questions in administrative and budgetary questions and
expressed their satisfaction with the work done by the Committee and
its secretariat, which was highly recognized.  In that context, those
delegations refused the suggestions of the Inspectors in paragraph 187
of the report regarding possible change in the working procedures of
the Committee, which they believed should be maintained as it was.  On
the question of the Committee for Programme and Coordination, those
delegations strongly supported the role of the Committee as the
principal subsidiary body of the General Assembly and the Economic and
Social Council with a programme planning and coordination mandate. 
They also recognized the role of JIU as the only independent
system-wide inspection, evaluation and investigation body and in that
regard strongly supported its work.  Others expressed reservations
about the usefulness of the role of the Committee for Programme and
Coordination given the way it currently functioned and reiterated
their support for the proposal to move the Committee's coordination
function to the Economic and Social Council.  They also noted their
intention to consider more fully the role of the Committee, JIU and
ACABQ in the context of the review of the oversight bodies called for
by the General Assembly in its decision 47/454 of 23 December 1992.

194.     Recommendation 1.  Some delegations supported the
recommendation and considered the establishment of the proposed
strategic unit to be important, whereas others were of the view that
it would have undesirable financial implications by establishing an
additional layer of bureaucracy, probably on the scale of a division. 
They thought that the tasks of strategic planning and improvement in
management and accountability should be pursued through existing
services such as departments' executive offices, the Department of
Administration and Management and the Office of Internal Oversight
Services.  One delegation emphasized that while the proposed unit had
excessively broad functions, the establishment of an office of
strategic planning should be supported.  Another delegation pointed
out to a contradiction in the terms of reference of the proposed unit,
which was to encompass both management and oversight functions, and
noted the lack of focus in that idea.  In regard to "benchmarking",
one delegation noted that the choice of criteria should reflect a
diverse experience of Member States in regard to the standards of
performance.

195.     Recommendation 2 was widely supported, while some delegations
criticized its general nature.

196.     Recommendation 3 was supported, although some delegations
noted that it was too general.  One delegation underlined the
importance of adopting and enforcing a code of conduct of
international civil service.

197.     Recommendation 4 was supported and the importance of an
effective information systems strategy was underscored.

198.     Recommendation 5 was supported, with delegations emphasizing
the importance of consistent development of comprehensive management
training and career development systems.  In that connection, some
delegations noted the JIU observation in paragraph 111 that in large
agencies with sizeable training programmes, funds had traditionally
been oriented towards language training, and emphasized that the
shortage of funds should not prevent the development of training
beyond the languages area.

199.     Recommendation 6.  This recommendation found general support
from the Committee.

200.     Recommendation 7.  Most delegations expressed support for
this recommendation, although one delegation questioned its meaning.

201.     Recommendation 8.  Some delegations found this recommendation
somewhat obscure and that it mixed the objectives of sound management
to be pursued by all programme managers and intergovernmental
follow-up of programme performance.

202.     Recommendation 9 was supported by many delegations, whereas
others questioned the need for a separate annual report.  Some
delegations also found that it was unclear to whom such a report
should be presented.


                        Conclusions and recommendations

203.     The Committee regretted that the comments of the
Secretary-General and of ACC on the JIU report were not available at
the time the Committee commenced its consideration of the report.  It
reiterated that relevant comments of the Secretary-General and of the
participating organizations were clearly mandated in the relevant
resolutions of the General Assembly and translated in the statute of
JIU.  It requested the Secretariat to make every effort to meet the
deadlines for offering detailed comments on JIU reports and to
ascertain that comments of the Secretary-General and of the executive
heads of the participating organizations on the Unit's reports
selected for consideration by the Committee be issued on time in all
the official languages of the United Nations.

204.     The Committee expressed its appreciation for the report and
endorsed its recommendations 2 to 6, subject to the reservations
expressed in paragraphs 194-199 above.


