C H A P T E R VII

Governmental expert studies, information and United Nations research


Disarmament studies

Studies concluded in 2006

Group of Governmental Experts on the continuing operation of the Register and its further development

By resolution 60/226 of 23 December 2005, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General, with the assistance of a group of governmental experts to be convened in 2006, to prepare a report on the operation and further development of the Register. The expert group met in New York for three sessions: 27 February to 3 March, 8 to 12 May and 17 to 28 July, and made significant progress on a number of issues related to the operation and further development of the Register. For a discussion of the Group's deliberations, and the General Assembly's resolution requesting implementation of their recommendations, see chapter III, page 1. (For the list of participants, see annex I to chapter III.)

Studies in progress

Group of Governmental Experts on the illicit brokering in small arms and light weapons

By resolution 60/81 of 8 December 2005,1 the General Assembly requested a group of governmental experts be established, on the basis of equitable geographical representation, to consider further steps to enhance international cooperation in preventing, combating and eradicating illicit brokering on SALW and to report its outcome at its sixty-second session (2007). The first session of the Group was held in Geneva from 27 November to 1 December 2006, while the second and third sessions were to be convened in New York from 19 to 23 March 2007 and from 4 to 8 June, respectively. For further discussion, see chapter III, page 2.

Group of Governmental Experts on verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification

Pursuant to resolution 59/60 of 3 December 2004 dealing with verification in all its aspects, the Secretary-General established a panel of government experts that met for three sessions in 2006 (for dates, see the 2005 edition of the Disarmament Yearbook). The Secretary-General was requested to transmit the panel's report to the General Assembly for consideration at its sixty-first session, but was unable to do so. On 20 October 2006, the Chairman of the Panel, Mr. John Barrett of Canada, was invited to address the First Committee to describe the situation with the report. For a fuller account of that description, see chapter V. For its part, the General Assembly decided, by decision 61/514 of 6 December,2 to encourage the Group to bring its work to an agreed conclusion as soon as possible.

Studies mandated in 2006

Group of Governmental Experts on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security

By resolution 61/54 of 6 December (see appendix V, p. 3), the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General, with the assistance of a group of governmental experts, to be established in 2009 on the basis of equitable geographical distribution, to continue to study existing and potential threats on information security and possible cooperative measures to address them, and to submit a report on the results of the study to its sixty-fifth session (2010). For further discussion of the resolution, see chapter V, page 4.

Group of Governmental Experts on problems arising from the accumulation of conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus

By resolution 61/72 of 6 December (see appendix V, p. 5), the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to establish, no later than 2008, a group of governmental experts to consider further steps to enhance cooperation in confronting conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus and to submit a report for consideration at its sixty-third session (2008). For further discussion of the resolution, see chapter III, page 6.

Group of Governmental Experts on common international standards for the import, export and transfer of conventional arms

By resolution 61/89 of 6 December (see appendix V, p. 7), the Secretary-General was requested by the General Assembly to establish a group of governmental experts, on the basis of equitable geographical distribution, to seek the views of Member States and to examine, commencing in 2008, the feasibility, scope and draft parameters for a comprehensive, legally-binding instrument establishing common international standards for the import, export and transfer of conventional arms, and to transmit a report of its studies to the sixty-third session. For further discussion of the resolution, see chapter III, p. 8.

Disarmament and non-proliferation education

Implementation of the recommendations by Member States

By resolution 59/93,3 of 3 December 2004, the Secretary-General was requested to prepare a report on the status of implementation of recommendations made on the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education in 2002,4 including projects under way and any new opportunities for advancement.5 Annexed to this chapter is a selection of recommendations from the 2002 Report relevant to the activities discussed below.

Canada

Canada hosted annual consultations with civil society covering a range of topics, such as nuclear challenges, new non-proliferation mechanisms, missile proliferation, controls and defences, chemical and biological weapons, verification and compliance issues, the global partnership programme and space security. Additionally, during the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) PrepCom and Review Conference, Canada's delegations included representatives from civil society. Canada also provided funding to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to convene expert-level consultations, and supported efforts of the project for Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) through Reaching Critical Will (RCW) to ensure wide public access to national statements and other documents emanating from meetings of United Nations disarmament bodies. (Recommendations 1 and 8, see annex I.)

Japan

Through its Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan published the third edition of "Japan's Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Policy", which disseminates information on efforts it has taken in the field. The Ministry also established, and regularly updates, comprehensive web pages with easily accessible information on Japan's activities in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation. In March, its Centre for the Promotion of Disarmament and Non-Proliferation held a three-day seminar with a series of presentations covering a variety of related issues in which lecturers from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs participated. (Recommendations 1, 13 and 31, see annex I.)

Bolivia

Bolivia benefited from the United Nations Disarmament Fellowship Programme, which trained a number of its diplomats. Later, the recipients of their training participated in the monitoring and implementation of national disarmament and non-proliferation policy in the country's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Worship. (Recommendations 1, 21 and 31, see annex I.)

Mexico

Mexico offered a diploma course in "Disarmament and International Security" to Ministry officials at the Matías Romero Institute of Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Additionally, a preliminary curriculum on a peace, disarmament and non-proliferation education course - aimed at both policy makers and youth - was developed as a result of discussions between the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL) and the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (UN-LiREC) during the year. This education initiative was strongly endorsed by the Member States in attendance at the Regular Session of the OPANAL Board Meeting in May, in Mexico City, where it was initially presented. (Recommendation 13, see annex I.)

Suriname

Suriname conducted training programmes to increase awareness and promote a culture of enhanced disarmament and non-proliferation. (Recommendations 14 and 28, see annex I.)

Implementation of the recommendations by civil society and non-governmental organizations6

Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS)

The high school outreach and exchange programme of CNS, the Critical Issues Forum, held a student-teacher conference in April. Over sixty students, teachers and parents from five high schools in California, two in Texas and ten schools in Russia's "Closed nuclear cities"7 participated. The conference was the culmination of a year-long investigation into nuclear weapons and non-proliferation by high school students. Research activities ranged from scientific and environmental aspects to social and cultural issues associated with nuclear weapons.8 (Recommendation 6, see annex I.)

Educators for Social Responsibility, Metropolitan Area (ESR-Metro)

ESR-Metro coordinated a citywide youth caucus on nuclear issues on the twentieth anniversary of the Chernobyl accident, screening Maryann De Leo's Academy Award-winning film Chernobyl Heart, and displaying works by Magnum photographer Paul Fusco.9 (Recommendation 23, see annex I.)

Peace Boat

In May, the Peace Boat encouraged participation in the Control Arm's "Million Faces" Campaign10 by collecting photographs and explaining the issues in the ports visited by the ship. During the 2006 Review Conference of the PoA, special SALW-related events and exhibitions took place at the United Nations.
From 6 to 8 September, the Peace Boat conducted two workshops at the 59th Annual United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI)/NGO Conference in New York, "Unfinished Business: Effective Partnerships for Human Security and Sustainable Development",11 to discuss ways and means for strengthening collaboration between local communities and global institutions.12 (Recommendation 23, see annex I.)

The Institute for Energy and Environmental Research (IEER)

IEER began developing courses centred on weapons non-proliferation with the aim of empowering students to provide valuable input to local, state and national government officials.13 (Recommendation 23, see annex I.)

World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA)

On 2 August, coinciding with its sixtieth anniversary, WFUNA14 launched an online global essay competition, targeting high school and university students, to educate young people on the recommendations emanating from the Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission (WMDC), and to stimulate them to consider how their countries might be usefully engaged in implementing those recommendations, both independently and in the framework of the United Nations. Hans Blix, President of WFUNA, won a similar competition conducted in 1950 by the World Federation. His prize was a trip to the United Nations where he was inspired to pursue a profession in international law, and later realized a prominent career that included Foreign Minister of Sweden, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Executive Director of the United Nations Monitoring and Verification Commission (UNMOVIC) dealing with Iraq's WMD programmes and, most recently, Chairman of the WMDC.15 (Recommendation 23, see annex I.)

Atomic Mirror

Photographer, Yuriy Kossin, a former cybernetic scientist at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, displayed his work in the visitor's lobby of the United Nations. In April, as part of the official twentieth anniversary commemoration of the Chernobyl accident, he also hosted two discussion sessions during his visit.16 (Recommendation 23, see annex I.)

Implementation of the recommendations by the United Nations and other international organizations

Department of Public Information

The Global Teaching and Learning Project Unit of DPI continued to collaborate with the Department for Disarmament Affairs (DDA) on a project to create a disarmament component on the United Nations CyberSchoolbus website. While dealing with a range of disarmament and non-proliferation issues, its primary focus will be on nuclear disarmament and SALW. The site is being designed with a dual portal: a multimedia curriculum for educators, with suggestions for activities to engage on the issues from an international perspective, and an independent entrance platform for students working on their own.17 (Recommendation 18, see annex I.)

United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR)

To support peacekeeping and peacebuilding, UNIDIR is working on the inclusion of women in the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) process through better research, training and education, to further the objectives of UNSCR 1325.18 (Recommendation 27, see annex I.) For more information on the activities of UNIDIR, see p. 8 of this chapter.

University for Peace (UPEACE)

The University is developing the "UPEACE GlobalEd" distance education programme, which will offer web-based teaching in all major fields, including disarmament.19 (Recommendations 6, 13, 14, 21 and 23, see annex I.)

The Geneva Forum

On the issue of biological weapons, the Geneva Forum20 launched a "Briefing Book: BWC Sixth Review Conference", to assist government delegations participating in the RevCon. The publication contained basic documents and texts relating to the biological weapons regime, such as official BWC documents (including the Final Documents from the previous five Review Conferences); documents from the United Nations and other international and regional organizations; documents from informal arrangements (Australia Group, G8 and the Proliferation Security Initiative); and supporting material from NGOs. (Recommendations 6 and 23, see annex I.)

Disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services, 2006

DDA has been providing training for young diplomats, especially those from developing countries, through the United Nations fellowship, training and advisory services programme for more than 25 years.21 Since 1979 the Programme has trained 704 officials from 155 States, many of whom hold positions of responsibility in the field within their own Governments.
In 2006, fellowships were awarded to diplomats from 30 Member States.22 The Programme continued to be structured in three segments: a study session in Geneva; study visits to intergovernmental organizations working in the field of disarmament and to Member States, at their invitation; and a study session in New York.
The Programme ran from 28 August, in Geneva, to 1 November 2006, in New York. It encompassed lectures by heads of delegations to the Conference on Disarmament (CD) and the First Committee; presiding officers of various arms control and disarmament conferences and meetings; United Nations officials, including senior DDA and UNIDIR staff; representatives of the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces; and Switzerland's Department of Foreign Affairs. The fellows also attended meetings of the CD and the First Committee. In New York, they participated in a seminar on non-proliferation and disarmament issues organized by the Centre for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) of the Monterey Institute of International Studies, and in panel discussions sponsored by DDA. During the programme, fellows conducted research projects and prepared papers on disarmament-related topics of their own choice as well as on agenda issues before the General Assembly.
The fellows studied in Vienna, including visits to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) as well as to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in The Hague. The German Government hosted the fellows in Berlin, where they were briefed by, and held a round-table discussion with, senior officials and experts of the Department of Disarmament and Arms Control of the Federal Foreign Office and with the Head of the Parliamentary Sub-Committee for Arms Control and Disarmament. The fellows also visited the Nammo Buck GmbH conversion plant.
At the invitation of the Government of China, the fellows visited Beijing, where they were briefed and held round-table discussions with senior officials and experts of the Department of Arms Control and Disarmament, representatives from the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association, and scholars in the field of arms control. Further, the fellows visited the facilities of the China Institute of Atomic Energy, the Forbidden City and the Great Wall.
At the invitation of the Government of Japan, they visited Tokyo, Nagasaki and Hiroshima. In Tokyo, the fellows were briefed by senior officials of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Japan's arms control and disarmament policies, and ended the study visit with a wrap-up session on nuclear disarmament. In Hiroshima and Nagasaki, they visited memorial museums at the atomic bomb hypocentres, met with survivors and heard lectures on social and medical legacies of atomic bombings.
At the conclusion of the Programme, the fellows were awarded certificates at a ceremony held in New York, which was presided over by the Chairperson of the First Committee and the Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs.
At its sixty-first session, the General Assembly considered the Secretary-General's report on the United Nations disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services.23 In the report, the Secretary-General expressed his gratification that the Programme contributed to enhancing the expertise of Member States in the field of disarmament, particularly in developing countries, and promoted awareness of its importance and benefits, and provided a better understanding of the international community's concerns regarding disarmament and security. The Secretary-General also expressed his appreciation to all Member States and organizations that have supported the programme throughout the years, thereby adding to its success. He recognized, in particular, the Governments of Germany and Japan for continually hosting extensive and highly educative study visits, as well as the Government of China for organizing the study visit in 2006. The General Assembly adopted resolution 61/91 on the fellowship, training and advisory services, as discussed below.

