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EMBARGOED TO THE MEDIA UNTIL TUESDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2003, 1100 HRS NEW YORK TIME

 
 

Flash Appeal
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Grenada

Flash Appeal

Executive Summary


On 7 September 2004, Hurricane Ivan, one of the most powerful hurricanes to hit the Caribbean region in the last 10 years, ravaged Grenada with rain and winds of 220 kilometres per hour. ‘Ivan,’ a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, left behind an unimaginable scene of destruction and despair on this tri-island nation of 102,000 inhabitants.

Some 37 people died and most of the population of Grenada was affected to a greater or lesser extent. Of the six parishes, St. Andrew, St. David, St. Georges and St. John were completely devastated, and the destruction is very striking in all remaining parishes as well. Approximately 90% of the houses were damaged or destroyed; according to government estimates, some 50% of the population is now homeless.

Government buildings, the main prison, hospitals, schools and churches did not escape the fury of the hurricane. Consequently, most of the ministries and public services were paralyzed for several days immediately following the hurricane. The official residences of both the Governor General (Head of State) and the Prime Minister (Head of Government) were destroyed. The homes of many senior government ministers also suffered extensive damage. Utilities services such as water, power and telecommunications were severely disrupted.

As of 24 September, some 90% of the water supply system has been restored but some access and quality problems remain. Telephone connections are limited and are primarily mobile. The local power company faces a mammoth task to restore the power sector. Although the main generator is still operational, most of the distribution lines were damaged and a great number of electric cables and poles are lying on the roads and fields, posing a direct threat to the safety of the population and the circulation of vehicles. The government has made an effort to restore power to hospitals and government buildings, but it will take 6-12 months to rehabilitate the power supply system and reestablish power to the entire country.

Medical facilities and equipment were also affected, and so were stocks of medical supplies. The lack of power poses a serious challenge for health care of patients such as diabetics, whose medication requires refrigeration at health clinics. Although medical personnel are not in short supply because of volunteers from other islands, transportation for health personnel is a challenge due to the extensive damage to many vehicles. Cases of diarrhoea have been reported and there is a concern that this might worsen if water supply and sanitation facilities do not improve.

Two and a half weeks after the disaster, food shortages and distribution continue to be a major
challenge, with many people lacking food and water as well as medical care.

An important part of Grenada’s food basket consists of rice and beans, and stocks are running low. It is expected that food assistance will be necessary, at least until people are able to partially restore their livelihood.

There is an urgent need to assist approximately 40% of the population to return to their damaged homes: this will free up shelters, many of which are schools in need of immediate repairs.

The agricultural sector has been decimated. Of particular concern is the destruction of cash crops and nutmeg (nutmegs account for 80% of agricultural exports). It takes at least seven years for nutmeg trees, when replanted, to grow and bear fruit. Consequently, Grenada faces a long-term decline in its foreign exchange earning capacity.

This grim picture extends to the fishing sector, with a considerable number of boats, equipment and icemakers lost or damaged, and fisherfolk in dire need of immediate assistance. Loss of livelihoods and income are also paramount concerns given the impacts and danger to tourism and agriculture sectors, the “twin pillars” of the Grenadian economy. It is estimated that over 60% of employment in the tourism industry is now likely lost, affecting the youth and women.

There has been a major environmental disaster with many forested areas destroyed, negatively
impacting watershed management. There is an emerging problem of desertification and associated
risks.

This Flash Appeal covers six months (from 1 October 2004 – 31 March 2005), and its projects will be implemented within that period. It intends to respond to the urgent humanitarian needs of the
population of Grenada, and quickly to establish the foundation for rehabilitation of social services and economic recovery. Urgent needs include emergency shelter, food, education, and health, as well as communications, seeds, tools, alternative crops, non-agricultural activities and personal security.

Projects to facilitate recovery involve the creation of quick impact projects (QIP) at the community level, to generate employment and rebuild capacities. Food aid is not included in this Flash Appeal but is part of the Emergency Appeal launched by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) on 15 September 2004.

United Nations agencies will work in partnership with non-governmental agencies and the Red Cross movement to implement these projects, as well as with the relevant public sector institutions, particularly those responsible for housing, infrastructure, education, health and agriculture. The United Nations and its partners are appealing for US$ 27.6 million to meet urgent humanitarian needs and establish the basis for recovery in the next six months for the people of Grenada.

Note: The Flash Appeal will be revised as required following needs assessments and in accordance with the evolution of the situation. Revisions to the Appeal may include projects from other partners.
Updates and revisions to the Appeal can be found on www.reliefweb.int/appeals: Grenada Hurricane Ivan Flash Appeal – September 2004. The Financial Tracking Service shows the funding status of each project in the appeal, continuously updated, on www.reliefweb.int/fts.


Summary of Requirements by Appealing Organization
as of 27 September 2004

  SECTOR NAME

ORIGINAL REQUIREMENTS

 
  CEDERA

100,000

 
  FAO

3,965,000

 
  French RC 594,000  
  OXFAM 1,115,160  
  PAHO/WHO 450,000  
  UNDP 19,904,000  
  UNESCO 335,000  
  UNFPA 310,000  
  UNICEF 777,600  
  WFP 90,000  
       
       
  GRAND TOTAL 27,640,760  
       

Summary of Requirements by Sector
as of 27 September 2004

  SECTOR NAME

ORIGINAL REQUIREMENTS

 
  AGRICULTURE

3,965,000

 
  COORDINATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

690,000

 
  ECONOMIC RECOVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE 1,926,400  
  EDUCATION 9,580,600  
  FAMILY SHELTER AND NON-FOOD ITEMS 8,826,000  
  HEALTH 28,148,384  
  PROTECTION/HUMAN RIGHTS/RULE OF LAW 777,600  
  WATER AND SANITATION 1,115,160  
       
       
  GRAND TOTAL 27,640,760  
       

Copyright  © 2003  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs