Paper Cranes

Poetry for Peace Contest

The Poetry for Peace contest was held from 15 September until 14 October 2011. The winners were anounced at a ceremony at UN headquarters in New York.

Below is one of the contest entries.


HIROSHIMA HIBAKUSHA

August 9, 1945, what a beautiful morning,
The sun slowly rising, so gentle and warming,
Who would've known that on this very day,
"The Land of the Rising Sun" would turn into almost nothing but death and decay.

The second world war had lasted far too long,
But the people of Japan remained patient and strong,
The city of Hiroshima was bustling with life,
Citizens awake early on their daily routines unprepared for the strife,
That would soon sweep over the land like a dark, overshadowing cloud,
Along with the deafening sound of sirens, so high-pitch and loud,
No one really knew the severity of the situation,
The danger that they would face, the horrible abomination.

Suddenly, a blast exploded into the air,
No sound, no pain, so magnificent and fair,
No screams were heard for miles around,
Just peace and silence was left to surround,
Minutes later, the whispers and moans barely began to arise,
As the deathly mushroom up in the skies only grew in its tremendous size.

It's the end of the world  for sure they thought,
But the hibakusha, the survivors, fought,
Fought for their lives through the dirt and the rust,
And escaped from the rubble of buildings and the shadows on the burnt earth's crust.

These sorrowful memories still haunt them today,
Their scars, deformities, and sadness still bring them pain in a mental way,
They made it through the bombings, the suffering, they should be proud,
And yet the names of those lost can't even be said out loud.
— Dionne Muyalde
 

 


All Poems Submitted to the Contest

 

Paper Cranes