United Nations

E/CN.9/1996/7


Economic and Social Council

 Distr. GENERAL
13 December 1995
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH


COMMISSION ON POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Twenty-ninth session
26 February-1 March 1996
Item 5 (a) of the provisional agenda*


    PROGRAMME QUESTIONS:  PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE AND IMPLEMENTATION 
                           IN 1995

          Progress of work in the field of population in 1995:
   Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis
                    of the United Nations Secretariat

                     Report of the Secretary-General


                             

         *  E/CN.9/1996/1.
                           /...

============================================================================

                                CONTENTS


                                                         Paragraphs  

INTRODUCTION 1-6

   I.    ANALYSIS OF DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES AT WORLD LEVEL. .  7-21  

         A.    Fertility and family planning . . . . . . . .  7-11  
         B.    Mortality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-13  
         C.    International migration . . . . . . . . . . . 14-16  
         D.    Internal migration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17

  II.    WORLD POPULATION PROJECTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . 18-22  

         A.    World population estimates and projections:
               1994 and 1996 Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . 18-20  
               
               1.  The 1994 Revision . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19  
               2.  The 1996 Revision . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
         
         B.    Urban, rural and city population estimates and
               projections:  1994 and 1996 Revisions . . . . 21-22  
               
               1.  The 1994 Revision . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
               2.  The 1996 Revision . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22

 III.    POPULATION POLICY AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. . 23-31 

         A.    Population policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-27 
         B.    Population and development  . . . . . . . . . 28-31 

  IV.    MONITORING, REVIEW AND APPRAISAL, COORDINATION AND
         DISSEMINATION OF POPULATION INFORMATION . . . . . . 32-38 

         A.    Monitoring of population trends and policies. 32-34 
         B.    Coordination and dissemination of population
               information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35-38 
               
               1.  Population Information Network  . . . . . 35-36
               2.  Publication and dissemination of research 
                   studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37-38

   V.    TECHNICAL COOPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  39 


Annex.   PUBLICATIONS AND OTHER MATERIAL ISSUED IN 1995 BY
         THE POPULATION DIVISION


                             INTRODUCTION

1.       The Department for Economic and Social Information and
Policy Analysis of the United Nations Secretariat acts as the
focal point for population, economic and social analysis and
information, and provides substantive support to pertinent
intergovernmental machinery, including the Commission on
Population and Development and the Statistical Commission.  Those
functions include research and policy analysis and the execution
of technical cooperation activities in the areas of population and
statistics.

2.       The Commission on Population and Development, at its
twenty-eighth session, reviewed the progress of work for 1994 and
the proposed programme of work for 1996-1997.

3.       The present report deals with the research and technical
cooperation work and information activities carried out by the
Population Division of the Department for Economic and Social
Information and Policies of the United Nations Secretariat in the
field of population during 1995.  The activities are grouped
according to the subprogrammes of the programme budget for the
biennium 1994-1995.

4.       The Population Division made every effort to implement the
programme of work adopted by the Commission on Population and
Development and endorsed by the Economic and Social Council and
the General Assembly.  The work programme for 1994-1995 was
formulated and implemented within the basic framework set forth in
the medium-term plan for the period 1992-1997, taking into account
the recommendations of the World Population Plan of Action1 (1974)
and the International Conference on Population2 (1994).  Part of
the programme period was affected to some extent, however, by the
additional responsibilities that had been placed on the Department
for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis to provide
substantive support to the International Conference on Population
and Development and its follow-up.  To the extent possible, this
was achieved by integrating the regular research activities of the
Department with the added substantive reporting requirements of
the Conference.

5.       Some delays in the implementation of programmed outputs
occurred as a consequence of the extraordinary measures taken by
the Secretary-General in response to the financial situation of
the Organization.  Some activities were cancelled or had to be
carried over into 1996.

6.       The Department for Economic and Social Information and
Policy Analysis continued to collaborate closely with the United
Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), whose financial assistance made
it possible to expand the scope and character of the projects
undertaken by the Department and to improve their substantive
aspects.  In addition, the Department maintained close and
effective collaboration with UNFPA in connection with the
substantive preparations for and servicing of the International
Conference on Population and Development and the follow-up
activities to the Conference, and in carrying out technical
assistance activities within the technical support
services/country support team (TSS/CST) system.


