A P P E N D I X III

Sixth Review Conference of the States Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction1


Geneva, 20 November to 8 December 2006

Final Declaration

The States Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction, which met in Geneva from 20 November to 8 December 2006 to review the operation of the Convention, solemnly declare:
(i) Their conviction that the Convention is essential for international peace and security;
(ii) Their determination also to act with a view to achieving effective progress towards general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control including the prohibition and elimination of all weapons of mass destruction and their conviction that the prohibition of the development, production and stockpiling of bacteriological (biological) weapons and their elimination, will facilitate the achievement of this goal;
(iii) Their reaffirmation of their firm commitment to the purposes of the Preamble and all the provisions of the Convention;
(iv) Their determination to comply with all their obligations undertaken pursuant to the Convention and their recognition that States Parties not in compliance with their Convention obligations pose fundamental challenges to the Convention's viability, as would use of bacteriological (biological) weapons by anyone at any time;
(v) Their continued determination, for the sake of humankind, to exclude completely the possibility of the use of bacteriological (biological) weapons, and their conviction that such use would be repugnant to the conscience of humankind;
(vi) Their reaffirmation that under any circumstances the use, development, production and stockpiling of bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons is effectively prohibited under Article I of the Convention;
(vii) Their conviction that terrorism in all its forms and manifestations and whatever its motivation, is abhorrent and unacceptable to the international community, and that terrorists must be prevented from developing, producing, stockpiling, or otherwise acquiring or retaining, and using under any circumstances, biological agents and toxins, equipment, or means of delivery of agents or toxins, for non-peaceful purposes, and their recognition of the contribution of full and effective implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540 by all states to assist in achieving the objectives of this Convention;
(viii) Their conviction that the full implementation of all the provisions of the Convention should facilitate economic and technological development and international cooperation in the field of peaceful biological activities;
(ix) Their reiteration that the effective contribution of the Convention to international peace and security will be enhanced through universal adherence to the Convention, and their call on signatories to ratify and other states not party to accede to the Convention without delay;
(x) Their recognition that achieving the objectives of the Convention will be more effectively realized through greater public awareness of its contribution, and through collaboration with relevant regional and international organizations, in keeping within their respective mandates, and their commitment to promote this;
(xi) Their recognition of their consideration of the issues identified in reviewing the operation of the Convention as provided for in Article XII, as well as their consensus on the follow-up actions contained herein.

Article I

1. The Conference reaffirms the importance of Article I, as it defines the scope of the Convention. The Conference declares that the Convention is comprehensive in its scope and that all naturally or artificially created or altered microbial and other biological agents and toxins, as well as their components, regardless of their origin and method of production and whether they affect humans, animals or plants, of types and in quantities that have no justification for prophylactic, protective or other peaceful purposes, are unequivocally covered by Article I.
2. The Conference reaffirms that Article I applies to all scientific and technological developments in the life sciences and in other fields of science relevant to the Convention.
3. The Conference reaffirms that the use by the States Parties, in any way and under any circumstances, of microbial or other biological agents or toxins, that is not consistent with prophylactic, protective or other peaceful purposes, is effectively a violation of Article I. The Conference reaffirms the undertaking in Article I never in any circumstances to develop, produce, stockpile or otherwise acquire or retain weapons, equipment, or means of delivery designed to use such agents or toxins for hostile purposes or in armed conflict in order to exclude completely and forever the possibility of their use. The Conference affirms the determination of States Parties to condemn any use of biological agents or toxins for other than peaceful purposes, by anyone at any time.
4. The Conference notes that experimentation involving open-air release of pathogens or toxins harmful to humans, animals and plants that have no justification for prophylactic, protective of other peaceful purposes is inconsistent with the undertakings contained in Article I.

Article II

5. The Conference reaffirms for any state ratifying or acceding to the Convention, the destruction or diversion to peaceful purposes specified in Article II would be completed upon accession to, or upon ratification of, the Convention.
6. The Conference emphasises that states must take all necessary safety and security provisions to protect populations and the environment when carrying out such destruction and/or diversion. The Conference also stresses that these States Parties should provide appropriate information to all States Parties via the exchange of information (confidence-building measures form F).
7. The Conference welcomes statements made by States Parties, and newly acceding and ratifying States Parties, that they do not possess agents, toxins, weapons, equipment or means of delivery as prohibited by Article I of the Convention.

