REPORT OF THE PREPARATORY COMMITTEE FOR THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE UNITED NATIONS

United Nations
General Assembly

Distr. GENERAL
A/50/48/Rev.1
5 December 1995

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

Fiftieth Session


CONTENTS

								Paragraphs


I.	BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION	 			 1 - 7	

II.	PREPARATIONS FOR THE SPECIAL COMMEMORATIVE MEETING
	OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON THE OCCASION OF THE FIFTIETH
	ANNIVERSARY OF THE UNITED NATIONS	 		 8 - 20

	A.	Procedural and organizational arrangements 
		for the meeting				 	 8 - 12	
	B.	Drafting of the Declaration			13 - 20

III.	OTHER PREPARATIONS FOR THE COMMEMORATION OF THE
	FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY					21 - 33


	A.	Action by Member and observer States, including
		the establishment of national committees and the
		issuance of commemorative stamps and coins	21 - 24	
	B.	Global projects undertaken by the secretariat of
		the fiftieth anniversary			25 - 27
	C.	Activities within the United Nations system	28 - 31	
	D.	Activities of non-governmental organizations  	32 - 33	

IV.	ADMINISTRATIVE AND FINANCIAL ISSUES			34 - 36	

V.	RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE PREPARATORY 
	COMMITTEE						37


ANNEXES

I.	List of speakers for the special commemorative meeting	21

II.	List of documents					25

III.	Declaration on the Occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the
	United Nations (as contained in General Assembly resolution 
	50/6 of  24 October 1995)				32

I. BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION

1. The Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations was established by the General Assembly in its decision 46/472, of 13 April 1992, adopted at the 84th plenary meeting of its forty-sixth session. In that decision, the Assembly also entrusted the Preparatory Committee, consisting of the members of the General Committee and open to the participation of all Member States, with the task of considering and recommending to the Assembly at its forty-seventh session proposals for suitable activities in connection with the observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, on the understanding that its decisions would be taken by consensus.

2. On 8 December 1992, the General Assembly considered the first report of the Preparatory Committee. 1/ In its decision 47/417 of the same date, the Assembly took note of the work of the Preparatory Committee in 1992 and decided that it should continue its work and report to the Assembly at its forty-eighth session.

3. At the forty-eighth session, on 19 October 1993, the General Assembly considered the second report of the Preparatory Committee. 2/ In its decision 48/406 of the same date, the Assembly took note of the work of the Preparatory Committee in 1993, including the decision that the theme for the commemoration would be "We the Peoples of the United Nations ... United for a Better World" and that an open-ended drafting group would be established to prepare a declaration to be adopted in 1995 to mark the anniversary. Furthermore, the Assembly decided that the Preparatory Committee should continue its work and report thereon to the Assembly at its forty-ninth session.

4. In a letter dated 9 December 1993 addressed to the President of the General Assembly (A/48/749), the Chairman of the Preparatory Committee requested that consideration be given to reopening the agenda item of the forty-eighth session of the Assembly relating to the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary in order to enable the Assembly to consider additional matters. As a result, the Assembly adopted, on 23 December 1993, resolution 48/215 A, in which it (a) approved, on an exceptional basis, the creation of the post of Special Adviser at the under-secretary-general level against temporary assistance resources for organizing and coordinating activities related to the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations; and (b) requested the Secretary-General to provide adequate secretariat support for the Preparatory Committee.

5. Later in the forty-eighth session and on the recommendation of the Preparatory Committee, the General Assembly adopted resolution 48/215 B of 26 May 1994, in which it decided to convene a special commemorative meeting of

the Assembly on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the entry into force of the Charter of the United Nations, to be held at United Nations Headquarters from 22 to 24 October 1995. The Assembly also decided that invitations to the meeting would be issued to all Member and observer States at the level of head of State or Government, and that all heads of delegations would be afforded the opportunity to address the special meeting. The Secretary-General was entrusted with sending out the invitations requesting all heads of State or Government of Member and observer States to advise him, as soon as possible, of their participation and representation and of whether or not they proposed to address the special meeting. The General Assembly also requested the Secretary-General to report to it at its forty-ninth session on replies received, in order to enable it at that session to recommend to the Assembly at its fiftieth session a precise timetable and agenda for the special commemorative meeting and a suggested timetable for the conduct of the general debate of the fiftieth session.

6. In its report to the General Assembly at its forty-ninth session, 3/ the Preparatory Committee reported that the arrangements mentioned in Assembly resolution 48/215 B for the special commemorative meeting of the Assembly, in addition to applying to all Member and observer States, would also apply to Palestine and other observers, should they so request. In that report, the Preparatory Committee also reported on its review of the development of commemorative programmes and activities being undertaken by the secretariat of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, Member States, the United Nations system and non-governmental organizations. In addition, it recommended two draft resolutions, which were subsequently adopted on 9 November 1994 by the Assembly: resolutions 49/11, on the United Nations fiftieth anniversary coin programme, and 49/12, on the work of the Preparatory Committee. In the latter resolution, the Assembly approved the report of the Preparatory Committee, welcomed the commemorative programme being formulated by the secretariat and expressed its appreciation to the secretariat for its efforts to make it a global commemoration. The Assembly also welcomed the continued work of the Preparatory Committee on the draft declaration of the fiftieth anniversary, and decided that the Preparatory Committee should continue its work and report thereon to the Assembly at its fiftieth session. The present report is submitted in response to that decision.

7. Since the adoption by the General Assembly of its resolution 49/12, the Preparatory Committee has held 16 meetings: in 1994, the 19th and 20th meetings, on 17 November and 1 December; and in 1995, the 21st to 34th meetings, on 2 and 10 February, 17 and 28 March, 11 April, 17 and 23 May, 7 and 19 June, 18 September, 20 and 21 October, 17 November and 5 December.

II. PREPARATIONS FOR THE SPECIAL COMMEMORATIVE MEETING
OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON THE OCCASION OF THE
FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE UNITED NATIONS

A. Procedural and organizational arrangements for the meeting

8. Pursuant to resolution 48/215 B, in which the General Assembly had requested the Secretary-General to report to the Assembly at its forty-ninth session on replies received to invitations to participate in, and address, the special commemorative meeting, a document on the status of replies received (A/AC.240/1995/L.2) was submitted to the Preparatory Committee for consideration at its 21st meeting. In that paper it was noted that, as at 27 January 1995, 69 heads of State or Government had indicated their intention to attend and to address the commemorative meeting and that two Member States and one observer State had indicated that they would send high-level delegations. Three options for the organization of the list of speakers were presented, as follows:

(a) The list of speakers to be opened on a certain date for inscription
and the order to be determined strictly in the order in which the delegation was
inscribed in the list;

(b) The list of speakers to be organized alphabetically, that is, in
accordance with the seating arrangement in the General Assembly Hall;

(c) Drawing by lot, on the understanding that heads of State would take
precedence at a given meeting, followed by heads of Government.

In addition, it was noted that discussion would be required on extended sessions to accommodate all speakers, a possible limitation of speaking time in view of the number of potential speakers and the relationship between the general debate and the commemorative meeting.

9. Following discussion of document A/AC.240/1995/L.2, the Preparatory Committee agreed that the Chairman would undertake further consultation with regard to the organization of the list of speakers for the special commemorative meeting. These consultations resulted in the submission of a note by the Chairman (A/AC.240/1995/L.3), in which the options and underlying assumptions for the organization of the list of speakers were further elaborated. These options were extensively debated by the Preparatory Committee at its 22nd to 25th meetings. Based on those discussions, a draft resolution on the organization of the list of speakers (A/AC.240/1995/L.5), submitted by the Chairman, was considered at the 26th meeting. A revision of the resolution (A/AC.240/1995/L.5/Rev.1), on which consensus was reached by the Preparatory Committee at its 27th meeting, was subsequently submitted to the General Assembly for appropriate action.

10. On the recommendation of the Preparatory Committee, the General Assembly, on 24 May 1995, adopted resolution 49/12 B, in which it was agreed that the order of the list would be determined in a drawing by which the Secretary-General or his representative would draw one name from a box containing the names of all Member States, observer States and Palestine, in its capacity as observer, participating in the special meeting. That procedure would be repeated until all names had been drawn from the box, thus establishing the order in which participants would be invited to choose one of the six meetings set aside for the commemorative event and to select their speaking slots. Other provisions of the resolution included:

(a) The six meetings would each have 25 speaking slots, with the exception
of the afternoon meeting on Tuesday, 24 October, which would have 60 slots;

(b) Heads of State would be accorded first priority, followed by
vice-presidents, crown princes/princesses, heads of Government, the highest-
ranking official of the Holy See and Switzerland, as observer States, and
Palestine, in its capacity as observer, ministers, permanent representatives and
other observers;

(c) The first speaker in the special meeting would be the head of State of
the host country;

(d) In the event that the level at which a statement was to be made was
subsequently changed, the speaker would be moved to the next available speaking
slot in the appropriate category at the same meeting;

(e) Statements should be limited to five minutes, without precluding the
circulation of more extensive texts. The full text of all speeches would be
published in a bound book.

11. As stipulated in General Assembly resolution 49/12 B, the drawing of the lots took place at the 28th meeting of the Preparatory Committee, on 7 June 1995, resulting in a speakers list for the special commemorative meeting. Given the provision in subparagraph (d) above, there were a number of changes made to the speakers list from 7 June until 22 October, reflecting changes in the level of representation of certain delegations. The final speakers list for the meeting is presented in annex I to the present report.

12. At its 29th meeting, the Preparatory Committee considered the remaining logistical and substantive issues regarding the special commemorative meeting. Subsequently, at its 34th meeting, the Preparatory Committee decided, for reasons of cost, to publish in the bound book the texts of statements as delivered at the special commemorative meeting. It was also agreed that a commemorative photograph of permanent representatives or chargés d'affaires of Member States and of the Holy See, Palestine and Switzerland, in their capacity as observers, present at the fiftieth session should be made, provided that it was done without cost to the United Nations.

B. Drafting of the Declaration

13. At its 4th meeting, the Preparatory Committee established an open-ended drafting group, chaired by the Chairman of the Preparatory Committee, to prepare a solemn declaration to be adopted in 1995 to mark the observance of the anniversary. In the initial period of 1994, a conceptual approach was agreed upon, namely, that the declaration should address the general public, utilize simple and not grandiose language, be substantive in nature, strive for brevity and reflect a thematic approach. It was also agreed that all decisions by the drafting group should be taken by consensus.

14. Subsequently, a general structure for a draft declaration was agreed to by the drafting group, as reflected in document A/AC.240/1994/WG/2 of 30 March 1994. A document containing possible elements for inclusion in a draft declaration, based on the outline, was submitted by the Chairman of the drafting group (A/AC.240/1994/WG/3 of 4 May 1994). Delegations were invited to provide additional texts, as appropriate. The Group of Non-Aligned Countries submitted a proposed draft declaration, contained in document A/AC.240/1994/WG/4 of 31 May 1994.

15. While some discussions took place in the drafting group around documents A/AC.240/1994/WG/3 and A/AC.240/1994/WG/4, no specific agreement was reached. It was therefore decided that a period of reflection and informal consultations would be the most appropriate way to move forward and also to take account of major discussions and conferences planned for 1994 and early 1995.

16. The drafting group resumed its formal discussions at its 9th meeting and has since held 37 meetings, its 10th to 46th, in 1995: on 16 February, 24 and 31 March, 10 April, 16, 18 and 25 May, 6, 14 and 29 June, 20, 25, 27 and 28 July, 2, 3, 4, 29 and 31 August, 1, 7, 8 and 12 September and 3, 13, 19 and 20 October.

17. At its 9th meeting, the drafting group agreed that the Bureau would prepare a draft that would serve as the "single negotiating document" (A/AC.240/1995/WG/1 of 13 February 1995). Subsequently, based on a paragraph-by-paragraph reading and written amendments presented by delegations (see annex II), the first rolling text was produced by the Chairman for the 16th meeting (A/AC.240/1995/WG/6 of 22 May 1995). The drafting group was of the view that A/AC.240/1995/WG/6 reflected substantial progress and decided to continue considering amendments to it. Following the submission of additional written amendments, the Chairman of the drafting group issued rolling text 2 (A/AC.240/1995/WG/10) at its 21st meeting, rolling text 3 (A/AC.240/1995/WG/12) at its 22nd meeting and rolling text 4 (A/AC.240/1995/WG/16) at its 28th meeting.

18. A series of informal meetings were arranged by the Chairman of the drafting group to enable further consultations and for rolling text 4 to be finalized. The result of that process was document A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11/Rev.1, submitted by the Chairman to the Preparatory Committee at its 31st meeting, on 20 October. Extensive discussions were held on the document during that meeting and into the 32nd meeting of the Preparatory Committee, on 21 October. At that meeting the Chairman made the following statement:

"The Preparatory Committee has been in suspension to enable informal consultations to take place. Those consultations focused on concerns expressed about the right of peoples to take action to resist foreign occupation.
"A considerable number of delegations are of the view that the following sentence, in paragraph 1.3 of the draft declaration, gives expression, inter alia, to that right. I will now read that sentence 'and recognizes the right of peoples to take legitimate action in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations to realize their inalienable right of self-determination.'
"Some other delegations were of the view that that sentence needed to be clarified further. I was not able to find a way of reconciling those differences through an amendment of the text of document A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11/Rev.1.
"In these circumstances, I draw particular attention to the facility that is available to all in the event that we agree to adopt this declaration, namely, to make a statement that will be recorded in full in the report of the Preparatory Committee.
"I now propose that this text be adopted and forwarded to the General Assembly with the recommendation that it be adopted by the Assembly at its special commemorative meeting as the 'Declaration on the Occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations'."
19. The Preparatory Committee agreed with that recommendation and adopted the draft declaration, after which the following statements were made:

Lebanon

The Lebanese delegation participated in the work of this Committee in a positive spirit and openness to all concerns of Member States and agreed to a number of proposals in the draft declaration in a spirit of cooperation with the chair. However, it cannot but continue to confirm its consistent and uncompromised position regarding the right of peoples to resist foreign occupation.

The Lebanese delegation considers paragraph 1.3 of the draft declaration as confirming the legitimate right of peoples to resist foreign occupation. We believe that no one in the world stands against this legitimate right, which is in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations, international law and relevant United Nations resolutions. And while Lebanon stresses its firm condemnation of all forms of terrorism, it firmly supports the legitimate right of peoples to resist foreign occupation.

In the light of your statement that a very significant number of delegations interpret paragraph 1.3 as implying the legitimate right of peoples to resist foreign occupation and having confirmed our position on this question, we would like to declare that the Lebanese delegation thus supports the draft declaration.

Finally, I would like to address to you the great appreciation of my delegation for your valuable efforts in bringing about such a positive conclusion.

Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

I refer again, as I did in my statement before this Committee yesterday, to the fourth subparagraph of paragraph 1 of this draft declaration (A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11/Rev.1). This subparagraph is good because it does condemn what threatens the security of all States. Foremost among such threats is terrorism, which my country firmly condemns. We also said in our statement that our delegation believes that this subparagraph should be completed in such a way as to differentiate between terrorism, on the one hand, and the right of peoples to resist foreign occupation and colonialism. Now that the Preparatory Committee has adopted this draft declaration, which it is to be hoped will be finally adopted on the occasion of the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary, my delegation wishes to place on record that we believe the third subparagraph of paragraph 1 of the draft declaration refers to the legitimate rights of peoples to resist foreign occupation, a right which, in our opinion, cannot be objected to by anyone - this being a right embodied in the Charter of the United Nations, in international law and in the resolutions of the United Nations.

Ireland

My delegation welcomes the agreement that we have just reached on the draft declaration on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, and we look forward to its adoption during the special commemorative meeting next Tuesday. In joining in the consensus, my delegation wishes to state that Ireland interprets the declaration, and notably the provisions relating to self-determination, in the light of the Helsinki Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, which makes clear that borders may be changed, in accordance with international law, by peaceful means and by agreement.

Cuba

With reference to the third subparagraph of paragraph 1 of the draft declaration just adopted by this Committee and distinct from the interpretation placed on it by the Chairman of the Preparatory Committee, the delegation of Cuba wishes to reiterate its support for the peoples' struggle against colonial domination and foreign occupation. The delegation of Cuba would like to put on record that we also feel that we should stick to the decision adopted in this Committee and made known to the United Nations and to the public. We would like to reiterate our premise that the statements of heads of State and Government should be published in their entirety as was agreed upon previously within the framework of this Committee.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

The United Kingdom supports the right of self-determination of all peoples and places great importance on the effective realization of this right. In paragraph 1.3 of the draft declaration just adopted, the words that read "and recognize the right of peoples to take legitimate action in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations to realize their inalienable right of self-determination" clearly do not legitimize any unlawful use of force. As the General Assembly decided, by consensus, in the Declaration on Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism, at its forty-ninth session, all acts, methods and practices of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable, wherever and by whomever committed (resolution 49/60, annex, sect. I, para. 1).

India

I take the floor not because I have any reservations to express or a declaration to make. I take the floor basically to convey my delegation's happiness that we finally have a declaration that our heads will adopt three days hence. In this context, I think I speak not only on behalf of my delegation, but I think I speak on behalf of most delegations present in this room. We thank you for your chairmanship. You have been a pillar of strength. I think its your steadfast perseverance that has ensured that we even have a declaration that we can now commend to our heads of Government and heads of State. It would have been most unfortunate, at least in the view of my delegation, if we had not had a declaration on this occasion. My delegation has always maintained that document A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11/Rev.1 is a document worthy of adoption and we will certainly commend it to our head of Government. We thank you for your efforts and we are grateful that we finally have a declaration.

Mexico

Like other delegations, we welcome the adoption of this declaration. Similarly, we would like to point out that we accept the text contained in document A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11/Rev.1 in its version in English. The delegation of Mexico, whose official language is Spanish, will submit to the secretariat the purely linguistic changes that are necessary in order to ensure that the Spanish text corresponds in all the words with the declaration that we have adopted in English. In addition, we would simply like to point out that, as regards present paragraph 14 in document A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11/Rev.1, we would have preferred to use the wording in document A/AC.240/1995/CRP.8, referring to the errors of the past that we must avoid.

Japan

On behalf of my delegation, I would like to echo the previous speakers in their appreciation for your patient chairmanship in bringing this important declaration to life. My delegation is very happy to see the final adoption of this resolution on the occasion of the commemorative meeting of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations. We will certainly recommend that the head of my delegation support this declaration for the sake of further strengthening the activities of this Organization. It is the determination of my Government to make a further contribution to the United Nations.

Russian Federation

On behalf of the Russian delegation I would like, first of all, to thank you for the huge efforts that you have made so that our work would be successfully completed today. Like many delegations, we welcome the adoption of the draft declaration on the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations and we do expect that it will be solemnly adopted during the special session of the General Assembly on this issue. Like the representative of the Mexican delegation, we would like to draw attention to the fact that we have some problems with the Russian text of this declaration. Unfortunately, it differs seriously from the documents that this declaration is based on - it is sort of a free translation. So we would ask the secretariat to draw the attention of the translators to the fact that certain sections of the declaration were taken from already existing documents and the Russian text should not differ from the text that already exists.

Portugal

The delegation of Portugal would like to congratulate you at this important moment of the adoption of the declaration by this Committee and to express its extreme admiration for your hard work, patience and perseverance, present through the whole project. We would also like to extend our thanks to the secretariat, which assisted us admirably and worked long hours in order to allow us to achieve the present result.

Portugal attaches great importance to this declaration and that accounts for the fact that, being a small delegation, we always gave priority to this work and were present in all the meetings and informal group negotiations. We were not only interested in the specific language the declaration would have but also in the fact that there would be a declaration, for all the reasons that have been put forward previously by us and by delegations that also shared our strong stand in this regard. This position also accounts for the high degree of flexibility that my delegation always displayed, trying to find compromise language that could satisfy all.

Finally, I would like to express my extreme happiness for the result achieved and I am sure that the President of the General Assembly, who is a Portuguese, will equally be very satisfied to know that we will have a declaration to be adopted at the special commemorative meeting of the General Assembly.

Pakistan

My delegation, from day one, was confident that we would get to where we are today because of your chairmanship. And coming to the language problems, I think the only language that we have adopted in this declaration is the language of compromise, cooperation and flexibility. There is no other language for this declaration. And coming to the point of interpreting paragraph 1.3, as far as the phrase of "legitimate action" is concerned, I think it clearly states that there is no justifying any unlawful action and every action that is taken is done so in accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations. I hope there will not be any statements of reservation coming in on the Charter. And peoples' right to resist foreign occupation is always supported by the General Assembly documents that we know.

Syrian Arab Republic

The delegation of the Syrian Arab Republic would like on this occasion to express its appreciation of the efforts exerted by Ambassador Richard Butler, the Chairman of the Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations, and for the consultations he conducted in order to bring the draft declaration to its present form. My delegation would like to place on record its support for the declaration on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations and, in particular, for the interpretation put forward by a large number of the Member States in the light of the extensive consultations conducted by the Chairman on paragraph 1.3 of the declaration, which means, inter alia, the legitimate rights of peoples to resist foreign occupation. We would like to reaffirm that Syria has consistently condemned terrorism in all its different forms and manifestations and makes the distinction clear between terrorism and the legitimate right of peoples to resist foreign occupation. This foreign occupation, this occupation, is considered the highest stage of terrorism because it deprives people of their basic human and fundamental rights. I would like also to join my colleagues in thanking you for your efforts to reach this declaration.

Norway

It is only fitting that, on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, heads of Government and heads of State adopt a solemn declaration and without it, in a few days, certainly that fact would have been noticed. My delegation would like to join wholeheartedly with others in the words of appreciation that have been directed to you and we have, for our part, been very thankful for the fairness with which you have conducted our negotiations as well as the motivation you have shown, without which, I think, various points of view could not have been joined and moral authority, in difficult times, be listened to. As well in the ebbs of our work you have pushed forward when that was necessary.

Israel

First of all I would like to thank you for your efforts in the conduct of this Committee to bring about a declaration. My delegation has been forthcoming and compromising throughout the deliberations of the meetings - from the first meeting until this meeting. But, I must say that we are perplexed by the efforts of some delegations to get this Committee, and to get the General Assembly on the solemn occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, to get the United Nations to legitimize terrorism, and I trust that the great majority of the Members of the United Nations, like ourselves, do not read paragraph 1.3 in this light and do not see the explanation that was put by some to this paragraph as a correct one.

United States of America

My delegation would like to thank Ambassador Butler for his hard work in the drafting group and among the friends of the chair. His perseverance has made it possible for us all to make the progress necessary to reach agreement today.

Egypt

The delegation of Egypt would like to express its appreciation to the Chairman of the Preparatory Committee of the fiftieth anniversary for his dedicated efforts and wise leadership in guiding the Committee to a successful conclusion of the drafting of the declaration. We would also like to thank the fiftieth anniversary secretariat for providing the necessary services and support to the drafting group.

20. Subsequently, the Declaration on the Occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations was adopted by the General Assembly by acclamation at its 40th meeting, on 24 October 1995 (resolution 50/6) (see annex III).

III. OTHER PREPARATIONS FOR THE COMMEMORATION
OF THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY

A. Action by Member and observer States, including the establishment of national committees and the issuance of commemorative stamps and coins

21. In response to the Secretary-General's note verbale to all permanent representatives to the United Nations, national committees continued to be established through the end of 1994 and into 1995. The Preparatory Committee was informed that, as at 10 November 1995, 152 Member or observer States had established national committees.

The Member or observer States that established national committees are as follows:


	Albania
	Algeria
	Andorra
	Angola
	Antigua and Barbuda
	Argentina
	Armenia
	Australia
	Austria
	Azerbaijan
	Bahamas
	Bangladesh
	Barbados
	Belarus
	Belgium
	Benin
	Bhutan
	Botswana
	Brazil
	Brunei Darussalam
	Bulgaria
	Burkina Faso	
	Burundi
	Cambodia
	Canada
	Cape Verde
	Chile
	China
	Colombia
	Costa Rica
	Croatia
	Cuba
	Cyprus
	Czech Republic
	Djibouti
	Dominica
	Egypt
	El Salvador
	Eritrea
	Estonia
	Ethiopia
	Fiji
	Finland
	France
	Gabon
	Gambia
	Georgia
	Germany
	Ghana
	Greece
	Guatemala
	Guinea
	Guinea-Bissau
	Guyana
	Haiti
	Honduras
	Hungary
	Iceland
	India
	Indonesia
	Iran (Islamic Republic of)
	Iraq
	Ireland
	Israel
	Italy
	Jamaica
	Japan
	Jordan
	Kazakstan
	Kenya
	Kuwait
	Kyrgyzstan
	Lao People's Democratic Republic
	Latvia
	Lebanon
	Lesotho
	Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
	Liechtenstein
	Lithuania
	Luxembourg
	Madagascar
	Malawi
	Malaysia
	Maldives
	Mali
	Malta
	Marshall Islands
	Mauritania
	Mauritius
	Mexico
	Mongolia
	Morocco
	Myanmar
	Namibia
	Nepal
	Netherlands
	New Zealand
	Nicaragua
	Nigeria
	Norway
	Pakistan
	Panama
	Paraguay
	Peru
	Philippines
	Poland
	Portugal
	Qatar
	Republic of Korea
	Republic of Moldova
	Romania
	Russian Federation
	Saint Lucia
	San Marino
	Sao Tome and Principe
	Senegal
	Seychelles
	Sierra Leone
	Singapore
	Slovakia
	Slovenia
	South Africa
	Spain
	Sri Lanka
	Sudan
	Suriname
	Swaziland
	Sweden
	Switzerland
	Syrian Arab Republic
	Tajikistan
	Thailand
	The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia	
	Togo
	Trinidad and Tobago
	Tunisia
	Turkey
	Turkmenistan
	Uganda
	Ukraine
	United Arab Emirates
	United Kingdom of  Great Britain and Northern Ireland
	United Republic of Tanzania
	United States of America
	Vanuatu
	Venezuela
	Viet Nam
	Yemen
	Yugoslavia
	Zaire
	Zambia
	Zimbabwe

22. Throughout the year the Preparatory Committee was kept advised of the numerous commemorative activities being organized for the anniversary year by these committees. The Preparatory Committee was pleased to note that many of the activities were directed at reaching and informing the general public, and especially at educating youth about the work of the United Nations. These activities include:

(a) United Nations educational materials being used at schools,
universities and institutes all over the world;

(b) Global teach-in programmes planned for October in numerous countries;

(c) Issuance of publications on the United Nations and its role in
different spheres;

(d) Numerous conferences, symposia and seminars on the United Nations have
taken place in the different regions of the world and are still scheduled to be
held throughout the remainder of the year;

(e) Special programmes on the United Nations being aired on the radio and
on major television stations. Publication of special sections in newspapers and
magazines;

(f) Organization of essay and art competitions on the United Nations theme
in schools. Winners from different parts of the world would visit the United Nations;

(g) Exhibitions on the United Nations and its activities being held in
every continent;

(h) Model United Nations" with student participants have taken place and
are continuing throughout the year;

(i) National galas and concerts honouring the United Nations and
commemorating its anniversary have been or will be held in virtually every Member State;

(j) Sport events have been organized throughout the year around the world;

(k) Several Member States are naming public streets, plazas and parks in
honour of the United Nations.

23. In addition to the many activities cited above, numerous Member States decided to honour the United Nations on its fiftieth anniversary with special issues of stamps and coins. In addition to the three special stamp series that are being issued in 1995 by the United Nations Postal Administration in honour of the fiftieth anniversary, virtually every other postal administration has issued or has noted plans to issue such commemorative stamps. Many of these stamps depict United Nations programmes and activities in the country of issue. Further, over 40 Member States already have agreed to issue legal tender coins honouring the anniversary, pursuant to the provisions of General Assembly resolution 49/11. In addition to gold and silver coins for collectors, a number of base metal coins will be issued at face value for general circulation. Under the programme, participating Member States donate a royalty to the Trust Fund for the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebrations on each special proof or uncirculated coin sold to collectors. These royalties are being used to support education and communications activities about the work of the United Nations.

24. In addition to supporting Member States with education and information materials, the secretariat of the fiftieth anniversary has worked with many cities in the development of appropriate commemorations. Events in June 1995 in San Francisco to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Charter included a myriad of events. Geneva, New York and Vienna also are undertaking major commemorations during the year, including concerts, art exhibits, symposia and other cultural events.

B. Global projects undertaken by the secretariat of the fiftieth anniversary

25. While supporting the Member States and cities in preparation for the fiftieth anniversary celebrations, and providing substantive and technical support to the Preparatory Committee, the secretariat continued to develop and implement a global commemorative programme of activities and products. At all its meetings in 1995, the Preparatory Committee was briefed on these activities, which enabled them to provide the necessary guidance and input to the secretariat. The goals identified by the secretariat and endorsed by the Preparatory Committee for the anniversary had been to promote a more balanced image of the United Nations, to enlarge its constituency of support, especially among youth and non-traditional audiences, to improve world-wide education about the work of the Organization and to mobilize public support in favour of the United Nations to position it to meet ever-growing demands. Programme development responded to these objectives by developing and implementing projects in key programme areas, among which education and communication have been given priority.

26. During the initial stages of preparations in 1993 and 1994, several members of the Preparatory Committee had stressed the need to accord the highest priority to reaching youth and the general public. Among the most important global youth projects undertaken by the secretariat are:

(a) The promotion of a global teach-in on the United Nations, in which the objective is to have all schools designate time around 24 October to teach about the United Nations, has been publicized. Teachers have been encouraged to concentrate on world affairs and the role of the United Nations for a week or a month in October 1995, with the hope that it will become a part of teaching plans every year to mark United Nations Day;
(b) Educational kits for teachers on the United Nations and its work were developed for three school levels - primary, intermediate and secondary - in all six official languages. The kits contain activity units that focus on such global issues as migration, pollution, health and peace, within subject-matters ranging from history and literature to science and mathematics. Substantial resources have been devoted to providing copies of these materials through United Nations offices in all Member States, especially in developing countries, and have been made available for translation of these materials into other languages. Local educational projects, including classroom posters, also have been funded;
(c) A passport to the future was also initiated to involve younger children in thinking about cooperation and community service. It was designed to sign on millions of young persons between the ages of 7 and 14 years as "global citizens" by having them pledge to carry out a number of volunteer activities to make their world a better place. The passport encourages them to demonstrate their concern for a better future by becoming involved in some of the world's most pressing challenges - human rights, development and the environment - starting in their local community;
(d) Young people from around the world submitted contributions to a book about the United Nations, "A World In Our Hands", written, illustrated and edited by young people;
(e) A world youth leadership training summit focusing on the rights and responsibilities of youth was held at Headquarters in late August 1995, bringing together 200 young people from around the world and encouraging them to be proactive in the future;
(f) The secretariat also has encouraged and provided award medals for numerous international and national school competitions about the United Nations.
27. Fiftieth anniversary global communications activities developed by the secretariat have included:

(a) Print, audio and video campaigns for media, exhibits, conferences, film and television programming. The international public service announcement campaign, in the six official languages, was designed to inform the public of the many achievements of the United Nations system, in the areas of democratization, decolonization, women and development, health, refugees, peace-keeping, environment and food security. These materials have been distributed to United Nations offices world-wide and to broadcasters and publishers in all Member States;

(b) A multimedia exhibit provided to headquarters and regional offices, and to headquarters of specialized agencies. The exhibit uses CD interactive technology and demonstrates the interdependence of the global community by focusing on the history of the Organization and on its major areas of endeavour;

(c) Fiftieth anniversary information sites on the Internet and related on-line services (United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Gopher, America On-Line, CompuServe and The Microsoft Network);

(d) Publications, including a pictorial history of the United Nations - "Visions - fifty years of the United Nations" - a newsletter, press kits, an informational brochure, notes for speakers and an educational wall chart. These materials have been distributed widely to the international news media, national committees, United Nations information centres and field offices, permanent missions to the United Nations, United Nations associations, academic groups and the general public.

C. Activities within the United Nations system

28. In its 1993 report, the Preparatory Committee had agreed that within the context of the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary, an extraordinary opportunity existed to highlight the mutually reinforcing goals of the United Nations and its sister organizations. The Preparatory Committee expressed its continuing interest in that important aspect of the commemoration and requested that it be kept informed of further developments. The Preparatory Committee was advised that the Administrative Committee on Coordination, at its 1994 spring session held at Geneva, had further considered these issues, including, increasing system-wide participation in the fiftieth anniversary and consolidating the messages that the Organization would direct towards the general public during the critical year 1995. In addition, and in parallel with the Administrative Committee on Coordination session in February 1995, a Forum on the Future of the United Nations had been convened at Vienna with the participation of all Administrative Committee members and a number of distinguished personalities who had been leading independent reviews on ways to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations system to meet the major challenges ahead.

29. The Preparatory Committee was informed that since its last report, cooperative activities between the United Nations and other organizations of the United Nations system had taken a more operational turn - focusing on the preparation of projects that highlight the work of the system. Since in effect the information being disseminated by the secretariat is information regarding the work of the United Nations system, the organizations were contacted for inputs such as slides, video footage, facts, for global projects on the fiftieth anniversary, such as the multimedia exhibit, the youth leadership training summit, the book "A World in Our Hands", and so on. There are in addition specific joint projects being undertaken with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) regarding the distribution of educational materials, the promotion of the global teach-in, the organization of youth encounters and Design 21. Cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) for the publication of results of discussions with non-governmental and private organizations related to a Global Assembly on Food Security has also been undertaken. In addition, UNDP had contributed significantly to the dissemination of information on the fiftieth anniversary through the Internet by arranging for the use of the Gopher. Other organizations' databases have since also pointed to the Gopher, thus further widening dissemination.

30. The Preparatory Committee was also informed that the United Nations field network, and the regional commissions, had been mobilized towards the commemorative effort. Resident coordinators, directors of the United Nations information centres and the executive secretaries of the commissions were taking a very active part in the distribution of the information and education material on the fiftieth anniversary.

31. The Preparatory Committee was also informed of the continued efforts to involve the staff of the United Nations system in the anniversary preparations and events. In numerous countries, staff have supported local organizers of commemorative activities. In New York, Geneva and Vienna, the staff committees have organized programmes in honour of the anniversary, including a poll of staff views, literary competitions, photo exhibits and cultural events.

D. Activities of non-governmental organizations

32. United Nations associations and other non-governmental organizations have supported the fiftieth anniversary effort to broaden public understanding of the work and continued relevance of the United Nations through, among other things, education programmes, conferences, activities aimed at young people, such as art projects, essay competitions and model United Nations programmes. In addition, many of these organizations, especially the United Nations associations, actively participate as members of national committees established for the fiftieth anniversary to arrange commemorative programmes within the Member States.

33. In the context of the fiftieth session of the General Assembly, a one-day non-governmental organization programme was held in November to examine the role of the organizations and the United Nations and its future in the twenty-first century, building on the various initiatives, studies and reports issued in 1995 dealing with civil society and the United Nations. The programme was coordinated by the Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council together with the Executive Committee of Non-Governmental Organizations Associated with the United Nations Department of Public Information.

IV. ADMINISTRATIVE AND FINANCIAL ISSUES

34. In 1993, the Preparatory Committee was informed that the financial situation of the Organization precluded making funds from the regular budget available for financing fiftieth anniversary commemorative programmes and events. The Secretary-General had therefore established a Trust Fund for the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebrations for that purpose and had urged the Member States to support that initiative. A number of Member States have made contributions and many have provided resources to their national committees organizing anniversary commemorations.