United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR)

In a note to the General Assembly, the Secretary-General transmitted the report of the Director of UNIDIR covering its activities for the period from August 2005 to July 2006. The report had been considered and forwarded to the Secretary-General by the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters in its capacity as Board of Trustees for the Institute, during the Board's session in June.24
The focus of UNIDIR's work continued to be on the three priority areas of disarmament and global, regional and human security - addressing the full range of substantive issues from SALW to weapons in outer space. A list of UNIDIR publications is contained in annex III.
With regard to the global arena, throughout 2006, inter alia, UNIDIR provided support to the Geneva Centre for Security Policy by holding brainstorming sessions for the CD on fissile materials, nuclear disarmament, civil infrastructure and negative security assurance. It also took part in a conference held in Jerusalem on effective international measures to reduce the threat of man-portable air defence systems (MANPADS) to civil aviation. The Institute participated in an Australian-sponsored seminar, held in Geneva, on preventing the illicit transfer and unauthorized use of the systems.
On regional security, UNIDIR continued to explore the possibilities of furthering its work on a WMD-free zone in the Middle East, including a conference on the issue, tentatively to be held in 2007. The UNIDIR fellowship programme hosted two fellows from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) for a week-long orientation on disarmament research in Geneva, hopefully to provide new ideas for security policy in regions of conflict.
A joint project of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNIDIR, DDA and the Small Arms Survey (SAS) was established with a broad goal of assisting States in better fulfilling their commitments under the SALW PoA. More specifically, the project25 analyzed the information contained in national reports voluntarily submitted by States on their implementation of the PoA from 2002 to 2005, and offered a regionally based lens with which to examine PoA reporting. The project highlighted the main trends, including regional differences, thematic priorities and areas where further assistance was needed.
Regarding human security, the Geneva Forum held a residential workshop to assist States in preparing for the first review conference of the PoA on the illicit trade in SALW. UNIDIR also participated in the Ministerial Summit on Armed Violence and Development, hosted by the Government of Switzerland and UNDP, where the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development was adopted. Also worth highlighting was the completion of a pilot project with the European Commission (EC) to develop policies on ERW. The project incorporated the development of a network of research organizations and a field research project to ascertain the impact of cluster munitions.26
Through this project, "European Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons and Explosive Remnants of War (ERW),27 UNIDIR aimed to: provide the EU with an overview of the problems and current responses regarding SALW and ERW; support an analysis of actions; assess effectiveness; and provide evidence-based recommendations for future European action. To develop recommendations for the EU on how to improve its external assistance to third countries affected by illicit trade in SALW and ERW, with a specific focus on North Africa, UNIDIR conducted field research and training in cooperation with the relevant local government ministries and law enforcement agencies in six North African States.28

General Assembly, 2006

61/73
United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education. The draft resolution was introduced by Mexico, on behalf of the sponsors (see p. 9 for sponsors), on 12 October. It was adopted without a vote in the First Committee on 25 October and in the General Assembly on 6 December. For the text of the resolution, see page 9.
The resolution welcomed the Secretary-General's report on disarmament and non-proliferation education and requested him to review its status of implementation on recommendations, to reflect on potentially new opportunities for its promotion and to prepare a report for submission to the General Assembly at its sixty-third session. It also requested him to electronically disseminate, in as many official languages as feasible, information on that report and on any other ongoing information that DDA gathers in relation to the United Nations study.
61/91
United Nations disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services. On 20 October, the draft resolution was introduced by Nigeria, on behalf of the sponsors (for the sponsors, see p. 10). Essentially the same text as submitted to the fifty-ninth session of the General Assembly when it was last considered, Nigeria noted the resolution's importance in enhancing the knowledge and skills of fellows so they can actively participate in arms control and disarmament deliberations and negotiations. It was adopted without a vote in the First Committee on 27 October and in the General Assembly on 6 December. For the text of the resolution, see page 11.
The resolution requested the Secretary-General to continue to annually implement the Geneva-based Programme within existing resources, and to report thereon to the General Assembly at its sixty-third session.
61/95
United Nations Disarmament Information Programme. The draft resolution was introduced by Mexico, on behalf of the sponsors (see p. 12 for sponsors), on 12 October. It was adopted without a vote in the First Committee on 25 October and in the General Assembly on 6 December. For the text of the resolution, see page 13.
Among other things, the resolution commended the launch of the first online version of The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook by DDA; and recommended that the Information Programme continue to inform, educate and generate public understanding of the importance of multilateral action and support for it, including action by the United Nations and the CD in arms limitation and disarmament. It should also continue to publish the Yearbook; maintain the disarmament website as a part of the United Nations website; intensify United Nations interaction with the public, principally non-governmental organizations and research institutes to further debates; and organize discussions on issues of arms limitation, disarmament and security, with a view to broadening understanding and facilitating an exchange of views and information among Member States and civil society. Additionally, it requested the Secretary-General to submit to the Assembly at its sixty-third session a report covering both the Programme's status of implementation for the previous two years and the activities contemplated for the next two.

