CHAPTER VII

Studies, education and information


Introduction

From the early 1960s studies on disarmament have been mandated by General Assembly resolutions and carried out by the United Nations Secretary-General. To reflect a wide range of expertise and political views, most studies have been conducted with the assistance of governmental experts appointed by him on the basis of equitable geographical distribution. These studies have served to provide a deeper understanding of disarmament matters and have supported the negotiating process through analyses of specific issues related to ongoing or beginning disarmament negotiations. To date, 33 studies have been conducted on disarmament-related topics.
Since the publication in 2002 of the UN study on disarmament and non-proliferation education (DNP), the Department of Disarmament Affairs (DDA or the Department) has renewed its emphasis on DNP education and served as a focal point for that activity reallocating human and financial resources to the task where possible.1 In 2004, a biennial report on the implementation of the recommendations of the DNP study was submitted to the General Assembly which contained information from Member States, the United Nations, and other international and non-governmental organizations.2 The Department continued to carry out its largest disarmament and non-proliferation training effort, the United Nations Disarmament Fellowship, Training and Advisory Services Programme, which awarded fellowships to 30 officials in 2004.3
The Department maintained its information and education programme4 focusing on weapons of mass destruction, particularly nuclear weapons, as well as on small arms and light weapons. Issues such as international terrorism, the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, other transparency and confidence-building measures and the rise in global military expenditures received attention as well. The Department's web site, disarmament.un.org, saw a dramatic increase in visitors and its content and form were expanded in 2004. DDA continued to produce its flagship publication, The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook as well as its Occasional Paper series. Plans are under way to make the Yearbook available in electronic form on the Internet in the latest and archival editions.
DDA cooperated with other United Nations offices and disarmament-related organizations in their information and education efforts. In particular, it worked closely with the Department of Public of Information (DPI), in the development and implementation of public information strategies for the third session of the Preparatory Committee for the 2005 Review Conference and the Open-ended Working Group to negotiate an international instrument to enable States to identify and trace, in a timely and reliable manner, illicit small arms and light weapons (OEWG). The Department also cooperated with civil society in the field of nuclear non-proliferation and small arms by facilitating access to and participation by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) at special events and exhibits.
The United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) carried out research in global security, regional security and human security and disarmament with a view to examining arms control and disarmament issues in innovative and creative ways and to providing decision-makers with specific policy recommendations.5

Disarmament studies

Studies completed in 2004

Group of Governmental Experts on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development in the current international context6

Pursuant to General Assembly resolution 57/65 of 22 November 2002 on the above subject, the Group of Governmental Experts reappraised the disarmament and development relationship as well as the future role of the Organization in that connection. In so doing, it took into account all the major international changes that had taken place since the adoption of the Final Document of the International Conference on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development in 1987. The review focused on the pivotal role of security, the costs and consequences of military expenditure, the release of resources for development, the importance of multilateralism and the role of the United Nations as well as other international organizations and institutions. For a detailed discussion of the study see chapter V of this volume. The composition of the group of governmental experts appears in Annex I of this chapter.

Panel of Governmental Experts on the Issue of Missiles in All its Aspects7

Pursuant to resolution 58/37 of 8 December 2003 entitled "Missiles", the Secretary-General sought the views of Member States on the report on missiles and, with the assistance of a Panel of Governmental Experts (the Panel) established in 2004, explored further the "issue of missiles in all its aspects". For a detailed discussion of the Panel's work, see chapter I of this volume. The composition of the Panel appears in Annex II of this chapter.

Studies in progress

Group of Governmental Experts on Developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security

Pursuant to resolution 58/32 of 8 December 2003 on the above subject, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to consider existing and potential threats in the sphere of information security and possible cooperative measures to address them. He was also requested to conduct a study on relevant international concepts aimed at strengthening the security of global information and telecommunications systems, with the assistance of a group of governmental experts appointed by him on the basis of equitable geographical distribution and with the help of Member States in a position to render such assistance. The outcome of the study will be submitted in a report to the General Assembly at its 60th session. For a more detailed discussion of the progress being made, see chapter V of this volume. The composition of the first session of the group of governmental experts appears in Annex III of this chapter.

Studies mandated in 2004

Panel of Governmental Experts on Verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification

Pursuant to resolution 59/60 of 3 December 2004 on the above subject, the Secretary-General, with the assistance of a panel of governmental experts to be established in 2006 on the basis of equitable geographic distribution, was requested to explore the question of verification in all its aspects, including the role of the United Nations in the field of verification, and to transmit the panel's report to the General Assembly for consideration at its sixty-first session (2006). The Group will hold three sessions: the first from 30 January - 3 February 2006 in New York: the dates for the two remaining sessions have not yet been decided. For further details of resolution 59/60, see chapter V of this volume.

