United Nations

E/CN.9/1995/6


Economic and Social Council

 Distr. GENERAL
24 January 1995
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH


POPULATION COMMISSION
Twenty-eighth session
21 February-2 March 1995
Item 5 (a) of the provisional agenda*


     PROGRAMME QUESTIONS:  PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE AND IMPLEMENTATION

          Progress of work in the field of population, 1994: 
Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis 
          
                Report of the Secretary-General


                             SUMMARY

     The present report reviews the progress of the Department for
Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis in implementing
its programme of work in the field of population during 1994.  It
covers the activities of the Department in subprogrammes dealing
with analysis of demographic variables at the world level; world
population projections; population policy and socio-economic
development; monitoring, review and appraisal, coordination and
dissemination of population information; and technical cooperation
in population.













                             CONTENTS

                                                                  
                                                Paragraphs  Page

INTRODUCTION ..................................   1 - 7       4

  I.  WORLD DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS ..............   8 - 23      5

      A.  Status of women and fertility .......   8 - 10      5

      B.  Trends in reproductive behaviour ....  11 - 14      5

      C.  Dynamics of contraceptive use .......  15 - 16      6

      D.  Status of women and child survival  ...   17        7

      E.  International migration .............  18 - 21      7

      F.  Internal migration ..................  22 - 23      8

 II.  WORLD POPULATION PROJECTIONS ............  24 - 43      8

      A.  World population estimates and 
          projections:  1994 and 1996 revisions  24 - 34      8

      B.  Urban, rural and city population 
          estimates and projections:  1994 
          and 1996 revisions ..................  35 - 41     11

      C.  Subcommittee on Demographic 
          Estimates and Projections ...........  42 - 43     12

III.  POPULATION POLICY AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC 
      DEVELOPMENT .............................  44 - 57     13

      A.  Comparative study of new population 
          policy issues at the global level ....  44 - 45     13

      B.  National population policies .........  46 - 47     13

      C.  Population policy data bank ..........  48 - 49     14

      D.  Assessing the demographic 
          consequences of major development 
          projects ..............................     50       14

      E.  Proceedings of the International 
          Conference on Ageing Populations 
          in the Context of the Family ..........     51       14

      F.  Proceedings of the United Nations 
          Round Table on the Ageing of 
          Asian Populations ......................     52       14

      G.  Proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on 
          Population, Environment and Development      53       14

                               CONTENTS (continued)

                                                                  
                                                  Paragraphs  Page

      H.  Proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on
          Population Growth and Demographic Structure  54       14

      I.  Population and the environment:  setting the
          research agenda .........................    55       15

      J.  Population pressure, land use and the 
          environment: national trends ...........     56       15

      K.  Governments' views on the relationship
          between population and the environment       57       15

 IV.  MONITORING, REVIEW AND APPRAISAL, COORDINATION 
      AND DISSEMINATION OF POPULATION INFORMATION   58 - 70     15

      A.  Monitoring of population trends and policies 58       15

      B.  Substantive servicing of the Preparatory 
          Committee for the International Conference 
          on Population and Development at its third 
          session ................................     59       16

      C.  Substantive preparations and servicing of the
          International Conference on Population and 
          Development ............................     60       17

      D.  Coordination and dissemination of 
          population information ..................  61 - 70     19

  V.  TECHNICAL COOPERATION .......................     71       21

Annex.  PUBLICATIONS AND OTHER MATERIAL ISSUED 
        IN 1994 BY THE POPULATION DIVISION, 
        AND THE SOFTWARE AND DATABASES MAINTAINED BY IT .......  24



                          INTRODUCTION


1.   The Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy
Analysis acts as the focal point for economic and social analysis
and information in respect of population and statistics and
provides substantive support to the pertinent intergovernmental
machinery, including the Population Commission and the Statistical
Commission.  Those functions include research and policy analysis
and the execution of technical cooperation activities in the areas
of statistics and population.

2.   The Population Commission, at its twenty-seventh session,
reviewed the progress of work for 1991-1993 and the programme of
work for 1994-1995. 

3.   The present report deals with the research and technical
cooperation work and information activities carried out by the
Population Division in the field of population during 1994.  The
activities are grouped according to the subprogrammes of the
programme budget for 1994-1995.

4.   During 1994, most of the efforts and resources of the
Population Division were concentrated on the substantive
preparations and servicing of the International Conference on
Population and Development, which took place in Cairo in September
1994.  These are briefly dealt with in the present report.  A more
detailed report on the implications of the Conference for the work
programme on population is contained in document E/CN.9/1995/5.

5.   In addition, the Population Division made every effort to
implement other aspects of the programme of work adopted by the
Commission and endorsed by the Economic and Social Council and the
General Assembly.  The work programme for 1994-1995 was formulated
and implemented within the basic framework set forth in the
medium-term plan for the period 1992-1997, taking into account the
recommendations of the World Population Plan of Action (1974) 1/
and the International Conference on Population (1984). 2/  Part of
the programme period, however, has been affected, to some extent,
by the additional responsibilities that have been placed on the
Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis
for providing substantive support to the International Conference
on Population and Development.  To the extent possible, this has
been achieved by integrating the regular research activities of the
Department with the added substantive reporting requirements of the
Conference.

6.   Some delays in the implementation of certain projects have
occurred as a consequence, and some projects that were expected to
be completed by the end of the biennium 1992-1993 were, therefore,
carried over into 1994.  Those activities have been integrated into
the approved programme covered by the 1994-1995 programme budget,
so as to achieve their completion by the end of that biennium.

7.   The Department continued to collaborate closely with the
United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).  The financial assistance
of UNFPA made it possible to expand the scope and character of the
projects undertaken by the Department and to improve the
substantive aspects of several of them.  In addition, the
Department maintained close and effective collaboration with UNFPA
in connection with the substantive preparations and servicing of
the International Conference on Population and Development.


       I.  WORLD DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

       A.  Status of women and fertility

8.   Besides being identified as a development priority, women's
education is widely acknowledged as a crucial determinant of
fertility behaviour.  In view of this, the nature and strength of
the association between education and fertility has been a
recurrent theme of fertility analysis at the United Nations.  Most
recently, substantive work on a major comparative study has been
completed.  The report is currently in its final stage of
publication and is expected to be issued in 1995 under the title
Women's Education and Fertility Behaviour:  Recent Evidence from
the Demographic and Health Surveys.  The study reviews trends in
the educational attainment of women in developing countries in
Africa, Asia and Latin America and examines differences according
to education and fertility, desired family size, age at marriage,
contraceptive use and breast- feeding, among other factors.  The
report also examines education-fertility patterns over time, where
data allow, and discusses factors related to the emergence of the
large fertility contrasts, amounting often to differences of three
to five children between highly educated women and those with
little or no formal schooling, that are seen at present in a
substantial number of developing countries.

