United Nations

A/50/453


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

20 September 1995

ORIGINAL:
ENGLISH


Fiftieth session
Item 98 (a) of the provisional
  agenda*


             ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT:  IMPLEMENTATION
             OF DECISIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE UNITED NATIONS
CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

             Proposals on the format, scope and organizational aspects
             of the 1997 special session of the General Assembly on
the overall review and appraisal of Agenda 21

Report of the Secretary-General

SUMMARY

  Under  Agenda 21,  the  General Assembly  was entrusted  with the  task of
regularly reviewing implementation of the commitments  it contained.  In its
resolution 47/190, the Assembly decided to convene,  not later than in 1997,
a special session  for the purpose  of an  overall review  and appraisal  of
Agenda 21, and  requested the Secretary-General to  prepare a report on  the
modalities for  the organization and scope  of such a  special session.   In
accordance  with  that  mandate,  the  present  report  contains   proposals
concerning  the scope  of the  discussions, including priorities  for future
action  and the  institutional framework,  and organizational  matters.  The
report presents  proposals  on the  documentation  to  be prepared  for  the
session  and also on  the session's possible outcome.   As to organizational
matters, the report covers the possible  timing of, level of  representation
at and  participation of major  groups in the  special session.   The report
suggests guidelines for conducting  the preparatory process for the session,
including  the  role  to  be  played   by  the  Commission  on   Sustainable
Development at its fifth session.





  *  A/50/150.

95-28540 (E)   181095/...
*9528540*
CONTENTS

  Paragraphs  Page

I.  INTRODUCTION ........................................1 - 103

  A.  Mandate .........................................1 - 33

  B.  Background:  United Nations Conference on
    Environment and Development and related processes4 - 103

II.  SCOPE OF THE DISCUSSION .............................11 - 215

  A.  Priorities ......................................11 - 165

  B.  Institutional framework .........................17 - 216

III.  DOCUMENTATION .......................................22 -248

IV.  OUTCOME OF THE SPECIAL SESSION ......................     258

V.  ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE SPECIAL SESSION .......26 - 319

VI.  LEVEL OF REPRESENTATION .............................32 -3310

VII.  PARTICIPATION OF MAJOR GROUPS .......................34 -3710

VIII.  PREPARATORY PROCESS .................................38 -4011
I.  INTRODUCTION


A.  Mandate

1.   In its  resolution 47/190  of 22  December 1992,  the General  Assembly
endorsed the Rio Declaration on Environment  and Development, Agenda 21  and
the Non-legally Binding  Authoritative Statement of Principles for a  Global
Consensus on  the Management,  Conservation and  Sustainable Development  of
All Types  of  Forests,  as  adopted at  the  United Nations  Conference  on
Environment and Development (UNCED) on 14 June 1992.

2.  In the  same resolution, the General  Assembly, on the recommendation of
the  Conference, decided to convene,  not later than 1997, a special session
for the  purpose of  an  overall review  and  appraisal  of Agenda  21,  and
requested the Secretary-General to submit to  it at its forty-ninth  session
a report  containing recommendations  for its consideration  on the  format,
scope and organizational aspects of such a special session.

3.    Taking  into  account the  fact  that  a number  of  intergovernmental
processes  that had  been recommended  in  Agenda  21 were  currently taking
place  or had only  recently been concluded, the Secretary-General proposed,
in a  note to the Assembly  at its forty-ninth  session (A/49/463), that  it
postpone discussion of the format, scope  and organizational aspects of  the
special  session of  the  General  Assembly in  1997 to  a later  stage; the
Assembly took note of the proposal in its decision 49/437.


           B.  Background:  United Nations Conference on Environment and
               Development and related processes

4.   UNCED  represented a  milestone in  promoting international cooperation
and action  on sustainable  development, and  had a  profound effect  on the
work of the organizations  and bodies of  the United Nations system.   UNCED
recommendations also identified  specific actions to be undertaken in  order
to achieve sustainable development at national and regional levels.