Annex I

Promotion of disarmament and non-proliferation education and training: practical recommendations29
1. Member States are encouraged to accord importance to disarmament and non-proliferation education and training in their programmes and policies, consistent with their national legislation and practices, taking into account present and future trends. They are also encouraged to use, designate or establish public advisory bodies, where appropriate, whose responsibilities include advising on disarmament and non-proliferation education and training practices. Member States are encouraged to share their experience in disarmament and non-proliferation education and training with other Member States, international organizations, civil society and the Department for Disarmament Affairs.
6. The Department of Disarmament Affairs should examine, accumulate and make public and easily accessible the different disarmament and non-proliferation curricula and programmes that States have developed for their formal school systems and university courses as well as for informal training.
8. Member States are encouraged to include parliamentarians and/or non-governmental advisers in delegations to United Nations disarmament-related meetings, taking into account national legislation and practices.
13. Member States, in cooperation with the United Nations and relevant international organizations, are encouraged to sponsor training, fellowships, and awareness programmes, on as wide a geographical basis as possible, for researchers, engineers, scientists and other academics in areas of particular relevance, but not limited to treaties and agreements on weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery. They are also encouraged to give special emphasis to training customs, licensing and law enforcement officers for the purpose of fulfilling international obligations of Member States in the disarmament and non-proliferation fields.
14. The Department of Disarmament Affairs, in cooperation with United Nations University and UPEACE, should be encouraged to organize a programme of training for educators and trainers in disarmament and non-proliferation. These programmes may be implemented cooperatively with international organizations such as IAEA, OPCW and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization.
18. Disarmament and non-proliferation educational materials developed by the United Nations, such as the Cyberschoolbus website, should include complementary material on how parents can encourage attitudes of peace and non-violence. Efforts should also be made by educators, parents and the business community to devise and produce toys, computer games and videos that engender such attitudes.
19. Additional fellowships and scholarships should be provided for various target audiences by or through the Department of Disarmament Affairs (directly or through its regional centres), UPEACE, UNIDIR and the NGO Committee on Disarmament, among others. An important educational supplement to disarmament and non-proliferation classroom training should be on-the-job training, which may be conducted at the sites of international organizations, national governmental agencies, NGOs and research centres. Opportunities for such on-the-job training should be expanded.
21. Organizations of the United Nations system and other relevant international organizations are encouraged to promote and provide financial support for disarmament and non-proliferation education and training using such techniques as distance learning, the Internet, and videoconferencing as well as cost-efficient and cost-effective media such as CD-ROMs.
23. Educators should consider a full range of pedagogical methods for inclusion in any educational material. In addition to computer-based learning, model United Nations programmes, other role-playing and simulation games, videos, film, dance, song, theatre, puppetry, poetry, photography, origami, visual art and creative writing, to name a few, are all useful methods. Special emphasis should be given to participatory learning approaches that can be applied to a wide variety of disarmament and non-proliferation problems and audiences.
27. International organizations, regional organizations and representatives of civil society, where appropriate, are encouraged to include disarmament education and training in their programmes in post-conflict situations.
28. Member States are encouraged to ensure that their military staff colleges include disarmament and non-proliferation elements in their curricula.
31. Member States are encouraged to designate a focal point for disarmament and non-proliferation education and training and to inform the Department for Disarmament Affairs on steps taken to implement the recommendations contained in the present report.

