UN human rights chief hails end of death penalty in Mongolia

Managing traffic in central Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Photo: World Bank/Dave Lawrence

10 December 2015 – Hailing Mongolia’s recent abolition of the death penalty, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, commended the move as a “welcome step in the fight for the human rights of all.”

“This development is very encouraging and a clear example of positive progress in the fight for human rights for all – including people convicted of terrible crimes,” Mr. Zeid said in a statement, in which he added: “We must not allow even the most atrocious acts to strip us of our fundamental humanity.”

According to the High Commissioner’s Office (OHCHR), Mongolia’s passage of the law to end the death penalty, which is the result of strong and sustained leadership on the issue, has reaffirmed this essential truth.

Last week, Mongolia became the 105th country to abolish the death penalty in law. Another 60 States have moratoria, or have not carried out executions in the last 10 years, says OHCHR.


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