9.   To further the understanding of the groups of women of special
concern, as identified in the Nairobi Forward-looking Strategies
for the Advancement of Women, 3/ a comparative study on the living
arrangement of women and their children in the third world was
completed.  The report is in the final stage of publication.

10.  The Population Division has provided background information to
and participated regularly in meetings of the Ad Hoc Inter-agency
Advisory Committee on the Fourth World Conference on Women, the
United Nations Development Fund for Women and the Working Group on
Women's Health of the New York NGO Committee on the Status of
Women.  The Division has also been represented at several expert
group meetings convened in preparation for the Fourth World
Conference on Women.  Through the Statistical Division of the
Department, the Population Division has provided data and
analytical studies for use in preparing the revised edition of The
World's Women, 1970-1990:  Trends and Statistics, 4/ which is one
of the mandated documents for the Women's Conference.


     B.  Trends in reproductive behaviour

11.  With financial support from UNFPA, three country case-studies
(on Ecuador, Indonesia and Zimbabwe) were initiated to study the
effect of improved child survival on fertility.  These case-studies
employed individual-level data of mothers and children and the
characteristics of their communities.  The analysis focused on
examining how availability and contact with community health and
family-planning services mediate the relationship between child
survival and fertility.  The study was scheduled for completion in
1992-1993 but was delayed because of the late submission of the
reports by the respective country consultants.  The Population
Division has consolidated the country consultants' reports into one
report, with an overview showing common findings and
generalization.  The report will be published in late 1995.

12.  A study of the family-building process, covering 15 countries
representing various regions of the world, was initiated during the
biennium 1992-1993.  A new method for calculating parity
progression ratios and other measures of family building was
developed along with the necessary computer programs for
calculations.  The new method and computer programs were applied to
12 countries.  A preliminary analysis of some data has been
initiated.

13.  A new analysis of fertility levels and trends, entitled
Evolving Patterns of Fertility Behaviour in Developing Countries,
was initiated.  The study complements an earlier publication
entitled Patterns of Fertility in Low- fertility Settings 5/ and
covers the period from the 1970s to the 1990s.  Its purpose is to
update the data bank on fertility maintained by the Population
Division, as well as to examine evolving fertility patterns and
trends in the light of the new fertility data made available from
a great variety of fertility surveys undertaken in developing
countries in recent years.  This is particularly enriching for
regions of the world that in the past had very little information
available on fertility patterns, such as the sub-Saharan African
countries.  So far, the data overview suggests that in the latter
region, fertility has remained relatively high, with some notable
exceptions.  Fertility has continued to decline in Northern Africa,
as well as in Asia and Latin America.

14.  A computerized database for monitoring and analysis of family
planning and fertility was established and is being updated with
the latest available data from national and other sources.


   C.  Dynamics of contraceptive use

15.  A wall chart on contraceptive use worldwide was published in
1994. 6/  Patterns of Contraceptive Use will be published as an
updated and modified version of Levels and Trends of Contraceptive
Use as Assessed in 1988, 7/ which was published in 1989.  The
report provides data on contraceptive use, by type of method, for
all countries with available information.  It also presents
regional and global average levels of contraceptive use and trends
in levels of use, and estimates of the extent of availability of
modern contraceptives in the developing countries.  The report will
include special features dealing with contraceptive use according
to marital status and gender.  It will also employ an improved
basis for estimating numbers of married women and projecting the
growth in number of contraceptive users in the light of projected
fertility declines.  Major work on this study has been completed
and the report is scheduled to be published in 1995.

16.  The Division continues to receive and respond to numerous
requests for fertility and contraceptive-use data from United
Nations organizations, research institutions and individual
scholars.

      D.  Status of women and child survival

17.  A study on the status of women and child survival is being
carried out with the financial assistance of UNFPA.  The study will
review the specific mechanisms leading to sex differentials in
child mortality, particularly those associated with the prevalence
of excess female child mortality.  Both biological and
socio-economic factors related to differential child mortality by
sex are being considered.  Among the latter, special emphasis is
being placed on the analysis of the effects of variables indicating
the status of women, including the differential utilization of
health facilities, differential feeding practices by sex of the
child and differences in nutritional status between male and female
children.  A major part of the study includes the estimation of
infant and child mortality by sex for as many countries as possible
and for various periods.  The estimates derived will serve as a
basis for documenting the extent of excess female child mortality
and studying variations in sex differentials in child mortality by
level of development and socio-cultural setting.  The study is
expected to be completed by the end of 1995.


      E.  International migration

18.  The preliminary version of the proceedings of the Expert Group
Meeting on Population Distribution and Migration, which was held at
Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in January 1993 as part of the preparatory
activities for the International Conference on Population and
Development, was issued as a working paper (ESA/P/WP.126), pending
the publication of the final version.

19.  The data bank on levels and trends of international migration
is being continually updated and a database on South-to-North
migration flows is in preparation.  As already reported, databases
on international migrant stock for Africa, Asia and Latin America
are being disseminated on diskette together with a brochure for
each region.  For each of the countries in a region with available
data, the respective database contains the foreign-born population
enumerated by its censuses and classified by country of birth, sex
and age.  On the basis of such data, estimates of the number of
foreign-born persons in each country of the world as of 1965, 1975
and 1985 have been derived.  The full set of estimates is available
on diskette, under the title Trends in Total Migrant Stock,
together with an accompanying brochure.

20.  A study on levels and trends of international migration, with
particular emphasis on gender issues, is being carried out.  The
estimates of trends in the total migrant stock at the world and
regional levels will be included in the report.  In addition, a
regional approach will be used in discussing major international
migration flows.  Work is currently focusing on the assessment of
international migration trends in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia.  The
report is expected to be completed by the end of 1995.

21.  The proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on International
Migration Policies and the Status of Female Migrants, which was
held at San Miniato, Italy, in March 1990, have been submitted for
publication.


        F.  Internal migration

22.  The proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on Population
Distribution and Migration, which was carried out as part of the
preparatory activities for the International Conference on
Population and Development, include several chapters on population
distribution and internal migration.

23.  Data from the 1990 round of censuses are being compiled to
serve as a basis for the estimation of the components of urban
growth since 1970.  Since work on that issue is only starting, an
output is not expected during the current biennium.


   II.  WORLD POPULATION PROJECTIONS

        A.  World population estimates and projections:
            1994 and 1996 revisions

         1.  The 1994 revision

24.  On 27 July 1994, the Under-Secretary-General for Economic and
Social Information and Policy Analysis informed the
Secretary-General that the 1994 revision of the United Nations
world population estimates and projections had been completed.  At
that time, the results of the revision were made available, through
advance copies of the annex tables and other special documentation,
throughout the United Nations system and among major
non-governmental users. 

25.  The 1994 revision was challenged by many special events in the
political, economic and social spheres that had taken place during
the past two years.  Full sets of population estimates and
projections are included for all the newly independent States of
Africa, Asia and Europe, namely, Eritrea (with corresponding
adjustments for Ethiopia), Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia,
Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan,
Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Czech Republic,
Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, the Republic of Moldova, the Russian
Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of
Macedonia, Ukraine and Yugoslavia (i.e., Serbia and Montenegro).

26.  The 1994 revision incorporated the demographic impact of
acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the population
estimates and projections for the 16 developing countries whose
adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence level had
reached 1 per cent in 1992.  These countries are Benin, Burkina
Faso, Burundi, the Central African Republic, the Congo, Cte
d'Ivoire, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Uganda, the United
Republic of Tanzania, Zaire, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Thailand.

27.  Estimates and projections of international migration were
revised heavily in the 1994 revision for a large number of
countries in order to accommodate the continuing extensive
migratory movements within Europe and elsewhere, and the rapid
growth in the number of refugees in Africa and elsewhere.

28.  A number of improvements and innovations have been made in the
1994 revision.  The projection horizon was extended to 2050, so
that a full century of demographic history and projection
(1950-2050) is now presented.  The 1994 revision continues the
process of lowering the minimum-size criterion:  sex and
age-specific projections are now undertaken for countries with a
minimum population size of 150,000 persons in 1990.  This change
meant that population figures by sex and age, and the full range of
demographic variables, are available for the first time for five
additional countries, namely, Belize, the Netherlands Antilles, New
Caledonia, Samoa and Vanuatu.  Estimates and projections of
population size and growth are available for countries with smaller
populations.

29.  All programmed outputs from the 1994 revision have either been
published or are awaiting publication.  The United Nations wall
chart World Population, 1994, 8/ was issued in August 1994.  For
countries, regions and major areas, the wall chart presents
estimated and projected populations for 1994, 2015 and 2050; crude
birth and death rates, annual population growth rate, total
fertility rate, life expectancy at birth and infant mortality rate
for 1990-1995; percentage of the population in 1994 under ages 15
and 65 or older; and population density in 1994.  The publication
entitled The Sex and Age Distribution of the World Populations: 
The 1994 Revision 9/ was issued in December 1994.  It provides
estimated and projected populations (medium-, high- and
low-fertility variants) for the period 1950-2050, by sex and age,
for countries, regions and major areas.

30.  The major report of the 1994 revision, World Population
Prospects:  The 1994 Revision, 10/ has been completed and is in
press.  Along with the comprehensive set of annex tables, which
have been enlarged to include the extended projection horizon and
the newly independent countries, the publication contains an
extensive analysis of recent demographic events and trends.  Part
one of the volume features findings of special interest and
importance at the present time.  Chapter I, entitled "New and
renewed fertility declines in the less developed regions",
describes fertility declines that have begun in a number of African
and Asian countries where fertility levels had for decades remained
very high and constant.  Chapter II covers "The demography of
countries with economies in transition", and describes recent
changes in population size, mortality, fertility and international
migration for 27 European countries that have been moving from a
centrally planned economy to a market economy.  Chapter III is on
HIV/AIDS and its demographic impact.  This chapter is an updated
version of an earlier study undertaken in the context of the 1992
revision; however, the current work is expanded for the 1994
revision to include Thailand and to provide analyses of the impact
of AIDS on orphanhood, years of working life and years of
reproductive life.  Part two of the volume covers an overview of
world trends, including population size and growth, mortality,
fertility and international migration.  This is the first time that
the World Population Prospects series has contained an analysis of
international migration levels.  Part three of the volume covers
technical aspects of the 1994 revision, namely:  (a) a detailed
study of differences in country estimates and projections between
the 1994 and the 1992 revisions; (b) a chapter on the methodology
of the 1994 revision; and (c) a chapter providing sources of data
and demographic methods used for preparing the baseline figures for
population, mortality, fertility and international migration for
each country.

31.  Databases of results from the 1994 revision are available on
magnetic tape and on diskette for microcomputers.  The magnetic
tape World Population, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision) was issued in
August 1994.  It contains demographic estimates for 1950-1990 and
four variants of projections for 1990-2050 for countries, regions
and major areas of the world.  Most data are presented
quinquennially.  However, population data by age and sex for the
medium variant and total population figures for all variants are
presented annually.  Population estimates and projections have been
prepared by sex and five-year age groups, and for 27 major
demographic indicators.

32.  Databases for IBM microcomputers became available during
October- November 1994.  The database Demographic Indicators,
1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision) contains selected demographic
indicators for all countries, regions and major areas of the world.

Quinquennial estimates are presented for the period 1950-1990 and
the medium-, high- and low-variant projections are presented for
1990-2050.  Sixteen demographic indicators are given:  total
populations for males, females and both sexes combined; population
density; female population aged 15-49; population under age 15;
population aged 15-64; population aged 65 or over; average annual
rate of population growth; crude birth and death rates; total
fertility rate; life expectancies at birth for males, females and
both sexes combined; and infant mortality rate.  The database Age
Patterns of Fertility, 1990-1995 (The 1994 Revision) contains
estimates of age-specific fertility rates and births by age of
mother for all countries, regions and major areas of the world. 
Data are for the period 1990-1995 from the United Nations
medium-variant projections.  The database Sex and Age Quinquennial
1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision) contains population by sex and age
for countries, regions and major areas.  Quinquennial estimates are
presented for the period 1950-1990 and the medium-, high- and
low-variant projections are presented for 1990-2050.

