APPENDIX V


The Zagreb Declaration sixth Meeting of States Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction1


(As adopted at the final plenary meeting on 2 December 2005)

1. We, the States Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction have gathered in Zagreb, Croatia, to reaffirm the commitments made one year ago at the landmark Nairobi Summit on a Mine Free World.
2. We remain as determined as ever to secure our achievements to date, to sustain and strengthen cooperation under the Convention, and to spare no effort to meet our challenges in universalizing the Convention, ending the use of anti-personnel mines globally, destroying stockpiled mines, clearing mined areas and providing mine risk education, as well as assisting the victims.
3. Our sense of responsibility has also been heightened by the fact that we are meeting for the first time in South Eastern Europe - a region heavily affected by anti-personnel mines. We welcome the fact that despite recent conflicts, all countries of the region have joined the Convention. We draw inspiration from their cooperation in applying its provisions and from their determination to free this region from the scourge of anti-personnel mines.
4. Through the vigorous pursuit of the provisions of the Convention and the aims of the Nairobi Action Plan, we indeed will achieve major progress towards ending, for all people and for all time, the suffering caused by anti-personnel mines.
5. We have noted with great satisfaction the progress made over the past year in applying the Nairobi Action Plan:

Since the Nairobi Summit, Bhutan, Ethiopia, Latvia and Vanuatu have ratified or acceded to the Convention, bringing to 147 the number of States that have accepted the Convention's comprehensive approach to ending the suffering caused by anti-personnel mines.

Algeria, Bangladesh, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritania and Uruguay have confirmed that they have destroyed their stockpiles, bringing the number of States Parties that now no longer possess stockpiled anti-personnel mines to 134.

Suriname and Guatemala have reported fulfillment of their obligation to clear all anti-personnel mines from mined areas under their jurisdiction or control, joining others that have achieved this important milestone.

Many of the 24 States Parties that have reported the responsibility for significant numbers of landmine survivors have developed concrete objectives to guide our assistance efforts between now and the Convention's second Review Conference in 2009.

6. We are committed to overcome together the great challenges that persist:

47 States have yet to ratify or accede to the Convention, including some that continue to use, produce, or possess large stockpiles of anti-personnel mines, or otherwise warrant special concern. In addition, several armed non-State actors continue to use anti-personnel mines.

13 States Parties still need to fulfill their obligations to destroy stockpiled anti-personnel mines.

45 States Parties have not yet reported having fulfilled their obligations to clear all anti-personnel mines from mined areas under their jurisdiction or control, including 22 which are obliged to do so by the end of 2009.

The 24 States Parties with the responsibility to assist significant numbers of mine victims need to continue to do their utmost to respond in a concrete, measurable and meaningful way, and those in a position to assist them should respond to the priorities for assistance as articulated by those States Parties in need.

7. The 70 action points agreed to in the Nairobi Action Plan are the road map to overcoming these challenges. In addition, we welcome the Zagreb Progress Report and its identification of priorities for 2006, which will focus our efforts in the coming year.
8. We recognize the urgency of fulfilling all our obligations under the Convention as well as our responsibilities to mine-affected communities, to landmine survivors and to future generations to whom we have promised a world free of anti-personnel mines.

1APLC/MSP.6/2005/5.