5.   Since  UNCED, a  large number  of intergovernmental  processes that had
been recommended  in  Agenda 21  have  completed  their  work.   The  United
Nations   Convention   to   Combat   Desertification   in  those   Countries
Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, particularly in  Africa
was opened  for signatures in  October 1994.   The Global  Conference on the

Sustainable  Development  of  Small  Island  Developing States  (Bridgetown,
Barbados, 25 April-6 May 1994), adopted  the Declaration of Barbados and the
Programme  of  Action  for  the  Sustainable  Development  of  Small  Island
Developing States.  The United Nations  Conference on Straddling Fish Stocks
and  Highly  Migratory  Fish  Stocks  concluded  its  proceedings  with  the
adoption of the  Agreement for the  Implementation of the Provisions  of the
United Nations  Convention  on  the  Law of  the  Sea  of 10  December  1982
relating to  the Conservation and Management  of Straddling  Fish Stocks and
Highly Migratory  Fish Stocks.  During  this period,  the Global Environment
Facility, managed jointly by the World  Bank, the United Nations Development
Programme (UNDP) and  the United  Nations Environment Programme (UNEP),  has
been   replenished  and   restructured   in  order   to   enable   universal
participation  in  its  decision-making.    The  United  Nations   Framework
Convention on  Climate Change  and the Convention  on Biological  Diversity,
which were opened for signatures during UNCED, have both entered into  force
and  have already held  their first meetings of  Conferences of the Parties.
The  outcomes  of  these  processes, together  with  Agenda 21  and  the Rio
Declaration on Environment and Development, are  commonly referred to as the
Rio commitments and will  have to be  considered by the General Assembly  at
its special  session if  it  is to  obtain a  full  picture  of the  results
achieved.

6.   Furthermore, a  number of  major international  conferences held  since
UNCED,  such as  the World  Conference  on  Human Rights,  the International
Conference on  Population  and  Development,  the World  Summit  for  Social
Development,  and the  Fourth World  Conference  on Women,  as well  as  the
forthcoming Second United  Nations Conference on Human Settlements  (Habitat
II),  are also  closely related  to the  implementation of Agenda  21, since
they add substantially  to the international  understanding and consensus on
various  critical elements  of  sustainable development;  the  comprehensive
review of Agenda  21 also needs to take  into account the outcomes of  these
conferences as well.   

7.   At its  substantive session  of 1995,  the Economic and  Social Council
decided on  the modalities of a  comprehensive and  coordinated follow-up to
major international conferences in the economic, social and related  fields.
In  his report  to the Council (E/1995/86),  the Secretary-General presented
his  views on how  this coordinated  approach could  be furthered, including
the establishment  of the  relevant monitoring  mechanisms, with  a view  to
promoting  programme  harmonization  and  policy  integration  at  both  the
country  level   and   the  inter-agency   level,   as   well  as   at   the
intergovernmental level.  The Council decided  that, within the framework of
its coordination segment, it  would carry out  a review each year of  cross-
cutting  themes common  to  major international  conferences,  and/or  would
contribute to an overall  review of the  implementation of the programme  of
action of a United Nations conference.

8.  The finalization of the discussions on  an agenda for development, which
will  integrate many of  the above-mentioned  initiatives, will  also have a
major impact on the special session.

9.   In considering  preparations for such  an overall  review and post-1997
arrangements, special  focus needs to be  given to the  outcome of the  1995
substantive  session of  the Economic  and  Social Council.   In  the  first
instance,  the Council,  in selecting  themes for its  coordination segment,
may wish to choose a theme that would  maximize its contribution to the 1997
review of Agenda 21.   Such a theme could focus on one major  cross-sectoral
issue or on a sectoral issue for which greater attention is required.

10.   To  fulfil the mandate  of UNCED and  other conferences, institutional
arrangements  have been  established.   The intergovernmental  follow-up  of
UNCED has remained within the framework of the United Nations system and  is
the special responsibility of the General  Assembly, as the supreme  policy-
making  forum providing overall  guidance to Governments, the United Nations
system and  relevant treaty bodies.   In addition  to the General  Assembly,
the Economic  and Social Council has  been provided  with the responsibility

of providing  systemwide coordination, and  of overseeing implementation  of
Agenda 21 and making recommendations in that regard.


