United Nations

A/50/655


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

19 October 1995

ORIGINAL:
ENGLISH


Fiftieth session
Agenda item 125


FINANCING OF THE UNITED NATIONS MISSION FOR THE
REFERENDUM IN WESTERN SAHARA

Report of the Secretary-General



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  The  present  document  contains the  performance  report  of  the  United
Nations  Mission for  the Referendum  in  Western  Sahara (MINURSO)  for the
period from 1 October  1994 to 30 June 1995.  The initial cost estimates for
the  period under  review amounted  to  $43,181,000 gross  ($39,713,500 net)
with $39,711,500 gross ($36,582,500 net) apportioned.  Expenditure  totalled
$37,092,900 gross  ($34,364,700 net), resulting  in an unencumbered  balance
of $2,618,600 gross ($2,217,800 net).

  The reported unencumbered balance resulted mainly  from delays in the work
of the  Identification Commission  and,  as a  result, the  lower number  of
international and  local staff  in the  Mission area.   This led  to savings
under premises, other equipment and supplies and services.

  The  savings realized for  the reporting  period were  partially offset by
additional requirements  in the flying hours  for the  aircraft, the overlap
time during the increased number of  rotations of military observers,  spare
parts for the transport operations and commercial freight and cartage.

  The proposed action to  be taken by the  General Assembly at  its fiftieth
session, which is  set out in paragraph 4  of the present report, relates to
crediting  the  unencumbered   balance  to  Member  States  against   future
assessments.




95-31781 (E)   031195/...
*9531781*
CONTENTS

    Paragraphs  Page

I.  INTRODUCTION ........................................... 13

II.  STATUS OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS ....................... 23

III.  FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR THE PERIOD FROM
  1 OCTOBER 1994 TO 30 JUNE 1995 ......................... 33

IV.  ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY AT ITS
  FIFTIETH SESSION ....................................... 43

Annexes

I.  Financial performance report for the period from 1 October 1994 to
  30 June 1995:  summary statement ...................................4

II.  Financial performance report for the period from 1 October 1994 to
  30 June 1995:  supplementary information ...........................9

III.  Authorized and actual staff on board for the period from
  1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995 .....................................31

I.  INTRODUCTION


1.   In  accordance  with  the  reports  of  the  Secretary-General  on  the
financing of  the  United Nations  Mission  for  the Referendum  in  Western
Sahara  (MINURSO)  of  11  May  1994   (A/48/848/Add.1)  and  7  March  1995
(A/49/559/Add.1), the performance report for the  period from 1 October 1994
to 30 June  1995 is presented below. The  two mandate periods covered by the
report - from the inception of  the Mission to 31 May 1995 and from 1 to  30
June 1995 - have been combined.


II.  STATUS OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS

2.  The status of assessed contributions to  MINURSO received and unpaid  as
at 22 September 1995  is summarized in  the table below.  Total  outstanding
assessments  of $50,321,922 are  due from Member States  for the period from
the inception of the Mission up to 30 September 1995.

                                         United States dollars

  Amount appropriated                      196 094 150
    Less:  Applied credits               (6 774 574)

  Amount apportioned                       189 319 576
    Less:  Payments received           (138 997 654)

  Balance due                               50 321 922


             III.  FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR THE PERIOD FROM
                   1 OCTOBER 1994 TO 30 JUNE 1995

3.    Annex  I to  the present  report  sets out  by budget  line  items the
resources, totalling  $39,711,500 gross  ($36,582,500 net),  that were  made
available and the expenditure of the Mission for  the period from 1  October
1994 to 30 June 1995, as well as savings and overruns.  As indicated,  total
expenditure amounted  to $37,092,900 gross  ($34,364,700 net), resulting  in
an  unencumbered  balance  of  $2,618,600  gross ($2,217,800  net)  for  the
period.  Supplementary information on the  expenditure under each line  item
is provided  in annex II.   The authorized  and the actual  staffing of  the
Mission during the period under review is provided in annex III.


                 IV.  ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

                      AT ITS FIFTIETH SESSION

4.  The action  to be taken by the  General Assembly at its fiftieth session
in connection  with the  financing of  MINURSO is  a decision  to credit  to
Member States the unencumbered balance of $2,618,600 gross ($2,217,800  net)
with  respect to  the period  from 1  October 1994  to 30  June 1995 against
their  future assessment  relating to  any  mandate  period approved  by the
Security Council.
Annex I

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR  THE PERIOD FROM 1 OCTOBER 1994 TO 30  JUNE
1995

Summary statement

(In thousands of United States dollars)



Initial cost
estimate
(1)
Apportionment
(2)
Estimated
expenditure
(3)
Savings/
(overruns)
(4)=(2)-(3)



1.  Military personnel costs







  (a)  Military observers







  Mission subsistence allowance
3 783.8
3 773.0
3 837.8
(64.8)  Travel costs
657.2
657.2
839.3
(182.1)  Clothing and equipment allowance
   33.9
   33.9
   34.7
 (0.8)    Subtotal
4 474.9
4 464.1
4 711.8
(247.7)



  (b)Military contingents







  Standard troop cost reimbursement
406.4
406.4
381.9
24.5  Welfare
5.1
5.1
4.0
1.1  Rations
1 050.7
1 050.7
998.6
52.1  Daily allowance
16.5
16.5
14.5
2.0  Mission subsistence allowance
298.8
130.9
134.3
(3.4)  Emplacement, rotation and
      repatriation of troops
138.8
138.8
137.4
1.4  Clothing and equipment allowance
   30.9
   31.0
   25.2
 5.8    Subtotal
1 947.2
1 779.4
1 695.9
83.5



  (c)Other costs pertaining to military personnel







  Contingent-owned equipment
593.0
593.0
593.0
0.0  Death and disability compensation
  123.9
  123.9
  123.9
  0.0      Subtotal
  716.9
  716.9

  716.9
  0.0



      Total, line 1
7 139.0
6 960.4
7 124.6
(164.2)



2.Civilian personnel costs







  (a)Civilian police







  Mission subsistence allowance
1 755.0
1 509.8
1 156.0
353.8  Travel costs
535.9
535.9
291.0
244.9  Clothing and equipment allowance
   20.9
   20.9
   17.2
  3.7      Subtotal
2 311.8
2 066.6
1 464.2
602.4



  (b)International and local staff salaries







  International staff salaries
9 254.1
8 415.9
6 844.1
1 571.8    Local staff salaries
370.7
381.5
355.3
26.2  Consultants

