United Nations

A/50/16


General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL  

30 June 1995

ORIGINAL:
ENGLISH


Fiftieth session












REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE FOR PROGRAMME AND COORDINATION
ON THE WORK OF ITS THIRTY-FIFTH SESSION*


















________________________

  *   The present document is  a mimeographed version of  the report of  the
Committee  for Programme and  Coordination on  the work  of its thirty-fifth
session.   The final  report  will be  issued  as  Official Records  of  the
General Assembly, Fiftieth Session, Supplement No. 16 (A/50/16).


95-18538 (E)   140795/...
*9518538*
CONTENTS

Chapter  Paragraphs  Page

  ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................5

Report of the Committee for Programme and Coordination on the
work of its thirty-fifth session, held at United Nations
Headquarters from 15 May to 9 June 1995

I.  ORGANIZATION OF THE SESSION ..........................1 - 116

  A.  Agenda ...........................................2 - 36

  B.  Election of officers ............................. 46

  C.  Attendance .......................................5 - 96

  D.  Documentation ....................................     107

  E.  Adoption of the report of the Committee ..........     117

II.  REVIEW OF THE EFFICIENCY OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE AND
  FINANCIAL FUNCTIONING OF THE UNITED NATIONS ..........12 - 248

III.  PROGRAMME QUESTIONS ..................................25 -26711

  A.  Proposed programme budget for the biennium
      1996-1997 ........................................25 - 24111

      Section 1.   Overall policy-making, direction and
               coordination ........................48 - 5314

      Section 2.   Political affairs ...................54 - 6515

      Section 3.   Peace-keeping operations and special
               missions ............................66 - 7117

      Section 4.   Outer space affairs .................72 - 7718

      Section 6.   Legal activities ....................78 - 8819

      Section 7A.  Department for Policy Coordination
               and Sustainable Development .........89 - 9420

      Section 7B.  Africa:  critical economic situation,
               recovery and development ............95 - 10121

      Section 8.   Department for Economic and Social
               Information and Policy Analysis .....102 - 11122

      Section 9.   Department for Development Support
               and Management Services .............112 - 12223

      Section 10A. United Nations Conference on Trade
               and Development .....................123 - 13524
CONTENTS (continued)

Chapter  Paragraphs  Page

      Section 10B. International Trade Centre
               UNCTAD/GATT .........................136 - 13826

      Section 11.  United Nations Environment Programme 139 -14126

      Section 12.  United Nations Centre for Human
               Settlements (Habitat) ...............142 - 14327

      Section 13.  Crime control .......................144 -15027

      Section 14.  International drug control ..........151 -15628

      Section 15.  Economic Commission for Africa ......157 -16229

      Section 16.  Economic and Social Commission for
               Asia and the Pacific ................163 - 16730

      Section 17.  Economic Commission for Europe ......168 -17430

      Section 18.  Economic Commission for Latin America
               and the Caribbean ...................175 - 18431

      Section 19.  Economic and Social Commission for
               Western Asia ........................185 - 19132

      Section 20.  Regular programme of technical
               cooperation .........................192 - 19733

      Section 21.  Human rights ........................198 -21334

      Section 22.  Office of the United Nations High
               Commissioner for Refugees ...........214 - 21836

      Section 23.  United Nations Relief and Works
               Agency for Palestine Refugees in the
               Near East ...........................219 - 22237

      Section 24.  Department of Humanitarian Affairs ..223 -23237

      Section 25.  Public information ..................233 -24138

  B.  Evaluation .......................................242 -26740

    1.  In-depth evaluation of the programme on
      environment ..................................242 - 24840

    2.  Final report on the in-depth evaluation of
      peace-keeping operations:  start-up phase ....249 - 26742
CONTENTS (continued)

Chapter  Paragraphs  Page

IV.  COORDINATION QUESTIONS ...............................268 -28847

  Report of the Administrative Committee on Coordination
  and preparations for the Joint Meetings of the
  Committee for Programme and Coordination and the
  Administrative Committee on Coordination .............268 -28847

V.  REPORTS OF THE JOINT INSPECTION UNIT .................289 -30451

  A.  Review and assessment of efforts to restructure
      the regional dimension of United Nations economic
      and social activities ............................289 -29851

  B.  Communication for development programmes in the
      United Nations system ............................299 -30452

VI.  CONSIDERATION OF THE PROVISIONAL AGENDA FOR THE
  THIRTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE COMMITTEE ................305 -30754

Annexes

I.  Agenda for the thirty-fifth session of the Committee .............57

II.  List of documents before the Committee at its thirty-fifth session58

ABBREVIATIONS


ACABQ  Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions

ACC  Administrative Committee on Coordination

CPC  Committee for Programme and Coordination

ECA  Economic Commission for Africa

ECE  Economic Commission for Europe

ECLAC  Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

ESCAP  Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

ESCWA  Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia

FAO  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

GATT  General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade

IAEA  International Atomic Energy Agency

ITC  International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/GATT)

JIU  Joint Inspection Unit

UNCTAD  United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

UNDP  United Nations Development Programme

UNEP  United Nations Environment Programme

UNHCR  Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

UNRWAUnited Nations  Relief and Works Agency  for Palestine  Refugees in the
Near East

I.  ORGANIZATION OF THE SESSION


1.     The  Committee   for  Programme   and  Coordination   (CPC)  held  an
organizational session (1st  meeting) at  United Nations Headquarters on  21
April 1995 and its thirty-fifth session  at United Nations Headquarters from
15  May to  9 June 1995.  It held 28 meetings  (2nd to 29th  meetings) and a
number of informal meetings.


A.  Agenda

2.   The agenda  for the  thirty-fifth session, adopted by  the Committee at
its 1st meeting, is reproduced in annex I below.

3.  In adopting  the agenda, the Committee,  in accordance with the decision
taken at its  organizational session for  1995, decided to consider,  at its
thirty-fifth  session,  the  report  of  the  Joint  Inspection  Unit  (JIU)
entitled  "Review and  assessment  of  efforts to  restructure the  regional
dimension of United Nations economic and  social activities" (A/49/423).  At
its 2nd meeting, on 15 May 1995, the Committee decided to  consider also the
report  of the Joint Inspection Unit entitled "Communication for development
programmes in the  United Nations  system" (A/50/126-E/1995/20), as well  as
the comments of the Administrative  Committee on Coordination  (ACC) thereon
(A/50/126/Add.1E/1995/20/Add.1).


B.  Election of officers

4.   At  its  1st  meeting, on  21  April 1995,  the  Committee elected  the
following officers by acclamation:

  Chairman:  Mr. Valeriu Tudor (Romania)

  Vice-Chairmen:  Mr. Jorge Osella (Argentina)
                  Mr. Mahmoud Barimani (Islamic Republic of Iran)
                  Mr. Wolfgang Stockl (Germany)

  Rapporteur:  Mr. Hisham Elzimaity (Egypt)


C.  Attendance

5.  The following States members of the Committee were represented:

  Argentina
  Bahamas
  Belarus
  Benin
  Brazil
  Cameroon
  Canada
  China
  Congo
  Cuba
  Egypt
  France
  Germany
Ghana
India
Indonesia
Iran (Islamic Republic of)  
Japan
Kenya
Mexico
Netherlands
Nicaragua
Norway
Pakistan
Republic of Korea
Romania
  Russian Federation
  Senegal
  Togo
  Trinidad and TobagoUkraine
United Kingdom of Great Britain
  and Northern Ireland
United States of America
6.  The following States Members of the  United Nations were represented  by
observers:

  Afghanistan
  Algeria
  Australia
  Austria
  Belgium
  Botswana
  Bulgaria
  Chile
  Costa Rica
  Finland
  ItalyIreland
Kazakstan
Latvia
Mongolia
New Zealand
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Spain

Sweden
Uruguay
7.    The  following  non-member  State  was  represented  by  an  observer:
Switzerland.

8.  The following specialized agencies were represented:

  International Labour Organization (ILO)
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
  World Health Organization (WHO)
  International Monetary Fund (IMF)

9.  Also present at the  session were senior officials of the United Nations
Secretariat.  At  the invitation of the  Committee, Mr. Fatih Bouayad  Agha,
President of the Joint Inspection Unit, also participated in its work.


D.  Documentation

10.  The list of documents before the  Committee at its thirty-fifth session
is set forth in annex II below.


E.  Adoption of the report of the Committee

11.   At its 29th  meeting, on 9 June 1995, the  Committee adopted the draft
report on its thirty-fifth session (E/AC.51/1995/L.3 and Add.1-32).

             II.  REVIEW OF THE EFFICIENCY OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE AND
                  FINANCIAL FUNCTIONING OF THE UNITED NATIONS


12.   At its 9th and 10th meetings, on 22 May 1995, the Committee considered
agenda item 3, entitled "Review of  the efficiency of the administrative and
financial  functioning of the United Nations".  The  Committee had before it
the report of the  Secretary-General on the item (A/49/633).  In  accordance
with  General Assembly decision  47/454 of  23 December  1992, the Committee
was  requested to  express  its views  on  the  roles  and coverage  of  the
subsidiary  bodies responsible  for  coordination,  administrative questions
and budgetary  matters, including the  Advisory Committee on  Administrative
and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), the United  Nations Board of Auditors,  JIU
and CPC, with a  view to improving the  effectiveness of their oversight and
coordination mechanisms.


Discussion

13.    During the  discussion, concerns  were expressed  that CPC  needed to
consider  how to  apply  its mandate,  as set  out  in Economic  and  Social
Council  resolution  2008  (LX)  of  14   May  1976,  more  effectively  and
efficiently in  view of  contemporary requirements  and taking  into account
the relevant rules and regulations.

14.   Delegations noted  that in order  for CPC to  fulfil its mandate  in a
satisfactory   manner,   it   required   complete,   timely   and   relevant
documentation. They expressed concern that those  needs had not always  been
met in the past.   On the other hand, delegations stressed the need for  CPC
to give clear indications as to its documentation requirements, in terms  of
both substance and timeframes.

15.   Delegations noted, for  example, that  the annual overview  report for
1994  of  ACC  (E/1995/21), while  providing  valuable  information  on  ACC
proceedings,  did  not focus  sufficiently on  the coordination  issues that
were  of primary  concern to CPC.   They also noted that  CPC had previously
drawn attention  to that  problem, in  paragraph 159  of its  report on  the

first part of the thirty-second session, 1/ where it stated:

"The report  was considered too  descriptive in nature.   A  more analytical
and  forward-looking report was  required in  order to  facilitate the tasks
and responsibilities regarding coordination of  the respective organizations
that were members of ACC.   The Committee emphasized that the purpose of the
report was to serve as  an instrument to enable both  Member States and  ACC
to identify and overcome problems in system-wide coordination."

16.  Delegations stressed  the importance of joint meetings between CPC  and
ACC  as a  unique forum  for in-depth  and concrete  exchanges of  views  on
coordination issues.  They therefore emphasized  the need for such  meetings
to concentrate  on the  coordination aspects  of the  subjects discussed  at
them.

17.    Some  delegations offered  possible  roles  for CPC  to  consider  in
response to new  emerging needs.   In this context, the  following proposals
were made:

  (a)    To  develop  criteria  for  evaluating results  against  prescribed
parameters;

   (b)  To state comparative advantages  of agencies in addressing programme
activities;

  (c)   To  provide a sense  of what had  been accomplished versus  what was
expected;

  (d)   To consider zero-based analysis  (value for  money) and establishing
realistic performance measures.

18.  Several  other delegations indicated that  in any possible role  played
by CPC  in examining  new emerging  needs, special  consideration should  be
given to the following:

  (a)  Follow-up of the established rules and regulations;

  (b)   Consideration  of activities whose  objectives had not  been met and
identification  of the  obstacles that  had been  met in pursuance  of those
objectives;

  (c)   Review of possible duplication  or overlapping  of activities within
the United Nations system;

  (d)    In  any  revision  of  the  implementation  of  programmes, special
emphasis should  be given  to the  achievements  made as  compared with  the
difficulties  encountered  in achieving  them,  identifying  their economic,
political or financial aspects.

19.   Some delegations  referred to  other bodies  responsible for oversight
and  control  as  mentioned  in  the  report  of  the  Secretary-General and
commented on how  to improve  coordination with  ACABQ, JIU  and the  United
Nations Board  of Auditors, while taking care to avoid  duplication of work.
In that regard some delegations supported a term of office of  six years for
the members of the United Nations Board of Auditors.


Conclusions

20.  The Committee  considered that since it  was the main  subsidiary organ
of the Economic and Social Council, it  should be informed of the  views and
decisions  of  that  body  regarding  reports   that  it  had  submitted  in
accordance with its  mandate.  The  need for  an adequate  follow-up by  the
Council and its respective intergovernmental bodies was stressed.

21.   The Committee recognized  the need to  pay more  in-depth attention to

its coordinating  role, which  should be  based on  substantive issues.   To
that end, the Committee considered that  it required a more detailed insight
into  the efforts  of  ACC and  other  relevant  departments  of the  United
Nations in that respect.

22.  The  Committee considered that  there should be careful  preparation of
joint CPC/ACC  meetings.  The  structure and  content of the  joint meetings
should  therefore be determined  in advance.   The  Committee also expressed
the need to encourage dialogue through  in-depth discussions, as opposed  to
orally delivered prepared statements.

23.   The Committee  stressed the  need for  the Secretariat  to provide  it
regularly with complete and relevant documentation, including the  decisions
and resolutions adopted by the General Assembly and  the Economic and Social
Council  on  its  reports  and  the   memoranda  on  the  implementation  of
resolutions,  prepared  by  the  Secretariat,  after  each  session  of  the
Assembly and the  Council, in accordance with paragraph  2 (a) (iii) of  the
annex to  Council resolution  2008 (LX)  on the  terms of  reference of  the
Committee.

24.   The  Committee agreed  to  review regularly  its working  methods  and
procedures.

III.  PROGRAMME QUESTIONS


A.  Proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997

25.    The  proposed  programme  budget   for  the  biennium  1996-1997  was
introduced by the Under-Secretary-General for Administration and  Management
and  by the Controller  at the  10th meeting of the  Committee for Programme
and Coordination on 23 May 1995.

26.    The  Committee  was  informed  that  the  paramount  consideration in
formulating  the programme  budget for  the  biennium  1996-1997 was  to put
forward  a proposal  that responded  fully  and  in the  most cost-effective
manner to  the  mandates  provided  by Member  States.    The level  of  the
resources  proposed, in comparable terms, was lower than that of the revised
appropriations  for 1994-1995 and  lower than  that of  the programme budget
outline for the biennium  1996-1997.  A  determined effort had been made  by
programme   managers  to  look   for  efficiency   gains  in   the  form  of
rationalization  of  work   programmes,  improvement  in  productivity   and
simplification of work procedures, and, as a result, there had been  savings
without  affecting  delivery of  mandated  activities.    The Committee  was
informed  that the  Secretariat would  continue  to review  overlapping  and
duplication of work.

27.  The Committee was also informed that  the distribution of resources had
been guided by the  priority areas as identified in the medium-term plan for
the period  1992-1997, as  revised, 2/ and  also by those  reflected in  the
budget  outline,  namely,  political  affairs,  international  and  regional
cooperation  for  development,  human   rights,  humanitarian  affairs   and
internal oversight.

28.   It was pointed out  to the Committee that the new format of the budget
included a  self-contained  part  one, which  gave a  comprehensive  picture
without requiring reference  to individual  budget sections.   New  features
included  summaries  of  each  budget  section,  additional  information  on
expenditures for  the biennium 1992-1993  and information on  extrabudgetary
expenditures and projections by object of expenditure.

29.  At  its 10th to  13th meetings,  on 23 and  24 May 1995, the  Committee
considered part one of the proposed programme  budget for the biennium 1996-
1997.

Discussion

30.  Some delegations expressed concern for the  reduction in the number  of
subprogrammes  in the proposed  programme budget  and stressed  the need for
indepth  consideration of  this issue  during  the  fiftieth session  of the
General Assembly.