II.  SCOPE OF THE DISCUSSIONS

A.  Priorities

11.   The overall review of the  implementation of Agenda  21 by the General
Assembly at its  special session will need  to determine the critical  areas
of  sustainability  for  the years  to  come.   The  concept of  sustainable
development encompasses  economic, social,  environmental and  institutional
dimensions.   The  identification of  the critical  areas  of sustainability
will have to be based on  a comprehensive review of the progress achieved in
the  implementation  of the  Rio  commitments  at  all  levels, taking  into
account  relevant  conclusions  of  subsequent  global  conferences.     The
objective  should be  to maintain  the political  momentum and give  a clear
sense  of  direction  for  future  actions   to  be  taken  by  Governments,
intergovernmental  bodies and  major groups  aimed at  reaching  sustainable
development.   The Assembly will have to identify priorities  at the special
session, including priorities for the  institutional follow-up to  UNCED and
the role  of  the United  Nations system,  in particular  the Commission  on
Sustainable Development.

12.  In identifying  the critical constraints to  the implementation of  the
Rio  commitments at the  local, country,  regional and  international levels
and the means for Governments, international organizations and major  groups
to overcome  them,  the Assembly  may  wish  to consider  strengthening  its
substantive activities  as well  as adopting  supportive measures  necessary
for the achievement of sustainable development  goals, such as the provision
of financial resources,  transfer of environmentally sound technologies  and
creation of institutional mechanisms.

13.   Further, in the light of  paragraphs 7 to 9 above, the recommendations
of the  Assembly could  include the  identification of  possible themes  for
future consideration by  the Council or its subsidiary bodies,  particularly
the  Commission  on Sustainable  Development,  with  a  view  to ensuring  a
harmonized and non-duplicative approach to the issues involved.

14.   Public awareness and the  promotion of  sustainable development values
through, inter alia,  educational systems, remain major tasks necessary  for
the successful  implementation of  the Rio  commitments.   The Assembly  may
wish to explore further means of enhancing this process. 

15.  The Assembly may also wish to place a special  emphasis on the issue of
sustainable  consumption and production patterns as an umbrella concept that
facilitates  the integration  of environmental  and economic  questions.  If
the  Assembly  decides  to   do  so,  those  provisions  will  have  to   be
consequently reflected in the work programme of the Commission. 

16.    The  Commission  on  Sustainable  Development  has  approved  a  work
programme on  indicators on sustainable  development; its implementation  is
under way.  The Commission has encouraged Governments to  develop or conduct
studies  on the  development of  indicators  of sustainable  development  in
accordance  with specific national  conditions.  Their elaboration will have
a significant  impact on the process  of monitoring  progress achieved since
UNCED.  The Commission provides the  necessary platform for the  preparation
of  such indicators; at the special session, the  Assembly could provide the
necessary stimulus for their broad application.


B.  Institutional framework

17.   On  the  recommendation  of Agenda  21  and  in  order to  ensure  the
effective follow-up of the Conference, as  well as to enhance  international
cooperation, rationalize  the intergovernmental decision-making capacity for

the  integration  of environment  and  development  issues and  examine  the
progress in  the implementation of Agenda  21 at the  national, regional and
international  levels,  the Economic  and  Social  Council  established  the
Commission  on Sustainable  Development as  a  subsidiary  body.   Since its
first   session,   the   Commission   has   developed   certain   innovative
characteristics:

  (a)  The  Commission has  managed to  maintain a  high political  profile.
The high-level segment  of the Commission  is attended by  large numbers  of
ministers   and  high-level  decision   makers  from  all  over  the  world.
Attendance is not limited solely to  ministers of environment; ministers for
development,  agriculture,  forestry and  finance  also  participate.    The
Assembly may  wish to  further encourage  this  type of  participation as  a
means  of  fully  integrating  a  whole  spectrum  of  different  aspects of
sustainable development;

  (b)  The  Commission has incorporated  into its work, on  an unprecedented
scale, the  representatives of  major groups  involved in  the promotion  of
sustainable development.  Major groups are consulted  on a variety of issues
in the  course of the inter-sessional period, and the  dialogue between them
and  member  States  during  Commission  sessions  has  also  been  steadily
reinforced.   The  secretariat  of  the  Commission  collects  and  analyses
information on major groups' involvement in Agenda 21 implementation;

  (c)  Commission activities  are not limited  to its annual sessions.   The
Commission provides  a framework  for a  larger  process of  inter-sessional
meetings,  the outcomes of  which it subsequently reviews  and analyses.  It
has also established two  ad hoc working groups  that hold sessions prior to
the meetings  of the  Commission  in  order to  prepare its  discussions  on
specific agenda items.  Duration of those ad  hoc working group meetings, as
well as subjects to  be discussed, are  determined by the Commission at  its
consecutive sessions and  remain flexible but harmonized with its  programme
of work.  These year-round activities are coordinated  by the Bureau of  the
Commission,  which meets regularly  in order  to take the  best advantage of
the  above-mentioned events  while preparing  for  the  main session  of the
Commission.  Efforts have been made to make  this process transparent and to
make information on meetings and their outcomes widely available;