          I.  ANALYSIS OF DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES AT WORLD LEVEL


                    A.  Fertility and family planning


7.       Women's education is widely acknowledged to be a crucial
determinant of their reproductive behaviour.  The relationship
between education and reproductive behaviour of women has
therefore been a critical element in  fertility analysis at the
United Nations.  A recently published report, entitled Women's
Education and Fertility Behaviour:  Recent Evidence from the
Demographic and Health Surveys,3 shows that in all regions, average
fertility levels become lower with the transition from primary to
secondary and to tertiary education.  Higher educational
attainment is associated with later entry into marriage and a
later transition to motherhood, and in turn is likely to influence
family size:  the study documents the fact that better educated
women consistently want smaller families.  Education also affects
women's ability and willingness to implement fertility preferences
through contraceptive means.  The study provides numerous
arguments showing a strong association between women's education
and health status, family well-being and reduced fertility, and
these arguments are persuasive enough to warrant policy
consideration.

8.       Monitoring of contraceptive use worldwide is an ongoing
activity of the Population Division.  A study, entitled Levels and
Trends of Contraceptive Use as Assessed in 1994, has been
completed and the report of the study has been submitted for
publication.  This is the third such global review of
contraceptive practice carried out by the Population Division. 
The study provides data on contraceptive use, by type of method,
for all countries with available information.  It also presents
regional and global average levels of contraceptive use and trends
in levels of use, and estimates of the extent of availability of
modern contraceptives in the developing countries.  The study
includes special features dealing with contraceptive use according
to marital status and gender.  It also employs an improved basis
for estimating number of married women and projecting the growth
in number of contraceptive users in the light of projected
fertility declines.

9.       Work continued during 1995 on a study of the family-
building process.  The study aims to measure the impact of family
planning programmes by examining the nature of parity-specific
fertility behaviour.  Parity progression schedules are being
analysed in order to measure changes in fertility.  The study
covers 15 developing countries with data from both the World
Fertility Survey (WFS) and the Demographic and Health Surveys
(DHS).  The report is expected to be completed in early 1996.

10.      Work also proceeded during 1995 on the study entitled
Evolving Patterns of Fertility Behaviour in Developing Countries,
which examines evolving patterns and trends in fertility in the
light of the new fertility data made available from a large number
of surveys undertaken in developing countries in recent years. 
Two computerized databases for monitoring and analysis of family
planning and fertility data have been updated with the latest
available information from national and other sources.  First
results suggest that although fertility has remained relatively
high in sub-Saharan Africa in a number of countries, a fertility
transition has commenced.  Fertility has continued to decline in
Northern Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean.

11.      An ad hoc expert group meeting was scheduled in October
1995 to review systematically the issues involved in the
measurement of quality of family planning services.  Owing to the
financial crisis in the United Nations, the meeting was cancelled. 
However, a report on the topic is under preparation based on
papers submitted by potential participants.


                              B.  Mortality


12.      A study on the status of women and child survival is
nearing completion.  A comprehensive set of data has been compiled
allowing the estimation of infant, child and under-five mortality
by sex for countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the
Caribbean.  A database showing the basic data and the estimates
derived from them is being made available on diskette.  The
database for Africa, entitled Child Mortality by Sex:  Africa, has
already been released.  Estimates of male and female mortality in
childhood have been obtained for 87 countriesž36 in Africa, 28 in
Asia and 23 in Latin Americažderived from over 200 sources of data
covering the spectrum from vital registration systems to sample
surveys.  The estimates obtained indicate that in most countries
male children under age 1 experience higher mortality than their
female counterparts but among children ages 1-4, female mortality
is higher than male mortality in many countries.  DHS data show
that in 9 out of 11 countries in Latin American, in 9 out of 21
countries in sub-Saharan Africa, and in 7 out of 9 countries in
Asia and Northern Africa, girls ages 1-5 are more likely to die
than boys in the same age group.

13.      The study also includes a set of papers exploring the
mechanisms thought to lead to excess female mortality in
childhood.  A preliminary version of the set of papers is being
released as a working paper prior to publication so as to make
this important research readily available.  Both the proximate
determinants of sex differentials in child mortality, such as
nutritional status and use of health services, and less proximate
causes of such differentials are considered.  An analysis of
differences in nutritional status by sex of child indicates that
in most countries the differences between boys and girls ages 3-35
months are small.  However, the evidence suggests that the
nutritional status of girls relative to that of boys deteriorates
somewhat as children grow older.  With respect to the use of
preventive health measures, there are small differences in the
immunization coverage of girls and boys in most countries. 
However, in Northern Africa, Southern Asia and Western Asia,
immunization coverage tends to be higher among boys.  Furthermore,
boys who are ill are also more likely than girls who are sick to
be treated at modern facilities and to receive effective
treatment.  The report also considers the effects of maternal
education, intra-household allocation of resources, and son
preference on sex differentials in mortality.  With regard to the
last, data relative to Bangladesh, Egypt and the Republic of Korea
show that in families that have mainly daughters, excess mortality
among girls appears to be caused by short birth intervals rather
than by deliberate neglect.  The report provides a useful basis
for the design of measures aimed at eliminating the pattern of
excess and preventable mortality among girl infants and children,
as called for by the Programme of Action of the International
Conference on Population and Development.4