31.  A number of delegations welcomed  the significant reduction in resource
levels in  the proposed programme budget  for the  biennium 1996-1997, which
was to  be achieved through  maximum efforts at  efficiency.  Several  other
delegations  recognized  the   increased  demands  being  placed  upon   the
Organization and  stressed that  a  reduction in  the budget  should not  be
perceived  as meaning a  reduced role  for the Organization and  that such a
reduction  must  not  affect  the  proper  implementation  of  all  mandated
programmes and  activities.   Those  delegations expressed  concern for  the
possible  negative   impact  that   the   reductions  could   have  on   the
implementation of programmes,  in particular those in  the economic area.  A
number of  delegations were of  the view that  it was  the responsibility of
Member States  to ensure that there  were no  discrepancies between mandates
and  resources, and  emphasized that  once the  budget was  approved  it was
essential for  Member States to meet  their financial  obligations by paying
their assessments in full, on time and without conditions.

32.   Several delegations  stressed the  importance of  strictly adhering to
the priorities as set  in the medium-term plan  for the period 1992-1997, as
revised,  in  particular  with  regard  to  African  economic  recovery  and
relevant programmes, mainly  programme 45.  Other delegations recalled  that
the General Assembly, in  annex I, paragraph 1 (b), of its resolution 41/213
of 19  December 1986, had required  the Secretary-General,  in preparing the
biennial budgets, to  indicate priorities,  reflecting general  trends of  a
broad  sectoral nature, and were  of the view that  the priorities indicated
in  the   proposed  programme  budget  for   the  biennium  1996-1997   were
appropriate.

33.  Some delegations questioned the  appropriateness of including  internal
oversight among the priorities of a  broad sectoral nature, emphasizing that
it  was not  in  itself  a substantive  activity  of the  Organization or  a
priority  agreed by  the General  Assembly, and stressed  that they  did not
approve of the proposed  increase in the budget  for the Office  of Internal
Oversight Services  at  the expense  of  other  mandated activities  of  the
Organization.  One delegation questioned the excessive and  disproportionate
increase in  the budget for  the Office, taking  into account  that this was
not a priority decided  on by the Assembly.  Many delegations regretted that
the Secretariat had not taken fully  into consideration the views  expressed
by Member  States when  they  had considered  the report  of the  Secretary-
General   on  the  proposed   budget  outline  for  the  biennium  1996-1997
(A/49/310) during the  forty-ninth session,  and expressed their views  that
the  Secretariat should  strictly comply  with  decisions by  Member States.
Other  delegations emphasized  their support  for the  strengthening  of the
Office, which had an important role in all programmes and stressed the  need
for  additional  resources  for  that  Office  as  proposed  in  the  budget
proposal.

34.    Many delegations  expressed  concern  at  the  proposed reduction  in
resources for development, despite this being  a priority, and stressed  the
need  to  ensure  adequate  resources  for  development activities.    Other
delegations underlined  in particular their  support for  the designation of
human rights,  humanitarian affairs, peacemaking,  preventive diplomacy  and
internal  oversight as  priorities. Some  delegations felt  that  priorities
like  human   rights  and  humanitarian  affairs  should  be  allotted  more
resources than  had ben  proposed.   Other delegations  questioned proposals
for the provision of additional resources  for human rights and humanitarian
affairs.   Some delegations  stressed that the  programme of  work for 1996-
1997 should  properly reflect  all mandates  of the  Vienna Declaration  and
Programme of  Action, 3/ adopted  by the World  Conference on Human  Rights,
particularly the right  to development.   Some  delegations also  emphasized

the need to ensure  that the proposed budget for humanitarian affairs was in
accordance with General Assembly resolution 46/182 of 19 December 1991.

35.  Some delegations regretted that  the Secretary-General had proposed the
transfer of  posts from  the peace-keeping  support account  to the  regular
budget without  any legislative  mandate.  Those delegations  emphasized the
importance of giving equal treatment regarding  the transfer of resources to
all  sections  of  the  budget.    Other  delegations  emphasized  that  the
Secretary-General was mandated  to carry out back-stopping of  peace-keeping
operations and  that  the proposed  transfer  of  posts concerned  only  the
method of  financing,  and was  therefore a  legitimate part  of the  budget
proposal for the Department of Peacekeeping Operations.

 36.  Some delegations stressed that the Secretary-General  did not have the
mandate to propose the establishment at Vienna of a unit for  the support of
reconstruction  and  development  in  central  and  eastern  Europe.    They
questioned some of the  proposed activities to be carried out by that  unit.
Other  delegations, however,  emphasized that  the Secretary-General  had  a
mandate for those activities and expressed support  for the transfer of  the
unit  as a means to  implement mandated activities in  a more cost-effective
manner.   Several delegations  noted that  the Secretary-General's  proposal
had referred to the  establishment of a new  office, while the Committee was
informed by the  representative of the Secretary-General that the  intention
was to transfer the  Unit now  at Geneva to Vienna.   Therefore it was  also
stressed  that   clearer  information  was   required.    Some   delegations
emphasized  that   the  activities   related  to   the  reconstruction   and
development of central and eastern Europe  should continue to be  undertaken
by the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE).

37.   With regard  to  the activities  not  carried  over from  the  current
biennium to 1996-1997, amounting  to $92.8 million,  many delegations  noted
that  those resources were  for activities  related to  the preparations for
and convening  of the global conferences  that were held during the biennium
1994-1995,  the completion of  special missions  such as  the United Nations
Observer  Mission  in   South  Africa  (UNOMSA),  completion  of   apartheid
activities  and  the  completion  of  major  construction  in  the  Economic
Commission for Africa (ECA).

38.  Many delegations stressed that the decrease  in the level of  resources
should not  affect priority areas,  the economic  development of  developing
countries and, in particular, African economic recovery.  These  delegations
stressed  the need  to  increase  the  level  of  both  regular  budget  and
extrabudgetary  resources  in   section  7B,  Africa:    critical   economic
situation, recovery and development, and emphasized  the importance of fully
supporting programmes relating to Africa.

39.   Many delegations  stressed the  importance of  follow-up activities to
all  major conferences  and expressed  the  view that  the Secretary-General
should  make every effort to provide adequate resources for the follow-up to
those  conferences.    They noted  that  adequate  resources  for  follow-up
activities to  the World  Summit for  Social Development,  the Ninth  United
Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime  and the Treatment of  Offenders
and the Fourth  World Conference on Women would  be considered in the  light
of decisions  by the General Assembly.   Some  delegations expressed concern
that  the  absence of  budgetary  provision  for  these  and other  expected
additional activities,  such as ad hoc  missions, gave  a misleading picture
of the  level of  growth  in the  budget.    Some delegations  stressed  the
importance of improving coordination between the Department for  Development
Support  and Management  Services, the  Department for  Economic and  Social
Information and  Policy Analysis and  the Department for Policy Coordination
and Sustainable  Development,  and  indicated  that the  division  of  their
responsibilities should be in accordance with their respective mandates.

40.   Many  delegations  expressed concern  at the  negative  impact  of the
restructuring process  on  the  implementation of  some programmes.    Those
delegations also emphasized that in the  search for efficiency a distinction

had to  be  made as  to  the  nature of  the  different activities.    Other
delegations welcomed  the fact that the  efficiency savings  were the result
of rationalization of  work programmes, improvement of productivity  related
to   investment  in  technological   improvements,  simplification  of  work
procedures  and  reductions  in  external   printing,  travel,  consultants,
supplies, equipment  and general operating expenses, and therefore would not
have a negative impact on mandated activities.

41.   A number of delegations questioned the level  of consultancy resources
and the necessity for outside expertise.  They expressed concern in  respect
of the  heavy reliance  on consultants  instead of  use of  the services  of
available staff and in-house expertise.

42.  A  number of delegations  noted that  as a result of  recosting, Member
States  would be  assessed a  higher nominal  amount than  for the  biennium
1994-1995.  Other  delegations  stated  that  this  situation  was   totally
logical, taking into account the recosting  methodology currently used.  One
delegation  stated   that  this  would  be   unacceptable  and  urged   that
significantly  greater   savings  be  achieved   for  1996-1997.     Several
delegations expressed their concern over the  effect of the future recosting
and stated  that every effort  should continue to  be made  to achieve cost-
effectiveness  with relation  to  additional activities  that  might  emerge
towards the end of this year.


Conclusions and recommendations

43.   The  Committee  expressed appreciation  for the  efforts  made by  the
SecretaryGeneral to present a programme budget on time and took note of  the
new features in the format of the budget.

44.   The Committee noted that  the total amount  of resources requested  by
the  Secretary-General  was  below the  level  determined  in the  programme
budget  outline for the  biennium 1996-1997,  and noted  also the Secretary-
General's  assurances that  such a  reduction  would  in no  way affect  the
implementation of all mandated programmes and activities.

45.   The Committee recommended that proposals for provision of resources in
the programme  budget for 1996-1997 should  be derived  from the medium-term
plan for the period 1992-1997, as  revised, and legislative mandates adopted
subsequent to the adoption of the medium-term plan or its last revisions.

46.   The  Committee  took  note of  the  methodology  used to  prepare  the
proposed programme budget.

47.  The Committee  noted the refinements in  the presentation of the budget
and  recognized   that  the   new  format   included  additional   features,
particularly the presentation of extrabudgetary resources and their  linkage
with the regular budget, as requested previously by the Committee.


Section 1.  Overall policy-making, direction and coordination

48.   At its 28th meeting, on  6 June 1995, the Committee  for Programme and
Coordination  considered  section  1, Overall  policy-making,  direction and
coordination, of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

49.    Many  delegations  endorsed  the  structure of  the  section.    Some
delegations  questioned the structure  of that  section and  stressed that a
number of bodies listed, such as ACABQ  and the Committee on  Contributions,
should  not  be considered  policy-making organs  but  rather expert  bodies
rendering technical advice to the General Assembly and other main bodies.

50.  Some delegations  felt that proposed increases  and decreases under the
General Assembly, the  Committee on Contributions,  the United Nations Joint
Staff  Pension Fund and  the United  Nations Board  of Auditors  should have
been  explained more fully  in the  proposal.  One delegation  felt that the
level of  resources  provided for  CPC,  including  staff support,  was  not
commensurate to  its tasks.  Another delegation  stressed the importance  of
the  functions of  the  President  of  the General  Assembly  and felt  that
resources should  be allocated  to enable him or  her to take part  in major
events outside New York during his or her term in office.

51.   With regard  to the  provisions proposed for  ACABQ, some  delegations
felt  that the increase in the travel provision was  excessive.  A number of
delegations queried the  cost of airfares  for spouses  of members of  ACABQ
and  stressed that  the matter  should  be  reviewed during  the forthcoming
session of the General Assembly.

52.   Some delegations  questioned the  proposed increase  in extrabudgetary
posts, particularly since the staffing of  the secretariat had already  been
augmented  in 1992-1993.   One delegation  supported the  level of resources
for ACABQ and recalled the  continued increase in the workload  of CPC as  a
result  of reports requested  by the  General Assembly,  in particular those
related  to  peace-keeping  operations.    Some  delegations  stressed  that
additional  posts for the  ACABQ secretariat  should be made  available on a
temporary basis.


Conclusions and recommendations

53.   The  Committee  took  note of  the  narrative of  section  1,  Overall
policymaking, direction and  coordination, of the proposed programme  budget
for the biennium 1996-1997.


Section 2.  Political affairs

54.  At its 25th  meeting, on 5 June 1995, the Committee considered  section
2, Political  affairs, of  the proposed  programme budget  for the  biennium
1996-1997.


Discussion

55.   Many  delegations welcomed  the  efforts  of the  Secretary-General to
streamline the Department of Political Affairs.   Some delegations  welcomed
the  overall  substantial   decrease  in  the  resources  proposed.     Some
delegations  expressed concern  as to whether sufficient  resources had been
proposed for activities relating to the Security Council.

56.  Several delegations considered that  resources allocated to the Special
Committee  on  the  Situation  with  regard  to  the  Implementation  of the
Declaration  on  the  Granting of  Independence  to  Colonial Countries  and
Peoples were  excessive.   Several other  delegations expressed  support for
the level of resources proposed.

57.   Some delegations  suggested that  the Department  of Political Affairs
review  the  narratives  relating  to  subprogrammes  1,  Special  political
questions,  and  2,   Regional,  political  and  security  cooperation,   of
programme 4,  Special political questions,  trusteeship and  decolonization,
of the  medium-term plan  for the period  1992-1997, as revised,  2/ with  a
view to  further streamlining and coordinating those activities and avoiding
apparent overlap.

58.  Some delegations supported the  programme narrative of subprogramme  3,
Trusteeship and  decolonization, of programme  4, whose legislative  mandate
was based on General  Assembly resolution 1514 (XV) of 14 December 1960  and
subsequent  resolutions of  the Assembly  on  the  item.   Other delegations

regarded the programme as a low priority.

59.  Many delegations emphasized that the proposed  activities to be carried
out under  subprogramme 4, Enhancing the  effectiveness of  the principle of
periodic  and genuine  elections, with  respect  to provision  of  electoral
assistance should in all cases  be in the form of responses to requests made
by Governments. Several delegations  expressed their strong  support for the
role and activities of the Electoral Assistance Division.

60.   With respect  to programme 7,  Disarmament, of  the medium-term  plan,
many  delegations  stressed  that  additional  resources  should  have  been
proposed for  the  regional  centres  in order  to  strengthen them.    They
regretted  that the  actual  state  of the  centres  did not  allow them  to
undertake  their activities  in a  satisfactory manner.   Other  delegations
emphasized  that the proposed  increase for  the programme  of activities of
the  Conference on  Disarmament was not  adequate to carry  out the mandated
activities.

61.  Many delegations  welcomed the fact that  the Committee on the Exercise
of the Inalienable  Rights of the  Palestinian People would  remain until  a
just, comprehensive and lasting settlement of  the question of Palestine had
been achieved, expressed concern at the  proposed decrease in resources  for
programme  5, Question  of Palestine,  and  urged the  Secretary-General  to
review the  narrative of the  programme with a  view to  reinstating the two
posts proposed  for suppression.    Many other  delegations expressed  their
support for the Secretary-General's proposed reduction on the  understanding
that it would not affect the quality of delivery of mandated activities.

62.    One  delegation  supported  the  Secretary-General's  proposal   that
activities related  to  the Office  of  the  Coordinator of  United  Nations
Assistance  for the  Reconstruction  and Development  of  Lebanon  (UNARDOL)
should continue to  be carried out and emphasized  that this should be  done
by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency  for Palestine Refugees in the
Near East  (UNRWA) rather  than by  the resident  coordinator of the  United
Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

63.  Several delegations  did not agree  to the level of resources  proposed
for consultants and travel.


Conclusions and recommendations

64.   The  Committee recommended  deletion  of  the phrase  "the  front-line
States" in paragraph 2.48.1 (a) (iii) and the phrase "but not in Africa"  in
paragraph 2.104.3 (b).

65.  The Committee  recommended to the General Assembly that it approve  the
programme narrative  of section  2, Political  affairs, as  amended, of  the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.
Section 3.  Peace-keeping operations and special missions

66.    At  its 26th  and  27th  meetings,  on 5  June  1995,  the  Committee
considered section 3, Peace-keeping operations and  special missions, of the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

67.   Many  delegations welcomed  the  reorganization  of the  Department of
Peacekeeping  Operations   and  considered  that   it  should  improve   the
Department's capacity  to meet the challenges  facing it.   Many delegations
welcomed the streamlining of the support  units for peace-keeping under  the
Field Administration and  Logistics Division and stressed the importance  of
further improving  the quality  of services  provided to  troop-contributing
countries,  mainly  in  the  areas  of   logistics  and  personnel.     Many
delegations  stressed  the  difficulties  encountered by  troop-contributing

countries,  especially with  regard to  deaths and disability  claims, troop
reimbursement   costs  and   related  matters.   Some  delegations   further
emphasized the importance of mitigating,  if not completely eliminating, the
problems  of troop-  and equipment-contributing  countries, as  well  as the
problems relating to death and disability claims.

68.    Many  delegations  emphasized  the  importance  of  effective  public
information support  activities as a  component of peace-keeping  operations
and felt that a mission information unit to back-stop  such field activities
should  have been  included in  the Department of  Peace-keeping Operations.
Many other  delegations said  that no  legislative mandate  existed for  the
establishment  of a  mission  information  unit  within the  Department  and
underlined their  support for the decision  of the  Secretary-General not to
include  a  mission  information  unit  in   the  budget  proposal  for  the
Department.