Panel of Governmental Experts on the Issue of Missiles in All Its Aspects

By resolution 59/67 of 3 December 2004 entitled "Missiles", the Secretary-General, was requested to prepare a report, with the support of qualified consultants and the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, as appropriate, taking into account the views expresssed by Member States, to contribute to the United Nations endeavour to address the issue of missiles in all its aspects, by identifying areas where consensus could be reached, and to submit it to the General Assembly at its 61st session. With the assistance of a Panel of Governmental Experts, to be established in 2007 on the basis of equitable geographical distribution, the Secretary-General was also requested to further explore further ways and means to address the subject within the United Nations, including identifying areas where consensus could be reached. The outcome of the panel's work will be submitted in a report to the General Assembly at its sixth-third session (2008). For details of the resolution, see chapter I of this volume.

Group of Governmental Experts to consider further steps to enhance international cooperation in preventing, combating and eradicating illicit brokering in small arms and light weapons

By operative paragraph 5 of resolution 59/86, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to establish, after the 2006 review conference and no later than 2007, a group of governmental experts, appointed by him on the basis of equitable geographical representation, to consider further steps to enhance international cooperation in preventing, combating and eradicating illicit brokering in small arms and light weapons.

DDA Implementation of the recommendations of the 2002 UN Study on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education (DNP)

Recommendation 31 of the study on disarmament and non-proliferation education8 encouraged Member States, the United Nations and other international and non-governmental organizations to continue to inform the Department of Disarmament Affairs on steps that they had taken to implement the study's recommendations.
Recommendation 32 of that report encouraged the Secretary-General to prepare a report on a biennial basis reviewing the results of the implementation of the study's recommendations. In his report to the General Assembly,9 he submitted the replies from seven Member States: Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Russian Federation, Sweden and Venezuela, six United Nations and international organizations and four non-governmental organizations. Highlights of their activities in relation to specific recommendations of the study are described in brief below.

Implementation of the recommendations by Member States

First Committee

During the general debate and thematic discussions in the First Committee of the General Assembly's 59th session statements in support of DNP were made by Canada, Japan, Mexico and New Zealand (recommendation 33).

Preparatory Committee for the 2005 Review Conference of Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

Several States - Egypt, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Poland and Sweden - referred to their initiative at the Preparatory Committee for the 2005 NPT Review Conference in which they encouraged the Review Conference to attribute a high level of importance to the UN study; to report on educational and training programmes and workshops that included information on the results of review conferences and the work of States parties to implement the Treaty; and to promote a deeper understanding of the Treaty10 (recommendation 1).

Implementation of the recommendations by the United Nations and other international organizations

Department of Disarmament Affairs

The Department hosted two meetings of the inter-agency task force in 2003 and 2004 with a view to stimulating further implementation of the recommendations and coordinating the efforts of the United Nations system and of other international organizations in disarmament and non-proliferation education (recommendation 29). The meetings, which were also open to non-governmental educational practitioners, generated interest in creating DNP education programmes and encouraged the efforts of the United Nations University and the United Nations-associated University for Peace.11
In support of recommendation 18, DDA established an Advisory Group on DNP12 in close cooperation with the Global Teaching and Learning Project of DPI. The Group held its first meeting in February 2004 concomitant with the second inter-agency task force. The group mapped out developmentally appropriate peace and disarmament themes and identified best practices at different levels of education in order to enhance the United Nations Cyberschoolbus web site with disarmament and non-proliferation content.
In February, DDA completed its first full-year small arms education project dealing with education in post-conflict situations and peace-building - a project carried out in partnership with the Global Campaign for Peace Education of the Hague Appeal for Peace in Albania, Cambodia, Niger and Peru. Among the many initiatives reported to the Secretary-General, one conceived and carried out by students in primary and secondary schools in N'Guigmi, Niger in April 2004, stood apart. In imitation of the arms collection projects under way by the United Nations Development Programme, students organized a collection of knives, not guns, from their fellow students and invited teachers and community members for a celebratory Flame of Peace.13

Department of Public Information

With its new emphasis on educational outreach, the UN Chronicle featured numerous educational articles on the need for disarmament and non-proliferation, as well as combating terrorism (recommendations 3 and 4). The UN Works campaign created two web site features on child soldiers and landmines with links to the web sites of DDA and other partners (recommendation 23). The UN study on DNP was also covered in radio news programmes as well as in radio magazine and feature programmes for regional and worldwide dissemination on topics ranging from disarmament in crisis, to mine clearance, to small arms and light weapons in Africa (recommendation 23).