Article III

8. The Conference reaffirms that Article III is sufficiently comprehensive to cover any recipient whatsoever at the international, national or sub-national levels. The Conference calls for appropriate measures, including effective national export controls, by all States Parties to implement this Article, in order to ensure that direct and indirect transfers relevant to the Convention, to any recipient whatsoever, are authorized only when the intended use is for purposes not prohibited under the Convention.
9. The Conference calls for appropriate measures by all States Parties to ensure that biological agents and toxins relevant to the Convention are protected and safeguarded, including through measures to control access to and handling of such agents and toxins;
10. The Conference reiterates that States Parties should not use the provisions of this Article to impose restrictions and/or limitations on transfers for purposes consistent with the objectives and provisions of the Convention of scientific knowledge, technology, equipment and materials under Article X.

Article IV

11. The Conference reaffirms the commitment of States Parties to take the necessary national measures under this Article. The Conference also reaffirms that the enactment and implementation of necessary national measures under this Article would strengthen the effectiveness of the Convention. In this context, the Conference calls upon States Parties to adopt, in accordance with their constitutional processes, legislative, administrative, judicial and other measures, including penal legislation, designed to:
(i) enhance domestic implementation of the Convention and ensure the prohibition and prevention of the development, production, stockpiling, acquisition or retention of the agents, toxins, weapons, equipments and means of delivery as specified in Article I of the Convention;
(ii) apply within their territory, under their jurisdiction or under their control anywhere and apply, if constitutionally possible and in conformity with international law, to actions taken anywhere by natural or legal persons possessing their nationality;
(iii) ensure the safety and security of microbial or other biological agents or toxins in laboratories, facilities, and during transportation, to prevent unauthorized access to and removal of such agents or toxins.
12. The Conference welcomes those measures taken by States Parties in this regard, and reiterates its call to any State Party that has not yet taken any necessary measures to do so without delay. The Conference encourages States Parties to provide appropriate information on any such measures they have taken, as well as any other useful information on their implementation, to the United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs.
13. The Conference reaffirms the commitment of States Parties to take the necessary national measures to strengthen methods and capacities for surveillance and detection of outbreaks of disease at the national, regional and international levels.
14. The Conference urges the inclusion in medical, scientific and military educational materials and programmes of information on the Convention and the 1925 Geneva Protocol. The Conference urges States Parties to promote the development of training and education programmes for those granted access to biological agents and toxins relevant to the Convention and for those with the knowledge or capacity to modify such agents and toxins, in order to raise awareness of the risks, as well as of the obligations of States Parties under the Convention.
15. The Conference encourages States Parties to take necessary measures to promote awareness amongst relevant professionals of the need to report activities conducted within their territory or under their jurisdiction or under their control that could constitute a violation of the Convention or related national criminal law. In this context, the Conference recognises the importance of codes of conduct and self-regulatory mechanisms in raising awareness, and calls upon States Parties to support and encourage their development, promulgation and adoption.
16. The Conference urges States Parties with relevant experience in legal and administrative measures for the implementation of the provisions of the Convention, to provide assistance on request to other States Parties. The Conference also encourages such initiatives on a regional basis.
17. The Conference recalls United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) that places obligations on all states and is consistent with the provisions of the Convention. The Conference notes that Resolution 1540 affirms support for the multilateral treaties whose aim is to eliminate or prevent proliferation of nuclear, chemical or biological weapons and the importance for all States Parties to these treaties to implement them fully in order to promote international stability. The Conference also notes that information provided to the United Nations by states in accordance with Resolution 1540 may provide a useful resource for States Parties in fulfilling their obligations under this Article.
18. The Conference encourages States Parties to designate a national focal point for coordinating national implementation of the Convention and communicating with other States Parties and relevant international organizations.
19. The Conference reaffirms that under all circumstances the use of bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons is effectively prohibited by the Convention.