                       C.  International migration


14.      The estimates of the international migration stock in all
countries of the world, available in 1994, have been updated as
more information became available.  As reported in 1994, the
estimates had been derived largely from census information on the
number of foreign-born persons enumerated in each country.  Out of
the 214 countries or areas constituting the world in 1990, 184 had
at least one source of information on the international migrant
stock for the period 1960-1990.  Comparable estimates were derived
for 1965, 1975, 1985 and 1990.  They have been issued on diskette
under the title Trends in Total Migrant Stock.  At the world
level, the estimates obtained indicate that the total number of
international migrants rose from 75 million to 120 million between
1960 and 1990.

15.      A database on migrant flows directed to selected developed
countries (Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands,
Sweden, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland,
and the United States of America) has been released on diskette
under the title South-to-North Migration.  As far as possible, the
data cover the period 1960-1994 and provide detailed information
on migrants admitted annually by country of origin.  The database
allows for the estimation of South-to-North migration levels.

16.      The updating of the data bank on levels and trends of
international migration continued during 1995, as has the
dissemination on diskette of information on the international
migrant stock enumerated by censuses of developing countries. 
Work also proceeded on a study of levels and trends of
international migration with particular emphasis on gender issues. 
The study will provide a comprehensive picture of the demographic
characteristics of international migrants in major regions.


                         D.  Internal migration


17.      Considerable progress has been made in estimating the
components of urban growth on the basis of intercensal methods. 
Estimates of intercensal rural-urban net migration are available
for 39 developing countries for the 1960s; 45 developing countries
for the 1970s; and 27 developing countries for the 1990s. 
However, only 13 countries have estimates for the three decades. 
Although it is not possible to generalize from such small numbers,
the evidence suggests that the contribution of net rural-urban
migration to urban growth has been declining.  Thus, for 6 of the
13 countries with data for the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, the
percentage of urban growth due to migration declined steadily over
those decades.  In five additional countries, the percentage of
urban growth attributable to net migration increased during the
1960s and 1970s and declined thereafter.  Eight of the 11
countries showing a decline during the past two decades are
located in Latin America.  A full set of rural-urban migration
estimates and their relation to urban growth has been made
available on diskette under the title Rural-Urban Migration
Estimates for Developing Countries.


                    II.  WORLD POPULATION PROJECTIONS


     A.  World population estimates and projections:  1994 and 1996
Revisions

                          1.  The 1994 Revision

18.      Completion of the 1994 Revision of world population
estimates and projections was announced to the Commission at its
twenty-eighth session.  At that time, all but one of the reports
describing the results of the revision had been published.  The
final report, World Population Prospects: The 1994 Revision,5 was
issued in September 1995.

19.      The report provides 900 pages of analytical and
descriptive text, graphs and tables giving a full picture of world
population trends to the present and alternative variant
projections of how the population may evolve from 1995 to the year
2050.


                          2.  The 1996 Revision


20.      Work is currently proceeding on the 1996 Revision of the
world population estimates and projections whose first results are
expected to be announced during the summer of 1996.   As in the
previous revision, the 1996 Revision will present a century of
demographic estimates and projections, incorporating an estimation
period extending from 1950 to 1995 and four projection variants to
the year 2050.  For the 1996 Revision, full sets of demographic
estimates and projections, by sex and age, will be presented, for
the first time, for the Gaza Strip, Macau and Western Sahara.  In
addition, owing to the continued spread of human immunodeficiency
virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in the world,
the number of countries for which the demographic impact of AIDS
is being incorporated will be increased to 28 (from the 16 in the
1994 Revision).