United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR)

The UNIDIR publication Coming to Terms with Security: a Lexicon for Arms Control, Disarmament and Confidence-Building, is available in Arabic, English, Hungarian, Korean and Spanish and being translated into French. The Institute is keen to see it translated into other languages, in particular in countries with little tradition of study in the field (recommendations 3 and 28).
Within the reporting period covered in the biennial report, UNIDIR hosted 39 research interns and 15 research fellows from a total of 26 countries (July 2002 to June 2003) and an additional 28 from 16 countries (July 2003 to June 2004) (recommendation 24).
The UNIDIR focal point for DNP education will continue to work on those issues. The Institute plans to hold a seminar to assist States in their reporting on the implementation of the recommendations made in the report. UNIDIR is also exploring the possibility of sponsoring additional disarmament and arms control exhibits and bringing exhibits by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency to Geneva (recommendation 29).

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

Publications by the IAEA included a quarterly journal, informative brochures, thematic reports, articles and opinion pieces written by the Director General and other Agency staff, examples of which are available on the Agency's Worldatom web site (http://www.iaea.oprg) which has been expanded and includes, in particular, the Agency's verification activities in support of global nuclear non-proliferation efforts. The Agency's web portal receives on average more than seven million visits per month, clearly demonstrating its utility for public education and information on the Agency's activities in the field of verification, nuclear safety and security, and other activities (recommendations 3 and 4).

IAEA and United Nations University

A direct result of the United Nations study was the launching of the United Nations University course on arms control and disarmament which was held in Tokyo from 12 to 15 October 2004 in collaboration with the IAEA. The module covers both non-proliferation and disarmament aspects, relevant regimes, technologies, export controls and related implementation issues.

University for Peace

In the last academic year, the University for Peace, a United Nations-associated university, developed and taught a disarmament module for degree credit as part of its Master's Programme on International Peace Studies. The course consists of two major segments: (a) weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weaponry and biological and chemical weapons; and (b) small arms and light weapons. (recommendations 7, 14 and 29).

Implementation of the recommendations by non-governmental organizations

Global Guide to Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education

The Global Guide, now in its third edition, is the most extensive guide to disarmament and non-proliferation education efforts around the world. It covers institutes and programmes in several dozen countries and is available both on the web and in print.

Foundation for Peace Studies, New Zealand

The Peace Foundation has been actively engaged in the promotion and implementation of peace and disarmament education through teacher workshops and the development and distribution of teaching resources. It plays an active role in the Public Advisory Committee on Disarmament and Arms Control, which advises the Government on disarmament issues, including education, and disperses funds from the Peace and Disarmament Education Trust for peace and disarmament education projects. The Foundation also worked with the New Zealand Government to publish the brochure "Peace education in schools" (recommendation 1).

Examples of disarmament and non-proliferation education programmes

Of the many existing DNP education programmes, the Department received details of two programmes - the 2004 Teaching Non-Proliferation Summer Institute of the University of North Carolina and an innovative programme in English and French designed for secondary schools by the United Nations Association of Canada. The former offered practical training on curriculum development, gave lectures and held seminars and panel discussions ranging from nuclear-weapon technology to the threat of nuclear terrorism. The latter, begun in the third quarter of 2004, consisted of a comprehensive guide for teachers, an online manual for students, featuring interactive lesson plans with case studies, designed to foster critical thinking and involvement in specific follow-up activities.
The Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) offers a Certificate in Nonproliferation Studies, awarded by the Graduate School of International Policy Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (recommendation 6). In the 2003-2004 academic year, 31 Masters of Arts students and six non-degree students earned the Certificate. In March 2004, CNS organized a workshop on the 2004 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Preparatory Committee in France entitled "The roadmap to 2005: where do we want to go and how should we get there?" More than 70 participants, including many ambassadors to the Conference on Disarmament and other senior representatives of States parties to the Treaty took part in the workshop. It provided an opportunity for delegations as well as the Chair of the third session of the PrepCom to consider the substantive and procedural issues that would be discussed at the third session in April (recommendation 13).
The Hague Appeal for Peace carries out a Global Campaign for Peace Education (GCPE) of which disarmament and human security form an integral part. From 20 to 24 October 2004 an international conference was held in Tirana, Albania entitled "Developing democracy through peace education: educating toward a world without violence". Innovative projects are ongoing or underway for 2005.
(For details of the activities of Member States, the United Nations and international and non-governmental organizations in implementing the recommendations of the study, see documents A/59/178 and Adds. 1 and 2.)