Article V

20. The Conference reaffirms that:
(i) this article provides an appropriate framework for States Parties to consult and cooperate with one another to resolve any problem and to make any request for clarification which may have arisen in relation to the objective of, or in the application of, the provisions of, the Convention;
(ii) any State Party which identifies such a problem should, as a rule, use this framework to address and resolve it;
(iii) States Parties should provide a specific, timely response to any compliance concern alleging a breach of their obligations under the Convention.
21. The Conference reaffirms that the consultation procedures agreed at the Second and Third Review Conferences remain valid to be used by States Parties for consultation and cooperation pursuant to this Article. The Conference reaffirms that such consultation and cooperation may also be undertaken bilaterally and multilaterally, or through other appropriate international procedures within the framework of the United Nations and in accordance with its Charter.
22. The Conference stresses the need for all States Parties to deal effectively with compliance issues. In this connection, the States Parties had agreed to provide a specific, timely response to any compliance concern alleging a breach of their obligations under the Convention. Such responses should be submitted in accordance with the procedures agreed upon by the Second Review Conference and further developed by the Third Review Conference. The Conference reiterates its request that information on such efforts be provided to the Review Conferences.
23. The Conference emphasises the importance of the exchange of information among States Parties through the confidence-building measures (CBMs) agreed at the Second and Third Review Conferences. The Conference welcomes the exchange of information carried out under these measures, and notes that this has contributed to enhancing transparency and building confidence.
24. The Conference notes that only a limited number of States Parties make an annual CBM submission. The Conference recognises the urgent need to increase the number of States Parties participating in CBMs. In this regard, the Conference also recognises the technical difficulties experienced by some States Parties in completing full and timely declarations. In order to update the mechanism of transmission of information, the Conference has agreed on several measures.
25. The Conference reaffirms that the data submitted in the framework of the annual exchange of information should be provided to the United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs and promptly forwarded by it to all States Parties according to existing modalities. The information supplied by a State Party must not be further circulated or made available without the express permission of that State Party.

Article VI

26. The Conference notes that the provisions of this Article have not been invoked.
27. The Conference emphasizes the provision of Article VI that such a complaint should include all possible evidence confirming its validity. It stresses that, as in the case of the implementation of all the provisions and procedures set forth in the Convention, the procedures foreseen in Article VI should be implemented in good faith within the scope of the Convention.
28. The Conference invites the Security Council:
(i) to consider immediately any complaint lodged under this Article and to initiate any measures it considers necessary for the investigation of the complaint in accordance with the Charter;
(ii) to request, if it deems necessary and in accordance with its resolution 620 of 1988, the United Nations Secretary-General to investigate the allegation of use, using the technical guidelines and procedures contained in Annex I of United Nations Document A/44/561;
(iii) to inform each State Party of the results of any investigation initiated under this Article and to consider promptly any appropriate further action which may be necessary.
29. The Conference reaffirms the agreement of States Parties to consult, at the request of any States Party, regarding allegations of use or threat of use of biological or toxin weapons. The Conference reaffirms the undertaking of each State Party to cooperate in carrying out any investigations which the Security Council initiates.
30. The Conference notes that the Secretary-General's investigation mechanism, set out in A/44/561 and endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolution 45/57, represents an international institutional mechanism for investigating cases of alleged use of biological or toxin weapons. The Conference notes in this regard General Assembly resolution 60/288 (2006).
31. The Conference notes that the procedure outlined in this Article is without prejudice to the prerogative of the States Parties to consider jointly the cases of alleged non-compliance with the provisions of the Convention and to make appropriate decisions in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and applicable rules of international law.

Article VII

32. The Conference notes with satisfaction that these provisions have not been invoked.
33. The Conference takes note of desires expressed that, should a request for assistance be made, it be promptly considered and an appropriate response provided. In this context, pending consideration of a decision by the Security Council, timely emergency assistance could be provided by States Parties if requested.
34. The Conference considers that in the event that this Article might be invoked, the United Nations could play a coordinating role in providing assistance, with the help of States Parties as well as the appropriate intergovernmental organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC).
35. The Conference notes that State Parties' national preparedness contributes to international capabilities for response, investigation and mitigation of outbreaks of disease, including those due to alleged use of biological or toxin weapons.
36. The Conference takes note of the proposal that States Parties may need to discuss the detailed procedure for assistance in order to ensure that timely emergency assistance would be provided by States Parties, if requested, in the event of use of biological or toxin weapons.
37. The Conference reaffirms the undertaking of States Parties to provide or support assistance to any State Party which so requests, if the Security Council decides that such State Party has been exposed to danger as a result of a violation of the Convention.
38. The Conference takes note of the willingness of States Parties, where appropriate, to provide or support assistance to any State Party which so requests, when that State Party has been exposed to danger or damage as a result of the use of bacteriological (biological) agents and toxins as weapons by anyone other than a State Party.

