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EMBARGOED TO THE MEDIA UNTIL TUESDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2003, 1100 HRS NEW YORK TIME

 
 

Democratic People's Republic of Korea
2004 Appeal

 
 

Hear Our Voices - DPRK

 
 

General Background

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Democratic People's Republic of Korea

CONSOLIDATED APPEAL

SUMMARY

Gains at risk

A humanitarian emergency in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) continues to affect the lives of millions of people, who still need assistance to maintain their nutritional status and general health.

This year, 6.4 million vulnerable people needed food aid. Some 5.5 million received it.

Despite substantial gains in nine years of humanitarian operations, assistance is still needed. It continues to play a vital role in safeguarding and promoting the well-being of millions of people, whose nutritional status and general health would otherwise be seriously compromised.

Many North Koreans face continued health problems. Nine per cent of children suffer from acute malnutrition, while chronic malnutrition in some places, such as Ryanggang, is above 45 per cent.

Anemia is common, and is seen in 30 per cent of pregnant women. The maternal mortality rate has doubled since 1993.

Many people lack access to clean water. Although the country is rich in water resources, girls and women spend hours each day collecting water from unsafe sources because of a breakdown of water systems, and poor electricity supply.

The international response has been weakened by increasing security tension on the Korean peninsula and re-emergence of the nuclear issue in October 2002. The tension has negatively affected efforts by UN Agencies and NGOs to build national capacity.

While most donors have continued to separate politics from humanitarian aid, the level of assistance has been affected.

This has undermined the Common Humanitarian Action Plan (CHAP) short term goal of meeting the needs of the most vulnerable through direct humanitarian activities, and the strategic goal of building capacities for future development.

These problems were compounded by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic. Although SARS was not reported in the DPRK, its proximity to China and the poor state of health services made it vulnerable. The SARS outbreak also had an adverse effect on the DPRK economy.

Two-pronged approach

The strategy of organizations participating in the 2004 Consolidated Inter-Agency Appeal for DPR Korea, aims to preserve lives and promote the well-being of vulnerable populations, including children and women.

The humanitarian response in 2004 must include greater investment in health, water and sanitation. While there was a relatively good response to food requirements in 2003, the response to water and sanitation and health was poor. Without these, further improvements in the benefits from food alone cannot be expected.

Moreover, the DPRK needs both humanitarian and development assistance. The humanitarian response alone will not help the country overcome its severe economic difficulties.

Agencies and their partners, therefore, have adopted a two-pronged approach to cover both humanitarian and development requirements.

While retaining the CAP mechanism for the present, work has started on the UNDAF. Between both coordinating frameworks, emergency and development will be catered for.

This strategy was prepared by the CAP Country Team, including United Nations agencies, NGOs, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and donors.

Request

For 2004, a total of US$ 221,224,079 is required for programmes in support of the CAP strategy.

Funding Requirements in 2004
 (US$)

  SECTOR NAME

ORIGINAL REQUIREMENTS

 
  AGRICULTURE

4,167,000

 
  COORDINATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES 829,984  
  EDUCATION 924,000  
  FOOD 191,933,451  
  HEALTH 18,649,844  
  WATER AND SANITATION 4,719,800  
       
       
  GRAND TOTAL 221,224,079  
       

 

 

Copyright  © 2003  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs