Statue of Saint Agnes

The Permanent Disarmament Collection at the United Nations

The statue of Saint Agnes stands in the centre of the permanent collection at the United Nations. The damaged statue was found in the ruins of a Roman Catholic Cathedral in Nagasaki, Japan in 1945. The Cathedral was completely destroyed when the atomic bomb exploded half a kilometre away. The charring and mottling on the back of the statue are the result of the intense heat and radiation.

People injured by landmines

The Permanent Disarmament Collection at the United Nations

Hundreds of thousands of people have been injured by landmines. Many thousands have been killed. For those victims who survived the force of the blast and the spray of shrapnel, they can face a lifetime of complications from amputations, other illnesses due to traumatic injuries, post traumatic stress, loss of educational opportunities and the loss of livelihood.

Shot-up car and building

The Permanent Disarmament Collection at the United Nations

Armed violence due to wars and civil unrest destroy more than buildings and automobiles, it tears at the fabric of society, devastating the lives of civilians, reversing progress in social and economic development, disrupting food supplies, and creating massive migration of refugees.

Michael Douglas at Mayors for Peace petition event

The Permanent Disarmament Collection at the United Nations

On 24 March 2011, Michael Douglas participated in the inauguration ceremony of a new exhibit calling for the abolition of nuclear weapons. Michael Douglas has been a United Nations Messenger of Peace since 1998. He has spoken eloquently on a world free of nuclear weapons as a moral imperative and the importance of greater controls over the illegal possession and circulation of small arms and light weapons.

Video of the inauguration ceremony

Touring the UN Disarmament exhibit

The Permanent Disarmament Collection at the United Nations

Visitors from all over the world come to the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. The permanent disarmament collection is one of the highlights of the guided tour which is available in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Spanish and Russian. Tours in Italian, Japanese, German, Korean and other languages can be made available upon request. Every year there are over 1 million visitors to the United Nations.

The Escopetarra

The Permanent Disarmament Collection at the United Nations

The "Escopetarra," a guitar made from an automatic rifle, has become a symbol of peace around the world. The one on display in the permanent disarmament collection was donated by Colombian musician and peace activist Cesar Lopez.

UN Television film on "La Escopetarra"

Mayors for Peace petition installation

The Permanent Disarmament Collection at the United Nations

Two nine foot tall columns hold the petitions of a over a million citizens from every continent who have called upon world leaders to bring an end to nuclear weapons. The petitions were launched by the Mayors for Peace and presented to the President of the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. Each and everyday, many more of the world's citizens add their names, and their voices, calling for a world free of nuclear weapons.

Video about the Cities are Not Targets petition