     B.  Urban, rural and city population estimates and projections:
                         1994 and 1996 Revisions


                          1.  The 1994 Revision

21.      Completion of the 1994 Revision of urban, rural and city
population estimates and projections was announced at the time of
the twenty-eighth session of the Commission.  At that time, only
the wall chart, Urban Agglomerations, 1994,6 had been issued.  The
remaining two reports, which were in press at the time of the
twenty-eighth session of the Commission, have also been published. 
The wall chart, Urban and Rural Areas, 1994,7 was issued in
December 1994.  The report, World Urbanization Prospects: The 1994
Revision,8 containing 180 pages of analytical and descriptive text,
graphs and tables that give a full picture of urban, rural and 
city population trends to 1995 and alternative variant projections
of how the population may evolve in the future, was issued in
February 1995.

                          2.  The 1996 Revision

22.      Planning for the 1996 Revision of urban, rural and city
population estimates and projections has begun.  As discussed at
the eighteenth session of the Administrative Committee on
Coordination (ACC) Subcommittee on Demographic Estimates and
Projections, there would be initial consultations with the
regional commissions concerning data availability.  The 1996
Revision will be enhanced by increasing the projection horizon to
the year 2030; in past revisions, projections were to 2025.



         III.  POPULATION POLICY AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT


                         A.  Population policies


23.      In 1995, the project entitled "International migration
policies and programmes:  a world survey" was continued.  A wall
chart, entitled International Migration Policies, 1995,9 has been
published.  It provides information on, inter alia, immigration
policies concerning permanent settlement, admission of migrant
workers and dependants of migrant workers, as well as on
emigration policies.

24.      During 1995, research concerning policy issues resulting
from rapid population growth in the world's largest cities
continued.  The Challenge of Urbanization:  The World's Large
Cities,10 presenting profiles of 100 of the world's largest
agglomerations, has been published.  It is expected to be an
important input for the United Nations Conference on Human
Settlements (Habitat II)to be held in June 1996.

25.      In 1995, work continued on the publication entitled World
Population Policies, which consists of country-level profiles on
new and emerging issues in the area of population policy.  The
first volume in the projected four-volume series, covering
countries, in alphabetical order, beginning with Afghanistan
through the Dominican Republic, has been completed and is
currently being edited.

26.      The volume Abortion Policies:  A Global Review, volume
III, Oman to Zimbabwe,11 was published in 1995.  A wall chart on
abortion policies, entitled World Abortion Policies, 1994,12 which
had been published in English in 1994, was also published in
Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish in 1995.  This is the
first wall chart produced by the Population Division that has been
issued in the six official languages of the United Nations.

27.      The population data bank maintained by the Population
Division has been continuously updated.  In 1995, the fifth
edition of Global Population Policy Database, 1995 (GRIPP:1995)
and the companion volume, Population Policy Diskette
Documentation, 1995, were completed and submitted for publication.


                     B.  Population and development


28.      A literature survey and research bibliography on the
relationships between population and environment in developing
countries, which was issued as a working paper in 1994
(ESA/P/W.123), has been made available in electronic form on the
Internet.

29.      A study of Government views on the relationships between
population and the environment has been issued as a working paper
pending its publication.  The report is based on a review of
official governmental statements, national reports and the draft
and final documents adopted at major intergovernmental conferences
dealing with population, environment and development issues from
the early 1970s through the International Conference on Population
and Development in 1994, as well as the international development
strategies for the United Nations development decades since 1960. 
Over this period, the concept of development has evolved so as to
give more attention to social aspects, poverty as a core concern
and the sustainability of development.  The report shows that,
over the same period, population and environmental questions came
to be viewed as inextricably linked, rather than as issues that
could be dealt with separately.  The review found that by the time
of the International Conference on Population and Development in
1994, the Governments of at least 79 countries had expressed
concern with population and environment imbalances.  Countries
expressing such concerns included a substantial majority of the
population of developing countries, where rapid population growth
and unbalanced population distribution were cited by many
Governments in connection with urban congestion and pollution,
soil degradation, deforestation and threats to biodiversity.

30.      An updated version of the database on population,
resources, the environment and development (PRED Bank) has been
issued.  It incorporates information from the 1994 Revision of
population estimates and projections, includes updates of other
data series and incorporates a number of additional indicators. 
The technical notes and user's guide to the data bank and software
have also been expanded.  As in the original version of the PRED
Bank, the new version includes a special version of the POPMAP
software developed by the Statistics Division of the Department
for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis of the
United Nations Secretariat.  POPMAP is an information system for
microcomputers that combines database, spreadsheet and
geographical mapping facilities.  Work was initiated in 1995 on a
study of trends in population and land use in developing
countries, drawing on information assembled in the PRED Bank.