33.  The above databases provide quinquennial population estimates
and projections, that is, for 1950, 1955, 1960 etc.  Two additional
databases were created that provide annual figures.  The database
Annual Populations, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision) provides annual
estimates and projections of total population for countries,
regions and major areas of the world.  Estimates are provided for
the period 1950-1990 and the medium-, high- and low-variant
projections are presented for 1990-2050.  The database Sex and Age
Annual, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision) provides annual estimates and
projections of population by sex and age for countries, regions and
major areas of the world. Estimates are provided for the period
1950-1990 and the medium-variant projections are presented for
1990-2050.


         2.  The 1996 revision

34.  Work on the 1996 revision of global population estimates and
projections began in December 1994 and will continue through 1995
and 1996.

        B.  Urban, rural and city population estimates
            and projections:  1994 and 1996 revisions 

         1.  The 1994 revision

35.  The 1994 revision of population estimates and projections of
urban and rural populations, including large urban agglomerations,
was completed in November 1994.  The results were made available,
through advance copies of the annex tables and other special
documentation, throughout the United Nations system and among major
non-governmental users.  Population estimates and projections were
provided for urban and rural areas for all countries, regions and
major areas for the period 1950-2025.  Population estimates and
projections were also provided for the 370 urban agglomerations of
750,000 or more persons in 1990.  Population estimates and
projections for urban agglomerations were provided for the period
1950-2015.  This represents a further extension of the projection
horizon to 2015 (from 2000 in the 1990 revision and 2010 in the
1992 revision).

36.  The 1994 revision of urban, rural and city population
estimates and projections also responded to the emergence of many
newly independent countries during the past two years.  In
addition, full sets of population estimates and projections have
been included for all the newly independent States of Africa, Asia
and Europe, namely, Eritrea (with corresponding adjustments for
Ethiopia), Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan,
Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Belarus, Bosnia and
Herzegovina, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia,
Lithuania, the Republic of Moldova, the Russian Federation,
Slovakia, Slovenia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia,
Ukraine and Yugoslavia (i.e., Serbia and Montenegro).

37.  All programmed outputs from the 1994 revision have either been
published or are awaiting publication.  The United Nations wall
chart Urban Agglomerations, 1994 11/ was issued in December 1994. 
The wall chart provides population data for all urban
agglomerations of 1 million or more persons in 1994.  For each
urban agglomeration, the chart exhibits estimated population and
projected population sizes in 1994 and 2015; their population
growth rates for 1990-1995 and 2010-2015; percentage growth between
1975 and 1995 and between 1995 and 2015; size ranking in 1994 and
2015; and the percentage of national and urban populations residing
in that agglomeration in 1994.

38.  A second wall chart, entitled Urban and Rural Areas, 1994 12/
has also been completed and submitted for publication.  For every
country, the wall chart provides estimated and projected urban and
rural population sizes in 1994 and 2025; urban and rural population
growth rates for 1990-1995; the population of each country's
largest urban agglomeration; and the percentage of urban population
residing in that agglomeration.

39.  The major report of this exercise, World Urbanization
Prospects:  The 1994 Revision, has been completed and is in its
final stage of publication.  The report includes population
estimates and projections of urban and rural populations for all
countries of the world and related indicators of their growth;
population estimates and projections of all urban agglomerations of
population size 750,000 or more in 1990 and the percentage of total
and urban populations residing in those agglomerations; population
estimates of capital cities of all countries; and the distribution
of urban population by city-size class for the world regions and
major areas.  Along with these detailed country- specific tables,
the publication contains an extensive analysis of urban, rural and
city population growth.  A chapter on the world's cities explores
the dynamics of growth of the largest urban agglomerations of the
world, particularly its mega-cities; the phenomenon of
counter-urbanization; and urban population and size class.  A
chapter on urban and rural population size and growth discusses the
level of urbanization among countries and regions; the size,
distribution and growth of urban populations; rural population size
and growth, including the situation of a number of developing
countries that find themselves in the position of having to absorb
large rural populations while undergoing rapid urbanization because
of an extremely large population base in rural areas.  The volume
also contains a country-by-country compendium of sources of data,
concepts and adjustments for the baseline urban, rural and city
population figures.

40.  The results of the 1994 revision of urban, rural and city
population estimates and projections were also distributed on
microcomputer diskettes in December 1994.  The database Urban and
Rural Areas, 1950-2025 (The 1994 Revision) provides (for each
country, region and major area) estimated and projected urban,
rural and total populations and their rates of growth; percentage
of population residing in urban areas; and growth rate of
percentage urban and percentage rural.  The database, Urban
Agglomerations, 1950-2015 (The 1994 Revision), provides populations
of urban agglomerations (with population size of 750,000 or more)
and their rates of growth; and percentage of national and urban
populations residing in the urban agglomeration.  Data are
presented quinquennially, from 1950 to 2025 for urban and rural
areas and from 1950 to 2015 for urban agglomerations.


         2.  The 1996 revision

41.  Planning for the 1996 revision of urban, rural and city
population estimates and projections began in December 1994.


        C.  Subcommittee on Demographic Estimates and Projections

42.  The eighteenth session of the Subcommittee on Demographic
Estimates and Projections of the Administrative Committee on
Coordination (ACC) was held at United Nations Headquarters from 28
to 30 June 1994.  At that session, the Subcommittee successfully
arranged a schedule for coordination and dissemination of the 1994
rounds of consistent demographic and sectoral estimates and
projections, undertaken by the Population Division in cooperation
with the regional commissions (for population and demographic
estimates and projections), the International Labour Organization
(for labour force estimates and projections), the Food and
Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (for agriculture
population estimates and projections) and the United Nations Centre
for Human Settlements (Habitat) (for household estimates and
projections).  The United Nations Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization was unable to participate in the 1994 rounds
owing to severe resource constraints.  Arrangements were made for
the timely provision of the results of those estimates and
projections to other United Nations agencies, units and
organizations participating in the Subcommittee.  The Subcommittee
also discussed arrangements for coordination of the 1996 rounds and
agreed on a tentative schedule of work.

43.  The report of the Subcommittee on its eighteenth session
(ACC/1994/22) was issued in August 1994.  The ACC Consultative
Committee on Programme and Operational Questions (CCPOQ) reviewed
the report at its October 1994 session.  The nineteenth session of
the Subcommittee will be convened at the headquarters of the World
Health Organization in June 1996.


   III.  POPULATION POLICY AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

     A.  Comparative study of new population
         policy issues at the global level

44.  In 1994, a project entitled "International migration policies
and programmes:  a world survey" was initiated with the financial
assistance of UNFPA.  The goal of the project is to publish an
analytical survey report on the major trends in the area of
international migration policy and on emerging policy issues of
particular concern to Governments.  The project also aims to
systematically collect information on government policies in regard
to the flow of immigrants and emigrants, migrant workers and their
dependants, refugees and asylum-seekers and undocumented migrants,
which will be presented in a wall chart on international migration
policies.

45.  During 1994, research concerning policy issues resulting from
rapid population growth in the world's largest cities continued. 
The Challenge of Urbanization:  the World's Large Cities,
containing profiles of more than 100 of the world's largest
agglomerations, has been completed with the financial assistance of
UNFPA and is now ready for final processing.


   B.  National population policies

46.  In 1994, work on a publication entitled World Population
Policies was initiated.  The project will consist of
country-by-country profiles on new and emerging issues in the area
of population policy, particularly in regard to women's
reproductive health.  The first volume will cover Afghanistan to
France.

47.  The publication Abortion Policies:  A Global Review, volume
III, Oman to Zimbabwe, was completed with the financial assistance
of UNFPA and is currently awaiting final processing.  As part of
the project on abortion policies, a wall chart entitled Abortion
Policies, 1994, 13/ summarizing the major findings in volumes I to
III of the publication, was completed and issued during 1994.  The
wall chart will also be available in Arabic, Chinese, French,
Russian and Spanish.


    C.  Population policy data bank

48.  The population policy data bank maintained by the Population
Division has been expanded and strengthened.  In 1994, the fourth
edition of the population policy database Global Population Policy
DataBase, 1993 (GRIPP:1993) 14/ was completed.  A companion volume,
Population Policy Diskette Documentation, 1993, 15/ was also
completed.

49.  Replies to the Seventh United Nations Population Inquiry among
Governments were analysed and coded and a report was completed
during 1994.


    D.  Assessing the demographic consequences of major development

        projects

50.  An overview report on three case-studies (Costa Rica, India
and Morocco) has been issued as a working paper (ESA/P/WP.129).


      E.  Proceedings of the International Conference on Ageing
          Populations in the Context of the Family

51.  The proceedings of the International Conference on Ageing
Populations in the Context of the Family, held at Kitakyushu,
Japan, in 1990 have been published. 16/


      F.  Proceedings of the United Nations Round Table
          on the Ageing of Asian Populations

52.  The proceedings of the United Nations Round Table on the
Ageing of Asian Populations, which was held in Bangkok in 1992,
have been published. 17/ 

       G.  Proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on
           Population, Environment and Development

53.  The proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on Population,
Environment and Development, held in New York in 1992 as part of
the preparations for the International Conference on Population and
Development, have been published. 18/


      H.  Proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on Population
          Growth and Demographic Structure

54.  The preliminary version of the proceedings of the Expert Group
Meeting on Population Growth and Demographic Structure, which was
convened in Paris in 1992 as part of the preparations for the
International Conference on Population and Development, has been
issued as a working paper (ESA/P/WP.128) pending the publication of
the official version.


      I.  Population and the environment:  setting the research   
          agenda

55.  The Population Division completed a project, carried out with
the financial support of UNFPA, aimed at investigating the current
state of knowledge regarding the relationship between population
and the environment in developing countries.  A report which
included a bibliography, a literature survey of current research
and a proposed research agenda has been issued as a working paper
(ESA/P/WP.123).


       J.  Population pressure, land use and the environment:     
           national trends

56.  The Population Division has revised version 2.0 of the
database for population and research (PRED Bank).  The focus of
PRED Bank 2.0 is on the interrelationship between population
pressure and land use in rural areas.  PRED Bank 2.0 has been
designed as a POPMAP application, an information system for
microcomputers that combines database, spreadsheet and geographical
mapping facilities.  PRED Bank 2.0 contains national data on
approximately 70 relevant variables for the period 1961-1989 for
116 developing countries.  PRED Bank is currently available on
diskette with a user's guide.  A report entitled "Population
pressure, land use and the environment:  national trends" is
currently being finalized.


      K.  Governments' views on the relationship between population

          and the environment

57.  A report on Governments' views on the relationship between
population and the environment within the context of development
has been completed and submitted for publication.  Governments'
perceptions have been compiled from national reports to and
statements at global and regional conferences on population and the
environment.  The report also includes an overview of the positions
held by the Governments of eight selected countries.


       IV.  MONITORING, REVIEW AND APPRAISAL, COORDINATION
            AND DISSEMINATION OF POPULATION INFORMATION

             A.  Monitoring of population trends and policies

58.  The eighth round of the monitoring of world population trends
and policies was completed in 1994 and the report entitled World
Population Monitoring, 1993 is in press.  A concise version for the
more general reader, entitled Concise Report on the World
Population Situation in 1993, with a Special Emphasis on Refugees,
will be published in 1995.


             B.  Substantive servicing of the Preparatory Committee
                 for the International Conference on Population and
                 Development at its third session

59.  For the third session of the Preparatory Committee for the
International Conference on Population and Development, held in New
York from 4 to 22 April 1994, the Population Division was the focal
point for the preparation and/or submission of the following
documents, in consultation with UNFPA:

     (a)  Provisional agenda (A/CONF.171/PC/1).  The agenda,
prepared by the Population Division in consultation with UNFPA,
included the following items:  adoption of the agenda and other
organizational matters; accreditation of non-governmental
organizations to the Conference and its preparatory process;
preparations for the Conference; provisional rules of procedure of
the Conference; review and appraisal of progress made towards the
implementation of the World Population Plan of Action; national
reports of countries on their population situation, policies and
programmes; draft final document of the Conference; and provisional
agenda and proposed organization of work of the Conference;

     (b)  Progress report on the preparations for the International
Conference on Population and Development:  report of the
Secretary-General of the Conference (A/CONF.171/PC/2).  This
report, prepared by UNFPA, supplemented the two previous reports of
the Secretary-General of the Conference to the Economic and Social
Council and to the General Assembly at its forty-eighth session on
the progress made in all aspects of the preparatory activities of
the Conference;