0.0
0.0
66.0
(66.0)    Overtime
18.0
18.0
13.5
4.5    Common staff costs
4 512.3
4 347.7
4 392.7
(45.0)  Mission subsistence allowance
4 059.4
3 605.1
3 011.4
593.7  Travel to and from the mission
  area
340.4
55.2
55.2
0.0  Other travel costs
    50.4
    30.8
   175.8
 (145.0)      Subtotal
18 605.3
16 854.2
14 914.0
1 940.2



  (c)Government-provided personnel







  Travel and allowance of
    Organization of African Unity
    personnel and tribal chief
   166.3
   144.3
   130.9
   13.4



      Total, line 2
21 083.4
19 065.1
16 509.1
2 556.0



3.  Premises/accommodation

  Rental of premises
219.8
219.8
59.9
159.9  Alterations and renovations to premises
36.7
36.7
20.0
16.7  Maintenance supplies
16.0
16.0
15.0
1.0  Maintenance services
9.6
9.6
7.8
1.8  Utilities
76.1
76.1
36.2
39.9  Construction/prefabricated buildings
126.2
126.2
 73.5
 52.7



      Total, line 3
484.4
484.4
212.4
272.0



4.Infrastructure repairs
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



5.Transport operations







  Purchase of vehicles
166.7
166.7
166.7
0.0  Rental of vehicles
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Workshop equipment
8.6
8.6
7.7
0.9  Spare parts, repairs and maintenance
301.3

297.1
394.2
(97.1)  Petrol, oil and lubricants
558.4
558.4
484.4
74.0  Vehicle insurance
   56.7
   55.8
   65.6
(9.8)



      Total, line 5
1 091.7
1 086.6
1 118.6
(32.0)



6.  Air operations







  (a)Helicopter operations







    Hire/charter costs
2 966.1
2 925.0
2 876.4
48.6    Aviation fuel and lubricants
859.1
922.3
524.4
397.9    Positioning/depositioning costs
15.0
15.0
90.0
(75.0)    Resupply flights
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Painting/preparation
0.0
0.0
18.0
(18.0)    Liability and war-risk insurance
    0.0
    0.0
    0.0
  0.0      Subtotal
3 840.2
3 862.3
3 508.8

353.5



  (b)Fixed-wing aircraft







  Hire/charter costs
1 010.7
1 010.7
1 447.3
(436.6)    Aviation fuel and lubricants
913.4
891.3
1 225.0
(333.7)    Positioning/depositioning costs
20.0
20.0
30.0
(10.0)    Painting/preparation
10.0
10.0
3.0
7.0  Liability and war-risk insurance
   60.8
   60.8
   76.7
(15.9)      Subtotal
2 014.9
1 992.8
2 782.0
(789.2)



  (c)Aircrew subsistence allowance
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



  (d)Other air operations costs







  Air traffic control services
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Landing fees and ground handling
18.9
18.9
0.0
18.9    Fuel storage containers
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0      Subtotal
   18.9
   18.9
    0.0
 18.9



      Total, line 6
5 874.0
5 874.0
6 290.8
(416.8)



7.  Naval operations
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



8.  Communications







  (a)Complementary communications







  Communications equipment
983.0
274.0
251.7
22.3  Spare parts and supplies
112.5
112.5
139.2
(26.7)  Workshop and test equipment
20.0
20.0
18.9
1.1    Commercial communications
  217.5
182.5
283.9
(101.4)      Subtotal
1 333.0
589.0
693.7
(104.7)

  (b)Main trunking contract
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



    Total, line 8
1 333.0
589.0
693.7
(104.7)



9.Other equipment







  Office furniture
28.8
28.8
16.8
12.0  Office equipment
49.6
49.6
24.2
25.4  Data-processing equipment
200.8
200.8
192.8
8.0  Generators
218.3
33.3
66.4
(33.1)  Observation equipment
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Petrol tank plus metering equipment
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Medical and dental equipment
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Accommodation equipment
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Miscellaneous equipment
132.9
132.9
95.4
37.5  Field defence equipment
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Spare parts, repairs and maintenance
196.2

196.2
166.8
29.4  Water purification equipment
  0.0
  0.0
  0.0
 0.0



      Total, line 9
826.6
641.6
562.4
79.2



10.Supplies and services







  (a)  Miscellaneous services







  Audit services
56.3
56.3
56.3
0.0    Contractual services
4.5
4.5
10.2
(5.7)    Data-processing services
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Security services
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Medical treatment and services
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Claims and adjustments
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Official hospitality
0.9
0.9
0.3
0.6    Miscellaneous other services
19.0
19.0
 36.1

(17.1)      Subtotal
80.7
80.7
102.9
(22.2)



  (b)Miscellaneous supplies







    Stationery and office supplies
131.4
131.4
88.5
42.9    Medical supplies
101.0
101.0
71.0
30.0    Sanitation and cleaning materials
43.4
43.4
62.4
(19.0)    Subscriptions
2.7
2.7
1.7
1.0    Electrical supplies
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Ballistic-protective blankets for
      vehicles
40.0
40.0
0.0
40.0    Uniform items, flags and decals
21.7
21.7
22.4
(0.7)    Field defence stores
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Operational maps
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0    Quartermaster and general stores
 76.5
 76.5
100.5
(24.0)      Subtotal
416.7
416.7
346.5
70.2



      Total, line 10

497.4
497.4
449.4
48.0



11.  Election-related supplies and services
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



12.Public information programmes
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



13.Training programmes
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



14.Mine-clearing programmes
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



15.Assistance for disarmament and demobilization
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



16.Air and surface freight







  Transport of contingent-owned equipment
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Military airlift
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0  Commercial freight and cartage
23.2
23.2

42.9
(19.7)



      Total, line 16
23.2
23.2
42.9
(19.7)



17.Integrated Management Information System
35.4
35.4
35.4
0.0



18.Support account for peace-keeping operations
1 325.4
1 325.4
1 325.4
0.0



19.  Staff assessment
 3 467.5
 3 129.0
 2 728.2
  400.8



      Gross total, lines 1-10
43 181.0
39 711.5
37 092.9
2 618.6



20.  Income from staff assessment  
(3 467.5)
(3 129.0)
(2 728.2)
 (400.8)



      Net total, lines 1-20
39 713.5
36 582.5
34 364.7
2 217.8



21.  Voluntary contribution in kind
     0.0
     0.0
     0.0
    0.0



      Total resources
39 713.5
36 582.5
34 364.7
2 217.8





Annex II

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR THE PERIOD
FROM 1 OCTOBER 1994 TO 30 JUNE 1995

Supplementary information

(In United States dollars)


1.  Military personnel costs

  (a)  Military observers

  (i)  Mission subsistence allowance ...........................(64 800)

1.  The  additional requirement of $64,800 under this heading was due to the
higher than budgeted number of person-days  spent by the military  observers
in  the Mission  area  during  the period  under review.   The  initial cost
estimates  provided for a  total of  62,697 person-days,  whereas the actual
number of  persondays spent  by the  military observers in  the Mission  was
63,709.  This difference  between the projected and actual number of person-
days was due  not only to the slightly  higher number of military  observers
in the  Mission area, but  to the overlap  time of  handover/takeover, which
took three  days on  average for  the 192  rotation trips  of the  observers
during the  period under  review.  No  provision was made  for overlap  time
during  rotation of the  military observers  in the  initial cost estimates.
The authorized  and actual number  of observers  in the Mission  area during
the reported period is provided in table 1 below.


           Table 1.  Authorized and actual number of military observers
                     1 October 1994-30 June 1995


1994



1995
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
JuneAuthorized
231
231
231

231
231
231
231
231
231Actual
224
237
232

234
240
232
230
237
235Difference
(7)
6
1

3
9
1
(1)
6
4

    (ii)      Travel  ..................................................(182
100)

2.   The additional  requirement of  $182,100 under the travel  costs of the
military  observers was  due to  57  unforeseen  rotation trips  of military
observers during  the period.   The initial cost estimates  provided for the
rotation travel of military  observers, based on an  average of 15 trips per
month for  a total of 135 rotation  trips for the  nine-month period, from 1
October 1994 to  30 June 1995.  In  view of the difficult desert  conditions
at teamsites where the military observers  were stationed, the actual number
of rotation trips was increased to 192, or 21.3 rotations per month.

   (iii)  Clothing and equipment allowance ........................(800)

3.  The  additional requirement of $800 was  due to a slightly higher number
of military  observers in  the Mission  area than  provided for in  the cost
estimates, as shown in table 1 above. 

  (b)  Military contingents

  (i)  Standard troop cost reimbursement .......................24 500

4.  Savings were  due to payment of standard troop cost reimbursement for 40
military personnel as against the  48 military personnel provided for in the
cost  estimates.  As at 30 September 1995, a total of $569,900 is due to one
Government for this item.

    (ii)  Welfare .................................................1 100

5.    Savings  were due  to  payment  of  this  entitlement  to 40  military
personnel, instead of the 48 military personnel budgeted for.

   (iii)  Rations .................................................52 100

6.  Savings were due to the lower than projected number of personnel  posted
away from headquarters during the period under review.   Table 2 below shows
the projected and actual number of personnel posted away  from the Mission's
headquarters.

          Table 2.  Projected and actual number of personnel posted away
                    from Mission headquarters from 1 October 1994 to
                    30 June 1995


1994



1995
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
JuneProjected
200
200
200

267
328
385
431
431
431Actual
189
189
187

244
289
358
389
410
410Difference
11
11
13

23
39
27
42
21
21

7.  A total  of 208 person-months (6,257 person-days) have not been utilized
owing  to  delays  in  deployment  of   the  additional  personnel  to   the
Identification Commission.

     (iv)  Daily allowance .........................................2 000

8.    Savings  were  due  to  payment of  this  entitlement  to  40 military
personnel against the 48 personnel budgeted for.

  (v)  Mission subsistence allowance ...........................(3 400)

9.    The  additional  requirements  were  attributable  to  the  overlap in
handover/  takeover time  during rotation of military  personnel, which took
three  to  five days.     No provision  for  such overlap  time of  military
personnel was made in the cost estimates.

    (vi)  Emplacement, rotation and repatriation of troops ........1 400

10.   Savings  were  due to  the use  of air  charter instead  of individual
flight arrangements for the rotation of military personnel.

   (vii)  Clothing and equipment allowance ........................5 800

11.   Savings were due to payment of the clothing and equipment allowance to
40 military  personnel as against the 48 military personnel  provided for in
the cost estimates.

  (c)  Other costs pertaining to military personnel

  (i)  Contingent-owned equipment ..............................-   

12.   The provision  of $593,000  for contingent-owned  equipment was  fully
obligated  to  cover   claims  for  depreciation  of  the   contingent-owned
equipment  of the Republic of  Korea Medical Unit  and for the reimbursement
of consumable items.

    (ii)  Death and disability compensation .......................-   

13.   The provision  of $123,900  for death and  disability compensation was
fully obligated  to cover potential claims  for death,  disability or injury
of  military personnel.    At  present, the  total unliquidated  obligations
available for this purpose amount to $468,500.  Thus far, claims in  respect
of three deaths and two cases of disability or injury have been received.

2.  Civilian personnel costs

  (a)  Civilian police

  (i)  Mission subsistence allowance ...........................353 800

14.   Table  3 shows  the projected  and actual  number of  civilian  police
monitors in the Mission area during the period under review.


          Table 3.  Projected and actual number of civilian police in the
                    Mission area from 1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995


1994



1995
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
JuneProjected
55
55
55

81
107
133
160
160

160Actual
49
49
49

50
74
97
98
112
113Difference
6
6
6

31
33
36
62
48
47

15.   Savings  of  $353,800  under mission  subsistence  allowance  occurred
because of  the lower than projected  number of civilian  police monitors in
the  Mission area, resulting in a total of  194 person-months (5,897 person-
days) not being utilized, owing largely to delays in the deployment of  such
monitors.

    (ii)  Travel ..................................................244 900

16.  Table 4  below shows the projected  and actual emplacement and rotation
travel of civilian police monitors during  the reported period, resulting in
74 fewer trips than anticipated.


         Table 4.  Projected and actual number of emplacement and rotation
                   trips of civilian police from 1 October 1994 to
                   30 June 1995


Projected


Actual


Difference
Type of travel
Number
Cost
'000$
Number
Cost
'000$
Number
Cost
'000$Emplacement
105
351.7
64
216.6
41
135.1Rotation
55
184.2
22

74.4
33
109.8     Total
160
535.9
86
291.0
74
244.9

17.   Since one of  the functions of  the civilian  police is to  ensure the
safety of the Identification  Commission Centre, the effect  of the delay in
the Commission's  activities on  the deployment  of the  civilian police  is
reflected in the above table.

   (iii)  Clothing and equipment allowance ........................3 700

18.  Savings  under the above heading were  due to the lower than  projected
number of police monitors in the Mission area (see table 3 above).

   (b)  International and local personnel

  (i)  Salaries - international staff ..........................1 571 800

19.     Table  5  below  provides  the  authorized   and  actual  number  of
international  staff in  the Mission  area as  well as  the average  monthly
vacancy rate of international staff during the period under review.


          Table 5.  Authorized and actual number and average vacancy rate
                    of international staff in the Mission area from
                    1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995


1994



1995
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
JuneAuthorized
196
196
196

229
260
291
320
320
320Actual
144
164
174

184
198
223

228
236
228Difference
52
32
22

45
62
68
92
84
92Vacancy rate (%)
26.5
16.3
11.2

19.7
23.8
23.4
28.7
26.2
28.7

20.  As  shown in table 5 above,  savings were due  to the vacancy situation
in  the Mission.   A total of 549 person-months  was not utilized during the
period  because of the delays  in the work of the Identification Commission.


    (ii)  Salaries - local staff ..................................26 200

21.   Table  6  below shows  the authorized  and  actual number  of  locally
recruited staff in the Mission area during the reporting period.


          Table 6.  Authorized and actual number and average vacancy rate
                    of local staff in the Mission for the period from
                    1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995


1994



1995
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
JuneAuthorized
55
55
55

90
90
90
90
90
90Actual
59

67
69

79
82
82
84
84
79Difference
(4)
(12)
(14)

11
8
8
6
6
11Vacancy rate (%)
(7.3)
(21.8)
(25.4)

12.2
8.9
8.9
6.7
6.7
12.2
  22.  As shown in table 6 above, savings were due to the vacancy  situation
in the Mission  area, which in turn was  attributable to delays in the  work
of  the Identification  Commission.   A total  of 20  person-months was  not
utilized during the period under review.

   (iii)  Consultants .............................................(66 000)

23.   In paragraph 23 of his report to the Security Council of 30 March 1995
on  the situation  in  Western Sahara  (S/1995/240),  the  Secretary-General
noted, inter  alia, that the settlement  plan specified  that an independent
jurist would be appointed by the  Secretary-General who, in cooperation with
the  parties,  would  take  steps  to  ensure  the  release  of  all Saharan
political prisoners  and detainees  before the  beginning of the  referendum
campaign.  An independent jurist was  appointed by the Secretary-General  in
May 1995 for a six-month period.  The special service agreement cost of  the
independent jurist amounted to $32,800.   To this amount had to be added the
fee ($33,200) for another consultant, who  had rendered services during  the
previous mandate period.  

    (iv)  Overtime ................................................4 500

24.   Savings were due to  the lower than anticipated  use of overtime as  a
result of delays in the work of the Identification Commission.

  (v)  Common staff costs ......................................(45 000)

25.  During the period under  review, there were 52 home leave and 55 family
visit travels.   This is  greater than the  average annual  travel cycle and
was caused  by the  unforeseen delay  in the  identification  process, as  a
result of which  many of the Identification  Commission personnel had to  be
advised to proceed on leave travel.  Also,  a total of 56 staff members were
repatriated  during  the  mandate  period,  which  resulted  in   additional
expenses of $70,000.

26.    As  recommended  by  the  Advisory  Committee  on  Administrative and
Budgetary  Questions  (ACABQ)   (A/49/771/Add.1,  para.  16),  the   initial
provision  of  $285,200  made  for   emplacement  and  rotation   travel  of

international  civilian staff  under the  "Travel  to  and from  the Mission
area" line item was deleted and half of the provision made  for that purpose
($142,600)  was  incorporated into  the  common  staff  costs.   The  actual
expenses  in   connection  with  the   rotation  travel   of  the   civilian
international  staff for the  period under  review amounted  at $234,400 and
was recorded against common staff costs.  

    (vi)  Mission subsistence allowance ...........................593 700

27.  Savings under  this heading were attributable to the vacancy  situation
in the Mission (see table 5 above).

   (vii)  Travel to and from the Mission area .....................-   

28.  The provision of  $55,200 made for this purpose  for the period  from 1
October to 30 November 1994 was fully utilized. 

   (viii)    Other travel  costs  ......................................(145
000)

29.  A provision of $30,800  was made in the cost estimates for one official
trip per  two-month  period to  New York  for senior  Mission officials  for
consultations. The  additional requirement of  $145,000 for official  travel
of MINURSO staff was  due to the  following travel, not provided for  in the
cost estimates:

  (a)   Two  political officers  and a  military  adviser  in April  1995 in
connection  with the  preparation of  the Secretary-General's report  to the
Security Council (S/1995/404) for the consideration  of the extension of the
Mission's mandate beyond 31 May 1995 ($8,300);

  (b)  Two internal auditors in February 1995 ($7,400);

  (c)   Two political officers  in May 1995 to accompany  the members of the
Security Council mission to Western Sahara ($10,100);

  (d)  A radio  technician to set  up a satellite Earth station  in Tindouf,
Algeria ($2,700);

  (e)   A  staff member's  trip  to  Vienna to  accompany the  remains of  a
deceased  staff member  and the  repatriation  of  human remains  to Abidjan
($8,300);

  (f)  A  member of the Republic of Korea  Medical Unit to attend a  medical
conference in Munich ($2,800);

  (g)  Two staff members' travel from MINURSO to Brindisi, Italy, to  locate
generators  and  other  equipment  for  the  urgent  needs  of  the  Mission
($9,200);

  (h)   Three  staff  members'  trip  to Casablanca  to  survey the  medical
facilities in May 1995 ($3,100);

  (i)   A legal officer who travelled in May 1995 to  the Mission area for a
period of two  weeks to assist the independent  jurist in the conduct of his
work ($6,000);

  (j)   There were  11 other  official duty  trips during  the period  under
review as well as duty  trips within the Mission area  for the total  amount
of $10,300;

  (k)  Five personnel  travelled to the Mission area for the survey  mission
in October 1994 ($22,900);

  (l)   Six members of the Security Council travelled to the Mission area in
May 1995 ($29,200);

  (m)  Two security staff accompanied  the Secretary-General to the  Mission
area in November 1994 ($7,200);

  (n)  Two  military advisers travelled to  assist in defining the  Civilian
Police  concept and in  the preparation of an  integrated logistics plan for
Mission expansion ($7,900);

   (o)   A  medical adviser  travelled  for  medical inspection,  to conduct
local  training of  the Republic  of Korea  Medical  Unit  and to  study the
request of the Republic of Korea for additional medical personnel ($2,600);

  (p)  The Deputy Special  Representative of the Secretary-General travelled
to  United  Nations  Headquarters  in  May  1995  in  conjunction  with  the
presentation of the report of the  Secretary-General to the Security Council
($7,000).

  (c)  International contractual personnel

30.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (d)  United Nations Volunteers

31.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (e)  Government-provided personnel ...........................13 400

32.  Table 7 below provides the projected  and actual number of Organization
of African Unity (OAU) observers in the Mission area.