  (d)    Monitoring  of  the  implementation  of  UNCED  commitments  by the
Commission   has  involved  the  whole  United  Nations   system.    Various
organizations and bodies have participated in  the preparations for and  the
proceedings of the Commission.  Task managers from the  organizations of the
United  Nations  system have  been  nominated  to  ensure  an effective  and
coordinated follow-up in  the sectoral and cross-sectoral issues  identified
by Agenda 21.   The coordination of those  activities has been  entrusted by
the Administrative Committee  on Coordination to the Inter-Agency  Committee
for Sustainable Development (IACSD);

  (e)  The Commission  has also developed  a capacity for monitoring at  all
levels  the  implementation  of  the  Rio  commitments.    Its  particularly
innovative role is the monitoring of  progress achieved and major  obstacles
encountered at  the national  level, through  voluntary reporting  by member
States.  The  Commission has been  able to  analyse a number of  the reports
presented  to  date. The  Commission  also  serves as  a  platform  for  the
exchange of information on national policies  and practices introduced as  a
result of UNCED;

  (f)   Interaction between intergovernmental bodies  active in  the area of
sustainable development  is increasing.   For  example, the  Council of  the
Food and  Agriculture Organization  of the  United Nations (FAO)  considered
the issues  related to land management that  were also on  the agenda of the
third  session of  the Commission;  a  ministerial  meeting on  forestry was
convened  by  FAO prior  to the  Commission's  third  session; and  the UNEP
Governing Council,  after  the fourth  session  of  the Commission,  made  a
decision in  which it emphasized the  need for UNEP  to continue to  provide
effective support  to the  work of the  Commission, inter alia,  through the

provision  of  scientific, technical  and policy  information and  advice on
environment.  Some other intergovernmental bodies also committed  themselves
to substantively contributing to the work of the Commission.

18.  The General Assembly may wish to:

  (a)    Build  further   on  the  above-mentioned  characteristics  of  the
Commission, while deciding on the desirable focus of its future activities;

  (b)  Provide  guidance concerning the priorities  for the further work  of
the Commission, particularly  as reflected  in its multi-year thematic  work
programme;

  (c)   Consider ways and  means of enhancing  policy coherence  and further
strengthening coordination  between  the  Commission and  other  appropriate
intergovernmental bodies;

  (d)  Give further support  to the system of task managers as an  effective
mechanism for meeting the demands related to  the functioning of IACSD while
implementing Agenda 21 in respective thematic areas.

19.  In accordance  with its resolution  47/191, at the special session  the
Assembly is  also expected to review  the organizational  modalities for the
Commission.   The Assembly  could thus  reflect on  aspects of  the existing
structure of  the Commission,  such as  the organization  of its  high-level
segment and general debate, the participation  of major groups, side  events
and the functioning of its Bureau.

20.    The  review  of  the  institutional  framework  established  for  the
implementation of  the Rio commitments  should also  examine innovations and
changes  that have taken place  since UNCED in the  policies, programmes and
structures of the organizations and bodies of the United Nations system,  as
well as in the activities of non-United Nations institutions.

21.   The General Assembly  is also  expected to  decide on the  next review
timetable   for  assessing   further   progress  in   achieving  sustainable
development goals in the period after the special session.


III.  DOCUMENTATION

22.   The  General Assembly  may wish  to request  the  Secretary-General to
prepare  a comprehensive report  on the  overall assessment  of the progress
achieved  since  UNCED  in  the  implementation   of  Agenda  21,  the   Rio
Declaration on Environment and Development and related conference  outcomes,
as well as on recommendations for  future actions and priorities,  including
those  concerning  institutional  matters,  in particular  the  role  of the
Commission on Sustainable Development.

23.  Such a  comprehensive report would draw upon concise reports that  will
be prepared  for the fifth  session of the  Commission and  would contain an
assessment  of progress  achieved in  specific sectoral  and  cross-sectoral
areas, as  well as recommendations for future action.   The Commission would
thus be able to  undertake the review process and analyse progress  achieved
with a  view  to preparing  for the  special session.   The  above-mentioned
concise  reports  will  also  serve  as  background  documentation  for  the
Assembly's deliberations; the  modalities for  their preparation  will be  a
subject for discussion by IACSD.