69.    Many  delegations  supported  the  Secretary-General's  proposal   to
transfer posts from the support account  for peace-keeping operations to the
regular  budget  as  an  appropriate  reflection  of  the  increase  in  the
Department's  core  activities.    Many  other  delegations  regretted   the
Secretary-General's proposed  transfer of posts,  despite the  debate on the
matter in  the General Assembly, and expressed opposition to the proposal as
there was no specific  legislative mandate in this  respect.  One delegation
hoped there  would be  a clear  decision on this  issue at the  next resumed
session of the Assembly.  Another delegation suggested  that the issue could
be resolved during  the Assembly's consideration  of the  proposed programme
budget.

70.  Some delegations felt that  the Secretary-General should have  included
financial provision in the proposed programme  budget for unforeseen ad  hoc
missions, at  a level commensurate with  the requirements  for such missions
in the  recent past.  The  representative of  the Secretary-General recalled
in this  connection that,  in his  report on the  proposed programme  budget
outline for  the biennium  1994-1995 (A/47/358),  the Secretary-General  had
included such a financial provision.   In its related report (A/47/7/Add.9),
ACABQ  had recommended against  the proposal,  since, by  their very nature,
those  activities were generally  unpredictable and the experience gained in
one  biennium was not necessarily an indication of what would be encountered
in the next. Furthermore, the Advisory  Committee believed that the  General
Assembly, in  its resolution 46/187  of 20  December 1991 on  unforeseen and
extraordinary  expenses,   had  adequately   provided  for  any   unexpected
activity.  The Assembly  had accepted this recommendation.   It was  on that
basis that the Secretary-General had not included a similar proposal in  the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Conclusions and recommendations

71.    The Committee  recommended  that  the  General  Assembly approve  the
programme  narrative of  section  3, Peace-keeping  operations  and  special
missions, of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Section 4.  Outer space affairs

72.  At its 25th meeting, on 5  June 1995, the Committee considered  section
4, Outer  space affairs, of the  proposed programme budget  for the biennium
1996-1997.


Discussion

73.   Several delegations  queried the level  of resources  proposed for the
section and expressed the view that  additional information could have  been
provided  with respect to the activities  to be carried out and the level of
resources  proposed  since,  unlike  other   sections  of  the   budget,  no

reductions  or  efficiency  gains  had been  proposed.    Other  delegations
expressed their support for the proposals  since the activities were devoted
to  priority questions of the Organization, as outlined  in paragraph 4.2 of
the programme narrative for the section.   Several delegations stressed  the
important role of  the activities in reducing the  gap between the rich  and
the poor,  and  the technology  gap  between  the developed  and  developing
nations.   Some delegations appreciated  the work  performed so far  in that
direction.

74.   Some delegations  questioned the  need for  consultations and experts,
while others queried  the projected decrease in extrabudgetary resources for
the programme  and how  the  decrease would  affect its  capacity to  assist
developing countries.   Some delegations stressed  the need  to provide more
resources  for consultants  and  experts,  especially in  such  a  technical
field.

75.   Some delegations  referred to  the establishment  and strengthening of
regional  centres   of  excellence  for   promoting  cooperation  in   space
technology and its peaceful application.

76.  Some delegations questioned the increase of  2.3 per cent in  budgetary
allocations  in  the  absence  of  clear  objectives.     Other  delegations
emphasized  that more resources  should be  provided for  the programmes and
activities,  which   had  a   great  potential  for  promoting   growth  and
sustainable development.


Conclusions and recommendations

77.  The Committee recommended to the General  Assembly that it approve  the
programme  narrative of  section 4,  Outer  space  affairs, of  the proposed
programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


 Section 6.  Legal activities

78.  At its  27th meeting, on 6 June  1995, the Committee considered section
6,  Legal activities,  of the  proposed  programme  budget for  the biennium
1996-1997.


Discussion

79.   Some delegations  welcomed the significant  reduction in the  level of
resources  proposed for legal  activities.   Others felt  that the reduction
was  more related  to  the  completion of  a  number of  activities than  to
increased efficiency.

80.    A number  of delegations  considered that  the proposed  reduction in
resources  should not adversely  affect the  effectiveness of  the Office of
Legal Affairs. Other  delegations emphasized that additional tasks  assigned
to the Office resulting from peace-keeping  activities should be taken  into
account in that context.

81.   One delegation  expressed disappointment  that efforts  to convert the
United Nations Treaty  Information System  (UNTIS) database to compact  disc
read-only  memory  (CD-ROM)  had  been  unsuccessful.    Further  efforts to
complete  the computerization of the system during  1996-1997 were supported
by  a number  of delegations,  who  anticipated that  it would  prove  cost-
effective and produce significant savings in the future.

82.    One delegation  suggested  that  consideration  be  given within  the
programme of work  of the  Office to  providing assistance  on legal  issues
related  to peacekeeping operations to Member States with limited experience
in the area.

83.  Some delegations expressed concern  about the excessive orientation  of
the workload towards peace-keeping activities, given  that the Office had  a
very important role to play in other areas of United Nations activities.

84.     The  same  delegations  emphasized   the  importance  of   effective
coordination between the Office of Legal  Affairs and other departments  and
offices, and  expressed concern  that  the reduction  for external  printing
might   adversely  affect   the  availability   of  important  publications,
including the Repertory of Practice of United Nations Organs.

85.   Several delegations emphasized  the importance of programme  2, Law of
the  sea and ocean affairs, with the entry into  force of the United Nations
Convention on  the Law  of the Sea 4/  in 1994, and expressed  concern as to
whether  the proposed level of resources would be  sufficient to provide for
the activities under the programme.

86.  One  delegation expressed support for completion  of the draft code  of
crimes against peace and the security of mankind during 1996-1997.

87.   One  delegation questioned  the use  of the  term "reform  States"  in
paragraph 6.62.1 (a).


 Conclusions and recommendations

88.  The Committee  recommended to the General Assembly that it approve  the
programme  narrative  of  section  6,  Legal  activities,  of  the  proposed
programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


                Section 7A.  Department for Policy Coordination and
                             Sustainable Development

89.    At  its  14th and  15th  meetings,  on  25 May  1995,  the  Committee
considered section  7A, Department for  Policy Coordination and  Sustainable
Development, of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

90.  A  number of delegations expressed concern  that the proposed level  of
resources was  not adequate to ensure the full and  timely implementation of
mandated  activities as well  as the  follow-up activities  that had emerged
from the World Summit for Social Development and could be expected from  the
Fourth World Conference  on Women.   They noted  the statement  made by  the
Controller  that  proposed  programme  budget section  7A  did  not  include
provision  of  resources   for  possible  future  mandated  programmes   and
activities  arising out  of  legislative  decisions  relating to  the  World
Summit  for Social Development or  the Fourth World Conference on Women, and
that  if  significant  additional  activities  were  subsequently  mandated,
additional resources  would need  to be  provided for their  implementation.
Other delegations  welcomed the  efforts  to achieve  efficiency savings  as
well  as  internal redeployment  of  resources  to  allow  greater focus  on
priority programmes such as sustainable development.

91.  Some delegations  stressed the special importance  they attached to the
programme on  eradication of  poverty, in  particular  in the  light of  the
outcome of  the World Summit  for Social Development  and the  objectives of
the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty (1996).

92.   A  number  of delegations  expressed their  support for  the proposals
concerning the follow-up activities related to  the Global Conference on the
Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing  States and to Agenda 21.
5/

93.   Some delegations noted  that adequate provision should  be provided to

the   Department   to    ensure   maximum   outreach   and   contact    with
intergovernmental bodies on policy matters.


Conclusions and recommendations

94.    The Committee  recommended  that  the  General  Assembly approve  the
programme narrative of  section 7A, Department  for Policy  Coordination and
Sustainable Development, of  the proposed programme budget for the  biennium
1996-1997, on  the understanding  that, should  the Assembly  adopt any  new
legislative   mandates  that  established  new  programmes  and  activities,
adequate resource  provision  would be  proposed  to  the Assembly  for  its
consideration at the time of its examining and approving the budget.


             Section 7B.  Africa:  critical economic situation, recovery
                         and development

95.  At its 15th  meeting, on 25 May 1995,  the Committee considered section
7B, Africa:  critical economic situation,  recovery and development, of  the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

96.   A  number of  delegations welcomed  the submission  by the  Secretary-
General  of a  separate section  on  Africa:   critical  economic situation,
recovery and  development  as requested  by  the  General Assembly.    Other
delegations recalled their  reservation on  the question.  Some  delegations
stressed  that  section  7B  should  comprise  all  the  activities  of  the
Secretariat included within the framework of  the United Nations New  Agenda
for the Development of Africa  in the 1990s,  6/ the financing of which  was
to be  covered by the  regular budget.  Other  delegations expressed concern
that creation  of  a separate  section  7B  might diminish  flexibility  in,
adequate   accountability   with  respect   to,   and   control   over   the
implementation of mandated  activities, and supported the SecretaryGeneral's
view that a separate budget section was not desirable.

97.  Many  delegations stressed the  importance of adhering strictly  to the
priorities  set  in  the  medium-term  plan  for  the  period  1992-1997, as
revised, 2/  in particular,  with regard  to African  economic recovery  and
relevant  programmes,  mainly  programme  45.    They  emphasized  that  the
proposed resources under section 7B did not adequately address the needs  of
Africa and  felt  that the  resources  allocated  to the  Secretariat  units
responsible for the implementation of programme  45 of the medium-term  plan
and for the contribution of the  United Nations system to the implementation
of the  United Nations New Agenda for the Development of Africa in the 1990s
were not  sufficient  and should  be  increased.  They underlined,  in  that
connection,   the  important   role   of  the   Secretary-General   in   the
implementation  of  subprogramme  1,  Mobilization  of  resources,  and   in
ensuring that  the  organizations of  the United  Nations system  integrated
Africa as a priority into their programmes of activity. 

98.    Some  delegations  stressed  that   Member  States  were  faced  with
increasing  difficulty   in   providing  incremental   resources  and   that
consequently  resources  for  priority  activities would  have  to  be found
through internal reallocation and efficiency gains.

99.   Some  delegations stated  that  there was  a discrepancy  between  the
titles  of   the  subprogrammes  and   the  description  of  the  activities
thereunder.   They  considered, for  example,  that  the proposed  scope  of
activities and  resources under subprogramme 3  was insufficient  to have an
impact in raising awareness about African economic problems.

100.  Some delegations considered that  the allocation of resources  between
subprogrammes did not fully reflect priorities  within programme 45 and that

increased resources should have been allocated to subprogramme 2.


Conclusions and recommendations

101.   While welcoming the efforts  of the  Secretary-General to rationalize
the activities of the  Organization, the Committee  reaffirmed that priority
should  continue  to be  given  to  Africa:    critical economic  situation,
recovery  and development.    The  Committee therefore  recommended  to  the
General  Assembly that  it review  the  level of  resources devoted  to  the
implementation  of  activities   related  to  Africa:    critical   economic
situation, recovery  and development,  in accordance  with General  Assembly
resolutions 46/151 of 18  December 1991 and 49/142  of 23 December 1994, and
taking into account the enormous needs of Africa.


            Section 8.  Department for Economic and Social Information
                        and Policy Analysis

102.  At its 13th meeting, on 24 May 1995,  the Committee considered section
8, Department  for Economic and Social  Information and  Policy Analysis, of
the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

103.  A number of delegations expressed support  for the objectives and  the
scope of the activities proposed for the Department under section 8.

104.  Several delegations supported the  efforts made for the reorganization
and rationalization of the activities and  for the redeployment of resources
to priority  areas.   Other delegations  considered that  the allocation  of
resources  within  the  section did  not adequately  reflect  the priorities
established in  the  medium-term  plan  and subsequent  resolutions  of  the
General Assembly  and  the Economic  and  Social  Council.   One  delegation
doubted  that  the  rapid  growth  in  resources  devoted  to  microeconomic
analysis  was justified.   Some delegations expressed reservations about the
need for  creating a new Microeconomic  and Social  Policy Analysis Division
within  the  Department  for  Economic  and  Social  Information  and Policy
Analysis, and  felt that mandated programmes  and activities  could be fully
implemented within the existing organizational structure of the  Department.
One delegation  suggested that an in-depth  evaluation of  the activities of
the Department be undertaken in the  near future. Some delegations indicated
that   improved    coordination   between   the    Department   and    other
departments/offices of the Secretariat was still required.

105.    A  number  of  delegations  stated  that  certain  activities  under
programme 12, Global  development issues  and policies,  of the  medium-term
plan seemed to  duplicate and overlap with each  other and that a number  of
subprogrammes of programme 12 could be merged.

106.   Several delegations  stressed the  need to  ensure adequate resources
for  strengthening   activities  under  programme   12  pertaining  to   the
continuing economic  and social transformation  in countries with  economies
in transition and the  reporting to the General Assembly and to the Security
Council  on the  implementation  of multilateral  economic sanctions  on the
effects of unilateral economic coercive measures.   In this connection, some
delegations supported the creation  of the Microeconomic  and Social  Policy
Analysis Division within the Department.

107.  Some delegations  felt that the  level of resources allocated for  the
implementation  of  the   follow-up  to  the  International  Conference   on
Population  and Development  was not  sufficient  and should  be  increased.
Some  delegations  considered  that  the  Department  should  endeavour   to
strengthen its interaction with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

 108.  A number  of delegations indicated  that the activities envisaged  in
paragraph 8.42  of section  8 relating  to socio-economic  aspects of  post-
conflict peace-building  were  not based  on  the  medium-term plan  or  any
subsequent mandate. They felt  that subprogramme 2,  Problems and  prospects
of  integrated development, of  programme 12  should be  reformulated in the
light  of  those observations  and  that  the  related  resources should  be
redeployed  to priority areas.   Other  delegations supported the activities
proposed in that paragraph.

109.    A  number  of  delegations  stressed  that  the  programme narrative
included in subprogramme  5, Microeconomic issues and policies, of programme
12 did  not have  legislative mandate  and that  the subprogramme should  be
reformulated.   However,  other delegations  stressed that  there  were duly
adopted mandates for these activities.

110.   Most delegations supported approval of the programme narrative of the
section.


Conclusions and recommendations

111.    The  Committee  was  unable to  reach  agreement  on  the  programme
narrative  of  section  8.    It  therefore  recommended  that  the  General
Assembly, when  considering the  proposed programme budget for  the biennium
1996-1997,  review  the  programme   narrative  of  section  8,  paying  due
attention to the observations in the discussion portion above.


Section 9.  Department for Development Support and
            Management Services                  

112.  At its 14th  meeting, on 25 May 1995, the Committee considered section
9,  Department  for  Development Support  and  Management  Services, of  the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

113.   A  number  of delegations  supported the  proposed programme  of work
while some  delegations felt that the  resources provided  to the Department
were not commensurate with the importance of  the activities provided by  it
to developing countries.

114.  A number of  delegations felt that the potential of the Department  in
technical cooperation  activities should  be fully  realized and  emphasized
the importance of the  coordination of its activities with those of UNDP and
other  organizations  of  the  United  Nations  system.   Other  delegations
underlined  the need  to avoid  duplication  in  the Department's  work with
respect to that of other United Nations organizations.

115.   Several delegations  noted the reduction of  extrabudgetary resources
projected for  1996-1997 and  considered that  the level  of regular  budget
resources should also have been reduced  proportionally.  Other  delegations
stated  that the  reduction of  extrabudgetary  resources should  have  been
compensated by  an increase in the regular budget resources.  One delegation
noted  that  it  expected  the  Department  to be  affected  by  the changes
mandated  by the  General  Assembly  under  its resolutions  on  operational
activity, which  should  lead to  a  decrease  in its  recruitment,  project
management and  procurement work, and was  surprised there  was no reference
to  this  in the  budget.   Some  delegations requested  the Secretariat  to
present a table  illustrative of those activities  of the programme that had
been suppressed.

116.  Several delegations questioned the  legislative basis for the transfer
of the Department's  technical cooperation  functions from Geneva to  Vienna
and the establishment of a Reconstruction and Development  Unit at Vienna.  

Some  delegations stressed  that  the  transfer of  the Unit  to  Vienna was
justified  by its proximity  to the  countries with  economies in transition
and by the  savings that would be generated.  Some delegations felt that the
proximity factor  was not important.   Some delegations  considered that the
activities of  the Unit could duplicate  technical cooperation functions  of
the  ECE  and  the  United  Nations  Conference  on  Trade  and  Development
(UNCTAD), and  sought  assurances  that  duplication and  overlap  would  be
avoided.    Some  delegations  suggested  a  review  of  the  United Nations
activities in the context of countries with economies in  transition and the
activities  of other  organizations  in the  same  area in  order  to  avoid
duplication of work.

117.    Some delegations  felt  that  under  the  Public administration  and
finance  programme not  enough attention  was  given  to private  sector and
entrepreneurship  development.     Other  delegations  considered  that  the
programme was well-balanced.

118.   Some delegations  underlined  that  in the  narrative of  the  Global
development  issues  and policies  programme some  important  issues of  the
medium-term plan such as rural development,  and science and technology  for
development, had been ignored.

119.   Some delegations  considered that  the Natural  resources and  Energy
programmes should  have been presented separately  in the  fascicle, as they
were in the medium-term plan.

120.     Some  delegations  recommended  that   paragraph  9.34  should   be
implemented  in accordance with  relevant paragraphs of the medium-term plan
as revised by the  General Assembly in its resolution 47/214 of 23  December
1992.   The same  delegations stressed  that the  references to  sustainable
human  development  should   be  replaced  by  sustainable  development   in
accordance  with  the  relevant  decisions  of   the  Assembly.    The  same
delegations expressed  the view that the  activities in  this section should
be carried  out at the request of  the Governments and on the basis of their
interests and national priorities.

121.   Some  delegations considered  that  more  emphasis should  have  been
placed on the follow-up of the World Summit for Social Development.


Conclusions and recommendations

122.    The  Committee  recommended  to  the  General  Assembly  that,  when
considering  the proposed programme  budget for  the biennium  1996-1997, it
review  the programme  narrative of  section 9,  Department for  Development
Support and Management Services.


Section 10A.  United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

123.  At its 17th meeting, on 26 May  1995, the Committee considered section
10A,  United Nations Conference  on Trade  and Development,  of the proposed
programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.
 Discussion

124.   Several delegations  reaffirmed  the role  of UNCTAD  as focal  point
within  the United  Nations  for  integrated  treatment of  development  and
interrelated issues in areas  of trade, investment,  science and  technology
and  environment, finance  and  sustainable  development, as  laid  down  in
General Assembly resolution 49/99 of 19  December 1994.  Several delegations
also reiterated  the complementarity between  the World Trade  Organization,
which  was a  rule-making body,  and  UNCTAD,  which was  the trade-oriented
policy forum.

125.  A  number of delegations expressed  strong support for the  integrated
global approach  of the programme and were concerned that the proposed level

of resources  might not  be adequate  to ensure  full implementation of  the
mandated  activities programmed.   They  noted  the  assurance given  by the
representative of the Secretary-General that  a reduction would  not curtail
the  mandated programmes and  activities of  UNCTAD.   They reaffirmed their
support  for the important  role of UNCTAD in  providing research and policy
analysis  for  the  developing  countries,  especially in  meeting  the  new
opportunities  and in responding  to challenges  derived from the conclusion
and  full  implementation  of  the  Uruguay   Round  of  multilateral  trade
negotiations.  Several delegations stressed that measures that might  weaken
or undermine  the  contribution of  UNCTAD  to  the development  process  of
developing countries should be prevented.

126.   Some delegations  welcomed the  proposed reduction  of resources  and
felt  that some activities  could be  phased out,  with further streamlining
required under programme 13, Trade and  development.  They expressed  regret
that  UNCTAD had failed  to seize the opportunity  to rationalize and better
prioritize its work.

127.    Some delegations  welcomed  the  increased resources  allocated  for
subprogramme 4,  Poverty alleviation, of programme  13, but  continued to be
concerned at the relatively small share  in the overall resource  allocation
for  programme  13  despite  the  importance   of  the  subprogramme.    One
delegation  questioned the  increase of  resources in  poverty  eradication,
which it believed was not a priority activity of UNCTAD.

128.    A number  of  delegations  emphasized  the  importance of  effective
follow-up  of the outcome of the mid-term global review of implementation of
the Programme of Action  for the Least Developed  Countries for the 1990s 7/
as expressed in General Assembly  resolution 49/98 of 19  December 1994, and
were  concerned  that  adequate  resources   might  not  be  provided  under
programme 15 for that purpose.

129.   A number of delegations  stressed the importance of implementation of
the Programme  of Action  for the  Sustainable Development  of Small  Island
Developing States  8/ and  questioned whether  adequate  resources had  been
proposed for related activities.

130.  Several delegations expressed support  for activities related to land-
locked countries, and  the need for ensuring that the special problems faced
by those countries were addressed and necessary resources appropriated.

131.  Several delegations expressed concern at the  increase of 15 per  cent
in  resources allocated  to subprogramme  8, Privatization, entrepreneurship
and  competitiveness, and regretted  that, in  relation to  resources, equal
treatment  was  not  given  to  other  subprogrammes at  the  same  level of
priorities.    Some delegations  welcomed  the  increased resources  in  the
section.

 132.   In response to queries raised by some delegations regarding possible
overlapping of  the activities of UNCTAD  and the  World Trade Organization,
the   Secretariat   explained  their   respective   mandates   and   working
relationship, which  reflected the complementarity  between the two  bodies,
which were  mutually supporting  and required  for responding  to the  rapid
changes in  the world economy.   However, some  delegations remained of  the
view that there was  potential for duplication  and urged that the issue  be
kept under close review.

133.    One delegation  recommended  that  paragraph  10A.56  be amended  as
follows:

  (a)  In line  3, the words "entrepreneurship  and the strengthening of the
private   sector"   should   read   "entrepreneurship,   including   through
privatization, and the strengthening of the public and private sectors";

   (b)   The last sentence of  the paragraph should  be deleted since  there
was no legislative mandate for those functions.


Conclusions and recommendations

134.   The Committee  recommended approval by  the General  Assembly of  the
programme  narrative of section 10A of the proposed programme budget for the
biennium 1996-1997, on the basis of  assurances from representatives of  the
Secretariat that the proposed reduction  in the level of resources for 1996-
1997 would  in no  way lead to  curtailment of any  mandated programmes  and
activities.

135.   The  Committee also  recommended  that  in considering  the  proposed
programme budget for  the biennium  1996-1997, the  General Assembly  should
give due attention to the opinions  expressed by Member States  as reflected
in the discussion portion above.


Section 10B.  International Trade Centre UNCTAD/GATT

136.  At its 17th  meeting, on 26 May 1995, the Committee considered section
10B,  International Trade  Centre UNCTAD/General  Agreement on  Tariffs  and
Trade (GATT), of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

137.   Support  for  the programme,  as well  as  for the  strengthening  of
activities following  the conclusion  of the Uruguay  Round agreements,  was
expressed.


Conclusions and recommendations

138.  The Committee recommended to the General  Assembly that it approve the
programme narrative of section 10B, International Trade Centre  UNCTAD/GATT,
of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Section 11.  United Nations Environment Programme

139.  At its 16th meeting,  on 26 May 1995, the Committee considered section
11, United Nations  Environment Programme, of the proposed programme  budget
for the biennium 1996-1997.
 Discussion

140.   Several delegations  noted that  the Governing Council  of the United
Nations Environment  Programme (UNEP) was currently  in session  and that it
was  reviewing the programme  of work  of UNEP  for the  biennium 1996-1997.
Some were  of the  view that  the Committee  should postpone  its review  of
section  11 to a  later date when it  could consider it in  the light of the
outcome of the  Council's deliberations and decisions.  Others felt that the
results of  the Council's  deliberations could  be examined  by the  General
Assembly.


Conclusions and recommendations

141.  The Committee recommended to the General  Assembly that it approve the
programme narrative of section 11, United Nations  Environment Programme, of
the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Section 12.  United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat)

142.  At its 16th meeting, on 26 May  1995, the Committee considered section
12, United Nations Centre for Human  Settlements (Habitat), of the  proposed
programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Conclusions and recommendations

143.   The  Committee recommended  that  the  General Assembly  approve  the
programme  narrative  of  section  12,  United  Nations  Centre  for   Human
Settlements (Habitat),  of the  proposed programme  budget for the  biennium
1996-1997.


Section 13.  Crime control

144.  At its 16th meeting, on 26 May  1995, the Committee considered section
13, Crime control, of the proposed  programme budget for the  biennium 1996-
1997.


Discussion

145.  A number  of delegations expressed support  for the objectives and the
scope of activities proposed under section 13.

146.   Several delegations considered  that allocation  of resources  within
the programme did not  fully meet the priorities  established by the General
Assembly and the Economic and Social Council and  that subprogrammes 1 and 2
should receive priority attention.

147.    Some delegations  felt that  the  proposal for  upgrading the  Crime
Prevention  and  Criminal  Justice  Branch  into  a  division  and  for  the
strengthening  of staff  resources was  not  justified by  the scope  of the
activities envisaged  for the biennium.   One delegation  indicated that the
resources under the programme
should be  strengthened through  internal redeployment.   Other  delegations
supported the  proposals  of the  Secretary-General.   One delegation  noted
that it  did  not  believe  seeking ways  and  means  for the  treatment  of
acquired    immunodeficiency   syndrome    (AIDS)-affected   prisoners   was
appropriate work for the Branch.
  148.  Some delegations  rejected the link between the assistance given  to
Member  States to combat all  forms of organized transnational crime and the
promotion of the  fundamental principles of  the maintenance of the  rule of
law, sound public administration and good governance (para. 13.13 (d)).

149.    Some delegations  noted  the absence  of  reference  to  the illegal
traffic in  children, prostitution  and child  pornography as  new forms  of
transnational crime  and the means  that should be taken  to prevent, combat
and eliminate their causes.


Conclusions and recommendations

150.  The Committee recommended that  the General Assembly, when considering
the  proposed  programme  budget  for  the biennium  1996-1997,  review  the
programmatic narrative of section 13, Crime control.


Section 14.  International drug control

151.  At its 16th meeting, on 26 May 1995, the Committee considered  section
14,  International drug control,  of the  proposed programme  budget for the
biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

152.   Several  delegations expressed  their  support  for the  programme of
activities under the section.

153.    Some  delegations  considered  that  within  the  overall  level  of
resources  proposed for  the section,  increased resources  should have been
allocated to subprogrammes  3, 6 and 7, in  view of their importance for the
control of drug abuse.  They also questioned  the need for the resources for
consultants.

154.   Some  delegations stressed  that it  was necessary  to introduce more
balance  between  the resources  allocated  to  field  activities and  those
allocated to administrative activities.

155.    Some  delegations  emphasized  the  importance  for  the  developing
countries of easy access  to the information available in the United Nations
International  Drug  Control  Programme  (UNDCP),  in  order   for  them  to
strengthen their  capacity to control drug  abuse and  traffic in narcotics.
Other  delegations  questioned  the absence  of resources  from  the regular
budget  for subprogramme  4, Technical  cooperation, and  expressed  concern
that  the foreseen  activities would  not  be  properly endorsed  during the
biennium under this subprogramme.


Conclusions and recommendations

156.   The  Committee recommended  that  the  General Assembly  approve  the
programme  narrative  of  section 14,  International  drug  control, of  the
proposed programme budget for the 1996-1997 biennium.


 Section 15.  Economic Commission for Africa

157.  At its 18th meeting, on 30  May 1995, the Committee considered section
15,  Economic Commission for  Africa, of  the proposed  programme budget for
the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

158.   Several delegations  expressed concern  at the  continued decline  in
resources, in particular  extrabudgetary resources, and the negative  impact
this could have on programme delivery,  especially on the implementation  of
mandated activities, as well as technical cooperation projects.

159.  Several delegations expressed the hope that within  the proposed level
of  resources  the  secretariat of  ECA  would  be  able  to  implement  its
programmed activities, as contained in the  proposed programme budget.  They
welcomed the reorganization of the secretariat which, with renewed  efforts,
they hoped  would facilitate  implementation of  the Commission's  mandates.
They   expected  the   secretariat   to  compensate   for  the   decline  in
extrabudgetary resources by increasing the  level of resources proposed from
the regular  budget.  They stressed  that, in the face  of the magnitude  of
Africa's problems and  the enormous efforts the countries of the region were
making, the  United Nations and the  international community  should do more
to  assist Africa.  Other delegations said that not enough was being done to
streamline existing subprogrammes  and to prioritize  the use  of resources.
They  could not  therefore support  the  introduction of  more posts  to  be
funded  from  the  regular budget.    New requirements  must  be met  within
existing  resources,  including through  the  curtailment  of  redundant  or
ineffective  programmes.    Some  delegations  sought  assurances  that  the
decline  in resources would  not affect  the quality  of programme delivery,
the  Commission's  capacity  for  coordination  and  activities  related  to
regional cooperation.

160.   Some delegations called  on the secretariat  of ECA, taking advantage
of  its  unique position  to contribute  to  the  development of  Africa, to
endeavour  further  to  develop  a new  African  strategy  for  development,
promote intraregional trade and strengthen and  improve its database.   They
also  pointed to the  need for  ECA to evaluate  its work from  time to time

and,   among   other  things,   to  continue   to  implement   the  relevant
recommendations of the  Office of  Internal Oversight Services contained  in
the  report  on   the  programme   and  administrative   practices  of   the
secretariats of the regional commissions (A/49/891, annex).

161.  Some  delegations expressed their preference for the activities of the
African Institute for Economic Development and  Planning (IDEP) to be funded
through the regular budget so as to ascertain its viability and continuity.


Conclusions and recommendations

162.   The  Committee recommended  that  the  General Assembly  approve  the
programme narrative  of section 15, Economic  Commission for  Africa, of the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


              Section 16.  Economic and Social Commission for Asia and
                          the Pacific

163.   At its 19th meeting, on 30 May 1995, the Committee considered section
16,  Economic  and  Social  Commission for  Asia  and  the Pacific,  of  the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

164.   Several  delegations expressed satisfaction with  the increased level
of  resources proposed, while other  delegations felt that  there was a need
for  strengthening further the  priority areas  of work.   Some delegations,
while  welcoming the priority attached to programmes  on poverty alleviation
and  for  least  developed  countries,  felt   that  they  could  have  been
strengthened further.

165.  Some  delegations highlighted the  need to  avoid duplication of  work
with respect to other  bodies of the United  Nations system and  stated that
the efficiency and effectiveness of the  Commission's work practices must be
improved before additional resources or authority were devolved to it.

166.    Some  delegations  welcomed  the  initiative  of  the  Commission to
increase the  use of its conference  facilities and  streamline its meetings
schedule.


Conclusions and recommendations

167.  The Committee recommended to the General Assembly that it approve  the
programme narrative of section 16, Economic  and Social Commission for  Asia
and  the Pacific,  of the proposed  programme budget for  the biennium 1996-
1997.


Section 17.  Economic Commission for Europe

168.  At  its 19th meeting, on 30 May 1995, the Committee considered section
17,  Economic Commission for  Europe, of  the proposed  programme budget for
the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

169.   A number of  delegations emphasized the  importance of the activities
proposed under section 17 and supported the programme  of work and the level
of resources.

170.   Some delegations stressed  the importance  of coordinating activities

with  other  United  Nations  entities,  and  in  particular  with  regional
organizations, in order to avoid duplication of work.

171.  Some delegations  felt that there was  a need for further streamlining
of  resources in  non-priority areas  and their  redeployment to  designated
highpriority areas.   They also considered  that the activities of  some ECE
bodies  should be reviewed.   Other delegations stressed  the need to ensure
adequate  resources for all  mandated activities  of ECE,  in particular for
the development of cooperation in the field of industry and technology.

 172.   Many delegations expressed support for the proposal under section 9,
Department for Development Support and  Management Services, to  establish a
Unit at  Vienna.  In this  connection, other delegations  regretted that the
SecretaryGeneral  had  proposed  an  activity  at  Vienna  to  support   the
reconstruction  and  development   of  the  central  and  eastern   European
countries,  without any  legislative  mandate.   They  emphasized that  such
functions could be  developed under the activities of ECE.  Some delegations
regretted  that  the  Secretariat  had  not  given  precise  and  sufficient
information to Member States  in order to enable  them to identify the gains
related  to  effectiveness  and  productivity  that  would  arise  from  the
transferring of those functions from Geneva to Vienna. 

173.  Many delegations emphasized the  importance of further orientation and
development  of the  activities of  ECE  for  the purposes  of economic  and
social transformation in the countries with economies in transition.