31.  Also ongoing during 1995 was a study of demographic aspects
of poverty.  The focus is methodological, with the long-term aim
of increasing the amount of attention given to demographic factors
in poverty research, and vice versa.  The study includes an
overview of approaches to measuring poverty and a discussion of
data requirements for linking poverty measurement to the study of
demographic factors.  The study also considers ways in which
measurement choices may affect the demographic profile of
households classified as poor.


           IV.  MONITORING, REVIEW AND APPRAISAL, COORDINATION
               AND DISSEMINATION OF POPULATION INFORMATION


            A.  Monitoring of population trends and policies


32.      At its twenty-ninth session, the Commission on Population
and Development will have before it a concise report on world
population monitoring, focusing on the topic of "Reproductive
rights and reproductive health, including population information,
education and communication" (E/CN.9/1996/2).  This is the first
annual report on a special theme derived from the Programme of
Action of the International Conference on Population and
Development, as proposed by the Commission at its twenty-eighth
session.13  The theme corresponds to the issues addressed in
chapter VII of the Programme of Action, together with relevant
parts of chapters IV, V, VIII, XI and XII.

33.      The preparation of an expanded version of the report has
also been completed and the draft will be available to the
Commission as a working paper.  In addition to an overview and an
introductory chapter, the report consists of eight other chapters
covering topics such as:  entry into reproductive life;
reproductive behaviour; contraception; abortion; maternal
mortality and morbidity; sexually transmitted diseases, including
HIV/AIDS; reproductive rights; and population information,
education and communication with respect to reproductive rights
and reproductive health.  The report centres on issues covered in
chapter VII (Reproductive rights and reproductive health) of the
Programme of Action but, as pointed out by the Commission on
Population and Development, other chapters of the Programme of
Action are also relevant to this issue.  Those other chapters are
chapter IV (Gender equality, equity and empowerment of women);
chapter V (The family, its roles, rights, composition and
structure); chapter VII (Health, morbidity and mortality); chapter
XI (Population, development and education); and chapter XII
(Technology, research and development).

34.      The report contains an extensive set of annex tables
providing indicators of the current demographic situation in major
areas and regions, as well as data on population size and growth,
population distribution, and fertility and mortality levels in
countries, major areas and regions.  These annex tables also
provide data specific to reproductive rights and reproductive
health.


      B.  Coordination and dissemination of population information


                   1.  Population Information Network

35.      During 1995, the global Population Information Network
(POPIN) Coordinating Unit, in collaboration with the regional
commissions, has continued to focus on strengthening the Network
and its ability to collect and disseminate information among
United Nations entities and non-governmental organizations in the
field of population.  The Network continues to promote the use of
electronic mail and the Internet to facilitate and enhance
communication among the regional networks, specialized agencies,
non-governmental organizations and the broader population
community.  Using the Internet, POPIN has greatly increased
worldwide dissemination of population information produced by the
United Nations and its organizations.  Enhanced access to these
materials has been provided through the POPIN Gopher and the POPIN
World Wide Web site (URL = ttp://www.undp.org/popin/popin.htm),
which has been established to facilitate the use of electronic
media for publication of population information and to improve
coordination of dissemination efforts worldwide.

36.      From 12 to 21 June 1995, POPIN held meetings of its
Advisory Committee and Information Technology Working Group in
Bangkok.  The meetings were convened by the Population Division
and the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific
(ESCAP).  The purpose of the meetings was to review the status of
POPIN activities and electronic computer networking in each of the
regions, present the POPIN work programme and future plans, and
draft a strategy for POPIN activities for the next biennium (1996-
1997).  Represented at those meetings were the Economic Commission
for Africa (ECA), ESCAP, the Economic and Social Commission for
Western Asia (ESCWA), the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) and
the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean
(ECLAC); Northern American POPIN; the UNFPA country support team
in Bangkok; the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations (FAO); the United Nations Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization (UNESCO) regional office in Bangkok; and the
World Health Organization (WHO) regional office in New Delhi.



          2.  Publication and dissemination of research studies

37.      The Population Division continues to publish the results
of its research studies in a variety of formats to meet the needs
of different audiences.  They are widely disseminated to
Governments, national and international organizations, to research
and educational institutions, to individuals engaged in social and
economic planning, research and training, and to the general
public.  It also continues to develop and maintain databases and
software, which are made available on magnetic tape and/or
diskette(s).  A list of the Population Division's publications and
other material issued in 1995 is given in the annex to the present
report.