           Table 7.  Projected and actual number of OAU observers in the
                     Mission area from 15 January to 30 June 1995


1995
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
JuneProjected
8
12
12
12
12
12Actual
4
6
6
8
8
8Difference
4
6
6
4
4
4

33.  As  shown in table 7,  savings under government-provided personnel were
due to delays in deployment of OAU observers to the Mission area. 

  (f)  Civilian electoral observers

34.  No provision was made under this heading.

3.  Premises/accommodations

  (i)  Rental of premises ......................................159 900

35.    Since the  outcome of  negotiations in  progress with  the Government
concerned  to  provide  offices/accommodation  for  the  additional  MINURSO
personnel in connection with  the expansion of the Identification Commission
was not  known at the time the  cost estimates were prepared, a provision of
$156,200 was  made in the  MINURSO budget to  rent 34  apartments in January
and 50 apartments from  February to June 1995.  However, the  Identification
Commission personnel,  for whom the  apartments were to be  rented, were not
recruited because of the  slow progress in  the Identification process.   At
the  same time,  the Government  had  also  provided additional  rooms in  a
hotel, which have resulted in savings under the above line item.

    (ii)  Alteration and renovation of premises ...................16 700

36.   The initial provision  of $36,700  for alterations and  renovations to
MINURSO  premises was  not fully  utilized,  as  facilities provided  by the
Government required minimal alterations and/or renovations.

   (iii)  Maintenance supplies ....................................1 000

37.  Savings were  due to the lower than  projected average monthly costs of
maintenance  supplies during the  period, recorded  at $1,600 against $1,800
provided in the budget.

    (iv)  Maintenance services ....................................1 800

38.  Savings were due to the lower  than projected average monthly costs  of
maintenance  services during  the period,  recorded at  $800  against $1,000
provided in the budget.

  (v)  Utilities ...............................................39 900

39.   The lower use  of electricity and  other utilities  than projected was
due to the vacancy situation in the Mission area.

    (vi)  Construction/prefabricated buildings ....................52 700

40.   Owing  to delays  in the  deployment of  the additional  staff  of the
Identification Commission, this provision was only partially utilized.

4.  Infrastructure repairs

41.  No provision was made under this heading.

5.  Transport operations

  (i)  Purchase of vehicles ....................................-   

42.   The provision of $166,700 made for the cost of shipping the additional
57 vehicles to the  Mission area was fully utilized during the period  under
review. The actual number of vehicles shipped to  the Mission area from  the
United Nations Observer Mission in Liberia  (UNOMIL) in connection with  the
expansion of  the Identification  Commission was  71.   This is 14  vehicles
more than initially anticipated by MINURSO.

    (ii)  Rental of vehicles ......................................-   

43.  No provision was made under this heading.
     (iii)  Workshop equipment ......................................900

44.   Savings were due  to the  lower cost  of vehicle  lift and  heavy-duty
batteries than initially estimated.

    (iv)  Spare parts, repair and maintenance .....................(97 100)

45.  The provision of $297,100 for the  spare parts, repair and  maintenance
of MINURSO vehicles for  the period under review proved to be  insufficient.
An  additional $97,100 was  required to  obtain urgently  needed spare parts
and to  cover  the  cost of  repairing non-operational  vehicles.   Most  of
MINURSO's vehicles  are over three  years old  and are being  utilized under
harsh desert conditions.   The 71 vehicles shipped to the Mission area  from
UNOMIL were in no better condition.

46.  As at 27 June 1995, 31  vehicles were awaiting spare parts in Laayoune,
12  vehicles were in  off-the-road condition  in the Northern  Sector, 19 in
the Southern  Sector and 7  in the Tindouf area in Algeria.   In addition to
that, out  of 21  Pegaso trucks  on  loan from  the Royal  Moroccan Army,  8
vehicles were off the road.

  (v)  Petrol, oils and lubricants .............................74 000

47.   Savings  were due  to lower  fuel consumption,  which in  turn was the
result of reduced  mileage requirements  per vehicle attributable to  delays
in the work of  the Identification Commission and the significant number  of
cars off the road during the period under review.  

    (vi)  Vehicle insurance .......................................(9 800)

48.   The additional  requirement of  $9,800 for  vehicle insurance resulted
from  the  higher  than  projected  costs  of  local  third-party  liability
insurance.  The provision of $55,800 was based on an estimated  cost of $260
per vehicle per  year for 278  MINURSO vehicles and at an  increased rate of
$320 per vehicle per year for 57 additional  vehicles for the period from  1
March to 30 June  1995. However, the  cost of worldwide coverage during  the
period  under review  was $57  per vehicle  per year  while that  for  local
third-party  liability   insurance  was   $262.3  per   vehicle  per   year.
Consequently,  the total  average  cost  of insurance  coverage for  MINURSO
vehicles during the period under review  amounted to $319.3 per  vehicle per
year.   In  addition,  the  Mission  paid  for  the  insurance  cost  of  14
additional  vehicles ($1,400) for  the period  from 18 May to  30 June 1995,
which  had not  been  provided  for in  the  cost estimates.    The  current
contracts  are  being  extended  on  a  three-month basis  with  a  view  to
attempting to canvass for better terms  with insurance companies other  than
the present insurer,  which has declined to  extend any special  discount to
MINURSO.

6.  Air operations

49.  Table  8 below shows the  composition of the  MINURSO air  fleet during
the period  under review.  Since the actual rental of one additional B-200 C
light aircraft  started on 15  January 1995 instead  of 1  February 1995, as
projected in the cost  estimates, one Bell-212  helicopter was  discontinued
as of that date.   Three Bell-212 helicopters remaining in the Mission  area
were replaced  by three  Mi-8T  helicopters as  of  16  March 1995.    These
changes are reflected in table 8 below.


             Table 8.  Composition of MINURSO air fleet for the period
                       from 1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995

Period
Helicopters
Aircraft1 October-30 November 1994
5 Bell-212
2 AN-261 December 1994-14 January 1995
4 Bell-212
2 AN-2615 January-15 March 1995
3 Bell-212
2 AN-26

1 B-20016 March-30 June 1995
3 Mi-8T
2 AN-26
1 B-200

  (a)  Helicopter operations

  (i)  Hire/charter costs ......................................48 600

50.     Table  9  below  provides   the  projected   and  actual  helicopter
hire/charter costs during the reporting period.