Conclusions and recommendations

174.   The  Committee recommended  that  the  General Assembly  approve  the
programme narrative  of section 17, Economic  Commission for  Europe, of the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


                Section 18.  Economic Commission for Latin America
                             and the Caribbean

175.  At its 20th meeting, on 31 May  1995, the Committee considered section
18,  Economic  Commission  for  Latin  America  and  the  Caribbean,  of the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

176.  Several delegations  supported the programme of  work and the proposed
level of  resources, while expressing concern  at the decrease  in the level
of  extrabudgetary resources.    Some delegations  were concerned  about the
limited   resources   assigned   to   some  subprogrammes,   in   particular
subprogramme 14,  Regional integration and  cooperation.  Other  delegations
expressed their  belief that the Economic  Commission for  Latin America and
the Caribbean  (ECLAC) needed restructuring  to ensure a more cost-effective
and  targeted work  programme.    More attention  needed to  be paid  by the
Commission to the changes  in the economic environment of the region and  to
strengthening links with the private sector.

177.  Many delegations considered that  increased resources should have been
proposed  for the programme.   Other  delegations argued  that no additional
resources  or responsibilities should  be devolved  to ECLAC  until it could
demonstrate  that it  was making  efficient  and  effective use  of existing
resources.

178.  A number of  delegations requested an explanation about the parameters
used for  the recosting, which  appeared to be  too high  in comparison with
the level of recosting in other regional commissions.

179.   A number of delegations welcomed the efforts by the Secretary-General

to reduce the rental cost for the premises of the office at Mexico City.

 180.   Several delegations stressed the need to  ensure coordination of the
ECLAC programme of work  with that of other organizations within the  United
Nations system in order to avoid duplication.

181.  Some delegations expressed concern  regarding the timing of submission
of ECLAC documentation in all the official languages of the Commission.

182.  One delegation  expressed concern at the inclusion of concepts such as
governability,   capacity  for   government,  decentralization   and   local
government (para.  18.28) without properly  defining the  role of government
in this connection.


Conclusions and recommendations

183.   The  Committee recommended  that  the  General Assembly  approve  the
programme  narrative of  section 18,  Economic Commission for  Latin America
and the  Caribbean, of the proposed programme budget for  the biennium 1996-
1997.

184.   The  Committee also  recommended  that, when  implementing  paragraph
18.28, the  Secretariat develop  the activities  mentioned therein upon  the
request  of  interested  Governments  on  the  basis  of  the  interests and
national priorities of Member States.


Section 19.  Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia

185.  At its 20th meeting, on 31 May 1995, the Committee considered  section
19,  Economic  and Social  Commission  for  Western  Asia,  of the  proposed
programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

186.  Many delegations expressed their  support for the programme activities
and welcomed the  new thematic approach  adopted by the Economic  and Social
Commission   for  Western  Asia  (ESCWA)  and  the   reorganization  of  its
secretariat.   Some delegations expressed the  hope that the  reorganization
would lead  to  a  more effective  use  of  ESCWA  resources,  with  greater
attention being paid to priority activities.

187.   Some delegations considered that  subprogramme 2,  Improvement of the
quality of  life, should be designated  high priority and  that ESCWA should
avoid duplication of work with other organizations in the region.

188.  Some delegations requested information  about the timing and  resource
implications of the transfer of ESCWA headquarters to Beirut.

189.    Some delegations  asked  whether  the  reorganization  of the  ESCWA
secretariat had been completed.  Other  delegations welcomed the  assurances
by the  Secretariat  that the  reorganization  was  in compliance  with  the
recommendations  of the  Office of Internal Oversight  Services contained in
the   report  on   the  programme   and  administrative   practices  of  the
secretariats of the regional commissions (A/49/891, annex).

190.  Some delegations rejected the inclusion in paragraph 19.14 of "(c)  to
regionalize human development concepts and indices"  as an objective.   They
considered that  those  concepts and  indices  had  no mandates,  since  the
General Assembly  in its resolution  49/123 of  19 December 1994  had stated
clearly that the  Human Development Report was  not an official  document of
the United Nations.

Conclusions and recommendations

191.   The  Committee recommended  that  the  General Assembly  approve  the
programme  narrative  of  section 19,  Economic  and  Social  Commission for
Western Asia, of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Section 20.  Regular programme of technical cooperation

192.  At its 21st meeting, on 31 May 1995, the Committee considered  section
20, Regular programme  of technical  cooperation, of the proposed  programme
budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

193.   A  number of  delegations expressed  their support for  the proposals
under  this  section.    They  stressed  that  the  proposed  activities and
resources  should  be   considered  complementary  to  the  activities   and
resources under other related budget sections.

194.   Some delegations  noted the  difficulty in  identifying activities in
the section and felt  that more detailed  information should be provided  in
that respect.  In  particular, they sought assurances  that the bulk  of the
money spent  under this programme  would be devoted  to the  least developed
and  poorest countries.   Other delegations  recognized that  the activities
under this section were by nature difficult to programme.

195.   Some  delegations  underlined that  activities related  to  technical
cooperation  should  be   financed  by  extrabudgetary  resources.     Other
delegations  considered that the activities under section  20 contributed to
the development of developing countries and  expressed their support for the
financing of  these activities through the regular budget in order to ensure
that they were placed on a sound and assured financial basis.

196.   Some delegations  queried the  relationship of  the activities  under
this  section with similar  activities carried  out by  other United Nations
programmes and  sought  assurance that  there  would  be no  overlapping  or
duplication of  efforts in  this regard.   Some  delegations advocated  this
programme's being fundamentally reviewed  and modified in  order to  respond
more  fully to the  current requirements  for technical  cooperation.  Other
delegations  stressed   that  this  section  was  useful  and  provided  the
necessary  flexibility to  satisfy  the emerging  priorities  of  developing
countries.


Conclusions and recommendations

197.   The  Committee recommended  that  the  General Assembly  approve  the
programme  narrative   of  section  20,   Regular  programme  of   technical
cooperation, of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


 Section 21.  Human rights

198.   At  its  22nd and  23rd  meetings,  on  1 June  1995,  the  Committee
considered section  21, Human rights, of  the proposed  programme budget for
the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

199.  Many  delegations supported  the proposed  programme of  work and  the
proposed  increases in  resources.   Many  other  delegations felt  that the
increase proposed was inadequate and more  resources were needed in  general
in this important field and in order to  reflect the expansion of activities

following the World Conference on Human  Rights.  Many delegations regretted
that priority  areas in  the economic  and social  sectors had  not received
similar proposals for  increases, while  recognizing the  importance of  the
activities in the field  of human rights, and expressed their concern at the
increase  in  resources  proposed  for  this  sector.    Other   delegations
expressed their concern that technical advisory assistance operations  might
not be adequately funded.

200.   A  number of  delegations questioned  the legislative  basis  for the
budget  proposal  as  contained  in  section  21,  since  the  revisions  to
programme 35  and section 21 of  the revised budget  estimates of the  1994-
1995 programme budget had not been approved by  the General Assembly.  Other
delegations  pointed  out  that  the  legislative  mandate  for  the  budget
proposal  was  derived  from  resolutions  and  decisions  adopted  by   the
Assembly.

201.   Some delegations  questioned the  proposed level  of resources  under
subprogrammes 2 and 4,  and felt that the  resources should be  more equally
distributed among subprogrammes.   Some delegations expressed concern  about
the  lower level of resources  allocated to subprogramme 2  from the regular
budget  in relation to  the higher  level from  extrabudgetary resources and
underlined, in  particular, that insufficient  resources had been  allocated
to implement the goals  and objectives of the Third Decade to Combat  Racism
and Racial  Discrimination in  accordance with  General Assembly  resolution
48/228  of 23 December  1993.   Other delegations  welcomed the  emphasis on
subprogramme  1, which had  been designated  high priority  by the Assembly,
and expressed  the hope that the  activities envisaged  under subprogramme 4
would  draw  fully on  expertise existing  elsewhere, including  outside the
United Nations system.

202.   Many delegations considered that the programme of  work regarding the
integration of  human rights concerns into  economic and social  development
activities was  not legislatively mandated.   Many delegations expressed the
view that  the programme  had been  mandated by  the Vienna Declaration  and
Programme of Action, 3/ adopted by the World Conference on Human Rights.

203.   Many delegations noted  that, despite having  been emphasized in  the
Vienna  Declaration and  Programme of  Action, the  activities regarding the
right  to  development  were  not   adequately  reflected  in  the  proposed
programme  of work and that  the right to  development should, in accordance
with General  Assembly resolution 48/141 of  20 December  1993, be addressed
in a  separate subprogramme. In that  context, they  insisted that programme
35 of the medium-term  plan for the period  1992-1997, as revised, 2/ should
be  redrafted  to  provide  an  effective   programmatic  follow-up  of  the
implementation of the Declaration on the Right to  Development 9/ as part of
the  efforts to implement  the Vienna  Declaration and  Programme of Action.
Many  other delegations felt  that the  issue had  been adequately addressed
under  the  relevant  subprogrammes,  in  the   same  manner  as  for  other
individual human  rights, none  of which  could or  should be confined  to a
single subprogramme.

204.  Many delegations felt that the  responsibilities of the United Nations
High  Commissioner for Human  Rights and  those of  the Assistant Secretary-
General for Human Rights  were well defined and mutually reinforcing.   Some
delegations  opined that the respective responsibilities and mandates of the
two senior officials should be further reviewed and clarified.

205.   A number of delegations considered that  the ongoing restructuring of
the programme  and the reorganization  of the Centre  for Human Rights  were
useful  and  effective, and  were in  line with  the recommendations  of the
Office of Internal  Oversight Services,  as reflected in  the report on  the
programme and administrative practices of  the Centre submitted by a team of
the  Office (A/49/892, annex).   Other  delegations felt  that those actions
were  not  sufficient  and  that  much  remained  to  be  done  to  increase
efficiency and to  eliminate any  duplication or overlapping of  activities.
They further emphasized the need for  the expeditious implementation of  the

Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action  adopted at the World  Conference
on Human Rights.

206.  Many delegations  emphasized that the activities in the field of human
rights,  including the right to development, should be for the well-being of
all  humankind  and that  an  integrated  approach  should  be developed  to
guarantee balanced  attention to  all  human  rights, on  the basis  of  the
principles of objectivity, impartiality and non-selectivity,  as set out  in
section I, paragraph 32, of the Vienna Declaration and  Programme of Action.
They  emphasized that  the programme  narrative  did not  refer to  all  the
relevant mandates  and omitted a number of important issues contained in the
Vienna  Declaration and Programme  of Action,  in particular in  the area of
economic and social rights.  They  stressed that the different proposals and
ideas reflected in section 21, particularly  in paragraphs 21.2, 21.6, 21.23
and 21.27 (b) and (c), should be redrafted  to reflect the mandates,  letter
and spirit of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action.

207.  Other delegations insisted that  the budget proposals correctly sought
to implement the  whole Vienna Declaration and  Programme of Action  and all
other mandates.   They disagreed with  attempts to pick  and choose  between
mandates and were of the opinion that the budget proposals should  therefore
be approved in their entirety.

208.     Some   delegations  reiterated   their  strong   support  for   the
establishment of  a comprehensive programme in  order to  help Member States
in strengthening  the institutions of the  rule of law  as contained in  the
Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action and General Assembly  resolutions
48/132  of  20  December  1993  and  49/194  of  23 December  1994.    Those
delegations emphasized that  adequate resources should  be allocated for the
programme.

209.   Delegations welcomed the inclusion  in the programme  of work of  the
legislative mandates  approved since  1992.   Several delegations  expressed
regret that the revisions  proposed in 1994  to programme 35 of the  medium-
term plan for  the period 1992-1997 were still  under review by the  General
Assembly and could not provide the framework for section 21.
   
210.   Many delegations supported the  proposed conversion  of posts, noting
that for  the most part  they did not  amount to  additional human resources
and that the regularization  of the posts would  have a beneficial impact on
morale  and  efficiency  at  the  Centre  for  Human  Rights.    Many  other
delegations felt that the 21 new posts approved  as temporary by the General
Assembly in section III  of its resolution 49/219 of 23 December 1994 should
not be  proposed  for conversion  into  established  posts until  ACABQ  had
commented further.  

211.  Many delegations stressed that the resources for the Committee on  the
Protection  of the  Rights  of All  Migrant  Workers and  Members  of  Their
Families should  have been redeployed to  the Committee  on Economic, Social
and  Cultural  Rights  instead  of  being  surrendered.    Some  delegations
expressed concern about the lack of clarity on  the resources that should be
allocated  to  the  promotion   of  the  International   Convention  on  the
Protection  of  the Rights  of  All Migrant  Workers  and  Members  of Their
Families, 10/ as requested by the General Assembly in its resolution  49/175
of 23 December 1994.

212.   Some delegations emphasized the  need to improve  the coordination of
activities in the field of human rights undertaken  by different entities of
the Organization.


Conclusions and recommendations

213.   The Committee  was unable  to reach agreement on  a recommendation to
the General Assembly that it approve the programme narrative of section  21,
Human  rights.    It  therefore  recommended  to  the  Assembly  that,  when

considering  the proposed  programme budget  for the biennium  1996-1997, it
review the  programme narrative of section  21, paying due  attention to the
observations in paragraphs 199-212 above.


            Section 22.  Office of the United Nations High Commissioner
                         for Refugees

214.  At its 23rd meeting, on  1 June 1995, the Committee considered section
22, Office  of the  United Nations High  Commissioner for  Refugees, of  the
proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

215.  General  support was expressed for the programme of work of the Office
of the  United Nations  High Commissioner  for Refugees.   Some  delegations
considered  that the  primary mandate  of the  Office was  the protection of
refugees and  that activities  undertaken in  the context  of the  continuum
from rehabilitation  to development  should not  be considered  part of  the
permanent functions of the Office.   Other delegations sought information on
the prevention activities undertaken by the Office.

216.   Some delegations  requested clarification as regards  the discrepancy
in  the level of the total resources projected to  be available for the next
biennium indicated  in  the fascicle  and  that  reported to  the  Executive
Committee.

217.  Several delegations expressed  their concern as regards the decline in
the level of extrabudgetary resources  projected for the biennium 1996-1997.
At the  same time,  they questioned  the rationale  for the increase  in the
number of extrabudgetary posts.


 Conclusions and recommendations

218.  The Committee  recommended to the General Assembly that it approve the
programme  narrative  of section  22,  Office  of  the  United Nations  High
Commissioner  for  Refugees,  of  the  proposed  programme  budget  for  the
biennium 1996-1997.


                Section 23.  United Nations Relief and Works Agency
                             for Palestine Refugees in the Near East

219.  At its 23rd meeting, on 1 June 1995,  the Committee considered section
23, United  Nations Relief and  Works Agency for  Palestine Refugees  in the
Near East, of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

220.   Many delegations endorsed the move of UNRWA  headquarters from Vienna
to the  Gaza Strip.   One delegation indicated  its opposition to  financing
the move from programme resources.

221.  Many delegations noted that,  following the signing of the Declaration
of  Principles  on  Interim  Self-Government  Arrangements,  signed  by  the
Government of the State of Israel  and the Palestine Liberation Organization
in Washington, D.C., on  13 September 1993, 11/  and in preparation  for the
extension of the self-governing Palestinian Authority  to the West Bank  and
Gaza Strip,  and pending the  completion of  the Middle East  peace process,
UNRWA would continue to undertake its  Peace Implementation Programme and to
play an  active role in the  region.  Some  delegations looked  forward to a
broader sharing of the costs of the Agency during the period.

Conclusions and recommendations

222.  The Committee recommended to the General  Assembly that it approve the
programme narrative  of section 23, United  Nations Relief  and Works Agency
for  Palestine Refugees in  the Near East, of  the proposed programme budget
for the biennium 1996-1997.


Section 24.  Department of Humanitarian Affairs

223.  At its  28th meeting, on 6 June 1995, the Committee considered section
24, Department of  Humanitarian Affairs,  of the  proposed programme  budget
for the biennium 1996-1997.


Discussion

224.    Many  delegations  recalled  the  objectives  enshrined  in  General
Assembly resolutions 46/182 of  19 December 1991, 49/22 A of 2 December 1994
and 49/22  B of 20 December 1994 and expressed the  hope that the Department
of Humanitarian Affairs would  enhance its efforts to meet the purposes  for
which it had been established.

 225.  Delegations expressed strong support  for the programme on  emergency
humanitarian assistance,  and the importance  of providing adequate  regular
budget resources for its implementation.

226.  Many delegations  expressed concern with  the decline in the level  of
extrabudgetary resources  projected  to  be available  in 1996-1997.    They
considered  that the  Department's activities  should  be  funded on  a more
secure  and predictable  basis.   Some  delegations  emphasized the  need to
secure  continuous  funding  for important  activities  such  as  the  early
warning systems.