38.      The Population Division continues to receive and respond
to numerous requests for population information from United
Nations organizations, research institutions and individual
scholars.  It also provides background information to and
participates regularly in international conferences and meetings
of inter-agency groups and professional societies.  Information
from the Population Division appeared prominently in a number of
publications and reports of other United Nations bodies and
international conferences and meetings.



                        V.  TECHNICAL COOPERATION


39.      During 1995, the Population Division continued to provide
technical assistance services to more than 80 projects in 45
developing countries in Africa, Asia, Western Asia, Latin America
and countries with economies in transition in the areas of
population and development training, institutionalizing analysis
and research on socio-economic and demographic data obtained from
population censuses, surveys and vital registration systems,
population policy, and population and development.  During 1995,
TSS specialists in the areas of demographic analysis, population
and development, population policy, fertility and family planning,
and teaching and training in demography augmented, whenever
possible and as required by other staff of the Population
Division, substantive support provided to the eight country
support teams (CSTs).  In addition, TSS specialists contributed to
an expert group meeting organized by the Statistics Division on
data collection and analysis in May 1995 and to a Senior Policy
Seminar on HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa, organized by ECA. 
Furthermore, a number of missions were undertaken by TSS
specialists to CSTs in Dakar, Addis Ababa, Harare, Santiago and
Suva.  The Interregional Adviser on Population and TSS staff
participated in Tripartite Project Review (TPR) meetings in
Africa, Asia and Europe to back-stop projects executed by the
Population Division.


                                  Notes

          1Report of the United Nations World Population Conference,
1974, Bucharest, 19-30 August  1994 (United Nations publication,
Sales No. E.75.XIII.3), chap. I.

          2See Report of the International Conference on Population,
1984, Mexico City, 6-14 August 1984 (United Nations publication,
Sales No. E.84.XIII.8 and corrigenda).

          3United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.23.

          4Report of the International Conference on Population and
Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994 (United Nations
publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.18), chap. I, resolution I.

          5United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.16.
 
          6United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.4.

          7United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.6.

          8United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.12.

          9United Nations publication, E.96.XIII.7.

         10United Nations publication, Sales No. E.96.XIII.4.

         11United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.24.

         12United Nations publication, Sales No. E.94.XIII.8.

         13See Official Records of the Economic and Social Council,
1995, Supplement No. 7 (E/1995/27), annex I, sect. III.


                                  Annex

             PUBLICATIONS AND OTHER MATERIAL ISSUED IN 1995
                       BY THE POPULATION DIVISION


                            Research studies

World Population Prospects:  The 1994 Revision.  ST/ESA/SER.A/145. 
Sales No. E.95.XIII.16.

World Urbanization Prospects:  The 1994 Revision. 
ST/ESA/SER.A/150.  Sales No. E.95.XIII.12.

Concise Report on the World Population Situation in 1995. 
ST/ESA/SER.A/153.  Sales No. E.95.XIII.14.

Results of the Seventh United Nations Population Inquiry among
Governments.  ST/ESA/SER.R/140.  Sales No. E.95.XIII.11.

The Challenge of Urbanization:  The World's Large Cities. 
ST/ESA/SER.A/151.
Sales No. E.96.XIII.4.

Women's Education and Fertility Behaviour:  Recent Evidence from
the Demographic and Health Surveys.  ST/ESA/SER.R/137.  Sales No.
E.95.XIII.23.

Population Consensus at Cairo, Mexico City and Bucharest:  An
Analytical Comparison.  ST/ESA/SER.R/142.  Sales No. E.96.XIII.2.

Developments in Demographic Training and Research Projects: 
Aspects of Technical Cooperation.  ST/ESA/SER.R/143.  Sales No.
E.95.XIII.13.


                   Proceedings of expert group meeting

International Migration Policies and the Status of Female
Migrants:  Proceedings of the United Nations Expert Group Meeting
on International Migration Policies and the Status of Female
Migration, San Miniato, Italy. 28-31 March 1990. 
ST/ESA/SER.R/126.  Sales No. E.95.XIII.10.


                               Wall charts

Urban and Rural Areas, 1994.  Sales No. E.95.XIII.6.

World Abortion Policies, 1994.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.8.  In Arabic,
Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish (English version issued in
1994).

International Migration Policies, 1995.  Sales No. E.96.XIII.7.


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