                        Table   9.     Projected   and   actual   helicopter
hire/charter costs
                                  from 1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995


Projected



Actual



Difference
Period
No. of
helicopters
Unit
cost
'000$
Total
cost
'000$
No. of
heli-copters
Unit
cost
'000$
Total
cost
'000$
No. of
heli-copters
Unit
cost
'000$
Total
cost
'000$1 Oct.-30 Nov. 1994
5
90.0
900.0
5
101.3
1 012.5
-(11.3)
(112.5)1 Dec. 1994-14 Jan. 1995
4
90.0
540.0
4
101.3
607.5

-(11.3)
(67.5)15 Jan.-15 Mar. 1995
3
90.0
540.0
3
101.3
607.5
-(11.3)
(67.5)16 Mar.-30 June 1995
3
90.0
  945.0
3
61.8
  648.9
-28.2
296.1     Total


2 925.0


2 876.4


48.6

51.  As shown in table  9 above, savings were due to the lower monthly rates
for three Mi-8T  helicopters contracted by the  Mission for the  period from
16 March  to 30  June 1995,  which resulted in  savings of  $48,600 for  the
period under review.

    (ii)  Aviation fuel and lubricants ............................397 900

52.  Savings of $397,900 have resulted from two factors:
    (a)    The  actual  hourly fuel  consumption  of  Bell-212  helicopters,
operating in the Mission  area during the period from  1 October 1994  to 15
March  1995, was  lower  than projected  in the  cost estimates  (400 litres
actual versus 850 litres projected), which resulted in savings of $300,000;

  (b)   The cost  of aviation  fuel went  down in  1995 from 0.55  cents per
litre,  projected in  the  budget estimates,  to  0.43 cents  per  litre  on
average,  depending  on extra  delivery  charges,  resulting  in savings  of
$97,900.

   (iii)  Positioning/depositioning costs .........................(75 000)

53.   The additional requirement  of $75,000 was  due to the  fact that  the
contractual arrangements for the three Mi-8T  helicopters to be deployed  in
March 1995  had not been  finalized at the  time of  the budget preparation.
The cost  estimates  provided only  $15,000  for  the depositioning  of  one
helicopter.   The  charter  agreement  with  the  new  contractor,  however,
provided  for   a  one-time   positioning  charge  of   $90,000  for   three
helicopters, at $30,000 each.  

    (iv)  Resupply flights

54.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (v)  Painting/preparations ...................................(18 000)

55.   The  charter agreement  with the  new  contractor involved  a one-time
charge  of $18,000 for the  painting of three helicopters  in United Nations
colours  at  $6,000 each.   No  provision was  made in  the budget  for this
purpose since the contractual arrangements for  the three helicopters to  be

deployed  in the Mission area in  March 1995 were  not finalized at the time
of budget preparation.

    (vi)  Liability and war-risk insurance

56.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (b)  Fixed-wing aircraft

  (i)  Hire/charter cost .......................................(436 600)

57.  Table 10 compares the projected and  actual cost of fixed-wing aircraft
hire/charter for the period under review.
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                              Table  10.    Projected  and  actual  aircraft
hire/charter requirements from
                                         1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995

(In thousands of United States dollars)

Period

Projected




Actual




Difference
(No.
of
aircraft)
Hire
cost
per
unit
Total hire cost
Additional hours (No.)
Total projected cost
Hire cost per unit
Total hire cost
Addi-tional
hours
(No.)
Total
actual
cost
In
hire
cost
per unit
In
 total
hire
cost

   In cost of
   additional
     hours  
  $350  $400
   per   per
   hour  hour

In
total
cost
for the
period1 October 199430 June 1995
(2 AN 26)
344.3
688.7
-688.7
434.9
869.8
497.0
1 041.7
90.6
181.1
171.9

353.015 January-30 June 1995
(Bell-200 C)
322.0
322.0
-322.0
354.2
354.2
128.0
405.6
32.2
32.2

51.4
83.6     Total

1 010.7

1 010.7

1 224.0
625.0
1 447.3

213.3
223.3  

436.6
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58.   As  shown in  table 10,  the  additional  requirement of  $436,600 for
fixed-wing aircraft rentals was due to the following:

  (a)  The  provision of $688,700  for the  rental of  two AN-26  fixed-wing
light  aircraft for  the period  from 1  October 1994  to  30 June  1995 was
underestimated. The  actual cost of  two aircraft for  the period, based  on
the  charter  agreements,  was  $869,800.     This  resulted  in  additional

requirements of $181,100;

  (b)   Provision  was made  in the budget  estimates for the  rental of one
fixed-wing B-200 C light aircraft for the period  from 1 February to 30 June
1995 at  an estimated  cost of  $322 for the  period.   However, the  actual
aircraft hire started  on 15 January  1995, resulting in an  additional cost
of $32,200;

  (c)  The requirements  of the Mission in  flying hours for  the fixed-wing
aircraft for the period  under review was also  underestimated.  As shown in
table  10, no  provision was  made for  the additional  flying hours.    The
projected hire/charter costs ($1,010,700) were based  on 75 flying hours per
aircraft  per  month.    However,  just  4  weekly  resupply  flights to  11
teamsites  in the Northern and Southern Sectors of  the Territory required a
total of 145 flying  hours of the 2  AN-26 aircraft, utilizing  much of  the
provision for  the flying hours. Justification  for the  need for additional
flying hours during the period under review is provided below.

  (i)Maintenance  flights  to any  destination  in  the Mission  area  where
MINURSO  personnel are  located,  including 11  teamsites and  8 operational
identification centres;

    (ii)Travel of tribal representatives and observers from each party  from
both Tindouf and Laayoune simultaneously to each of  the 10 centres in order
for identification to start;

   (iii)Flying  48 Moroccan delegates  plus 8 OAU observers  twice a week to
and  from Laayoune  to  participate in  identification at  4 centres  in the
Tindouf area (El Aiun  Camp, Smara Camp, Awsard Camp and Dakhla Camp),  plus
Es Smara and Ad Dakhla, as well as Zouerate and Nouadhibou in Mauritania;

    (iv)Flying  36 delegates  of the  Frente  Popular  para a  Liberacion de
Saguia el-Hamra  y de  Rio  de Oro  (POLISARIO) twice  a  week  to and  from
Tindouf  to participate  in  identification  in the  El Aiun,  Es  Smara and
Dakhla camps, as well as at Zouerate and Nouadhibou in Mauritania;

  (v)Three more flights per week originating  from both Laayoune and Tindouf
to each centre to exchange tribal representatives;

    (vi)Flights for  the rotation  of tribal  representatives and  observers
must  be   scheduled  above   and  beyond  the   resupply  and   maintenance
requirements of the Mission.  Since all flights  must take place in daylight
hours because  of constraints  imposed by  the Algerian  authorities, flight
times for the rotation of observers in and out of Tindouf are limited;