227.   Some delegations  regretted the  use of  new terms  in the  programme
narrative,  such as  "humanitarian  diplomacy" and  "humanitarian advocate".
One delegation welcomed the use of  new terms like "humanitarian diplomacy",
which was  understood  to mean  diplomacy  in  the service  of  humanitarian
assistance.  Some delegations regretted the  use of the word  "intervencion"
in the Spanish text  and requested an accurate  translation of the word used
in  the  English  and  French  texts.     Some  delegations  questioned  the
Department's mandate for demining activities.

228.    Some delegations  welcomed  the  inclusion  of  the "White  Helmets"
initiative  in the  activities to  be  performed  in subprogramme  1, Policy
planning  and  development, and  its legislative  mandate  based on  General
Assembly resolution  49/139 B of  20 December 1994.  In  that regard, it was
mentioned that additional operative guidelines  should be established by the
Economic  and Social Council at its substantive session of 1995 (July 1995).
Other  delegations expressed  their  concern  about the  usefulness  of  the
initiative in complex emergency situations.

229.     A   number   of   delegations   suggested   that   the   respective
responsibilities of the New  York and Geneva offices should be more  clearly
defined.

230.   Some  delegations emphasized  the interrelationship  between  natural
disaster  reduction  and development  and  stressed  that  natural  disaster
reduction strategies should cover the continuum from relief to development.

231.  Some delegations stressed the  importance of information component  in
natural disaster measures and requested that  information related to natural
disaster prevention should be easily accessible for all countries.


Conclusions and recommendations

232.   The Committee  recommended approval  by the  General Assembly of  the
programme narrative of  section 24,  Department of Humanitarian Affairs,  of
the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


Section 25.  Public information

233.   At its 24th meeting, on 2 June 1995, the Committee considered section
25, Public  information, of the proposed  programme budget  for the biennium
1996-1997.


Discussion

234.    Several   delegations  expressed  satisfaction  with  the   proposed
reductions  in the  budget of  the Department of  Public Information.   Some
delegations  stressed  that further  reductions  could  have  been  achieved
through  greater   economy  measures  and   improved  productivity.     Many
delegations stated that budget  reductions should not  be seen as an end  in
themselves  and  emphasized  concern  that  such  reductions  could  have  a
negative impact  on the programme  of work of  the Department.   They sought
clear assurances from the Secretariat in that regard.

235.   Many  delegations stressed  the  need  for adequate  resources to  be
allocated  to provide  back-stopping for  public information  activities  of
peace-keeping
missions and made reference to the  recommendations contained in the  report
on the evaluation  of peace-keeping operations (E/AC.51/1995/2 and  Corr.1).
They  expressed concern that no  separate unit, either  in the Department of
Public Information or the Department  of Peace-keeping Operations,  had been
identified  to provide  such  support.   Many  other  delegations emphasized
their support for the Secretary-General's decision to assign  responsibility
for  the  information  component  of  the peace-keeping  operations  to  the
Department of  Public  Information.    One delegation  emphasized  that  any
increase for that purpose should be  achieved through internal  redeployment
of resources.

236.    Several  delegations  emphasized  the  importance  of  the  role  of
information in  raising public awareness  of issues  facing the Organization
and its members. Many delegations suggested  that while a significant  level
of  resources were  assigned to  cover issues  of  peace and  security, more
emphasis  should be  placed on  coverage  of  economic and  social concerns,
including issues  of debt, trade  and poverty, and  urged the Department  to
strive for a balance between activities  relating to peace-keeping and those
relating  to  development.     Other  delegations  felt  that   insufficient
resources  were being  devoted to information on  peace and security-related
activities given their impact on public perceptions of the Organization.

237.    Several delegations  emphasized the  importance of  the work  of the
United  Nations information  centres and  services  in promoting  a  greater
understanding of the issues facing the  Organization and of its  activities.
Several delegations  queried the  growth proposed  in the  resources of  the
Information  Service at Geneva  and emphasized  the importance  of a clearer
division of  responsibility between the Information  Services at Geneva  and
Vienna.

238.  Many delegations commended the  Department on its efforts in utilizing
electronic  media as an efficient and cost-effective  method of implementing
its  work  programme and  felt  that  greater  economies  could be  achieved
through a  greater  concentration on  such  electronic  media.   Many  other
delegations  emphasized  the  importance  of  responding  to  the  needs  of
developing  countries  in that  context,  since  access  to  such media  was
relatively  limited.   They stressed  the  importance of  giving  continuing
attention to radio and print media.

239.  Some  delegations emphasized the  need for  a periodic  review of  the

Department's  publications programme  with a  view to  identifying  obsolete
publications.   Some other  delegations stressed  that any  revision to  the
mandated programme of work  of the Department would  have to be  endorsed by
the General Assembly.

240.  Many  delegations emphasized the importance of achieving parity in the
production  of outputs  in the  working  languages  of the  Organization and
emphasized the importance of the use of all United Nations languages.   Some
delegations stressed  that, to reach as large an audience  as possible, more
items  and  material should  be  produced,  as far  as  possible,  in  local
languages.


 Conclusions and recommendations

241.  The Committee  recommended to the General Assembly that it approve the
programme narrative  of  section 25,  Public  information,  of the  proposed
programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997.


B.  Evaluation

1.  In-depth evaluation of the programme on environment

242.    At its  2nd  and 3rd  meetings, held  on  15 and  16  May 1995,  the
Committee  considered  the  report  of  the  Office  of  Internal  Oversight
Services  on  the  in-depth evaluation  of  the  programme  on  environment,
transmitted  to  it  under  cover  of   a  note  by  the   Secretary-General
(E/AC.51/1995/3).


Discussion

243.  Several delegations  noted that the  Governing Council of UNEP was  in
session  simultaneously with  CPC, considering  the policy  and  operational
functions  of UNEP,  and  stressed that  the  report  before  CPC should  be
examined by the Governing Council of UNEP.

244.   In the course  of the debate,  delegations noted  that the Secretary-
General was  in agreement with  the recommendations  in the report  and made
observations on the following recommendations:

  (a)  Recommendations 1,  2 and 3.   Delegations supported the broad  goals
of  these  recommendations,  which  were  for  UNEP  to  (i)  reinforce  its
catalytic  role,  (ii)  enhance  its  environmental  coordinating activities
within  the United  Nations system;  and  (iii)  facilitate its  capacity to
address  emerging  environmental issues.    Several  delegations recommended
that  UNEP should strengthen  its support  to the  Commission on Sustainable
Development and  its secretariat.   Other delegations  also considered  that
UNEP  should  concentrate  on  the  environmental  aspects  of   sustainable
development;

  (b)   Recommendations 4  through 9.   Several  delegations commented  that
UNEP should  continue and enhance its  role as  the environmental conscience
of  the world through  its assessment and Earthwatch coordinating activities
by  providing  credible   scientific  information   on  the  state  of   the
environment.   The need to develop  the capacity of  developing countries to
assess the environment was stressed.  Several delegations  noted the need to
coordinate  the development  of  agreed environmental  indicators  with  the
Commission on  Sustainable Development  and other  organizations working  on
the subject.   Delegations agreed that the  title of recommendation 9 should
read "An internationally agreed set of indicators";

  (c)   Recommendations 10  through 13.   Several  delegations stressed  the
importance of  environmental law.   They also noted  the need to  coordinate
and  provide  adequate  managerial  support   to  the  secretariats  of  the

conventions;

  (d)   Recommendations 14  and 15.   Several  delegations supported  UNEP's
role  in capacity-building  and  welcomed  the  efforts  to  strengthen  the
cooperation  and coordination  between UNEP  and UNDP in  this field.   Some
delegations  emphasized   that  this  role  in  particular  was  of  special
importance  for  developing  countries  and  countries  with  economies   in
transition.   Several delegations  considered that  UNEP's regional  offices
could  play a  useful role  in  helping  developing countries  to strengthen
their capacity to  implement Agenda 21. 5/   Some delegations stressed  that
the role of UNEP in providing  information on sustainable development should
be concentrated on environmental aspects of  such development and that  such
information should be prepared upon the request  of Governments. Delegations
agreed that the implementation of the  proposals of recommendation 15 should
be carried  out in  close consultation  with Governments  and in  accordance
with General Assembly resolution 47/199 of 22 December 1992;

  (e)   Recommendation 16.   A number of  delegations commented  on the need
for  new  and  additional  resources  for   the  training  of  personnel  in
developing countries;  they felt  that UNEP  expertise could  be drawn  upon
more extensively. One delegation considered that additional resources  would
be  required   for  the  implementation   of  environmental  programmes   or
recommendations;  such resources  were  frequently not  available  to  those
countries;

  (f)   Recommendations 17 through  19.  Some  delegations commented on  the
need  for  UNEP  to  target  its  information  activities  towards  specific
audiences;

  (g)   Recommendation 20.  Delegations  stressed that  the current location
of UNEP  headquarters should  be maintained  and that  there was  a need  to
improve communication facilities at UNEP headquarters.  Several  delegations
commented on  the need  to strengthen  the UNEP  regional presence,  without
weakening its  headquarters.   Some  delegations expressed  support for  the
outposting   of  certain   headquarters  units   to  regional   offices   as
recommended;

  (h)   Recommendation 21.  Delegations  commented on the  need for UNEP  to
work more  closely with  non-governmental organizations.   Some  delegations
observed  that   this  should   not  entail   creating  new   organizational
structures;

  (i)   Recommendation 22.   Many  delegations agreed that there  was a need
for a  more effective  fund-raising strategy,  utilizing existing  financial
mechanisms;

  (j)  Recommendation 23.   This recommendation was  widely supported.   One
delegation commented  that the  proposed report  by the  Office of  Internal
Oversight Services on UNEP management could  provide a useful background for
the special  session  of  the General  Assembly on  the  overall review  and
appraisal of Agenda 21 scheduled for 1997.


Conclusions and recommendations

245.     The   Committee   expressed  appreciation   for  the   quality  and
comprehensive nature of the report. 

246.  The  Committee was in general  agreement with the  main thrust  of the
report,  which   was  to  refocus   UNEP  activities  by  strengthening  its
partnership with other organizations  within and outside  the United Nations
system,  with due  regard to  its  role as  a global  environment programme.
Subject  to the  different views  expressed  by  the delegations  during the
discussion, and subject to the subsequent views of the  Governing Council of
UNEP, the Committee endorsed the recommendations contained in the report.

247.   The report  on the study to be carried  out by the Office of Internal
Oversight Services  on the effects of  the reorganization  of UNEP, proposed
in recommendation 23, should  be submitted to CPC  for its consideration  at
its thirty-seventh session in 1997. 
  248.    The  Committee  decided  that   the  report,  together  with   the
conclusions and  recommendations of  CPC thereon,  should be transmitted  to
the Governing  Council of UNEP at  its eighteenth  session for consideration
and appropriate action.


           2.  Final report on the in-depth evaluation of peace-keeping
               operations:  start-up phase

249.  At  its 2nd and  4th meetings,  on 15 and  16 May 1995, the  Committee
considered the final report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services  on
the  in-depth  evaluation of  peace-keeping  operations:    start-up  phase,
transmitted by the Secretary-General (E/AC.51/1995/2 and Corr.1).


Discussion

250.   Some  delegations stressed  that in  accordance with  paragraph 2  of
General Assembly  resolution 49/37  of 9  December 1994,  the principles  of
sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of States  and
non-intervention   in   matters  that   were  essentially   within  domestic
jurisdiction of  any State should  be strictly respected  in all aspects  of
peace-keeping operations.

251.   Some delegations observed  that the Committee's  request at the first
part  of its thirty-fourth  session on the  progress report  on the in-depth
evaluation of peace-keeping operations:  start-up phase (E/AC.51/1994/3  and
Corr.1) to the effect that the General Assembly should be given a  statement
of programme budget implications to permit  it to review the recommendations
of  the progress report  during the  Assembly's forty-ninth  session had not
yet been complied with.

252.    In that  connection,  the  representative of  the  Secretary-General
recalled that statements  of programme budget  implications were provided to
intergovernmental bodies only  when they were considering draft  resolutions
or decisions  whose adoption would have  such implications.   Statements had
never been  prepared in respect of  reports emanating  from the Secretariat,
nor  had  they  been  presented to  CPC.    In the  past,  when  approval of
recommendations  of the Committee  had had  programme budget implications, a
statement of programme  budget implications would  have been  presented with
the report of the Committee for consideration by the General Assembly.

253.   The representative  of the  Secretary-General also  recalled that the
programme  planning  regulations and  rules  provided  that the  findings of
intergovernmental review  of evaluations should  be reflected in  subsequent
programme  design, delivery  and  policy  directives.   In  preparing  their
proposals  for  the  proposed  programme  budget  for  1996-1997,  programme
managers  were aware of  the results of  the current  and earlier evaluation
studies.   Non-core  activities  related  to  peace-keeping  could  also  be
financed  by the  support account  for  peace-keeping  activities or  by the
budgets of  peace-keeping operations, but  these would not, in  any case, be
included in the statement of programme budget implications.

254.   Delegations  welcomed  the  clarification  and  understood  from  the
statement that the matter  should not hinder the Committee in reviewing  and
making  recommendations with respect to the evaluation.  In that regard some
delegations expressed the opinion  that recommendations 1-24 of the progress
report  (E/AC.51/1994/3 and Corr.1)  could not  be implemented  owing to the
lack of a decision of the General Assembly thereon.

 255.   Several  members, in  commenting on  the factors  to be  taken  into
consideration in the establishment of  new peace-keeping operations cited in

the final  report (E/AC.51/1995/2  and Corr.1,  para. 12),  stated that  the
existence of regional capacities should not  detract from the obligation  of
the international community to actively support  such operations.  They also
reaffirmed the  central responsibility of  the United Nations,  particularly
the  Security  Council,  for the  maintenance  of  international  peace  and
security as enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations.

256.   A  number of  delegations  stressed  the intergovernmental  nature of
peacekeeping and  the need for strengthening  mechanisms and modalities  for
consultation   with   troop-contributing   countries,   ensuring   financial
viability  of operations  before their  start-up, uniformity  of command and
control  and   improving  reimbursement   procedures  to  troop-contributing
countries.  One delegation  noted that a  distinction should be made on  the
issue  of  command  and  control:    that  command  of  a troop-contributing
country's military contingent  was a prerogative of  its head of State,  and
that the  United Nations  had responsibility  for the  chain of  operational
control of every aspect of peacekeeping  missions.  Some other  delegations,
while  noting the  responsibility of  Member  States  for the  readiness and
effectiveness of troops provided to peacekeeping operations, emphasized  the
importance of  enhancing the effectiveness  of peace-keeping operations,  in
particular  the  time-lag between  authorization  and  deployment.   In that
context a number of  suggestions were made.  These included the provision of
command modules  or specialized units, the  establishment of guidelines  for
minimal training standards and stockpiles of  standard equipment to be  made
available to peace-keeping forces prior to deployment.

257.   Many  delegations noted  that the consent  of the  parties concerned,
impartiality  and the non-use  of force,  except in  self-defence, which the
Secretary-General  had  identified  in  his  supplement  to "An  Agenda  for
Peace":  position paper  of the  Secretary-General  on  the occasion  of the
fiftieth  anniversary  of  the   United  Nations  (A/50/60-S/1995/1),   were
critical  to the  success of  peace-keeping  operations.   Some  delegations
noted  that  complete  and continuous  support and  cooperation  with peace-
keeping operations  by  all the  concerned  parties  was also  an  important
prerequisite of  their success.  Some  delegations also noted  that a peace-
keeping operation could only be commenced  or terminated through an  express
decision of the Security Council.

258.    Several delegations  expressed  concern  that the  evaluation report
assumed  that the  Electoral Assistance  Division  had  been moved  from the
Department  of  Political   Affairs  to  the  Department  of   Peace-keeping
Operations  on the  basis  of the  report of  the  Secretary-General  on the
restructuring  of the United  Nations Secretariat  (A/49/336).  While noting
that  the  shift  was  not  reflected   in  the  Secretary-General's  budget
proposals for  1996-1997, the delegations stressed  their opposition to  any
such  move which  would,  in  their view,  be in  violation of  the existing
legislative  mandate approved  by the  General Assembly,  and regretted that
the Office of  Internal Oversight Services had  not called the attention  of
the Secretariat  to that  violation, in  line with  its responsibilities  as
enunciated  in  Assembly  resolution  48/218  B  of 29  July  1994.    Other
delegations expressed  the view  that a  shift of  the Electoral  Assistance
Division to  the Department  of Peace-keeping  Operations could  improve its
effectiveness.