24.   On the  basis of  national reports  received so far  and expected  for
forthcoming sessions  of the Commission, and  in close  cooperation with the
Governments  concerned,   the  Commission  secretariat  intends  to  prepare
country profiles  aimed  at a  concise  presentation  of progress  made  and
constraints  encountered in implementing  Agenda 21.  These country profiles
will  be presented  to the Commission at  its 1997 session to  allow for the
review of the progress achieved at the national level.


IV.  OUTCOME OF THE SPECIAL SESSION

25.   The General Assembly  may wish to  reflect on  the possible outcome of
the 1997  review exercise.   One option  would be to  prepare a  substantive
document in the form of a  political declaration assessing progress achieved
and  setting priorities for future  action on how  to best reach sustainable
development goals. Such a declaration could build  on the review of progress
achieved  in  the implementation  of  the Rio  commitments  as  well  as the
achievements  of  recently held  major  United  Nations conferences  and  an
agenda  for  development.    It  should  also  take  into  consideration the
institutional aspects  of future monitoring  of Agenda  21 implementation by
the appropriate United Nations bodies.


 V.  ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE SPECIAL SESSION

26.  Eighteen special sessions  of the General Assembly  have been organized
to  discuss  topics of  special importance  to the  international community.
The last  (eighteenth) special session was held from 23 April  to 1 May 1990
to   discuss   the  theme   "Economic   cooperation,   in   particular   the
revitalization  of the  economic growth  and development  of  the developing
countries".   Previous  special sessions  of  the  General Assembly  did not
establish any  fixed pattern as far  as duration or  level of representation
are concerned.

27.   Drawing  on experience from  previous special sessions  of the General
Assembly,  the organization  of UNCED and other  major conferences organized
in  recent years  under the  auspices of  the United  Nations, including the
International Conference on Population and  Development and the World Summit
for  Social  Development,  the  Secretary-General  has  suggested  that  the
session be held for a  period of five  working days, a time-frame that  will
accommodate the statements of the representatives  of all Member States  and
will  allow   for  interaction   with  United   Nations  agencies   and  the
representatives of major groups.

28.  If the  need arises, the General Assembly  could allocate some time for
a preconsultation in the week(s) preceding the session.

29.  Bearing in  mind the provisions of  its resolution 47/190, the Assembly
may decide that  the special  session should  be a  self-standing event  and
that it should take place before  its fifty-second session.   Alternatively,
at  its  current session,  the  Assembly  may  consider  the possibility  of
building the  review exercise into  its fifty-second session, to  be held in
1997.

30.    Should  the  Assembly  decide   on  the  former  alternative,  having
considered  the calendar  of conferences  for  1997 and  the fact  that  the
preparations  for  the session  are to  be undertaken  by the  Commission on
Sustainable Development  at its fifth session,  the proposed time-frame  for
the special session  is the third or fourth week  in June 1997, i.e., 16  to
20 June or 23  to 27 June, with the  understanding that the fifth session of
the Commission on Sustainable Development will be held either  early in 1997
or back to back with the special session, so that the Commission  can act as
a preparatory committee for the special session.

31.  Whatever  the specific arrangements  for the  Assembly's review, it  is
essential  to  ensure  that  its  outcome  contributes  to  maintaining  the
political momentum and  visibility of the sustainable development agenda  as
well as  to the broader discussion currently  under way of the reform of the
United  Nations  in  the  economic,  social   and  related  fields  and   to
discussions on the agenda for development  and the coordinated follow-up  of
other major United Nations conferences.


 VI.  LEVEL OF REPRESENTATION

32.  UNCED brought  together an unprecedented  number of heads of State  and
Government,  delegates,  representatives of  non-governmental organizations,
and the mass  media, a sign of the tremendous importance given to the issues
discussed at the Conference. 

33.  The  General Assembly may  envisage a  level of  representation at  the
special  session that  will  maintain  the high  political momentum  reached
during UNCED, which was attended by 118 heads of State and Government.