    (vii)In addition to  the requirements of the Identification  Commission,
the Deputy Special  Representative of  the Secretary-General needed to  make
special round-trip flights to Tindouf.  An additional  10 hours a month were
also  needed for flights to take the Deputy Special Representative to Rabat,
Nouakchott and elsewhere for meetings with ministers and officials;

  (d)  The additional hours were utilized as follows:

  (i)Two AN-26  fixed-wing light aircraft.   For the  period from 1  October
1994 to 30 June  1995, which covered the peak workload of the Identification
Commission, as well as  an urgent need for consultations between the parties
in  June 1995, 497 additional hours were used at $350  per hour, for a total
of $171,900;

    (ii)One B-200  C light aircraft.   For the period from  15 January to 30
June  1995, which also  covered periods  of intensive identification process
and the need for urgent consultations between the parties in June 1995,  128
additional flying hours were used at $400 per hour, for a total of $51,400;

  (e)   A total of 625  additional hours used  during the nine-month  period
from 1 October 1994 to 30  June 1995 by three aircraft, which represent 69.6

additional hours per month or 23.2 hours per aircraft per month. 

    (ii)    Aviation  fuel  and lubricants  ............................(333
700)

59.  Table  11 below  shows the  projected and actual  cost of the  aviation
fuel for MINURSO aircraft for the reporting period.
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                              Table  11.    Projected  and  actual  cost  of
aircraft fuel from 1 October 1994
                                         to 30 June 1995

Period

Projected




Actual




Difference
(No.
of
aircraft)
No.
of
hours
Con-sump-tion
Cost
per
litre
$
Total
pro-jected
cost
'000$
No.
of
hours
Con-sump-tion
Average
cost
per
litre
$
Total
actual
cost
In
No. of
hours
In
con-sump-tion
In
cost

per
litre
In
total
cost
'000$1 October 1994-30 June 1995
(2 AN 26)
1 350.0
1 200.0
0.494
669.0
1 847.0
1 200.0
0.436
965.5
497.0
-0.058
296.515 January-30 June 1995
(B-200 C)
375.0
1 200.0
0.494
222.3
503.0
1 200.0
0.430
259.5
128.0
-0.064
37.2     Total
1 725.0


891.3
2 350.0


1 225.0
625.0


333.7
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60.  As  shown in table  11 above,  the additional  requirement of  $333,700
under  the fixed-wing  aircraft fuel  line item  was  due to  625 additional
flying hours during the period under review. 

61.   As mentioned above, the cost of aviation fuel fell in 1995 from $0.494
cents per litre  used in the budget estimates  to $0.43 cents  per litre. In
table 11, therefore, the average  per litre cost of fuel is shown at  $0.436
cents per litre for the period from 1 October 1994 to 30 June 1995.

   (iii)  Positioning/depositioning cost ..........................(10 000)

62.   The additional requirement  of $10,000 was  due to the  fact that  the
estimate   of   $20,000   in   the   budget   did   not   provide   for  the
positioning/depositioning  of  two AN-26  aircraft because  of  a change  of
contractor.

    (iv)Painting/preparation ....................................7 000

63.  Savings  were due  to the lower than  estimated costs for painting  the
aircraft in United Nations colours.

  (v)  Liability and war-risk insurance ........................(15 900)

64.  The additional cost  was due to the higher  cost of liability  and war-
risk insurance for two aircraft during the  period from 1 October 1994 to 14
January 1995  and for three aircraft  for the period from  15 January to  30
June 1995.   The  provision in  the cost estimates  was based on  $3,200 per
aircraft  per month  as  against  actual costs  of $4,900  per  aircraft per
month.

  (d)  Aircrew subsistence allowance

65.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (e)  Other air operation costs

  Landing fees and ground handling .............................18 900

66.   No charges under this  heading were recorded  during the period  under
review.
7.  Naval operations

67.  No provision was made under this heading.

8.  Communications

  (a)  Complementary communications

  (i)  Communications equipment ................................22 300

68.  Savings resulted  from the utilization of the existing inventory.   The
PABX  telephone  switching  system  and  rural  telephone  switching  system
required  were obtained  from other missions, thus  obviating purchases, for
which budgetary provision of  $82,000 had been made.  Only upgrading of  the
redeployed systems was required, resulting in savings of $22,300.

    (ii)  Spare parts and supplies ................................(26 700)

69.  The  installation of the ex-United  Nations Operation in Somalia  Earth
station in  Tindouf and the introduction  of a new PABX switchboard resulted
in additional requirements for which no provision had  been made in the cost
estimates.

   (iii)  Workshop and test equipment .............................1 100

70.  Savings were  due to the  lower than projected costs of  test equipment
for the radio workshop and satellite Earth station.

    (iv)    Commercial  communications   ...............................(101
400)

71.  Additional requirements  were needed to cover charges carried over from
the  previous periods.    These late  charges  were  due  to delays  in  the
recording and processing of invoices.

  (b)  Main trunking contract

72.  No provision was made under this heading.

9.  Other equipment

  (a)  Office furniture ........................................12 000

73.   Resources under  this heading  were not  fully utilized  owing to  the
lower  than   expected   cost   of  office   furniture  required   for   the
identification  centres during the  period under  review and  to the vacancy
situation in the Mission. 

  (b)  Office equipment ........................................25 400

74.  Underexpenditures occurred under this heading for the same reason.

  (c)  Data-processing equipment ...............................8 000

75.  Savings were  due to the lower  than expected costs  of data-processing
equipment  required  to  meet  the  needs  of  the  expanded  Identification
Commission and  to delays  in deployment of  the Commission's  international
staff (32 deployed against 124 projected).

  (d)  Generators ..............................................(33 100)

76.   The additional  requirement was  caused by the urgent  need to procure
generators locally since  planned delivery could not be  made on time.   The
provision in the cost  estimates ($33,300) covered only the cost of  freight
of  20  generators  to be  delivered from  the  United Nations  Operation in
Mozambique.

   (e)  Observation equipment

77.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (f)  Petrol tank plus metering equipment

78.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (g)  Medical and dental equipment

79.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (h)  Accommodation equipment

80.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (i)  Miscellaneous equipment .................................37 500

81.  Savings resulted from delays in the deployment of additional  personnel
for  the Identification  Commission  (32 deployed  against  124  projected).
Consequently,  the  provision  of  $119,700  for  the  acquisition  of   air
conditioners, freezers, water  tanks, cooking ovens and other  miscellaneous
equipment was not fully utilized during the period under review.

  (j)  Field defence equipment

82.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (k)  Spare parts, repair and maintenance .....................29 400

83.  Savings  were due to lower costs of spare parts, repair and maintenance
of the Mission's equipment, which were  procured in smaller quantities  than
originally estimated  as a result  of the lower  number of  personnel in the
Mission area than planned.  