United Nations Disarmament Information Programme

The Secretary-General's biennial report to the General Assembly on the United Nations Information Programme (the Programme)14 provided an overview of the activities of the Programme carried out by the Department of Disarmament Affairs in the priority areas of: (a) weapons of mass destruction and (b) conventional weapons, in particular small arms and light weapons. Other areas of attention were international terrorism, the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms and other transparency and confidence-building measures, and the rise in global military expenditures. The report also recorded the activities carried out by the Department of Public Information in the field of arms limitation and disarmament.
Information continued to be disseminated through the Department's print and electronic publications, its web site, exhibits, panel discussions, briefings, symposia, and activities of the Secretary-General's Messenger of Peace. In some instances, activities were carried out in collaboration with DPI, including implementation of some of the recommendations from the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education. (For a detailed discussion of the study see the above section).
Statistics taken by the Department on the usage of its web site, disarmament.un.org, showed a dramatic rise in the number of visitors to the site over the last two years. The Department continued to expand and improve the site so as to provide current and accurate information in a dynamic format available to its growing audience.
DDA, in collaboration with DPI, continued to facilitate access of civil society organizations at disarmament-related events and meetings and to cooperate closely with NGOs, especially those coalitions that spearhead the participation of a large number of such organizations in the field of disarmament.

E- and print publications

The Programme issued the 28th volume of its flagship publication, The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook, and plans are under way to introduce the latest and archival editions from 2002 to 2004 online. Other publications included two occasional papers entitled Multilateral disarmament and non-proliferation regimes and the role of the United Nations: an evaluation and Symposium on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development, the Resolutions and Decisions booklet of the 59th UN General Assembly and two ad hoc publications: one on biological weapons in collaboration with the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace and Security; the other on small arms and light weapons published by DPI under the aegis of the Coordinating Action on Small Arms (CASA) mechanism to facilitate ongoing work on the issue. (For a list of publications, see Annex V of this chapter).

Web site

DDA's web site15 entitled "Peace and Security through Disarmament" leans towards issues rather than institutional structures. As such, it includes information on weapons of mass destruction, conventional weapons and regional disarmament. It also contains articles on emerging issues which, among other things, cover the relationship between disarmament and development in the current international context, the link between disarmament and international terrorism, gender perspectives on disarmament, and children and disarmament. Its substantive pages disseminate information and documentation from major disarmament-related conferences in the official United Nations languages. Its front page provides current material on press releases, statements by the Secretary-General and other senior United Nations officials, information on current and upcoming disarmament events and relevant background documentation. An educational resource section covers all aspects of the UN Study on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education, including both a powerpoint presentation and an electronic version on peace and disarmament along with related links to research and educational institutions and organizations.
The web site has launched a full-text Internet search engine16 which provides basic and advanced search services and a spell-check function. With this feature, the contents of all web-based pages, MS Word files, text-based PDF files and Lotus Notes databases are search-enabled.
The DDA's web site is visited frequently and provides 24-hour service worldwide. The following table provides some statistical information regarding its visitors:
Web site traffic - basic statistics for 2004
Cumulative
Daily Average
Visitors
363,957
1,005
Page view hits
2,899,772
7,922

Visitors from nearly 180 countries in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North and South America were attracted to DDA's home and overview pages as well as to its links to WMD, the Non-Proliferation Treaty, conventional arms, regional disarmament, disarmament and development, terrorism, education resources and disarmament machinery such as the Conference on Disarmament, Disarmament Commission, First Committee and Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters. In addition, the DDA web email box also received hundreds of messages from around the world. These statistics continue to demonstrate that disarmament is an issue of global interest and that DDA is a valuable internet resource of disarmament issues for Member States, non-governmental organizations and the academic community.
The Department regularly updates its established databases which include General Assembly resolutions and decisions on disarmament items and updates (covering sponsors and voting patterns), status of disarmament and arms regulation agreements, submissions by Member States to the UN Register of Conventional Arms and the UN standardized reporting on military expenditures, reports submitted under article 7 by States Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction (Mine Ban Convention), the Department's online reference library and on disarmament and non-proliferation education.