V.  CONSIDERATION OF THE PROVISIONAL AGENDA FOR THE THIRTY-SEVENTH SESSION OF
    THE COMMITTEE


205.     In pursuance of paragraph 2 (e) of Economic and Social
Council resolution 1979/41 of 10 May 1979, and paragraph 2 of General
Assembly resolution 34/50 of 23 November 1979, the Committee shall
submit to the Council and to the Assembly, for their review, the
provisional agenda for its thirty-seventh session, together with the
required documentation.  In accordance with paragraph 8 of the annex
to Council resolution 2008 (LX) of 14 May 1976, the thirty-seventh
session of the Committee shall be of four weeks' duration.

206.     At its 35th meeting, on 28 June 1996, the Committee
considered the provisional agenda and the documentation for the
thirty-seventh session on the basis of a note by the Secretariat
(E/AC.51/1996/L.6).

207.     At the same meeting, the Committee decided to submit to the
Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly the following
provisional agenda for the thirty-seventh session of the Committee:

     1.  Election of officers.

     2.  Adoption of the agenda and organization of work.

     3.  Review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial
         functioning of the United Nations.

         Documentation

         Report of the Secretary-General (General Assembly resolution
         45/254 A, para. 17)

     4.  Programme questions:

         (a)   Proposed programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999;

         Documentation

         Report of the Secretary-General on the proposed programme
         budget for the biennium 1998-1999 (in fascicle form)

         (b)   Evaluation.

         Documentation

         Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the
         Office of Internal Oversight Services on the in-depth
         evaluation of the programme on statistics (A/49/16 (Part
         one), para. 34)

         Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the
         Office of Internal Oversight Services on the in-depth
         evaluation of the Department of Humanitarian Affairs (ibid.)

         Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the
         Office of Internal Oversight Services on the study on the
         effects of the reorganization of the United Nations
         Environment Programme (A/50/16, para. 247; E/AC.51/1995/3,
         recommendation 23)

         Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the triennial
         review of the implementation of the recommendations made by
         the Committee for Programme and Coordination at its
         thirty-fourth session on the evaluation of the United Nations
         programme on social development (A/48/16 (Part one),
         para. 35)

     5.  Coordination questions:

         (a)   Report of the Administrative Committee on Coordination;

         Documentation

         Annual overview report of the Administrative Committee on
         Coordination for 1996

         (b)   Revised System-wide Plan of Action for African Economic
               Recovery and Development.

         Documentation

         Report of the Secretary-General on the revised System-wide
         Plan of Action for African Economic Recovery and Development
         (A/49/16 (Part two), para. 162)

     6.  Reports of the Joint Inspection Unit.

     7.  Provisional agenda for the thirty-eighth session of the
     Committee.

     8.  Adoption of the report of the Committee on its thirty-seventh
     session.



                                    ANNEX I

             Agenda for the thirty-sixth session of the Committee


1.   Election of officers.

2.   Adoption of the agenda and organization of work.

3.   Review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial
     functioning of the United Nations.

4.   Programme questions:

     (a) Programme performance of the United Nations for the biennium
         1994-1995;

     (b) Proposed medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001;

     (c) Outline of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999;

     (d) Evaluation.

5.   Coordination questions:
     
     (a) Report of the Administrative Committee on Coordination and
         preparations for the Joint Meetings of the Committee for
         Programme and Coordination and the Administrative Committee
         on Coordination; 

     (b) Implementation of the System-wide Plan of Action for African
         Economic Recovery and Development;

     (c) Proposed system-wide medium-term plan for the advancement of
         women 1996-2001.

6.   Reports of the Joint Inspection Unit.

7.   Provisional agenda for the thirty-seventh session of the
Committee.

8.   Adoption of the report of the Committee on its thirty-sixth
session.


                                   ANNEX II

           List of documents before the Committee at the first part
                          of its thirty-sixth session

                               (3-28 June 1996)


A/50/503 and Add.1             Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the
 and Add.2                     report of the Joint Inspection Unit entitled
                               "Accountability, management improvement
                               and  oversight in the United Nations system
                               (Parts one and two) and the comments of the
                               Secretary-General thereon

A/50/885 and Add.1             Note by the Secretary-General transmitting
                               the report of the Joint Inspection Unit
                               entitled "Evaluation of the United Nations
                               New Agenda for the Development of Africa
                               in the 1990s:  Towards a more operational
                               approach?" and comments of the
                               Secretary-General and of the
                               Administrative Committee on Coordination
                               thereon

