Category Archives: IPCC

All posts related to the IPCC.

IPCC starts meeting to finalize Working Group III report

7 April 2014 – Government representatives and scientists opened a five-day meeting on Monday of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to finalize a report assessing the options for mitigating climate change, and the underlying technical, economic and institutional requirements.

The meeting is the culmination of four years’ work by hundreds of experts who have volunteered their time and expertise to produce a comprehensive assessment. The IPCC member governments are gathering to approve the Summary for Policymakers of the third part of the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), checking the text line by line.

The Working Group III contribution to the AR5 deals with the mitigation of climate change. It sets out the technological, economic and institutional requirements and associated risks of climate change policies at the global, national and sub-national level, investigates mitigation measures for all major sectors, and assesses investment and finance issues.

“Preventing dangerous interference with the climate system entails mitigating climate change,” said Ottmar Edenhofer, Co-Chair of Working Group III. “On a transparent scientific basis, our report provides an understanding of the available options to meet this challenge.”

The first contribution, by Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change, was finalized in September 2013, with the full report published at the end of January 2014. The Working Group II contribution, assessing impacts, adaptation and vulnerability, was finalized in March this year. The Fifth Assessment Report will be completed by a Synthesis Report in October.

The meeting, hosted by the Government of Germany, runs from 7 to 11 April 2014. The Summary for Policymakers is due to be released on Sunday 13 April. The full report will also be released within two days, published online in September, and in book form a few months later.

“The approval process puts our report under close scrutiny. It ensures that our report presents state of the art research in a language and format that policymakers can use,” said Ramón Pichs-Madruga, one of the other Co-Chairs of Working Group III.

“In the Plenary, all countries can voice their concerns and all of them are heard. In the end, it is scientific accuracy that decides”, added Youba Sokona, Co-Chair of Working Group III.

The report builds on previous IPCC reports and assesses the wealth of literature on climate change mitigation that has emerged since the publication of the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report in 2007.

For more information contact:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int

Jonathan Lynn, + 49 30 6831 30241 or Nina Peeva, + 49 160 9941 0967

IPCC Working Group III Media Contact, Email: press@ipcc-wg3.de
Patrick Eickemeier, +49 331 288 24 30

IPCC starts meeting to finalize Working Group II report

25 March, 2014 – (IPCC release) Government representatives and scientists on Tuesday opened a five-day meeting of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to finalize a report assessing the impacts of climate change on human and natural systems, options for adaptation, and the interactions among climate changes, other stresses on societies, and opportunities for the future.

The meeting, the culmination of four years’ work by hundreds of experts who have volunteered their time and expertise to produce a comprehensive assessment, will approve the Summary for Policymakers of the second part of the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report, checking the text line by line. The meeting will also accept the full report, which besides the Summary for Policymakers consists of a Technical Summary and 30 chapters in two volumes.

This report, produced by the IPCC’s Working Group II, deals with impacts, adaptation, and
vulnerability. It is part two of a four-part assessment. The first part, by Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change, was finalized in September 2013. The Working Group III contribution, assessing mitigation of climate change, will be finalized in April. The Fifth Assessment Report will be completed by a Synthesis Report in October.

“The Working Group II author team assessed thousands of papers to produce a definitive report of the state of knowledge concerning climate-change impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Many hundreds of volunteers, in and beyond the author team, approached this work with dedication and deep expertise,” said Vicente Barros, Co-Chair of Working Group II.

The meeting, hosted by the Government of Japan, runs from 25 to 29 March 2014. The Summary for Policymakers is due to be released on Monday 31 March. The draft full report will also be released at the same time, with final publication online and as a two-book series a few months later.

Volume I will cover issues sector by sector. Volume II will consider continental-scale regions.

“This report considers consequences of climate changes that have already occurred and the risks across a range of possible futures. It considers every region and many sectors, ranging from oceans to human security. The focus is as much on identifying effective responses as on understanding challenges,” said Chris Field, the other Co-Chair of Working Group II.