Annex II

Publications and other materials of the Department for Disarmament Affairs and its regional centres in 200630
The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook, vol. 30: 2006 (Sales No. E.06.IX.1) (forthcoming in all other official languages)
Occasional Papers No. 10: Verifying Non-Proliferation & Disarmament Agreements Today/Panel Discussion, United Nations, New York, 20 October 2005 (English only)
Occasional Papers No. 11: United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Asia and the Pacific, 12-13 July 2006, Beijing, China, United Nations, New York, October 2006 (English only)

Forthcoming

Occasional Papers No. 12: United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Africa, 9-10 November 2006, Accra, Ghana, United Nations, New York (English only)
Occasional Papers No. 13: United Nations Seminar on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Latin America and the Caribbean, 27-28 November 2006, Lima, Peru, United Nations, New York (English only)

Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (UN-LiREC)

Regional Perspectives series:
Regional Perspectives Nº18 Regional Seminar Implementing United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) In Latin America and the Caribbean" (Spanish)
Regional Perspectives Nº17 Regional Conference to Review Progress Made by Latin America and the Caribbean in the Implementation of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (Spanish)
Regional Perspectives Training the Trainers Investigative Techniques Course: Phase II: Final Report (English)
Regional Perspectives Nº14 Training the Trainers Investigative Techniques Course Commercial Trade of and Illicit Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Ammunition: Report of the Chair - Summary, 22 November-10 December 2004, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago (English)
Regional Perspectives Nº13 Training the Trainers Investigative Techniques Course Commercial Trade of and Illicit Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Ammunition: Report of the Chair - Summary, 6-24 September 2004, Lima, Peru (English)
Regional Perspectives Nº12 Training the Trainers Investigative Techniques Course Commercial Trade and Illicit Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Ammunition: Report of the Chair - Summary, 3-21 May 2004, Brasilia, Brazil (English)
Regional Perspectives Nº11 Commercial Trade of and Illicit Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Ammunition: Report of the Chair - Summary, 8-26 March 2004, Ciudad Colon, Costa Rica (English)
Regional Perspectives Nº9 New Strategies to Strengthen Firearms Control and to Curb their Illicit Trafficking in Brazil's South-eastern Region (Portuguese)
Regional Perspectives Nº2 Regional Meeting on Illicit Trafficking in Small Arms and Light Weapons: Preparing Latin America and the Caribbean for 2001 UN Meeting on Small Arms and Light Weapons (Spanish)
Folders:
- Basic Guidelines on the Elaboration of Defence White Books (Spanish)
- Regional Public Security Training Centre (English and Portuguese)

Posters:
- Peru Firearms amnesty 2006 (Spanish)
- Celebrate Peru: A different 28 July 2006 (Spanish)

Booklets:
- "Integrated Weapons Management System" (SIGA) (Spanish)
- "Peru in the United Nations Security Council: Ad Hoc Conference Report" (Spanish)
- "Regional Clearinghouse Programme on Firearms, Ammunition and Explosives: Basic Information on Assistance to States" (English and Spanish)
- "National Firearms Investigative Techniques Course on the Control, Legal Trade and Prevention of Illicit Firearms Trafficking: Final Report, 21 November - 2 December 2005, Ciudad del Este, Paraguay" (Spanish)
- "National Firearms Investigative Techniques Course on the Control, Legal Trade and Prevention of Illicit Firearms Trafficking: Final Report, 8-9 August 2006, Foz de Iguazu, Brazil" (Portuguese)

National Reports:
- Guatemala National Report on the implementation of the UN Programme of Action (2001-2005) (Spanish)
- Uruguay National Report on the implementation of the UN Programme of Action (2001-2005) (Spanish)
- Peru National Report on the implementation of the UN Programme of Action (2005) (Spanish)
- Peru National Report on the implementation of the United Nations Security Council resolution 1540 (Spanish)

Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Africa31

Small Arms Transparency and Control Regime in Africa: Final Activity Report - 1 October 2003 to 31 December 2005