DDA panels, NGO symposia, exhibits and special events

DDA continued to work closely with coalition non-governmental organizations such as Reaching Critical Will and IANSA (International Action Network on Small Arms) to facilitate the participation of representatives of civil society organizations at calendar meetings such as the third session of the Preparatory Committee for the 2005 NPT Review Conference and the OEWG.. The Department also cooperated with these umbrella groups as well as the NGO Committee on Disarmament and the Department of Public Information in facilitating a number of panel discussions during the third session of the Preparatory Committee for the 2005 NPT Review Conference on issues such as nuclear weapons, missiles, verification and compliance.
The Department continued to organize a series of discussions on topics of interest in the field of arms limitation and disarmament with a view to broadening understanding and facilitating a meaningful discussion of those issues among Member States, academics, civil society, United Nations officials and the press.
A symposium on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development took place at United Nations Headquarters on 9 March in conjunction with the third session of the group of governmental experts on the issue. Presentations by Lawrence R. Klein, Nobel Laureate in Economics, on world peace and economic and prosperity; Sarah Meek of the Arms Management Programme at the Institute for Security Studies in South Africa on confidence-building measures as a tool for disarmament and development; and Richard Jolly, a development economist, on an overview of disarmament and development provided useful input for the Group's work. (Full texts of the presentations are found in Occasional Paper 9 on the Department's web site.)17
On 24 June, DDA and the Small Arms Survey project hosted the New York launch of the English edition of the Small Arms Survey 2004, subtitled Rights at Risk at United Nations Headquarters. The Survey focused on the linkages between human rights abuse and the widespread proliferation, availability, and use of small arms. Speakers included Anton Thalmann, Chairman of the Open-Ended Working Group on Tracing Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons; Hannelore Hoppe, Director and Deputy to the Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs; Keith Krause, Programme Director, and Glenn McDonald, Yearbook Coordinator, of the Small Arms Survey.
On 12 October, an informal discussion entitled "Disarmament and Nonproliferation Education" stemming from the Secretary-General's report on the same subject18 was held at UN Headquarters sponsored by DDA and UNIDIR. The agenda included an introduction to the Secretary-General's report on the implementation of the recommendations of the UN Study on DNP; highlights from the replies of Member States on the implementation of the study; the activities of DDA, UNIDIR, DPI, IAEA, the University for Peace and civil society organizations; ways to promote and stimulate new initiatives; and ideas to facilitate an exchange of information and reporting.
On 21 October, DPI organized an NGO briefing in observance of Disarmament Week (24-30 October) on Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Challenges of Non-Proliferation and Disarmament. Briefings were given by Wolfgang Hoffmann, Executive Secretary of the PrepCom for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization; Luis Alfonso De Alba, Permanent Representative of Mexico to the International Organizations in Geneva and Chairman of the First Committee for the 59th General Assembly session; and Daryl Kimball, Executive Director, Arms Control Association (United States).
On 6 December, Harald Müller, Chairman of the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, gave a briefing on the Advisory Board's contribution to the High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change contained in its report entitled Multilateral disarmament and non-proliferation regimes and the role of the United Nations: an evaluation. The briefing addressed WMD-related issues and their delivery systems, small arms and light weapons, landmines and strengthening the UN role in those fields. The Board's report appears in Occasional Paper No. 8 available on the Department's web site.19
An exhibit sponsored by the Hidankyo, a Japan-based NGO of survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, was a side event at the third session of the Preparatory Committee of the 2005 NPT Review Conference. The display contained artifacts from 1945 along with posters and photographs documenting the after-effects of the bombing of the two cities and video projections recounting survivors' stories.

Activities of the Secretary-General's Messenger of Peace

Stamp

On 15 October, the United Nations Postal Administration issued a definitive 37-cent stamp on the theme "Books Not Guns". Michael Douglas, in his capacity as the Secretary-General's Messenger of Peace, prepared a 60-second video for the launch of the stamp at the United Nations Postal Administration's First Day of Issue Ceremony at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center (New York City). The statement highlighted the proliferation of light weapons and exploitation of children as instruments of war and the accompanying physical and emotional side-effects. Mr. Douglas urged viewers to assist in redirecting investment in weapons to investment in books and education, not war. Copies of the stamp were distributed to the First Committee and the video was shown on 15 October. A photo of the stamp appears in the front of this volume.
On 5 April, Michael Douglas filmed a World Chronicle television segment for DPI in which he spoke about nuclear non-proliferation and small arms. The film was aired in May 2004.20

United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR)

In a note to the General Assembly, the Secretary-General transmitted the report21 of the Director of UNIDIR on the Institute's activities for the period August 2003 to July 2004. It also contained the proposed programme of work and budget for 2004-2005 for the consideration by the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, acting as the Board of Trustees of the Institute at its forty-third session.
During the year, UNIDIR's research programme focused on global security, regional security, and human security and disarmament. In the broader framework of global security, UNIDIR initiated a project to draw, from humanitarian action, concrete proposals for new negotiating processes in disarmament. It organized a number of seminars on issues of relevance to the CD such as outer space and security, weapons of mass destruction and non-state actors, cooperative threat reduction and nuclear non-proliferation. In the area of regional security, UNIDIR focused on specific issues related to Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, North-East Asia, South Asia and Central Asia. In the field of human security, the Institute conducted research on issues related to small arms in West Africa, regional and cross-regional perspectives on illicit trafficking in small arms, and the implementation of the UN Programme of Action on Small Arms. The Geneva Forum, the Institute's ongoing discussion series, held a number of seminars on small arms. UNIDIR concluded its research project on the participatory evaluation of weapons for development programmes.
As the connections between security and health were increasingly of interest to the disarmament and security debate, UNIDIR cooperated with WHO and other UN institutions and NGOs on the effects of and issues pertaining to interpersonal violence and the spread of weapons. The Institute continued to be engaged in an extensive network with specialized agencies and institutions of the UN system and other organizations through electronic means, its publications and conferences, seminars and discussions. (A list of publications issued by the Institute during the period under review appears in Annex V of this chapter.)