The report builds on the four previous assessment reports produced by the IPCC since it was
established in 1988. Compared to past Working Group II reports, the Working Group II contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report assesses a substantially larger knowledge base of relevant scientific, technical and socio-economic literature, facilitating a comprehensive assessment across a broader set of topics and sectors.

Secretary-General deeply concerned by conclusions of Fifth Assessment, IPCC report says

New York, 27 September 2013 -UN  Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he was deeply concerned by the conclusions of the  Fifth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change which was released in Stockhom today.

In a statement attributable to the Spokesperson for the Secretary-General on the report of the IPCC Fifth Assessment, the Secretary-General said the “report clearly demonstrates that human influence on the climate system is now evident in most regions of the globe and it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century.”

“Limiting climate change will require substantial and sustained reductions of greenhouse gas emissions. The Secretary-General urges all countries to make every effort needed to reach a global legal climate agreement by 2015, and to take action swiftly in order to limit the effects of climate change.”

UNFCCC’s Figueres: Latest IPCC findings a clarion call for action

Bonn, 27 September – UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres, the UN’s top climate change official, said the findings of the latest IPCC report on climate change are a clarion call for the global community to accelerate efforts to combat climate change and steer humanity out of the danger zone.

On Friday, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released the first instalment of its Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), on the science of climate change.

“The report shows that there is more clarity about human-generated climate change than ever before. We know that the total effort to limit warming does not add up to what is needed to bend the emissions curve. To steer humanity out of the high danger zone, governments must step up immediate climate action and craft an agreement in 2015 that helps to scale up and speed up the global response,” Executive Secretary Figueres said from the United States, during her mission to the current UN General Assembly in New York.

Governments under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change have agreed to limit the global temperature rise to two degrees Celsius to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. They have also agreed to assess the adequacy of this limit and progress towards this goal using the best science, including this IPCC report. This formally agreed international review will conclude in 2015 in Paris, at the same time as the new, universal climate agreement.

 

“As the results from the latest and best available science become clearer, the challenge becomes more daunting, but simultaneously the solutions become more apparent. These opportunities need to be grasped across society in mutually reinforcing ways by governments at all levels, by corporations, by civil society and by individuals,” said Ms. Figueres.

“Thankfully, momentum to fight climate change is building. We know that success is possible. We have the technology, funding and ability to respond. The many successes at domestic, international and private sector levels to build a low-carbon society shine light on the way forward, but we do need to quickly go to scale,” she added.

Governments meeting for the next round of UN climate change negotiations in Warsaw from 11 to 22 November will consider the IPCC findings on the science of climate change in the context of the UNFCCC review.

In March of next year, the IPCC will release the second instalment of AR5 that addresses impacts and vulnerabilities. A third instalment outlining options to curb greenhouse gas emissions will be published in April 2014. The final instalment, an overall summary for policy makers, is due in October 2014, shortly before the UN Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru. These reports give governments tools that help design the architecture and content of the 2015 agreement.

 

Human influence on climate clear, IPCC report says

STOCKHOLM, 27 September – Human influence on the climate system is clear. This is evident in most regions of the globe, a new assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes.

It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. The evidence for this has grown, thanks to more and better observations, an improved understanding of the climate system response and improved climate models.

Warming in the climate system is unequivocal and since 1950 many changes have been observed throughout the climate system that are unprecedented over decades to millennia. Each of the last three decades has been successively warmer at the Earth’s surface than any preceding decade since 1850, reports the Summary for Policymakers of the IPCC Working Group I assessment report, Climate Change 2013: the Physical Science Basis, approved on Friday by member governments of the IPCC in Stockholm, Sweden.

“Observations of changes in the climate system are based on multiple lines of independent evidence. Our assessment of the science finds that the atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amount of snow and ice has diminished, the global mean sea level has risen and the concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased,” said Qin Dahe, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group I. Thomas Stocker, the other Co-Chair of Working Group I said: “Continued emissions of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and changes in all components of the climate system. Limiting climate change will require substantial and sustained reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.”