VII.  PARTICIPATION OF MAJOR GROUPS

34.   Chapter  23 of  Agenda 21  on strengthening the  role of  major groups
defines very clearly the critical role of genuine  involvement of all social
groups  in  the  effective implementation  of the  objectives,  policies and
mechanisms  that were agreed by Governments in all programme areas of Agenda
21.  UNCED itself brought together  an unprecedented number of  participants
representing major  groups, especially non-governmental organizations, which
have also been involved in follow-up at  both the national and international
levels.   The continuing concern  remains the broadening of  the spectrum of
the  representation  of  major  groups,  as  well  as  transparency  in  the
procedures of their selection for the various  coordination and consultation
mechanisms,  in  this  case  in  relation   to  the  preparations  for   and
proceedings  of   the  special  session.     Funding  the  participation  of
representatives of major groups  in such processes remains  by far the  most
acute problem.

35.  It has  also been widely recognized  that, in preparing  for UNCED  and
subsequently monitoring  progress in the  implementation of its  commitments
through  the  Commission  on  Sustainable  Development,  the   international
community has largely benefited from the  intellectual input of major groups
and  from  an  interactive dialogue  with  them.    However,  the  rules  of
procedure of  the General Assembly do  not allow the active participation of
representatives of major groups in its  deliberations.  The General Assembly
may  wish to  consider some  options  for  the involvement  of major  groups
during its special session.  For example, the  Assembly may wish to  suspend
its deliberations for the  duration of one or two meetings in order to enter
into  an informal dialogue  with the representatives of  major groups, or to
legislate  that for the  special session  under consideration  the rules for
participation  be amended  to allow  for  participation  along the  lines of
participation at UNCED.

36.   A number of  parallel events enabling  the broadening  of the scope of
the dialogue  by involving the representatives  of the major groups could be
considered.    In  addition,  before  or  during  the  deliberations  of the
session, the  organization of various forums  of major groups  could be also
encouraged.  The Assembly may wish to encourage  major groups to participate
in preparations for the  session and review the implementation of Agenda  21
in  the  areas of  their particular  concern, assessing  their role  in that
implementation.

37.   It is  therefore suggested  that the special session  integrate in its
core  debate,  as well  as  accompanying  proceedings,  the widest  possible
representation of major groups  and sectors of civil society.  The  Assembly
may  consider encouraging  Governments  to include  the  representatives  of
major groups in their  national preparatory processes,  as well as in  their
delegations to the session.


VIII.  PREPARATORY PROCESS

38.   At  the  special  session,  the  General Assembly  must  accomplish  a
considerable amount of work:  it must review  Agenda 21 and the  realization
of  commitments  included  therein  and  define   the  future  role  of  the
Commission  on Sustainable  Development, providing  guidance to  its  future
programme of work.   It is also expected that the Assembly will give new and

reinforced  political  impetus to  further  work  on  achieving  sustainable
development  at  all levels.    This  task  will require  careful  and time-
consuming preparation,  which should  begin at  the current  session of  the
Assembly.  The Assembly  may wish to  give more specific policy guidance  on
the  work to  be accomplished  before the special  session. Since  Agenda 21
underlines that preparations for the special  session should be conducted at
a  high level,  the Commission  on  Sustainable  Development, above  all its
ministerial segment, should also be involved  in determining the methods  of
reviewing commitments and identifying priorities for the future.

39.   The Commission  on Sustainable  Development, when  adopting its multi-
year thematic programme of  work, decided to undertake  at its fifth session
in  1997 an overall review of the progress achieved with a view to preparing
for the  special  session.    The  General  Assembly  may  wish  to  clearly
determine  the role to be played  by the Commission at its  fifth session as
well as the  tasks to  be accomplished at the  special session itself.   For
example, on the  basis of  analyses made during  its previous sessions,  the
Commission could undertake  an in-depth evaluation of progress achieved  and
could  identify  major   concerns  and  gaps  in  implementing   sustainable
development goals.  On the other hand, at the special session, the  Assembly
could  look  more  specifically  at  the   priorities  for  the  future  and
institutional  follow-up.    In  order  to  reach  agreement  on  the  final
document, the  Assembly may  wish to establish  an ad hoc  committee of  the
whole.

40.  The  Assembly may also wish to  consider proposing the organization  of
meetings under the auspices of the  regional commissions to assess  progress
made  at the regional level, according  to the provisions of Agenda  21.  If
the input from such  meetings are to be integrated into the overall  review,
they will have to be organized as early as possible in 1996.


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Date last posted: 18 December 1999 16:30:10
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