35. Support was also sought from the private sector, including a limited number of global sponsors and international licensees. Sufficient resources to develop core global activities were obtained from three global sponsors and several major project sponsors. A limited number of international licensees also provided substantial funds and distribution of messages about the work of the Organization. The Trust Fund is expected to continue to receive revenue from some of the licensees, in particular with respect to commemorative coins and publications.

36. The Preparatory Committee noted the positive impact that the Trust Fund has had in supporting not only global projects, but also national educational and communications initiatives about the work of the Organization.

V. RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE PREPARATORY COMMITTEE

37. The Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations recommends to the General Assembly the adoption of the following draft resolution:

Work of the Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations

The General Assembly,

Having considered the report of the Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth
Anniversary of the United Nations,

1. Expresses its appreciation to the national committees and to the innumerable non-governmental and other organizations around the world that have supported the goals of the anniversary;

2. Also expresses its appreciation to the secretariat of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations for the series of commemorative programmes and projects it has undertaken and coordinated and for its efforts to involve national committees, non-governmental organizations and the United Nations system and staff in the global commemoration of the anniversary;

3. Further expresses its appreciation to those Member States, corporations and individuals that have contributed to the Trust Fund for the Fiftieth Anniversary;

4. Requests the Secretary-General to ensure that the funds remaining in and which will be paid into the Trust Fund are applied to the purposes for which they were committed, and to report thereon to the General Assembly before the end of the fiftieth session;

5. Expresses its deep appreciation to the host country for the arrangements it made in support of the conduct of the special commemorative meeting of the General Assembly;

6. Approves the report of the Preparatory Committee, and takes note with deep appreciation of the successful conclusion of its work.

Notes

1. Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-seventh Session,
Supplement No. 48 (A/47/48).

2. Ibid., Forty-eighth Session, Supplement No. 48 (A/48/48).

3. Ibid., Forty-ninth Session, Supplement No. 48 (A/49/48).

ANNEX I

List of speakers at the special commemorative meeting of the General Assembly on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations


A.  Sunday, 22 October 1995

	MORNING:

1.	United States of America	(HS)
2.	Ukraine 	(HS)
3.	Jordan		(HS)
4.	Sri Lanka	(HS)
5.	Namibia	(HS)
6.	Zambia 	(HS)
7.	Turkey		(HS)
8.	San Marino	(HS)
9.	Estonia	(HS)
10.	Republic of Korea	(HS)
11.	Croatia		(HS)
12.	Russian Federation	(HS)
13.	Cuba		(HS)
14.	Brunei Darussalam	(HS)
15.	Uruguay	(VP)
16.	New Zealand	(PM)
17.	Poland		(PM)
18.	Norway	(PM)
19.	Spain		(PM)
20.	Japan		(PM)
21.	Switzerland	(highest-ranking official)
22.	Palestine	(highest-ranking official)


	AFTERNOON:

1.	Portugal	(HS)
2.	Algeria		(HS)
3.	Kazakstan	(HS)
4.	Azerbaijan	(HS)
5.	Angola	(HS)
6.	Guinea-Bissau	(HS)
7.	Belarus	(HS)
8.	The former Yugoslav Republic  
	of Macedonia	(HS)
9.	Slovakia	(HS)
10.	Marshall Islands  (HS)
11.	Gabon		(HS)
12.	Mexico		(HS)
13.	Turkmenistan	(HS)
14.	Latvia		(HS)
15.	Ireland		(HS)
16.	Netherlands	(PM)
17.	Saint Lucia	(PM)
18.	Liechtenstein	(PM)
19.	Canada	(PM)
20.	Iran (Islamic Republic of)  (FM)
21.	Lebanon	(M)
22.	Georgia	(FM)
23.	Solomon Islands  (DPM/FM)
24.	Luxembourg	(DPM)
25.	Ecuador	(FM)
26.	Guinea		(FM)
27.	Burkina Faso	(FM)
28.	Bolivia		(CD)
29.	Organization of the Islamic
	Conference
30.	Sovereign Military Order of Malta
31.	International Organization
	for Migration
32.	International Committee of
	the Red Cross

B.  Monday, 23 October 1995

	MORNING:

1.	Uganda	(HS)
2.	Botswana	(HS)
3.	Zaire		(HS)
4.	South Africa	(HS)
5.	France		(HS)
6.	Austria	(HS)
7.	Greece		(HS)
8.	Republic of Moldova	(HS)
9.	Romania	(HS)
10.	Sierra Leone	(HS)
11.	Brazil		(HS)
12.	Viet Nam	(HS)
13.	Equatorial Guinea  (HS)
14.	Myanmar	(VP)
15.	United Kingdom of Great Britain
	and Northern Ireland	(PM)
16.	Nepal		(PM)
17.	Bahamas	(PM)
18.	Bangladesh	(PM)
19.	Germany	(FM)
20.	Benin		(M)
21.	Malaysia	(FM)
22.	Egypt		(FM)
23.	Nicaragua	(FM)

	AFTERNOON:

1.	Swaziland	(HS)
2.	Ghana		(HS)
3.	Indonesia	(HS)
4.	Micronesia (Federated States of) (HS)
5.	Cyprus		(HS)
6.	El Salvador	(HS)
7.	Cape Verde	(HS)
8.	Australia	(HS)
9.	Central African Republic  (HS)
10.	Kyrgyzstan	(VP)
11.	Togo		(VP)
12.	Barbados	(PM)
13.	Belize		(PM)
14.	United Arab Emirates	(DPM)
15.	Saudi Arabia	(DPM)
16.	Qatar		(DPM)
17.	Lesotho	(DPM)
18.	Libyan Arab Jamahiriya  (FM)
19.	Congo		(FM)
20.	Nigeria		(FM)
21.	Papua New Guinea  (SE)
22.	Djibouti	(CD)
23.	Trinidad and Tobago	(CD)
24.	Samoa		(CD)
25.	League of Arab States
26.	European Community
27.	Agency for Cultural and Technical
	Cooperation
28.	Commonwealth Secretariat

C.  Tuesday, 24 October 1995

	MORNING:

1.	Suriname	(HS)
2.	Guatemala	(HS)
3.	Costa Rica	(HS)
4.	Panama	(HS)
5.	Venezuela	(HS)
6.	Madagascar	(HS)
7.	Mongolia	(HS)
8.	China		(HS)
9.	Monaco	(HS)
10.	Guyana	(HS)
11.	Bosnia and Herzegovina  (HS)
12.	Liberia		(HS)
13.	Palau		(HS)
14.	Rwanda	(HS)
15.	Bulgaria	(HS)
16.	Dominican Republic  (VP)
17.	Belgium	(PM)
18.	Thailand	(PM)
19.	Dominica	(PM)
20.	Pakistan	(PM)
21.	Jamaica	(PM)
22.	Israel		(PM)
23.	Lao People's Democratic
	Republic	(DPM)
24.	Mauritania	(FM)
25.	Gambia		(FM)
26.	Italy		(FM)
27.	International Federation of
	Red Cross and Red Crescent
	Societies

	AFTERNOON:

1.	Albania	(HS)
2.	Philippines	(HS)
3.	Zimbabwe	(HS)
4.	Lithuania	(HS)
5.	Finland	(HS)
6.	Armenia	(HS)
7.	Haiti		(HS)
8.	Malawi		(HS)
9.	Colombia	(HS)
10.	Slovenia	(HS)
11.	Uzbekistan	(HS)
12.	Paraguay	(HS)
13.	Kuwait		(HS)
14.	Mozambique	(HS)
15.	Maldives	(HS)
16.	Honduras	(HS)
17.	Czech Republic  (HS)
18.	Hungary	(HS)
19.	Chile		(HS)
20.	Argentina	(HS)
21.	Tajikistan	(HS)
22.	Burundi	(HS)
23.	Chad		(HS)
24.	Niger		(HS)
25.	Cameroon	(HS)
26.	Iraq		(VP)
27.	Yemen		(VP)
28.	Peru		(VP)
29.	Morocco	(CP)
30.	Mauritius	(PM)
31.	Antigua and Barbuda	(PM)
32.	Iceland		(PM)
33.	Sweden	(PM)
34.	Senegal	(PM)
35.	Vanuatu	(PM)
36.	Andorra	(PM)
37.	Singapore	(PM)
38.	India		(PM)
39.	Denmark	(PM)
40.	Cambodia	(PM)
41.	Fiji		(PM)
42.	Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (PM)
43.	Saint Kitts and Nevis	(PM)
44.	Côte d'Ivoire	(PM)
45.	Mali		(PM)
46.	Holy See	(highest-ranking official)
47.	Oman		(DPM)
48.	Malta		(DPM/FM)
49.	Syrian Arab Republic	(FM)
50.	Tunisia	(FM)
51.	Bahrain	(FM)
52.	Bhutan 	(FM)
53.	Kenya		(FM)
54.	Comoros	(FM)
55.	Afghanistan	(M)
56.	United Republic of Tanzania	(CD)
57.	Grenada	(CD)
58.	South Pacific Forum
59.	Caribbean Community
60.	Organization of African Unity
61.	Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe
62.	Latin American Economic System
63.	Organization of American States
64.	Asian-African Legal Consultative Committee
65.	Economic Cooperation Organization
66.	Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean
67.	Latin American Parliament
68.	Central American Integration System

Note:	 
HS = Head of State
VP = Vice-President
PM = Prime Minister
DPM = Deputy Prime Minister
FM = Foreign Minister
CP = Crown Prince
M = Minister other than for Foreign Affairs
CD = Chairman of delegation
SE = Special envoy


ANNEX II

List of documents

Document symbol		Subject

A. Preparatory Committee documents

A/AC.240/1992-1995/L.-

A/AC.240/1992/L.1	Provisional agenda for the 1st meeting, on 22 October 1992

A/AC.240/1992/L.2 Observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the and Corr.1 United Nations: note by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1992/L.3 Provisional agenda with annotations for the 2nd meeting, on 30 November 1992 A/AC.240/1993/L.4 Note by the Chairman A/AC.240/1993/L.5 Draft annotated agenda for the 4th meeting, on 12 March 1993 A/AC.240/1993/L.6 Draft provisional agenda for the 6th meeting, on 20 May 1993 A/AC.240/1993/L.7 Draft provisional agenda for the 7th meeting, on 8 June 1993 A/AC.240/1993/L.8 Draft provisional agenda for the 8th meeting, on 10 September 1993 A/AC.240/1994/L.1 Schedule of work of the Preparatory Committee and its drafting group during the first six months of 1995 A/AC.240/1994/L.2 Draft provisional agenda for the 10th meeting, on 15 February 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.3 Special Meeting of the General Assembly in 1995 at the level of head of State or Government: note by the Chairman and Bureau of the Preparatory Committee A/AC.240/1994/L.4 Draft provisional agenda for the 11th meeting, on 15 March 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.5 Draft resolution A/AC.240/1994/L.5 Revised draft resolution Rev.1 A/AC.240/1994/L.6 Draft provisional agenda for the 12th meeting, on 19 April 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.7 Draft provisional agenda for the 13th meeting, on 19 May 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.8 Draft provisional agenda for the 14th meeting, on 14 June 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.9 Draft provisional agenda for the 9th meeting, on 11 January 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.10 United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: draft resolution A/AC.240/1994/L.11 Draft provisional agenda for the 15th meeting, on 21 July 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.12 Draft provisional agenda for the 16th meeting, on 15 September 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.13 Draft provisional agenda for the 17th meeting, on 18 October 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.14 Information note on publications for the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations: note by the Secretariat A/AC.240/1994/L.15 Indonesia, on behalf of the States members of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries: draft resolution A/AC.240/1994/L.16 Draft provisional agenda for the 18th meeting, on 2 November 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.17 Draft provisional agenda for the 19th meeting, on 17 November 1994 A/AC.240/1994/L.18 Draft provisional agenda for the 20th meeting, on 1 December 1994 A/AC.240/1995/L.1 Draft provisional agenda for the 21st meeting, on 2 February 1995 A/AC.240/1995/L.2 Status of replies to the Secretary-General's invitation and organization of the special commemorative meeting of the General Assembly in observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations: note by the Secretary-General A/AC.240/1995/L.3 Organization of the list of speakers for the special commemorative meeting: note by the Chairman A/AC.240/1995/L.4 Draft provisional agenda for the 23rd meeting, on 17 March 1995 A/AC.240/1995/L.5 Organization of the list of speakers for the special commemorative meeting of the General Assembly on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations: draft resolution submitted by the Chairman A/AC.240/1995/L.5 Revised draft resolution submitted by the Chairman Rev. 1 A/AC.240/1995/L.6 Draft provisional agenda for the 26th meeting, on 17 May 1995 A/AC.240/1995/L.7 Draft provisional agenda for the 29th meeting, on 16 June 1995 A/AC.240/1995/L.8 Draft report of the Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations A/AC.240/1995/L.8 Draft report of the Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth Rev. 1 Anniversary of the United Nations A/AC.240/1995/L.9 Draft provisional agenda for the 30th meeting, on 18 September 1995 A/AC.240/1995/L.10 Draft decision: work of the Preparatory Committee for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations A/AC.240/1995/L.11 Draft decision: declaration commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations A/AC.240/1995/L.12 Draft provisional agenda for the 33rd meeting, on 17 November 1995 A/AC.240/1995/L.13 Draft report of the Preparatory Committee for the and Corr.1 and Rev.1 Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations A/AC.240/1995/L.14 Draft provisional agenda for the 34th meeting, on 5 December 1995

A/AC.240/1992/-

A/AC.240/1992/1		Observance of past anniversaries of the United Nations:  note by 
			the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1993-1995/CRP.-

A/AC.240/1993/CRP.1	Programmes and activities in progress:  note by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1993/CRP.2	Proposals for consideration by the Preparatory Committee at its 3rd
			meeting:  note by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1993/CRP.3	Establishment of national committees:  report by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1993/CRP.4	Proposed guidelines for activities of national committees:  
			report by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1993/CRP.5	Status of the commemorative programme:  paper prepared by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1993/CRP.6	National Committees for the fiftieth anniversary
and Add.1