“Global surface temperature change for the end of the 21st century is projected to be likely to exceed 1.5°C relative to 1850 to 1900 in all but the lowest scenario considered, and likely to exceed 2°C for the two high scenarios,” said Co-Chair Thomas Stocker. “Heat waves are very likely to occur more frequently and last longer. As the Earth warms, we expect to see currently wet regions receiving more rainfall, and dry regions receiving less, although there will be exceptions,” he added. Projections of climate change are based on a new set of four scenarios of future greenhouse gas concentrations and aerosols, spanning a wide range of possible futures. The Working Group I report assessed global and regional-scale climate change for the early, mid-, and later 21st century. “As the ocean warms, and glaciers and ice sheets reduce, global mean sea level will continue to rise, but at a faster rate than we have experienced over the past 40 years,” said Co-Chair Qin Dahe.

The report finds with high confidence that ocean warming dominates the increase in energy stored in the climate system, accounting for more than 90% of the energy accumulated between 1971 and 2010.

Co-Chair Thomas Stocker concluded: “As a result of our past, present and expected future emissions of CO2, we are committed to climate change, and effects will persist for many centuries even if emissions of CO2 stop.”

Rajendra Pachauri, Chair of the IPCC, said: “This Working Group I Summary for Policymakers provides important insights into the scientific basis of climate change. It provides a firm foundation for considerations of the impacts of climate change on human and natural systems and ways to meet the challenge of climate change.” These are among the aspects assessed in the contributions of Working Group II and Working Group III to be released in March and April 2014. The IPCC Fifth Assessment Report cycle concludes with the publication of its Synthesis Report in October 2014. “I would like to thank the Co-Chairs of Working Group I and the hundreds of scientists and experts who served as authors and review editors for producing a comprehensive and scientifically robust summary. I also express my thanks to the more than one thousand expert reviewers worldwide for contributing their expertise in preparation of this assessment,” said IPCC Chair Pachauri.

The Summary for Policymakers of the Working Group I contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (WGI AR5) is available at www.climatechange2013.org or www.ipcc.ch.

Key Findings

See separate Fact Sheet of Headline Statements from the WGI AR5 Summary for Policymakers, available at www.climatechange2013.org.

Background

Working Group I is co-chaired by Qin Dahe of the China Meteorological Administration, Beijing, China, and Thomas Stocker of the University of Bern, Switzerland. The Technical Support Unit of Working Group I is hosted by the University of Bern and funded by the Government of Switzerland. At the 28th Session of the IPCC held in April 2008, the members of the IPCC decided to prepare a Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). A Scoping Meeting was convened in July 2009 to develop the scope and outline of the AR5. The resulting outlines for the three Working Group contributions to the AR5 were approved at the 31st Session of the IPCC in October 2009.

The Summary for Policymakers of the IPCC WGI AR5 was approved at the Twelfth Session of IPCC Working Group I meeting in Stockholm, Sweden, 23 to 26 September 2013 and was released on 27 September.

The Final Draft of the Working Group I report (version distributed to governments on 7 June 2013), including the Technical Summary, 14 chapters and an Atlas of Global and Regional Climate Projections, will be released online in unedited form on Monday 30 September. Following copyediting, layout, final checks for errors, and adjustments for changes in the Summary for Policymakers, the full report of Working Group I will be published online in January 2014 and in book form by Cambridge University Press a few months later.

The Working Group I assessment comprises some 2,500 pages of text and draws on millions of observations and over 2 million gigabytes of numerical data from climate model simulations. Over 9,200 scientific publications are cited, more than three quarters of which have been published since the last IPCC assessment in 2007.

In this IPCC assessment report, specific terms are used to indicate the assessed likelihood of an outcome or a result. For those terms used above: virtually certain means 99–100% probability, extremely likely: 95–100%, very likely: 90–100%, likely: 66–100%. For more information see the IPCC uncertainty guidance note: https://www.ipcc-wg1.unibe.ch/guidancepaper/ar5_uncertaintyguidance-note.pdf

For more information, contact:
IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
Jonathan Lynn, + 41 22 730 8066 or Werani Zabula, + 41 22 730 8120
IPCC Working Group I Media Contact, Email: media@ipcc.unibe.ch
Pauline Midgley, +41 31 631 5620