A/51/6                         Proposed medium-term plan for the    period
                               1998-2001

                               Perspective

                               Programme 1:   Political affairs 

                               Programme 2:   Peace-keeping operations

                               Programme 3:   Outer space affairs

                               Programme 4:   Legal affairs 

                               Programme 5:   Policy coordination and
                                              sustainable development

                               Programme 6:   Africa:  New Agenda for
                                              Development

                               Programme 7:   Economic and social
                                              information
                                              and policy analysis

                               Programme 8:   Development support and
                                              management
                                              services

                               Programme 9:   Trade and development

                               Programme 10:  Environment

                               Programme 11:  Human settlements

                               Programme 12:  Crime prevention and criminal 
                                              justice

                               Programme 13:  International drug control    

                               Programme 14:  Economic and social development
                                              in Africa

                               Programme 15:  Economic and social development
                                              in Asia and the Pacific

                               Programme 16:  Economic development in Europe
        
                               Programme 17:  Economic and social development
                                              in Latin America and the
                                              Caribbean

                               Programme 18:  Economic and social development
                                              in Western Asia

                               Programme 19:  Human rights

                               Programme 20:  Humanitarian assistance

                               Programme 21:  Protection and assistance to
                                              refugees

                               Programme 22:  Palestinian refugees

                               Programme 23:  Public information

                               Programme 24:  Administrative services

                               Programme 25:  Internal oversight 

A/51/88                        Note by the Secretary-General transmitting
                               the report of the Office of Internal
                               Oversight Services on strengthening the
                               role of evaluation findings in programme
                               design, delivery and policy directives

A/51/128 and Add.1             Report of the Secretary-General on
                               programme performance of the United
                               Nations for 1994-1995

E/1996/4 and Corr.1            Report of the twenty-ninth series of Joint
                               Meetings of the Committee for Programme
                               and Coordination and the Administrative
                               Committee on Coordination

E/1996/16                      Report of the Administrative Committee on
                               Coordination on the proposed system-wide
                               medium-term plan for the advancement of
                               women, 1996-2001

E/1996/18 and Add.1            Annual overview report of the
                               Administrative Committee on Coordination
                               for 1995

E/AC.51/1996/1 and Add.1       Annotated provisional agenda  

E/AC.51/1996/2                 Note by the Secretary-General transmitting
                               the report of the Office of Internal
                               Oversight Services on the in-depth
                               evaluation of the Department of Public
                               Information

E/AC.51/1996/3                 Note by the Secretary-General transmitting
                               the report of the Office of Internal
                               Oversight Services on the in-depth
                               evaluation of peace-keeping operations: 
                               termination phase

E/AC.51/1996/4                 Note by the Secretary-General transmitting
                               the triennial review of the implementation
                               of the recommendations made by the
                               Committee on Programme and Coordination at
                               its thirty-second session on the
                               evaluation of the Office of the United
                               Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

E/AC.51/1996/5                 Letter dated 22 April 1996 from the
                               Chairperson of the Commission on the
                               Status of Women to the Chairperson of the
                               Committee for Programme and Coordination
                               on the proposed system-wide medium-term
                               plan for the advancement of women,
                               1996-2001

E/AC.51/1996/6 and Corr.1      Progress report of the Secretary-General
                               on the implementation of the System-wide
                               Plan of Action for African Economic
                               Recovery and Development

E/AC.51/1996/L.1 and Rev.1     Note by the Secretariat on the status of
                               documentation

E/AC.51/1996/L.2 and Rev.1     Proposed programme of work

E/AC.51/1996/L.3               List of reports issued by the Joint
                               Inspection Unit in 1995 and early 1996: 
                               note by the Secretariat

E/AC.51/1996/L.4               Current notional costs of documentation
                               and meeting time:  note by the Secretariat

E/AC.51/1996/L.5 and           Draft report of the Committee
Add.1, 2 and 28-35             on the first part of its thirty-sixth
                               session

E/AC.51/1996/L.6               Draft provisional agenda for the
                               thirty-seventh session of the Committee
                               for Programme and Coordination:  note by
                               the Secretariat


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