General Assembly, 2004

59/93
United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education. The revised draft resolution was introduced by Mexico, on behalf of the sponsors (see page 12 for the sponsors) on 4 November. At the same meeting, it was adopted without a vote by the First Committee and by the General Assembly on 3 December. For the text of the resolution see page 69.
The resolution welcomed the Secretary-General's report on disarmament and non-proliferation education and requested him to prepare a report reviewing the results of the implementation of the recommendations and possible new opportunities for promoting disarmament and non-proliferation education for submission to the General Assembly at its sixty-first session. It also requested him to utilize electronic means to the fullest extent possible in the dissemination, in as many official languages as feasible, of information related to that report and any other information that the Department of Disarmament Affairs gathered on an ongoing basis in relation to the UN study.
59/103
United Nations Disarmament Information Programme. The draft resolution was introduced by Mexico, on behalf of the sponsors (see page 15 for the sponsors) on 22 October . It was adopted without a vote by the First Committee, on 27 October and by the General Assembly on 3 December. For the text of the resolution see page 15.
The resolution recommended that the Programme continue to inform, educate and generate public understanding of the importance of multilateral action and support for it, including action by the United Nations and the Conference on Disarmament, in the field of arms limitation and disarmament, in a factual, balanced and objective manner. It also invited all Member States to make contributions to the Voluntary Trust Fund for the United Nations Disarmament Information Programme with a view to sustaining a strong outreach programme; and it requested the Secretary-General to submit to the General Assembly at its sixty-first session a report covering both the implementation of the activities of the Programme by the United Nations system during the previous two years and the activities it contemplated for the following two years.

Annex I

Composition of the Group of Governmental Experts on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development
Brigadier (Retired) Richard F. Baly, Conflict and Humanitarian Affairs, Department for International Development, London (third session)
Fikry Cassidy, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Indonesia to the United Nations, New York (second and third sessions)
Todor Churov, NATO and International Security Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Sofia
Yasuhito Fukui, First Secretary, Delegation of Japan to the Conference on Disarmament, Geneva (first session)
Andrea García Guerra, Minister, Permanent Mission of Mexico to the United Nations, New York
Friedrich Gröning, Deputy Commissioner of the Federal Government for Arms Control and Disarmament, Foreign Ministry of the Federal Republic of Germany, Berlin
Leslie Gumbi, Minister, Disarmament Section, Permanent Mission of South Africa, Geneva
Prasad Kariyawasam, Director-General, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Sri Lanka
Kagyabukama E. Kiliba, Minister Plenipotentiary, Permanent Mission of the United Republic of Tanzania to the United Nations, New York
Catharina Kipp, Director, Department for Global Security, Disarmament Section, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Stockholm
Santiago Irazabal Mourão, Counsellor, Disarmament and Sensitive Technologies Division, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Brazil
Cheikh Niang, Minister Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Senegal to the United Nations, New York
Geraldine O'Callaghan, Senior Adviser, Arms Control, Conflict and Humanitarian Affairs Department, Department for International Development, London, (first and second sessions)
Shutaro Ohmura, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations, New York, (second and third sessions)
Anatoliy Scherba, Head, Arms Control and Military and Technical Cooperation Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Kiev
Iwan Wiranataatmadja, Senior Official on Disarmament Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Jakarta, (first session)

Annex II

Composition of the Panel of Governmental Experts on the Issue of Missiles in All its Aspects
Mohsen Naziri Asl, Director, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Islamic Republic of Iran (second session)
Lotfi Bouchaara, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Morocco to the United Nations
Chun Yung-woo, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations
David Cooper, Director, Non-Proliferation Policy, Office of the Secretary of Defence, United States of America
Asif Ali Khan Durrani, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Pakistan to the United Nations (first and second sessions)
Richard Ekwall, Director, Department for Strategic Export Control, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Sweden
Khalil Ur-Rahman Hashmi, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Pakistan to the United Nations (third session)
Tariq Osman Hyder, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Pakistan (second session)
Alaa Issa, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Egypt to the United Nations
Jeremy Issacharoff, Deputy Director-General for Strategic Affairs, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Israel
Wernfried Köffler, Director for Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, Federal Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Austria
Barend J. Lombard, Deputy Director, Nuclear and Non-Proliferation, Department of Foreign Affairs, South Africa
Vitali A. Lukyantsev, Senior Counsellor, Department for Security and Disarmament Matters, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Russian Federation
Ma Shengkun, Deputy Division Director, Department of Arms Control and Disarmament, Ministry for Foreign Affair, China
Robert McDougall, Director, Non-Proliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament, Foreign Affairs, Canada
Santiago Irazabal Mourão, Counsellor, Division for Disarmament and Sensitive Technologies, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Brazil
Reza Najafi, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the United Nations (first and third sessions)
François Richier, Director, Non-Proliferation and Nuclear Disarmament, Department for Strategic Affairs, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, France
Renato Carlos Sersale di Cerisano, Director of International Security, Nuclear and Space Affairs, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Argentina
Anatoliy Scherba, Head of Arms Control and Military and Technical Cooperation, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ukraine
Harsh Vardhan Shringla, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of India to the United Nations (third session)
Paul Stephens, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Australia to the United Nations
Takaya Suto, Director, Centre for the Promotion of Disarmament, Japan Institute of International Affairs
D. B. Venkatesh Varma, Director, Disarmament and International Security Affairs Division, Ministry of External Affairs, India (first and second sessions)
Josef Vitek, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of the Czech Republic to the United Nations
Andrew Wood, Assistant Director, Head, Export Control Policy, Counter Proliferation and Arms Control Section, Ministry of Defence, United Kingdom
Zainal Mohd. Noor, Staff Officer I, Department of Artillery, Ministry of Defence, Malaysia

Annex III

Composition of the Group of Governmental Experts on Developments in the Field of Information and telecommunications in the context of international security (first session)
Bisher Al-Khasawneh, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Jordan to the United Nations
Murilo Marques Barboza, Special Advisor to the Minister of Defence, Ministry of Defence, Brazil
Jorge Antonio Espinosa Duràn, Information Security Manager, Policia Federal Preventiva, Mexico
Major-General A.C. Hurribunce, Chief of Command and Management, Information Systems Division, Department of Defence, South Africa
Cheickna Keita, First Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Mali to the United Nations
Andrey V. Krutskikh, Deputy Director, Department for Disarmament and Security Matters, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Russian Federation
Lew Kwang-chul, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations
Michele Markoff, Senior Coordinator for International Critical Infrastructure Protection, Bureau of Political Military Affairs, United States Department of State, United States
Sanjiv Ranjan, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of India to the United Nations
Stéphanie Schaer, Sécretariat Général de la Defense Nationale, France
Thomas Schäfer, First Counsellor, Head of Division, Conventional Arms Control, Federal Foreign Office, Division 241, Germany
Geoff Smith, Head Information Security Policy Team, Department of Trade and Industry, United Kingdom
Valery V. Tsepkalo, Assistant to the President of the Republic of Belarus, Belarus
Wu Haitao, Counsellor, Department of Arms Control and Disarmament, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, China
Mohd Azlan Zaharudin, Assistant Director, Directorate of Technical Development & Information Technology, National Security Division, Malaysia

Annex IV

Publications and other materials of the Department of Disarmament Affairs or produced in collaboration with the Department and its regional centres
The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook, vol. 28: 2004, (Sales No. E.04.IX.1)
Occasional Paper No. 8,22 October 2004, Multilateral disarmament and non-proliferation regimes and the role of the United Nations: an evaluation
Occasional Paper No. 9,23 November 2004, Symposium on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development
Disarmament Resolutions and Decisions of the Fifty-ninth Session of the United Nations General Assembly, December 2004
Small Arms and Light Weapons, Selected United Nations Documents (DPI/2353), June 2004
Reducing the Threat of Biological Weapons, 200424

Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa (UNREC)

African Peace Bulletin/Bulletin Africain de la Paix No. 30,25 July 2004, "Taking stocks of the Disarmament Debate"
Final Report on the "Training Workshop of the Members of the Parliamentary Defence Committees in West Africa," April 2004
Final Report on the regional workshop on "Promoting Transparency in the Flows of Small Arms and Light Weapons in Africa, July 2004
First Annual Report of the project entitled "Small Arms Transparency and Control Regimes in Africa," September 2004

Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (UNLiREC)26

Regional Perspectives series:
No. 6 Paraguay: Towards a Culture of Peace: Destruction of Firearms and Ammunition. 24 August - 6 October 2003
No. 7 Improving the Security of Stockpiles in Firearms, Ammunition and Explosives: A Latin American Experience 2002-2004
No. 8 Destruction of Firearms, Ammunition and Explosives: A Latin American Experience 2002-2004
No. 9 New Strategies to Strengthen Firearms Control in Brazil's South-eastern Region, 28-30 April 2004, Brazil
No. 10 Legal Norms and Instruments on Firearms, Ammunition and Explosives
No 11 Commercial Trade of and Illicit Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Ammunition: Training the Trainers Investigative Techniques Courses, 8-26 March 2004, Costa Rica
No 12 Commercial Trade of and Illicit Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Ammunition: Training the Trainers Investigative Techniques Course, 3-21 May 2004, Brazil
Latin America and Caribbean Policy Brief
No. 1: United Nations 2001 Conference on the Illicit Trafficking in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects: Colombia's position
Folders:
Small Arms and Light Weapons Administration (SALSA) System
The Firearms, Ammunition and Explosives Industry (FinDATA)
VHS:
Training the Trainers Course (SICA)
Training the Trainers Course (MERCOSUR)
Training the Trainers Course (CAN)
Video Clip: "Soldiers of Peace"
Video: CCP (Combined Command Post)
CD-ROMs:
Destruction Methods - 2004
The composition of the Panel appears in Annex II of this chapter.

United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific

Publications:
Pacific-Asia Dialogue Series No. 1
The Challenge of Terrorism for International Security and Disarmament: Global and Regional Impact, Kyoto, 7-9 August 2002. United Nations: New York, 2004

Annex V

UNIDIR Publications

Research reports

Peace in the Middle East: P2P and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, by Adel Atieh, Gilad Ben-Nun, Gasser El Shahed, Rana Taha and Steve Tulliu, 2004, 54p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.05.0.2.
Building a Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone in the Middle East: Global Non-Proliferation Regimes and Regional Experiences, in cooperation with the League of Arab States, 2004, 310p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.04.0.30.
Exchanging Weapons for Development in Cambodia: An Assessment of Different Weapon Collection Strategies Assessed by Local People, by Geofrey Mugumya, 2004, 132p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.04.0.28.
Implementing the United Nations Programme of Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons: Analysis of the Reports Submitted by States in 2003, by Elli Kytömäki and Valerie Anne Yankey-Wayne, in cooperation with UNDP, DDA and SAS, 2004, 320p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.04.0.27.
From Exchanging Weapons for Development to Security Sector Reform in Albania: Gaps and Grey Areas in Weapon Collection Programmes Assessed by Local People, by Geofrey Mugumya, 2004, 130p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.04.0.19.
Open Skies: A Cooperative Approach to Military Transparency and Confidence Building, by Pál Dunay, Márton Krasznai, Hartwig Spitzer, Rafael Wiemker and William Wynne, 2004, 340p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.04.0.18.
Exchanging Weapons for Development in Mali: Weapon Collection Programmes Assessed by Local People, by Geofrey Mugumya, 2004, 174p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.04.0.14.
A Guide to the Destruction of Small Arms and Light Weapons-The Approach of the South African National Defence Force, by Sarah Meek and Noel Stott, in cooperation with SAS, 2004, 76p., United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.04.0.5.
Costs of Disarmament-Mortgaging the Future: The South Asian Arms Dynamic, by Susan Willett, 2004, 124p., United Nations publication, Sales No.GV.E.04.0.1.

Disarmament Forum

No. 1, 2004, Strengthening Disarmament and Security
No. 2, 2004, India and Pakistan: Peace by Piece
No. 3, 2004, Human Rights, Human Security and Disarmament
No. 4, 2004, The 2005 NPT Review Conference

Annex VI

List of symposia and panels sponsored by DDA

1Disarmament and non-proliferation education, Report of the Secretary-General (A/59/178), p.27.
2Ibid. and Addenda 1 & 2.
3A/59/177.
4A/59/171.
5See UNIDIR web site: http://www.unidir.org/html/en/research_ projects.html.
6A/59/119.
7A/59/278.
8A/57/124.
9A/59/178, op. cit., parts II-IV.
10See NPT/ CONF.2005.PC.II/WP.18 available from http:// disarmament.un.org/wmd/npt/2005/PC2 listofdocs.html.
11A/59/178, op. cit.
12The Advisory Group on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education is composed of educators on peace and disarmament with competence in conventional and non-conventional weapons from four regions of the world.
13A/59/178, op.cit., Summary.
14A/59/171, op.cit.
15See DDA web site http://disarmament.un.org.
16See http://disarmament.un.org/search.html.
17http//disarmament.un.org/DDApublications/index.html.
18A/57/124, op.cit.
19See footnote 17.
20http://www.un.org/webcast/worldchron/trans935.pdf.
21A/59/168.
22Available from http://disarmament2.un.org/DDApublications. (The content was based on intensive deliberations and the contribution made by the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters to the Secretary-General's High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change.)
23Ibid. (The contents were based on the Panel discussion held at United Nations Headquarters on 9 March 2004.)
24In cooperation with the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace and Security, New York (panel discussions were held between 2000 and 2003).
25http://www.unrec.org/eng/Bulletin.htm, also from http://www.unrec.org/fr/bulletin.htm
26Available from http://www.unlirec.org.