Article VIII

39. The Conference appeals to all States Parties to the 1925 Geneva Protocol to fulfill their obligations assumed under that Protocol and urges all states not yet party to the Protocol to ratify or accede to it without delay.
40. The Conference acknowledges that the 1925 Geneva Protocol, which prohibits the use in war of asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases, and of bacteriological methods of warfare, and the Convention complement each other. The Conference reaffirms that nothing contained in the Convention shall be interpreted as in any way limiting or detracting from the obligations assumed by any state under the 1925 Geneva Protocol.
41. The Conference stresses the importance of the withdrawal of all reservations to the 1925 Geneva Protocol related to the Convention.
42. The Conference welcomes the actions which States Parties have taken to withdraw their reservations to the 1925 Geneva Protocol related to the Convention, and calls upon those States Parties that continue to maintain pertinent reservations to the 1925 Geneva Protocol to withdraw those reservations, and to notify the Depositary of the 1925 Geneva Protocol of their withdrawals without delay.
43. The Conference notes that reservations concerning retaliation, through the use of any of the objects prohibited by the Convention, even conditional, are totally incompatible with the absolute and universal prohibition of the development, production, stockpiling, acquisition and retention of bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons, with the aim to exclude completely and forever the possibility of their use.

Article IX

44. The Conference reaffirms that this Article identifies the recognized objective of the effective prohibition of chemical weapons.
45. The Conference welcomes the fact that the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction entered into force on 29 April 1997 and that 181 instruments of ratification or accession have now been deposited with the United Nations. The Conference calls upon all states that have not yet done so to accede to that Convention without delay.