     (c)  Fourth review and appraisal of the World Population Plan
of Action:  report of the Secretary-General (A/CONF.171/PC/3). 
Focusing on 30 selected population issues, the report, prepared by
the Population Division, provided the fourth quinquennial overall
assessment of the level of implementation of the World Population
Plan of Action and appropriate background information on population
trends and policies that would help facilitate the deliberations at
the International Conference on Population and Development.  The
report also provided important input in the preparation of the
draft Programme of Action of the Conference;

     (d)  Status of the national reports exercise:  report of the
Secretary- General of the Conference (A/CONF.171/PC/4).  Among the
preparatory activities for the International Conference on
Population and Development at the national level was the
preparation by each participating country of a national report
describing the population situation, policies and programmes of the
country concerned, as well as the steps required to reach
population goals in each country.  The document, which was prepared
by UNFPA, was a report on progress made in the conduct of the
national reports exercise and the preliminary findings of the
Conference secretariat;

     (e)  Draft programme of action of the Conference:  note by the
Secretary- General (A/CONF.171/PC/5).  The document, prepared
jointly by the Population Division and UNFPA, contained the draft
final document of the Conference, provisionally referred to as the
draft programme of action of the Conference, taking into account
the views expressed by participants during the second session of
the Preparatory Committee and the forty-eighth session of the
General Assembly;

     (f)  Additional non-governmental organizations proposed for
accreditation to the International Conference on Population and
Development and its preparatory process:  note by the Secretariat
(A/CONF.171/PC/6 and Add.1-5).  The document, prepared by UNFPA,
provided the necessary information on additional non-governmental
organizations that had requested accreditation to the Conference
and its preparatory process, each of which had been evaluated by
the secretariat of the Conference in accordance with the provisions
of Council resolution 1993/4 and had been found to have complied
with the criteria set forth in that resolution;

     (g)  Synthesis of the regional meetings or conferences
convened as part of the substantive preparations for the
Conference:  report of the Secretary- General of the Conference
(A/CONF.171/PC/7 and Add.1).  The two reports, prepared by UNFPA in
consultation with the Population Division, provided a synthesis of
the results of the regional conferences (A/CONF.171/PC/7) and of
the subregional meetings and conferences (A/CONF.171/PC/7/Add.1)
that were convened as part of the preparations for the Conference,
as requested in General Assembly resolution 48/186;

     (h)  Draft rules of procedure of the Conference:  note by the
Secretariat (A/CONF.171/PC/8).  The document presented the revised
draft rules of procedure of the Conference, which took into account
the discussion of the Preparatory Committee at its first and second
sessions and the decision of the General Assembly, in its
resolution 48/186, that the Preparatory Committee for the
Conference should become a subsidiary body of the General Assembly;

     (i)  Proposed organization of work of the Preparatory
Committee:  note by the secretariat of the Conference
(A/CONF.171/PC/L.1).  The document, prepared by the Population
Division in consultation with UNFPA, contained the draft
organization of work for the third session of the Preparatory
Committee for the purpose of facilitating the Preparatory
Committee's consideration of the items on the agenda for the
session within the time and conference services allocated to it;

     (j)  Draft provisional agenda, proposed programme of work and
other organizational matters of the Conference:  note by the
Secretariat (A/CONF.171/PC/L.2).  The document, prepared by the
Population Division in consultation with UNFPA, presented the draft
provisional agenda, proposed programme of work and other
organizational matters of the Conference. 

         C.  Substantive preparations and servicing of the
International Conference on Population and Development

60.  The Population Division, in consultation with UNFPA, was the
focal point for the preparation and/or submission of the following
Conference documentation:

     (a)  Provisional agenda (A/CONF.171/1).  The agenda, as
approved by the Preparatory Committee for the Conference at its
third session, included the following items:  opening of the
Conference; election of the President; adoption of the rules of
procedure; adoption of the agenda; election of officers other than
the President; organization of work, including the establishment of
the Main Committee of the Conference; credentials of
representatives to the Conference; experiences concerning
population and development strategies and programmes; Programme of
Action of the Conference; other matters; and adoption of the report
of the Conference;

     (b)  Provisional rules of procedure:  note by the Secretariat
(A/CONF.171/2).  The document contained the provisional rules of
procedure for the Conference, as approved by the Preparatory
Committee for the Conference at its third session and by the
General Assembly in its decision 48/490 of 14 July 1994;

     (c)  Organizational and procedural matters:  note by the
Secretariat (A/CONF.171/3).  The document, prepared by the
Population Division, contained proposals of the Preparatory
Committee for the Conference on:  pre-Conference consultations,
election of officers, adoption of the rules of procedure and of the
agenda; organization of work, including the allocation of agenda
items, general debate, establishment of the Main Committee of the
Conference, timetable for the work of the Conference and
organization of meetings; credentials of representatives of the
Conference and appointment of the members of the Credentials
Committee; and report of the Conference;

     (d)  Fourth review and appraisal of the World Population Plan
of Action:  report of the Secretary-General (A/CONF.171/4). 
Prepared by the Population Division, this document was a revised
version of the report presented to the Preparatory Committee for
the Conference at its third session (A/CONF.171/PC/3);

     (e)  Overview of the national reports prepared by countries
for the Conference:  report of the Secretary-General of the
Conference (A/CONF.171/5).  The document, prepared by UNFPA, gave
an overview of the national reports that were submitted by
countries as part of the preparatory activities for the Conference;

     (f)  List of non-governmental organizations recommended for
accreditation to the Conference:  note by the Secretariat
(A/CONF.171/7 and Add.1).  The document, prepared by UNFPA,
provided the necessary information on additional non-governmental
organizations that had requested accreditation to the Conference;
each of those organizations was evaluated by the secretariat of the
Conference in accordance with the provisions of Council resolution
1993/4 and found to have complied with the criteria set forth in
that resolution; 

     (g)  Participation of intergovernmental organizations in the
work of the International Conference on Population and Development
(A/CONF.171/8).  The document, prepared by UNFPA, listed the
additional intergovernmental organizations that had requested to
participate in the work of the Conference; the secretariat of the
Conference, having reviewed the credentials of those organizations,
recommended that they be granted observer status;

     (h)  Draft programme of action of the Conference:  note by the
Secretariat (A/CONF.171/L.1).  The document, prepared jointly by
the Population Division and UNFPA, contained the draft programme of
action of the Conference, as approved by the Preparatory Committee
for the Conference at its third session;

     (i)  Information for participants (A/CONF.171/INF/1).  The
document, prepared by the Population Division, provided information
on:  site of the Conference; pre-Conference consultations; opening
of the Conference; registration of participants and identification
cards; programme of meetings; seating arrangements; languages of
the Conference; interpretation services; circulation of prepared
statements; distribution of official documents; receipt and
circulation of other documents; press centre; and such other useful
information as reception on arrival at the Cairo airport, visas
required, necessary inoculation, declaration of valuables at
customs, transportation from hotels to the Cairo International
Conference Centre, Conference newspapers and related reporting,
currency/cheques and credit cards accepted, electricity, climate,
and services available at the Conference Centre and the Population
Information Network (POPIN) reference centre;

     (j)  Report of the International Conference on Population and
Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994 (A/CONF.171/13 and Add.1. 
The main document (A/CONF.171/13), prepared jointly by the
Population Division and UNFPA and consolidated by the Division for
Policy Coordination and Economic and Social Council Affairs of the
Department for Policy Coordination and Sustainable Development,
contained the resolutions of the Conference, attendance and
organization of work of the Conference, general debate, report of
the Main Committee, report of the Credentials Committee and the
Programme of Action adopted by the Conference.  The addendum
contained the list of documents, opening and closing statements,
and parallel and associated activities.


     D.  Coordination and dissemination of population information

  1.  Population Information Network

61.  One year after the reinstatement of the global Population
Information Network (POPIN) Coordinating Unit, the Network has
expanded to include regional networks of population institutions in
Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa and
Northern America.  Plans are also under way for the establishment
of population information networks in Europe and Western Asia.

62.  During this period of rapid expansion, POPIN has used
electronic mail and the Internet to promote and facilitate
communication among the regional networks and with the global POPIN
Coordinating Unit, and to promote a global dialogue on population
information topics.  POPIN also established an electronic
information service on the Internet, known as the POPIN Gopher. 
The POPIN Gopher is located inside the United Nations Development
Programme (UNDP) Gopher system and is an international computerized
collection of documents, bibliographic and demographic data banks,
newsletters, statistical tables and other population resources of
interest to Governments, non-governmental organizations and others
in the worldwide population community.  The Gopher service is free
of charge to users of electronic mail or the Internet.

63.  POPIN's use of new communication and information technologies
has had a profound impact on the management and functioning of the
Network and has significantly affected the ways in which population
information can be disseminated and obtained worldwide.  Most
notably, the creation of the POPIN Gopher and the use of other
electronic information services has enabled a dramatic expansion of
POPIN's dissemination activities to the population community and
the wider world audience.  These audiences include the Permanent
Missions to the United Nations, the United Nations regional
commissions and agencies, Governments, researchers, and students
and faculties of universities throughout the world.

64.  The popularity of the new Gopher service was illustrated by
its heavy use during the International Conference on Population and
Development, where POPIN established a Reference and Communication
Centre to collect, scan and disseminate statements presented to the
plenary sessions of the Conference.  Technical support for this
operation was provided by UNDP, the Information and Decision
Support Centre of the Egyptian Cabinet and the Association for
Progressive Communication.  Scanned materials (in print and
electronic format) were made available free of charge at three
locations in Cairo.  Outside Cairo, users of electronic mail or the
Internet could get access to Conference documents through the POPIN
Gopher in New York.  In all, over 28,000 people from all
geographical areas used the Gopher during the eight-day Conference.

65.  From 31 August to 1 September 1994, POPIN also held a meeting,
in Cairo, of the POPIN Coordinating Committee.  The meeting was
convened by the Population Division with financial support from
UNFPA and the regional commissions.  The purpose of the meeting was
to review progress on POPIN activities at the regional and global
levels; to promote coordination of information activities in
various regions; and to draft recommendations for POPIN activities
and on the role of the global POPIN Coordinating Unit in 1995 and
beyond.

66.  Recommended actions included the drafting of a long-term
strategy for POPIN as a whole for presentation to the POPIN
Advisory Committee at its meeting in 1995.  It was envisaged that
a long-term strategy would provide a population information plan of
action at the global, regional, subregional and national levels and
a blueprint for how population information networks can best
utilize modern information and telecommunications technologies. 
The strategy will define POPIN's role with respect to UNFPA Country
Support Teams and field offices.

67.  On the role of the global POPIN Coordinating Unit vis--vis
the regional networks, the Coordinating Committee recommended that
the global POPIN Coordinating Unit continue to provide technical
support to the regional POPINs by maintaining, updating and
expanding the scope of the POPIN Gopher.  It was also recommended
that POPIN promote international networking and the use of advanced
information technologies as called for in the Programme of Action
of the International Conference on Population and Development and
the regional programmes of action.  Given the lack of adequate
funding for network functioning and the continuing need for
technical assistance, it was recommended that the global
Coordinating Unit seek funds for activities at all levels of the
Network and continue to assist in the reformulation and
revitalization of population information activities in each region.

68.  With respect to future directions, POPIN's primary objective,
to increase awareness, knowledge and understanding of
population-related issues at all levels of society, is consistent
with the recommendations of the Programme of Action of the
International Conference on Population and Development.  In
particular, the global POPIN Coordinating Unit and the regional
Population Information Networks are working towards harnessing the
tremendous potential of print, audiovisual and electronic media,
including databases and networks, to disseminate technical
information and to promote and strengthen understanding of
relationships between population, consumption, production and
sustainable development.  It is expected that the Network's use of
new electronic information technologies will greatly increase the
availability of population information in all geographical regions
and for all segments of the population community.

69.  In view of the endorsement of population information
activities in the Programme of Action, POPIN will need to continue
to strengthen and expand its efforts in the area of information
dissemination so as to facilitate equitable access to population
information for all audiences and to support the implementation of
the Programme of Action and other population activities.  Further
staffing will be required to carry out population information
activities proposed for the biennium 1996-1997 and to ensure the
continuation and expansion of work done in the first phase of the
POPIN project.


     2.  Publication and dissemination of research studies

70.  The Population Division continues to publish the results of
its research studies in a variety of formats to meet the needs of
different audiences.  They are widely disseminated to Governments,
national and international organizations, research and educational
institutions, individuals engaged in social and economic planning,
research and training, and to the general public.  It also
continues to develop and maintain databases and software, which are
made available on magnetic tape and/or diskette(s).  A list of the
Population Division's publications and other material issued since
the twenty-seventh session of the Population Commission, as well as
its databases and software, is given in the annex to the present
report.


       V.  TECHNICAL COOPERATION

71.  During 1994, technical assistance services continued to be
provided to an average of more than 80 projects in 45 developing
countries in Africa, Asia, Western Asia, Latin America and Europe
in population and development training; institutionalizing analysis
and research on socio-economic and demographic data obtained from
population censuses, surveys and vital registration systems;
population policy; and population and development.  Recruitment of
five population specialists to be provided to the Population
Division by UNFPA under the new Technical Support Services (TSS)
arrangements was finalized during 1994, the last one as of 1
January 1995.  Through these five specialists in the areas of
demographic analysis, population and development, population
policy, fertility and family planning, and teaching and training in
demography, augmented whenever possible and as required by other
staff of the Population Division, substantive support has started
to be provided to the eight Country Support Teams established by
UNFPA as the vanguard of technical support to UNFPA-funded
country-, regional- and interregional-level projects in the
population area.  Preparations are under way for two expert group
meetings to be held in 1995:  a workshop on population data
collection and analysis, and a symposium on technical cooperation
in population.


                         Notes

     1/   Report of the United Nations World Population Conference,
1974, Bucharest, 19-30 August 1974 (United Nations publication,
Sales No. E.74.XIII.3), chap. I.

     2/   See Report of the International Conference on Population,
1984, Mexico City, 6-14 August 1984 (United Nations publication,
Sales No. E.84.XIII.8 and corrigenda).

     3/   Report of the World Conference to Review and Appraise the
Achievements of the United Nations Decade for Women:  Equality,
Development and Peace, Nairobi, 15-26 July 1985 (United Nations
publication, Sales No. E.85.IV.10), chap. I, sect. A.

     4/   United Nations publication, Sales No. E.90.XVII.3.

     5/   United Nations publication, Sales No. E.92.XIII.11.

     6/   World Contraceptive Use, 1994 (United Nations
publication, Sales No.
E.94.XIII.15).

     7/   United Nations publication, Sales No. E.89.XIII.4.

     8/   United Nations publication, Sales No. E.94.XIII.14.

     9/   United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.2.

     10/  United Nations publication, forthcoming.

     11/  United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.4.

     12/  United Nations publication, forthcoming.

     13/  United Nations publication, Sales No. E.94.XIII.8.

     14/  ST/ESA/SER.R/138.

     15/  ST/ESA/SER.R/139.

     16/  Ageing and the Family:  Proceedings of the United Nations
International Conference on Ageing Populations in the Context of
the Family, Kitakyushu, Japan, 15-19 October 1990 (United Nations
publication, Sales No. E.94.XIII.4).

     17/  Ageing of Asian Populations:  Proceedings of the United
Nations Round Table on the Ageing of Asian Populations, Bangkok,
4-6 May 1992 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.94.XIII.10).

     18/  Population, Environment and Development:  Proceedings of
the United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Population, Environment
and Development, United Nations Headquarters, 20-24 January 1992
(United Nations publication, Sales No. E.94.XIII.7).


                    Annex

  PUBLICATIONS AND OTHER MATERIAL ISSUED IN 1994 BY THE POPULATION 
  DIVISION, AND THE SOFTWARE AND DATABASES MAINTAINED BY IT


           Research studies

AIDS and the Demography of Africa.  ST/ESA/SER.A/137.  Sales No.
E.94.XIII.11.

The Sex and Age Distribution of the World Populations:  The 1994
Revision.  ST/ESA/SER.A/144.  Sales No. E.95.XIII.2.

The Health Rationale for Family Planning:  Timing of Births and
Child Survival.  ST/ESA/SER.A/141.  Available in English only. 
Sales No. E.95.XIII.3.


   Proceedings of expert group meetings, seminars and workshops

Population, Environment and Development:  Proceedings of the United
Nations Expert Group Meeting on Population, Environment and
Development, United Nations Headquarters, 20-24 January 1992. 
ST/ESA/SER.R/129.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.7.

Ageing and the Family:  Proceedings of the United Nations
International Conference on Ageing Populations in the Context of
the Family, Kitakyushu, Japan, 15-19 October 1990. 
ST/ESA/SER.R/124.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.4.

Ageing of Asian Populations:  Proceedings of the United Nations
Round Table on the Ageing of Asian Populations, Bangkok, 4-6 May
1992.  ST/ESA/SER.R/125.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.10.


              Wall charts

World Population, 1994.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.14.

Urban Agglomerations, 1994.  Sales No. E.95.XIII.4.

World Contraceptive Use, 1994.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.15.

Abortion Policies, 1994.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.8.


              Periodicals

Population Bulletin of the United Nations

     No. 36.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.12.  Articles on:  international
migration and development (Georges Photios Tapinos); Europe without
internal frontiers and international migration (Bela Hovy and Hania
Zlotnik); a study of maternity histories in a rural area of Senegal
(Niakhar) (Michel Garenne); recent trends in contraceptive use
(Mary Beth Weinberger); a decade of change in contraceptive
behaviour in Latin America, a multivariate decomposition analysis
(Teresa Castro Martin and Wamucii Njogu).

     No. 37/38.  Sales No. E.94.XIII.16.  A special issue on the
five regional population conferences and meetings convened as part
of the substantive preparations for the International Conference on
Population and Development. 

Population Newsletter

     Issued biannually to provide a wide readership information on
the programme activities of the Population Division; action taken
by legislative bodies with competence in the population field; and
meetings on population and related issues organized by the
Population Division and other United Nations organizations; recent
and forthcoming publications of the Population Division.

Databases and software

World Population, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision)

Demographic Indicators, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision)

Age Patterns of Fertility, 1950-1995 (The 1994 Revision)

Sex and Age Quinquennial, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision)

Sex and Age Annual, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision)

Annual Populations, 1950-2050 (The 1994 Revision)

Urban and Rural Areas, 1950-2025 (The 1994 Revision)

Urban Agglomerations, 1950-2015 (The 1994 Revision)

GRIPP:  1993 (Global Review and Inventory of Population Policies: 
1993)                    

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