259.   Several members  noted that  there was  no legislative basis  for the
listing  of  components of  complex  missions  in  the  report contained  in
document   E/AC.51/1995/2   and   Corr.1   and   considered   that   certain
recommendations  were  beyond the  competence  of  CPC.    Others noted  the
statement  in  paragraph  22  that  the   listing  of  the  six  substantive
components  of peace-keeping missions in  the report was for the purposes of
reviewing the  Secretariat's ready capacity to  act.   The representative of
the Secretariat  explained that  such a listing  did not imply  that all  of
those components would be part of all  missions.  Many delegations expressed
the view that only  the mandate as defined  by the Security Council provided
the basis  for specific  components to be  included in  a particular  peace-
keeping operation.

260.  Delegations noted  that the report  had been reviewed by the  relevant
departments and offices.  Many delegations  expressed their support for  the
report  and its  recommendations  which  if  implemented would  improve  the
effectiveness   of  peace-keeping   operations.    Many   other  delegations
expressed reservations with regard to some recommendations.

261.  Delegations made observations on the following recommendations:

  (a)   Recommendation 1.   Responsibility  for learning  from experience in
peace-keeping.    Delegations  stated  that  the  process  proposed  in  the
recommendation would greatly  help in improving peace-keeping operations  on
an ongoing basis and should be expeditiously put in place;

  (b)    Recommendation  2.   Allocation  of  responsibilities  for  support
functions  for   peace-keeping.     Commenting  on   the  text  leading   to
recommendation  2,  several   delegations  expressed  an  interest  in   the
forthcoming consolidated official  statement on the allocation of  functions
and responsibilities  for the  support of  peace-keeping operations  between
the  Department   of  Peace-keeping   Operations  and   the  Department   of
Administration and Management;

  (c)   Recommendation 3.   Responsibility for  the coordination of  a ready
capacity  to act  for peace-keeping  operations.   Several delegates  stated
that the  responsibilities for the various substantive and support functions
should be clearly allocated so that coordination could then be facilitated;

  (d)    Recommendation  4.   The  information  component  of  peace-keeping
missions.    The Under-Secretary-General  for  Internal  Oversight  Services
informed the Committee that the  Secretary-General was not in  favour of the
recommendation  and   had  assigned  responsibility   for  the   information
component  to  the Department  of  Public Information.    He  added  that he
intended  to take  the matter  up again  with the  Secretary-General.   Many
delegations stated  that,  given the  crucial role  to be  played by  public
information  in peace-keeping  operations,  it  was necessary  to develop  a
capacity within the  Secretariat to back-stop  the information  component of
such  operations.  Several  delegations supported  the proposal  that such a
unit  should   be  established   within  the   Department  of   Peacekeeping
Operations.   Several  other delegations  considered that  the Department of
Public Information should undertake such functions; they expressed  surprise
that after having informed the Committee  that the Secretary-General did not
agree with  the recommendation and had  made a decision  on the matter,  the
UnderSecretary-General for  Internal Oversight Services  had maintained  his
position.  Other delegations  considered the  expression of  an  independent
opinion  by  the  Office  of  Internal  Oversight  Services  to  be entirely
appropriate.   Some delegations observed that  a possible  solution would be
to have a joint unit for that purpose.   One delegation pointed out that the
Committee on Information  had before it a paper  containing a review of  the
Secretariat's  policy on  dissemination  of information  related  to  peace-
keeping;  from that paper  it appeared  that the  professional expertise and
existing infrastructure  in the  Department of  Public Information  remained
largely  untapped   and  its  involvement   in  conceptualizing,   planning,
implementing  and   coordinating  the   information   programmes  of   field
operations had so  far been minimal.  Other  delegations noted that the  key
was  for the  job to  be done;  if, despite  the apparent  expertise  of the
Department  of  Public  Information, it  was  not being  done,  then it  was
legitimate to suggest that other avenues be explored;

  (e)   Recommendation  5.   Human  rights  component.   Several delegations
stressed that  human rights  was not  one of  the components  of any  peace-
keeping  operation  unless  it was  specifically  mandated  by the  relevant
legislative bodies and felt  that that recommendation  should be deliberated
upon by the competent intergovernmental bodies.   Several other  delegations
considered that  the Department  of Peace-keeping Operations  should be  the
responsibility  centre,  with the  Centre  for  Human  Rights  acting in  an
advisory  capacity.   Several delegations  supported the  designation of the
Centre for  Human Rights as the  responsibility centre for that component of

peace-keeping operations;

  (f)     Recommendation  8.     Planning  for   stand-by  arrangements  and
recommendation 14.    Plan for  rapid  reaction  capacity.   One  delegation
welcomed  recommendations  8 and  14  and  underlined  the  linkage and  the
complementarity of both issues;

  (g)  Recommendation 9.  Review of  United Nations early warning activities
and  Recommendation 10.  Early  warning focal point in  the Executive Office
of  the  Secretary-General.   Several delegations  expressed  the view  that
activities  of  the  Secretariat in  the field  of  early warning  should be
streamlined  and "extra" layers  of coordination  avoided.   They also noted
that those  activities  should be  based  on  existing mechanisms  with  due
regard to the  role of the  Department of      Humanitarian Affairs in  that
matter.  At the same time they deemed  it necessary to refer recommendations
9 and 10 to relevant intergovernmental  bodies.  Several delegations  stated
that coordination  in the  Organization with  respect to  the early  warning
system  should  be   enhanced  for  its  effective  operation.   Delegations
underscored  that  the United  Nations should  do  more  to narrow  down the
origin  of conflicts  and  to attempt  to avoid  them  by integrating  in  a
coherent system all the early warning activities of the United Nations;

  (h)   Recommendation 16.   Analytical system  for budgeting  peace-keeping
operations.   Several delegations supported the approach proposed and looked
forward to reviewing the prototype recommended;

  (i)   Recommendation 17.  Security of personnel.  Delegations stressed the
importance of  the security  of personnel  in the  context of  peace-keeping
operations, for  both  regular  United Nations  personnel and  personnel  on
secondment   from    national   authorities    and   from   non-governmental
organizations;

  (j)  Recommendation 18.  Standard  operating procedures for logistics  and
procurement  and recommendation 19.   Office  of Internal Oversight Services
review of compliance in logistics and  procurement.  Many delegations stated
that logistics  and procurement were support  areas where improvements  were
needed, and noted that  the General Assembly would receive reports on  those
areas  by the Office  of Internal Oversight Services  in response to section
IX of Assembly resolution 49/233 of 23 December  1994 and by the  Secretary-
General  in response to  paragraph 3  of Assembly resolution 49/216  C of 23
December 1994.  Delegations were of the  opinion that the relevant decisions
of the  Assembly on the forthcoming reports should be  incorporated into any
review and revision of existing procedures;

  (k)   Recommendation  20.    Training guidelines  and  recommendation  21.
Training  plan.   Several delegations reiterated the  importance of training
and agreed that  the primary responsibility  for training personnel assigned
to peacekeeping duties rested  with Governments.  They also stated that  the
United  Nations   should  contribute  to   such  training  by   establishing
guidelines and  standards and training trainers.   One delegation  expressed
reservations concerning the role of the  United Nations in establishing such
guidelines   and  training  plans   for  the   training  of  personnel  from
intergovernmental   bodies,   non-governmental   organizations   and   other
organizations  contributing   personnel  to   United  Nations  peace-keeping
operations, since there had  been no decisions on  that issue by the General
Assembly.


Conclusions and recommendations

262.    The   Committee  commended  the   report,  which  it  found   to  be
comprehensive and informative.

263.  The Committee endorsed recommendations 1-3, 6-8 and 13-19.

264.  The Committee concluded that recommendations 5  and 9-12 needed to  be

examined further by the relevant intergovernmental bodies.

265.   The  Committee endorsed  recommendations 20 and  21 in so  far as the
training guidelines and the peace-keeping training plan were to be drawn  up
by  the   Secretariat  for   military  and  civilian   personnel  from   the
Secretariat.  The Committee felt that the need  for the Secretariat to  draw
up similar  guidelines in  respect of  personnel contributed  by cooperating
intergovernmental   bodies,   non-governmental   organizations   and   other
organizations  contributing   personnel  to   United  Nations  peace-keeping
operations  required further examination  by the Special Committee on Peace-
keeping Operations.

266.    With respect  to  recommendation  4,  the  Committee recognized  the
importance of information  in peace-keeping operations and recommended  that
the  SecretaryGeneral  take  all  necessary  measures  to  provide  adequate
support to that area.

267.    The  Committee  recalled  General  Assembly  resolution  49/37,   in
particular  paragraph  8,  and  suggested  that,   in  the  context  of  the
comprehensive review of  the whole  question of peace-keeping operations  in
all its  aspects, the issue  regarding possible  components of peace-keeping
operations should, among others, continue to be discussed by the Assembly.


IV.  COORDINATION QUESTIONS


              Report of the Administrative Committee on Coordination
              and preparations for the Joint Meetings of the
              Committee for Programme and Coordination and the
              Administrative Committee on Coordination

268.  At its 5th and 6th meetings, on 17 May 1995,  the Committee considered
the  annual overview report  of ACC  for 1994 (E/1995/21) and  the report of
the  twentyeighth series  of  Joint Meetings  of CPC  and  ACC, held  on  27
October 1994 (E/1995/4).


Discussion

269.   Delegations emphasized the importance  of CPC as a main  organ of the
General  Assembly   and  the   Economic  and   Social  Council  devoted   to
coordination  matters. They  consequently argued  that enhanced coordination
should  lead  to  a need  for  fewer resources.    Other members  questioned
whether the  Committee  had  any  added  value  to  offer  in  the  role  of
coordination given  the expanded  role of  the Council.   A number  of other
delegations expressed the view that the  objective of coordination should be
to improve  programme delivery, enhance  cooperation and avoid  duplication,
and any  cost savings should only  be seen as a  by-product of the  process.
Other  members indicated that  an enhanced  level of  coordination should be
followed  by an increase  in resources,  as improved  coordination by itself
could not meet the growing demands being placed on the system.

270.  Many delegations considered the report as  a good basis for discussion
on coordination within the United Nations  system.  Some members  considered
that the  report was too descriptive  in nature and  not critical enough  of
some of the  difficult challenges facing  some of  the organizations of  the
system.  In the  context of its  discussion under the item entitled  "Review
of  the efficiency of  the administrative  and financial  functioning of the
United  Nations",  a  number  of  members   expressed  the  view  that   the
documentation  under the coordination  items should  have a  better focus on
the coordination issues of primary concern to CPC.

271.   Some members expressed  the opinion that the  General Assembly should
remain the central forum for developing  cooperation and coordination.  Some
members expressed  the view that the role of the regional commissions should

be  strengthened,  particularly on  issues  that  called  for  collaborative
actions at the  subregional and regional  levels.   Other members said  that
the  regional commissions  must undergo  further reforms  before  additional
resources or authority could be devolved to them.

272.    With respect  to  the  issue of  division  of labour  and  access to
resources, some members cited  the fact that there was a world-wide trend of
reduction  of  resources  at  the  national  level,  thereby  leaving  fewer
resources available  for the  provision of assistance.   Other  delegations,
however,  believed that more  resources were required to address development
issues more effectively.

273.  With reference to African  economic recovery and development,  several
members  emphasized the  need for  concrete  actions  in support  of African
development.    Some  members  noted  the decline  in  official  development
assistance  (ODA)  flows  to Africa  and  the  need for  the  fulfilment  of
financial commitments  and  pledges to  African  countries.   Regarding  the
issue of debt, some members suggested  that a comprehensive strategy  should
be developed.  Some  members pointed out  that the issues of development  of
human  resources and the  promotion of  agriculture should  be assigned high
priority within the context of  achieving economic recovery  and development
in Africa.

274.  Several members expressed the need for  a coordinated follow-up on the
implementation  of the  declarations and  conclusions of  major  conferences
such as  the United Nations Conference  on Environment  and Development, the
International Conference on Population and Development and the World  Summit
for Social  Development.    They welcomed  the initiative  of  setting up  a
framework for the  follow-up to these  conferences and requested information
on an outline of such a framework.

275.    Some  delegations  expressed  their  concern  that  the  contents of
paragraph 60,  subparagraphs (a), (c) and (e), of the annual overview report
(E/1995/21) dealing with the  question of human rights might not be based on
the  Vienna  Declaration  and  Programme  of  Action  3/  and  might involve
conditionality.  It was clarified by  the Secretariat that these  provisions
were based on the  mandate emanating from the  Vienna Conference and did not
imply any conditionality.

276.   With  respect to  the preparations  for the  forthcoming Fourth World
Conference on  Women, some delegations requested  information on the  status
of  the   ad  hoc  inter-agency  meeting   on  women,   and  inquired  about
arrangements for  regularizing that  body.   The Secretariat  clarified that
this matter would be addressed after the Beijing Conference.

277.   Several members  commended the  information contained  in the  annual
overview  report  (E/1995/21,  paras.  71-80)  on  assistance  to  countries
invoking Article 50 of the Charter of the  United Nations.  Some delegations
expressed  the view  that the problems  of third countries  arising from the
impact of economic  sanctions needed to be  covered fully in future overview
reports.

278.  Several  members expressed their  concern regarding the  delay in  the
completion  of the  study  by  the International  Civil  Service  Commission
(ICSC) of  the application  of the Noblemaire  principle.  They  stated that
ICSC  should  complete  the  report  as  soon as  possible.    Other members
expressed  concern about the  comments made  under the  section dealing with
the application  of the Noblemaire  principle and said  that they  could not
endorse them.   A number of delegations also  welcomed the development of  a
prototype  appraisal system and  urged that it be  used by all organizations
of the system since  it would very likely enhance the competitiveness of the
staff.   Some representatives welcomed  the initiative of  ACC on the status
of women in the  secretariats of the United Nations  system.  They also took
note  of the  Convention  on the  Safety of  United  Nations  and Associated
Personnel (General Assembly resolution 49/59, annex).

279.  Several members expressed their  concern about the financial situation
of the organizations of the United  Nations system and stated the importance
for Member  States of fulfilling  their financial  and budgetary commitments
in  a  timely  manner.    Some  delegations  requested  information  on  the
statement  included   in  paragraph  96  of   the  annual  overview   report
(E/1995/21),  dealing with  standards  for the  harmonization  of  financial
statements.

280.   On the need for  identification of the theme  for the next series  of
Joint Meetings  of CPC and  ACC of 1995,  several delegations supported  the
proposal to  have a substantive discussion on the means of improving system-
wide collaboration  in the  field of  drug control,  particularly since  the
issue  had been the  subject of  discussion at the first  regular session of
ACC of 1995, and would also  be discussed in the coordination segment of the
substantive session of 1995 of the Economic and Social Council in  June-July
1995, and  therefore provided an opportunity  for having  a dialogue between
CPC and ACC.   Other delegations suggested the  theme of the eradication  of
poverty.   A few delegations proposed  the theme of the  role of the  United
Nations  in  the  development  of  Africa.    One  delegation  proposed  the
consideration of the  oversight functions within  the United Nations system.
Some  delegations  made a  number  of  suggestions  to  improve the  working
arrangements  for  the joint  meetings  with  a  view  to promoting  genuine
dialogue among participants, as reflected in  the recommendation part of the
item entitled "Review of the efficiency  of the administrative and financial
functioning of the United Nations".


Conclusions and recommendations

281.    The  Committee took  note  of  the  annual  overview  report of  ACC
(E/1995/21) and the report  of the Joint Meetings of CPC and ACC (E/1995/4).
While welcoming the  emphasis placed by ACC  on policy issues pertaining  to
system-wide  coordination  and  encouraging it  to continue  its  efforts to
promote  greater  coherence  in  the  development  work  of  the  system, it
stressed the  need for  the documentation  to focus  better on  coordination
issues of primary concern to CPC.

282.    The  Committee, while  recognizing  the  merits of  an  approach  to
coordination  that was  based on  a division  of labour among  the different
organizations and  agencies of the  United Nations  system, emphasized  that
the General Assembly was the central  policy-making forum within the  United
Nations system.   The Committee emphasized that enhanced coordination should
lead to greater cost effectiveness and improved programme delivery.

283.  The Committee  agreed that the conclusions  and declarations of recent
major conferences  and  international events  should  be  followed up  in  a
coordinated  manner  within  the  context  of  an integrated  approach,  and
welcomed the  initiatives taken  by the  Secretary-General and  ACC in  that
regard.

284.  The Committee agreed to propose that the theme for the next series  of
joint meetings of CPC  and ACC should be  "Coordination of the activities of
the  United Nations system for  the eradication of poverty".   The Committee
stressed  that  working  arrangements  for  the  joint  meetings  should  be
designed to  promote  a dialogue,  and  that  written statements  should  be
discouraged. 

285.  The Committee  stressed the importance of  continued attention of  the
Secretary-General, including in his capacity as  Chairman of ACC, to efforts
of assistance to countries invoking Article 50 of  the Charter of the United
Nations.   The  Committee requested  that  the  ACC overview  report  should
continue to  provide  detailed  information  on  assistance  by  the  United
Nations system to countries invoking Article 50 of the Charter.

286.   The Committee stressed the  need for concrete  actions in support  of
African development.   It was  emphasized that the  decline in  ODA flows to

many African countries should  be reversed, and Member  States were urged to
fulfil their  financial  commitments  and pledges.   The  Committee  further
urged that  the freeze on  the growth of  the budgetary  expenditures of the
United  Nations should  not affect  adversely the  development  projects for
Africa.

287.  The  Committee urged that the  study being undertaken  by ICSC  of the
application of the Noblemaire principle should be  completed in time for its
consideration by the General Assembly at the earliest opportunity.

 288.   The Committee stressed that  there was an  imperative need to  place
the organizations  of the  system  on a  more assured  financial basis,  and
suggested  that Member  States should  recommit themselves  to  paying their
assessments in full, on time and without conditions.


V.  REPORTS OF THE JOINT INSPECTION UNIT


A.  Review and assessment of efforts to restructure the
    regional dimension of United Nations economic and 
    social activities                                 

289.  At its  7th and 8th meetings, on 18 May 1995, the Committee considered
the  report  of  the  Joint  Inspection  Unit  (JIU)  entitled  "Review  and
assessment  of  efforts to  restructure  the  regional  dimension of  United
Nations economic and social activities" (A/49/423).


Discussion

290.  Delegations expressed  their thanks to JIU and many of them  qualified
the report  as a  clear, succinct  and high-quality  analytical document  as
well as a valuable  contribution to the current  restructuring of the United
Nations  Secretariat.      They  shared   most   of   the  conclusions   and
recommendations of  JIU, but some  delegations expressed their  reservations
with regard to  recommendations 2 and 3  and requested clarifications as  to
whether  implementation  of  these   recommendations  would  have  financial
implications  and  lead  to  the  creating   of  additional  posts  in   the
Secretariat.   One delegation queried what  the legislative  mandate was for
strengthening  the regional  commissions.   Some delegations  expressed  the
view  that  the  regional commissions  must  undergo  further reform  before
additional resources or remits could be considered.

291.    Recommendation  1.    Commenting  on  this  recommendation,  several
delegations referred to a number of  reasons explaining the slowing  down of
the current restructuring  exercise, in  particular, objective  difficulties
as well  as an apparent  lack of  interest of  Member States with  regard to
restructuring -  a kind of restructuring  fatigue.   Some delegations, while
mentioning that restructuring  should be carried out cautiously and  through
a  step-by-step  approach,  stated that  restructuring of  the  economic and
social sectors,  as  defined in  the  relevant  resolutions of  the  General
Assembly and the  Economic and Social  Council, should be  completed.   They
believed that  more active  involvement of  Member States  was essential  in
this regard and that those States  should not abdicate their  responsibility
to  give guidance  to the  Secretary-General.    Some delegations  said that
further  analysis of  the virtues  of  decentralization was  required before
taking further action.

292.   Recommendation 2.   Several delegations referred  to the necessity of
having  an  overall framework  for  restructuring  as  well  as a  strategic
analysis and strategic planning facility in  the United Nations Secretariat.
Some  delegations, while  being  in  agreement with  the  recommendation  in
principle,  wondered whether  implementation of  this recommendation implied
creating new posts  in the Secretariat and whether  such a facility was  not
already  existent  within   the  Department  for  Policy  Coordination   and

Sustainable Development.  The  Chairman of JIU  clarified that the Unit  did
not  recommend  that  new  posts  be  created  but  that  this  function  be
strengthened  and  articulated  through  streamlining  the  Secretariat  and
making better use of in-house expertise.

293.    Recommendation  3.    With regard  to  this  recommendation, it  was
clarified that JIU recommended  not the establishment of  a new post but the
designation  of  "a competent  senior  official  with  extensive  managerial
experience, who will  be a focal  point and  held accountable  for the  firm
implementation  of   the  current   restructuring  process".     There   was
acknowledgment  that  while  this  recommendation had  been  valid  when the
report was drafted, the  function it referred to  had been exercised  by the
Under-Secretary-General  for Administration and Management.  In  the view of
several delegations, the Secretariat entities concerned rather than a  focal
point  should  be  automatically responsible  and held  accountable  for the
implementation of the relevant decisions taken by Member States.

294.   Recommendation 4.   Several  representatives stated  that the  report
mentioned in the recommendation was long overdue.

295.   Recommendation 5.   Several delegations supported  the idea that  the
regional commissions  should  increasingly  concentrate their  resources  on
priority areas where they could make  a unique and significant  contribution
and  either readjust  or abandon  activities  that  did not  fall into  this
category.   Some  delegations held  the  view  that additional  efforts were
needed  on the part of the regional commissions to do away with obsolete and
marginal programmes.   Several  delegations also  shared the  view that  the
commissions  should improve  their performance and strive  to become centres
of excellence for specific activities  in their respective regions.  In this
context,  the  necessity  of  a  better  use  of  the  regional commissions'
comparative  advantages and  enhanced  cooperation  with other  multilateral
agencies,bilateral donors andnon-governmental organizations was emphasized.

296.  Recommendations 6  and 7.  These recommendations found general support
from the  Committee.  One delegation  was of the  opinion that the  regional
commissions   should  concentrate   on   coordination  of   the  operational
activities   of   other   United   Nations   bodies   and   non-governmental
organizations and  on  analysis in  fields  in  which they  had  significant
comparative  advantage  and in  which  they  could  become  real centres  of
excellence.


Conclusions and recommendations

297.   The Committee generally  commended the report,  which it  found to be
very clear, analytical, comprehensive and useful.

298.  The  Committee endorsed the  report of  JIU, taking  into account  the
views expressed in the discussion section.


B.  Communication for development programmes
    in the United Nations system           

299.   At its 7th  and 8th meetings, the Committee had  before it the report
of  JIU entitled  "Communication  for development  programmes in  the United
Nations system" (A/50/126-E/1995/20)  and the  comments of  the ACC  thereon
(A/50/126/Add.1E/1995/20/Add.1).   The  Committee  also had  before  it  the
written presentation provided by the Unit.

300.  Many delegations acknowledged the  innovative framework of the report,
while noting  that the  concept of  "communication  for development"  needed
additional clarification.  Some delegations stressed that the report  should
have  addressed more  thoroughly the  important role  of  telecommunication.
One delegation characterized the report as being slightly out of focus,  and
said that it could be improved  as the basic concept was clarified.  Another

delegation inquired  to what  extent communication  as a  process was  being
utilized within the United Nations system to enhance coordination.
  301.   Recommendation 10.  Concerning  the assertion  in recommendation 10
of the report that  "the United Nations  has no specific structure in  place
for  immediate  action  to deal  with  communication  when  a  peace-keeping
operation emerges",  several delegations  took exception.   Noting that  the
above  recommendation had already received  the support of  ACC, a number of
delegations expressed the view that the  subject-matter of the reform needed
further study.

302.   Some  delegations  questioned the  appropriateness of  linking peace-
keeping  operations  and  development  in  recommendation  10.    They  also
underscored the  sensitive nature of  this recommendation, particularly  the
implication for  political issues.  In  this connection, another  delegation
expressed the  opinion that  the "stand-by  unit of communications  experts"
called for should report to the Department of Public Information.

303.  Many delegations said that they had  to obtain instructions from their
capitals with  respect  to recommendation  10  of  the  report.   While  one
delegation supported the  thrust of recommendation  10, most delegations had
particular reservations with regard to it.


Conclusions and recommendations

304.  The Committee took note of the report.


                 VI.  CONSIDERATION OF THE PROVISIONAL AGENDA FOR
                      THE THIRTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE COMMITTEE


305.   In pursuance  of  paragraph 2  (e)  of  Economic and  Social  Council
resolution 1979/41  of 10  May  1979, and  paragraph 2  of General  Assembly
resolution 34/50  of 23  November 1979,  the Committee  shall submit  to the
Council and to the  Assembly, for their review,  the provisional agenda  for
its  thirty-sixth  session, together  with the  required documentation.   In
accordance with paragraph 8 of the annex to Council resolution 2008 (LX)  of
14 May  1976, the  thirty-sixth session  of the  Committee shall  be of  six
weeks' duration.

306.   At  its 29th  meeting, on 9  June 1995, the  Committee considered the
provisional agenda  and the  documentation for  the thirty-sixth  session on
the basis of a note by the Secretariat.

307.   At the same meeting, the Committee decided to  submit to the Economic
and  Social  Council  and  the General  Assembly  the  following provisional
agenda for the thirty-sixth session of the Committee:

  1.  Election of officers.

  2.  Adoption of the agenda and organization of work.

  3.Review  of   the  efficiency   of  the   administrative  and   financial
functioning of the United Nations.

    Documentation

  Report of  the Secretary-General  (General Assembly  resolution 45/254  A,
para. 17)

  4.  Programme questions:

    (a)Programme  performance of  the United Nations for  the biennium 1994-
1995;

      Documentation

    Report of the Secretary-General on  programme performance of  the United
Nations for the biennium 1994-1995

    (b)  Proposed medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001;

    Documentation

    Proposed medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001

    (c)Outline of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999;

    Documentation

    Report  of  the  Secretary-General   on  the  outline  of  the  proposed
programme budget  for the biennium  1998-1999 (General Assembly  resolutions
41/213  and  42/211,  and  regulation  3.2  of  the  Regulations  and  Rules
Governing  Programme  Planning, the  Programme Aspects  of  the Budget,  the
Monitoring of Implementation and the Methods of Evaluation)

    (d)Evaluation.

    Documentation

    In-depth evaluation of public information (A/49/16 (Part I), para. 34)

    In-depth  evaluation of  peace-keeping  operations:   termination  phase
(ibid.)

    Triennial review of the in-depth evaluation of the Office  of the United
Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

    Strengthening  of the role  of evaluation  findings in programme design,
delivery and policy directives (regulations 7.3  and 7.4 of the  Regulations
and  Rules  Governing  Programme Planning,  the  Programme  Aspects  of  the
Budget, the Monitoring of Implementation and  the Methods of Evaluation, and
General Assembly resolutions 37/234, 38/227 A and B, and 42/215)

  5.Coordination  questions:   report  of the  Administrative  Committee  on
Coordination and  preparations for the Joint  Meetings of  the Committee for
Programme   and   Coordination   and   the   Administrative   Committee   on
Coordination.

    Documentation

  Annual overview  report of  the Administrative  Committee on  Coordination
for 1995

  Report  of the Chairmen  of the  Committee for  Programme and Coordination
and the  Administrative Committee on Coordination on the twenty-ninth series
of Joint Meetings of the two Committees

  6.  Reports of the Joint Inspection Unit.

7.  Provisional agenda for the thirty-seventh session of the Committee.

8.  Adoption of the report of the Committee on its thirty-sixth session.


Notes

  1/   Official  Records of  the  General Assembly,  Forty-seventh  Session,
Supplement No. 16 (A/47/16), part one.

  2/   Ibid., Supplement  No. 6  and corrigendum  (A/47/6/Re.1 and  Corr.1),

vols. I and II.

  3/   Report of the  World Conference on  Human Rights,  Vienna, 14-25 June
1993 (A/CONF.157/24 (Part I), chap. III.

   4/  Official Records  of the Third United  Nations Conference on  the Law
of the  Sea, vol.  XVII (United  Nations publication,  Sales No.  E.84.V.3),
document A/CONF.62/122.

  5/    Report  of  the  United   Nations  Conference  on  Environment   and
Development, Rio  de Janeiro, 3-14 June 1992, vol. I, Resolutions Adopted by
the  Conference  (United   Nations  publication,  Sales  No.  E.93.I.8   and
corrigendum), resolution 1, annex II.

  6/  General Assembly resolution 46/151, annex II.

  7/  Report of the Second United Nations Conference on the Least  Developed
Countries, Paris, 3-14 September 1990 (A/CONF.147/18), part one.

  8/   Report of the  Global Conference  on the  Sustainable Development  of
Small Island  Developing States, Bridgetown,  Barbados, 25  April-6 May 1994
(United Nations  publication, Sales No. E.94.I.18  and Corr.1  and 2), chap.
I, resolution 1, annex II.

  9/  General Assembly resolution 41/128, annex.

  10/  General Assembly resolution 45/158, annex.

  11/    A/48/486-S/26560,  annex;  see  Official  Records of  the  Security
Council, Forty-eighth  Year, Supplement for  October, November and  December
1993, document S/26560.
ANNEX I

Agenda for the thirty-fifth session of the Committee


1.  Election of officers.

2.  Adoption of the agenda and organization of work.

3.Review of the  efficiency of the administrative and financial  functioning
of the United Nations.

4.  Programme questions:

  (a)  Proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997;

  (b)  Evaluation.

5.Coordination  questions:    report  of  the  Administrative  Committee  on
Coordination and  preparations for the Joint  Meetings of  the Committee for
Programme   and   Coordination   and   the   Administrative   Committee   on
Coordination.

6.  Reports of the Joint Inspection Unit.

7.Provisional agenda for the thirty-sixth session of the Committee.

8.Adoption of the report of the Committee on its thirty-fifth session.

ANNEX II

List of documents before the Committee at its thirty-fifth session


E/AC.51/1995/1  Annotated provisional agenda

A/50/6Proposed programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997

  Introduction and overview

  Section  1Overall policy-making, direction and coordination

  Section  2  Political affairs

  Section  3Peace-keeping operations and special missions

  Section  4Outer space affairs

  Section  6  Legal activities

  Section  7ADepartment for Policy Coordination and Sustainable Development

  Section  7BAfrica:  critical economic situation, recovery and development

  Section 8Department for Economic andSocial Informationand Policy Analysis

  Section  9Department for Development Support and Management Services

  Section 10AUnited Nations Conference on Trade and Development

  Section 10BInternational Trade Centre UNCTAD/GATT

  Section 11United Nations Environment Programme

  Section 12United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat)

  Section 13  Crime control

  Section 14  International drug control

  Section 15  Economic Commission for Africa

  Section 16Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

  Section 17  Economic Commission for Europe

   Section 18Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

  Section 19Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia

  Section 20Regular programme of technical cooperation

  Section 21  Human rights

  Section 22Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

  Section 23United  Nations Relief  and Works Agency for  Palestine Refugees
in the Near East

  Section 24Department of Humanitarian Affairs

  Section 25  Public information

E/AC.51/1995/2 Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the final
and Corr.1report  of the Office  of Internal Oversight  Services on the  in-
depth evaluation of peace-keeping operations: start-up phase

E/AC.51/1995/3Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report
and Corr.1of  the  Office of  Internal  Oversight  Services on  the  indepth
evaluation of the programme on environment

E/1995/21Annual  overview   report  of   the  Administrative   Committee  on

Coordination for 1994

A/49/423Note by the Secretary-General transmitting  the report of  the Joint
Inspection Unit entitled "Review  and assessment of  efforts to  restructure
the regional dimension of United Nations economic and social activities"

A/50/126-E/1995/20  Notes by the Secretary-General transmitting the report
and  Add.1of   the  Joint  Inspection   Unit  entitled  "Communication   for
development  programmes in the  United Nations  system" and  the comments of
the Administrative Committee on Coordination on the report

E/AC.51/1995/L.4Provisional agenda  for  the  thirty-sixth  session  of  the
Committee for Programme and Coordination

E/AC.51/1995/L.1/Rev.1     Note  by   the  Secretariat  on  the   status  of
documentation

E/AC.51/1995/L.2/Rev.1  Revised proposed programme of work
and Add.1


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