Annex III

UNIDIR publications in 200632
Common Security in Outer Space and International Law, by D. Wolter, January 2006, 316 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.0.3
International Assistance for Implementing the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in SALW in All Its Aspects: Findings of a Global Survey, by K. Maze and S. Parker, December 2006, 84 p., United Nations publications
Thinking Outside the Box in Multilateral Disarmament and Arms Control Negotiations, by J. Borrie and V. Martin Randin (eds), December 2006, 270 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.0.16
European Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons and Explosive Remnants of War - Final Report, UNIDIR, November 2006, 92 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.0.15
Bound to Cooperate: Conflict, Peace and People in Sierra Leone, by A. Ayissi and R. Poulton (eds), August 2006, 206 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.0.12
Costs of Disarmament: Cost Benefit Analysis of SALW Destruction versus Storage, by M. Turner, July 2006, 42 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.0.13
Disarmament as Humanitarian Action: From Perspective to Practice, by J. Borrie and V. Martin Randin (eds), May 2006, 178 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.0.9
Developing a Mechanism to Prevent Illicit Brokering in Small Arms and Light Weapons - Scope and Implications, in cooperation with SAS and DDA, 2006, 218 p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.06.0.17
Five Years of Implementing the United Nations Programme of Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons: Regional Analysis of National Reports, by E. Kytömäki and V. Yankey-Wayne, May 2006, 272 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.08
From Research to Road Map: Learning from the Arms for Development Initiative in Sierra Leone, by D. Miller, D. Ladouceur & Z. Dugal, March 2006, 112 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.07
Safeguarding Space Security: Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space - Conference Report, 21-22 March 2005
Comparative Analysis of Evaluation Methodologies in Weapon Collection Programmes, S. Koyama, January 2006, 68 p., United Nations publications, Sales No. GV.E.06.04
Cluster Munitions in Albania and Lao PDR: The Humanitarian and Socio-Economic Impact by R. Cave, A. Lawson and A. Sherriff. September 2006, 56 p., United Nations publications

Disarmament Forum (a quarterly publication)

No. 1 Taking Action on Small Arms
No. 2 CTBT: Passing the Test
No. 3 Toward a Stronger BTWC
No. 4 Cluster Munitions

1See "The illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects", 11 January 2006, A/RES/60/81.
2For the text of "Verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification", see appendix V, p. 15.
3See "United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education" of 16 December 2004, A/RES/59/93.
4See the Secretary-General's report on disarmament and non-proliferation education of 30 August 2002, A/57/124.
5See the Secretary-General's report on disarmament and non-proliferation education of 20 July 2006, A/61/169 and Add.1.
6The following is based on information received and is not inclusive of all activities in the field of disarmament and non-proliferation education being conducted in 2006.
7Lesnoy, Novouralsk, Ozersk, Penza, Sarov, Seversk, Snezhinsk, Zarechniy, Zelenogorsk and Zheleznogorsk.
8See http://cns.miis.edu (accessed 27 June 2007).
9Renamed: Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility, see http://www.esrmetro.org (accessed 27 June 2007).
10Since 2003, over one million people worldwide supported an international, legally-binding Arms Trade Treaty to ease the suffering caused by irresponsible weapons transfers. In December 2006, 153 Governments voted at the United Nations to start work on its development. For more information see chapter III of this volume and the Secretary-General's press release of 26 June 2006, SG/SM/10536-DC/3030.
11See http://www.un.org/events.
12See http://www.peaceboat.org/english (accessed 20 June 2007).
13See http://www.ieer.org (accessed 27 June 2007).
14See http://www.wfuna.org (accessed 27 June 2007).
15See chapter I of this volume for more information on the WMDC.
16See http://www.atomicmirror.org (accessed 27 June 2007).
17See http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus.
18See http://www.unidir.org.
19See http://www.upeace.org.
20The Geneva Forum is a joint initiative of the Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva (QUNO), the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR), and the Programme for Strategic and International Security Studies (PSIS) of the Graduate Institute of International Studies. For information on publications, see http://www.geneva-forum.org (accessed 27 June 2007).
21The Programme started in 1979 as a follow-up to a decision of the General Assembly adopted at its tenth special session in 1978 (resolution S-10/2, para. 108).
22Argentina, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Chile, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Georgia, Guinea, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Japan, Latvia, Liberia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Myanmar, Nepal, Russian Federation, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, United States and Zimbabwe.
23See the Secretary-General's report on the disarmament, fellowship and training advisory services of 11 July 2006, A/61/130.
24See the Secretary-General's note on UNIDIR of 25 July 2006, A/61/180.
25See Five Years of Implementing the United Nations Programme of Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons: Regional Analysis of National Reports, Elli Kytömäki and Valerie Yankey-Wayne, UNIDIR, 2006, ISBN No. 92-9045-181-5, or see http://www.unidir.org/html/en/publications.php.
26Ibid.
27See European Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons and Explosive Remnants of War: Final Report, UNIDIR, 2006, ISBN No. 92-9045-186-6.
28Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia.
29Excerpted selectively from A/57/124.
30For a full list, see http://disarmament.un.org/DDApublications/index.html.
31For a full list of UNREC publications, see http://unrec.org/en > Publications.
32For a full list of UNIDIR publications, see http://www.unidir.org/html/en/publications.php.