Article X

46. The Conference stresses the importance of implementation of this Article and recalls that the States Parties have a legal obligation to facilitate and have the right to participate in the fullest possible exchange of equipment, materials and scientific and technological information for the use of bacteriological (biological) agents and toxins for peaceful purposes and not to hamper the economic and technological development of States Parties.
47. The Conference reaffirms the commitment to the full and comprehensive implementation of this Article by all States Parties. The Conference recognises that while recent scientific and technological developments in the field of biotechnology would increase the potential for cooperation among States Parties and thereby strengthen the Convention, they could also increase the potential for the misuse of both science and technology. Therefore, the Conference urges all States Parties possessing advanced biotechnology to adopt positive measures to promote technology transfer and international cooperation on an equal and non-discriminatory basis, particularly with countries less advanced in this field, while promoting the basic objectives of the Convention, as well as ensuring that the promulgation of science and technology is fully consistent with the peaceful object and purpose of the Convention.
48. The Conference reaffirms that existing institutional ways and means of ensuring multilateral cooperation among all States Parties need to be developed further in order to promote international cooperation for peaceful uses in areas relevant to the Convention, including such areas as medicine, public health, agriculture and the environment.
49. The Conference calls for the use of the existing institutional means within the United Nations system and other international organizations, in accordance with their respective mandates, to promote the objectives of this Article. In this regard the Conference urges States Parties, the United Nations and its specialized agencies to take further specific measures within their competence for the promotion of the fullest possible exchange of equipment, materials and scientific and technological information for the use of bacteriological (biological) agents and toxins for peaceful purposes and of international cooperation in this field.
50. The Conference also recognises that there should be efficient coordination mechanisms between the specialized agencies of the United Nations system and international and regional organizations, in order to facilitate scientific cooperation and technology transfer.
51. The Conference emphasises that in the interest of facilitating the fullest possible exchange of equipment, materials and scientific and technological information for the use of bacteriological (biological) agents and toxin agents for peaceful purposes, States Parties should not use the provisions of the Convention to impose restrictions and/or limitations on transfers for purposes consistent with the objectives and provisions of the Convention of scientific knowledge, technology, equipment and materials.
52. The Conference recognises the need to effectively implement national measures in order to further implementation of Article X. In this regard, the Conference urges States Parties to undertake to review their national regulations governing international exchanges and transfers in order to ensure their consistency with the objectives and provisions of all the articles of the Convention.
53. The Conference urges States Parties to develop frameworks for disease surveillance in humans, animals and plants, and to support programmes for effective responses at the national, bilateral, regional and multilateral levels, including through the conclusion of appropriate agreements that would promote the regular exchange of scientific and technical information in these fields.
54. The Conference encourages States Parties to provide appropriate information on how this Article is being implemented to the United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs, and requests the Department to collate such information for the information of States Parties.
55. The Conference:
(i) encourages the States Parties to continue strengthening existing international organizations and networks working on infectious diseases, in particular those of the WHO, FAO, OIE and IPPC, within their respective mandates;
(ii) notes that the role of these organizations is limited to the epidemiological and public/animal/plant health aspects of any disease outbreak, but recognises the added value of information exchange with them;
(iii) encourages States Parties to improve communication on disease surveillance at all levels, including between States Parties and with the WHO, FAO, OIE and IPPC;
(iv) calls upon States Parties to continue establishing and/or improving national and regional capabilities to survey, detect, diagnose and combat infectious diseases as well as other possible biological threats and integrate these efforts into national and/or regional emergency and disaster management plans;
(v) urges States Parties in a position to do so to continue supporting, directly as well as through international organizations, capacity-building in States Parties in need of assistance in the fields of disease surveillance, detection, diagnosis and combating of infectious diseases and related research;
(vi) calls upon States Parties to promote the development and production of vaccines and drugs to treat infectious disease through international cooperation and, as appropriate, public-private partnerships.
56. The Conference recognises the important role of the private sector in the transfer of technology and information and the wide range of organizations within the United Nations system that are already engaged in international cooperation relevant to this Convention.

Article XI

57. The Conference notes that the Islamic Republic of Iran has formally presented a proposal to amend Article I and the title of the Convention to include explicitly the prohibition of the use of biological weapons.
58. The Conference takes note of the statement by the Government of the Russian Federation as a Depositary that it has notified all States Parties of the proposal by the Islamic Republic of Iran to amend the Convention. The Conference encourages all States Parties to convey their views to the Depositaries on the proposal by the Islamic Republic of Iran.
59. The Conference reaffirms that the provisions of this Article should in principle be implemented in such a way as not to affect the universality of the Convention.

Article XII

60. The Conference reaffirms that Review Conferences constitute an effective method of reviewing the operation of the Convention with a view to assuring that the purposes of the Preamble and the provisions of the Convention are being realized. The Conference therefore recommends that Review Conferences should continue to be held at least every five years.
61. The Conference decides that the Seventh Review Conference shall be held in Geneva not later than 2011 and should review the operation of the Convention, taking into account, inter alia:
(i) new scientific and technological developments relevant to the Convention;
(ii) the progress made by States Parties on the implementation of the obligations under the Convention;
(iii) progress of the implementation of the decisions and recommendations agreed upon at the Sixth Review Conference.

Article XIII

62. The Conference reaffirms that the Convention is of unlimited duration and applies at all times, and expresses its satisfaction that no State Party has exercised its right to withdraw from the Convention.

Article XIV

63. The Conference notes with satisfaction that eleven states have acceded to or ratified the Convention since the Fifth Review Conference.
64. The Conference calls upon signatories to ratify the Convention, and upon those states which have not signed the Convention to accede to it without delay, thus contributing to the achievement of universal adherence to the Convention.
65. The Conference encourages States Parties to take action to persuade non-parties to accede to the Convention without delay, and particularly welcomes regional initiatives that would lead to wider accession to the Convention.

Article XV

66. The Conference decides that as well as the five languages listed in this Article, Arabic shall be considered an official language for the purposes of any meetings of the States Parties and other formal communications concerning the operation of the Convention.




























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1BWC/CONF.VI/6.