  (l)  Water purification equipment

84.  No provision was made under this heading.

10.  Supplies and services

  (a)  Miscellaneous services

  (i)  Audit services ..........................................-   

85.  The provision  of $56,300  made for the cost  of external audit of  the
Mission was fully utilized during the period under review.

    (ii)  Contractual services ....................................(5 700)

86.  The  additional requirement was due to  the higher than foreseen  costs
of technical repairs and contractual cleaning and laundry services  provided
to  the Mission during  the period  under review.  The  budget provision was
based on an average  of $500 per month for  these purposes, while the actual
requirements proved to average $1,100 per month.

   (iii)  Data-processing services

87.  No provision was made under this heading.

    (iv)  Security services

88.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (v)  Medical treatment and services

89.  No provision was made under this heading.

    (vi)  Claims and adjustments

90.  No provision was made under this heading.

   (vii)  Official hospitality ....................................600

91.  Savings resulted  from only partial utilization of the funds  allocated
for official hospitality.

  (viii)  Miscellaneous other services ............................(17 100)

92.  The additional requirement was caused by the original underestimate  of
other   miscellaneous  supplies   and   services  required   for   the   new
identification  centres.   The initial  provision  of  $2,100 per  month for
miscellaneous charges  and services proved to  be insufficient  to cover the
needs of  the Mission  during the  period under  review.   The actual  costs
averaged $4,000 per month.

  (b)  Miscellaneous supplies

  (i)  Stationery and office supplies ..........................42 900

93.  The  original provision of  $131,400 was  not fully  utilized owing  to
delays  in  the activities  of  the  Identification  Commission  and in  the
deployment of additional staff to the Mission area.

    (ii)  Medical supplies ........................................30 000

94.  The  original provision of  $101,000 was  not fully  utilized owing  to
delays in deployment of personnel to the Mission area.

   (iii)  Sanitation and cleaning materials .......................(19 000)

95.  An  unforeseen amount of $19,000 was  required to maintain and  furnish
the accommodation sites at Tindouf and at Dakhla,  Algeria.  MINURSO had  to
meet supplementary  requirements  for  sanitation  and  cleaning  materials,
which could only be obtained locally at prevailing prices.
      (iv)  Subscriptions ...........................................1 000

96.   The  provision of  $2,700  for subscriptions  was not  fully  utilized
during the  period under review.   Actual subscription costs were lower than

estimated.

  (v)  Electrical supplies

97.  No provision was made under this heading.

    (vi)  Ballistic-protective blankets for vehicles ..............40 000

98.   The  provision  of  $40,000 for  procurement  of  ballistic-protective
blankets for vehicles was not utilized during the period under review  owing
to delays in the activities of the identification centres.

   (vii)  Uniform items, flags and decals .........................(700)

99.    The  actual cost  of  uniforms,  flags  and  decals  was higher  than
initially estimated.

  (viii)  Field defence stores

100.  No provision was made under this heading.

    (ix)  Operational maps

101.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (x)  Quartermaster and general stores ........................(24 000)

102.  The provision  of $76,500 made in  the cost estimates for refurbishing
sleeping  quarters and  replacing supplies,  quartermaster items  and  other
related  articles  at teamsites  proved to  be  insufficient.   In  order to
maintain  and furnish  the accommodation  sites  in  Tindouf and  in Dakhla,
Algeria,  MINURSO  had  to  supplement  actual  requirements  through  local
purchases at prevailing local market prices.

11.  Election-related supplies and services

103.  No provision was made under this heading.

12.  Public information programme

104.  No provision was made under this heading.

13.  Training programme

105.  No provision was made under this heading.

14.  Mine-clearing programme

106.  No provision was made under this heading.
  15.  Assistance for demobilization and disarmament

107.  No provision was made under this heading.

16.  Air and surface freight

  (a)  Transport of contingent-owned equipment

108.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (b)  Military airlifts

109.  No provision was made under this heading.

  (c)  Commercial freight and cartage ..........................(19 700)

110.  The provision of $23,200  made in the cost estimates  for shipping and

related  charges of  miscellaneous supplies  not provided for  elsewhere was
based on an average  monthly cost of $2,600.  However, actual monthly  costs
proved  to  be  much  higher,  at   $4,700,  resulting  in  the   additional
requirement of $19,700.

17.  Integrated Management Information System

111.  The amount authorized for this item was fully utilized.

18.  Support Account for Peace-keeping Operations .................-   

112.   The  amount allocated  ($1,325,400)  was  transferred to  the support
account for peace-keeping operations.

19.  Staff assessment .............................................400 800

113.  Savings  resulted from  the overall vacancy  situation in the  Mission
area during the period under review.  The  authorized and actual staffing of
the Mission is provided in annex III.

20.    Income  from  staff assessment  .................................(400
800)

114.  This amount is derived from item 19 above.
/...A/50/655
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A/50/655
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-----Annex III

Authorized and actual staff on board for  the period from 1 October  1994 to
30 June 1995



1994



1995
Oct.-Dec.
October
November
December
Jan.-June
January
February
March
April
May
June
Authorized
Actual
Actual
Actual
Authorized
Actual
Actual
Actual
Actual
Actual
ActualMilitary personnel










Military observers
231
224
237
232
231
234
240
232
230
237
235Other military personnel
48
48
48
48
48
48
50
48
48
48
48Total, military personnel
279
272
285
280
279
282
290
280
278
285
283
Civilian police
55
49
49
49
160
50
74
97
98
112
113
Civilian personnel

Professional and above










USG*
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1ASG
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1D-2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2D-1
2
1
1
0
2
0
1
1
2
2
2P-5
5
7
7
6
11
6
8
7
6
6

6P-4
32
10
13
18
45
20
23
24
25
26
25P-3
32
10
17
19
46
22
21
23
20
20
17P-2
6
7
8
8
24
9
12
13
15
15
14Subtotal
81
39
50
55
132
61
69
72
72
73
68
Other categories











General Service

78

63

71

76

145

78

80

100

100

109

106Field Service
37
42
43
43
43
45
49
51
56
54
54Subtotal, international staff
196
144
164
174
320
184
198
223
228
236
228Local level
55
59
67
69
90
79
82
82
84
84
79OAU Observer




12
4
6
6
8
8
8Total, civilian personnel
306
252
280
292
582
317
360
408
418

440
428Grand total
585
524
565
572
861
599
650
688
696
725
711
  *  On a "when actually employed basis".


 

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Date last posted: 18 December 1999 16:30:10
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