A/AC.240/1993/CRP.7	Draft report of the Preparatory Committee

A/AC.240/1994/CRP.1 	National Committees
and Add.1-4

A/AC.240/1994/CRP.2	United Nations fiftieth anniversary coin programme:  information 
			note by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1994/CRP.3	Summary of global projects for the fiftieth anniversary:
and Rev.1		information note

A/AC.240/1994/CRP.4	Draft report of the Preparatory Committee
and Rev.1

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.1	Proposed schedule of work of the Preparatory Committee

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.2	Draft table for time-scheduling implications for the Special
			Commemorative Meeting of the General Assembly on the occasion of 
			the fiftieth anniversary of the entry into force of the Charter of the 
			United Nations to be held at United Nations Headquarters from 22 to 24
			October 1995

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.3	National Committees for the fiftieth anniversary:
and Add.1 and 2		update by the Secretariat

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.4	Proposed options for the organization of the list of speakers

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.5	Chairman's notes

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.6	Draft declaration (rolling text 4 - informal) submitted by the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.7	Draft declaration (rolling text 4 - informal) submitted by the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.8	Draft declaration (rolling text 4 - informal) submitted by the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.9	Draft declaration (rolling text 4 - informal) submitted by the Chairman
		 	contained in A/AC.240/1995/CRP.8

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.10	Draft declaration:  text submitted by the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11	Draft declaration:  text submitted by the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/CRP.11	Draft declaration:  text submitted by the Chairman
Rev. 1
B. Drafting group documents


A/AC.240/1994/WG/1	Note by the Bureau of the Preparatory Committee

A/AC.240/1994/WG/2	Note by the Chairman of the Preparatory Committee

A/AC.240/1994/WG/3 	Possible elements for inclusion in a draft declaration

A/AC.240/1994/WG/4	Draft declaration to be adopted at the special
			commemorative meeting of the General Assembly on
			the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the
			United Nations - Proposals submitted by the Group
			of Non-Aligned Countries

A/AC.240/1995/WG/1	Draft declaration to be adopted at the special
			commemorative meeting of the General Assembly on
			the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the
			United Nations submitted by the Bureau

A/AC.240/1995/WG/2	Amendments to the draft declaration for the
			fiftieth anniversary submitted by the Bureau of
			the Preparatory Committee (amendments proposed by
			(a) Non-aligned countries; (b) Commonwealth of
			Independent States)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/3	Amendments to the draft declaration for the
			fiftieth anniversary submitted by the Bureau of
			the Preparatory Committee (amendments proposed by
			(a) Ukraine; (b) Sweden; (c) Japan; (d) Belarus;
			(e) Mexico)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/4	Amendments to the draft declaration for the
			fiftieth anniversary submitted by the Preparatory
			Committee (amendments proposed by (a) Canada;
			(b) Japan; (c) Turkey)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/5	Amendments to the draft declaration for the
			fiftieth anniversary submitted by the Preparatory
			Committee (amendments proposed by (a) Canada;
			(b) European Union; (c) Russian Federation;
			(d) Sweden)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/6	Draft declaration (rolling text 1) submitted by
			the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/WG/7	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling
			text 1) submitted by the Chairman (amendments
			proposed by the Republic of Korea)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/8	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling
			text 1) (amendments proposed by (a) Brazil;
			(b) China; (c) Japan; (d) Working Group of the
			Movement of Non-Aligned Countries)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/9	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling
			text 1) submitted by the Chairman (amendments
			proposed by (a) Belarus and Ukraine; (b) China;
			(c) Holy See; (d) Italy)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/10	Draft declaration (rolling text 2) submitted by
			the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/WG/11	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling
			text 2) submitted by the Chairman (amendments
			proposed by (a) Belarus, Russian Federation and
			Ukraine; (b) Germany; (c) Italy; (d) Japan;
			(e) Netherlands; (f) New Zealand; (g) Ukraine)

A/AC.240/1995/WG/12	Draft declaration (rolling text 3) submitted by the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/WG/13	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling text 2) submitted by 
			the Working Group of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries

A/AC.240/1995/WG/14	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling text 3) proposed by 
			the Russian Federation on behalf of the States members of the 
			Commonwealth of Independent States

A/AC.240/1995/WG/15	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling text 3) proposed by the 
			Holy See

A/AC.240/1995/WG/16	Draft declaration (rolling text 4) submitted by the Chairman

A/AC.240/1995/WG/17	Amendments to the draft declaration (rolling text 4) proposed by 
			the European Union

C. General Assembly documents

Official Records of the General	Reports of the Preparatory Committee
Assembly, Forty-seventh Session,of the GeneralAssembly at its forty-seventh session
Supplement No. 48 (A/47/48)

Ibid., Forty-eighth Session, 	 Report of the Preparatory Committee to the General Assembly at
Supplement No. 48 		 its forty-eighth session
(A/48/48 and Add.1)

Ibid., Forty-ninth		 Report of the Preparatory Committee to the General
Session, Supplement		 Assembly at its forty-ninth session
No. 48 (A/49/48 and Add.1)
General Assembly resolutions and decisions


Decision 46/472		Establishing the Preparatory Committee for the
			Fiftieth Anniversary

Decision 48/406		Establishing an open-ended drafting group

Resolution 48/6 Fiftieth anniversary of the Declaration of the Four Nations on General Security Resolution 48/215 Secretariat staffing and resources for the fiftieth anniversary Resolution 48/215 B Deciding to convene a special commemorative meeting from 22 to 24 October 1995 Resolution 49/11 Commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations Resolution 49/12 Endorsing the creation of a United Nations Fiftieth Anniversary Coin Programme Resolution 49/12 B Organization of the list of speakers for the special commemorative meeting Resolution 50/6 Declaration on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations

ANNEX III

50/6. Declaration on the Occasion
of the Fiftieth Anniversary
of the United Nations

The General Assembly

Adopts the following Declaration:

DECLARATION ON THE OCCASION OF THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE UNITED NATIONS

Fifty years ago the United Nations was born out of the sufferings caused by the Second World War. The determination, enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations, "to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war" is as vital today as it was fifty years ago. In this, as in other respects, the Charter gives expression to the common values and aspirations of humankind.

The United Nations has been tested by conflict, humanitarian crisis and turbulent change, yet it has survived and played an important role in preventing another global conflict and has achieved much for people all over the world. The United Nations has helped to shape the very structure of relations between nations in the modern age. Through the process of decolonization and the elimination of apartheid, hundreds of millions of human beings have been and are assured the exercise of the fundamental right of self-determination.

At this time, following the end of the cold war, and as the end of the century approaches, we must create new opportunities for peace, development, democracy and cooperation. The speed and extent of change in today's world point to a future of great complexity and challenge and to a sharp increase in the level of expectations of the United Nations.

Our resolve on this historic occasion is clear. The commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations must be seized as an opportunity to redirect it to greater service to humankind, especially to those who are suffering and are deeply deprived. This is the practical and moral challenge of our time. Our obligation to this end is found in the Charter. The need for it is manifest in the condition of humankind.

On the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, we, the Member States and observers of the United Nations, representing the peoples of the world:

  • Solemnly reaffirm the Purposes and Principles of the Charter of the United Nations and our commitments to them;

  • Express our gratitude to all men and women who have made the United Nations possible, done its work and served its ideals, particularly those who have given their lives during service to the United Nations;

  • Are determined that the United Nations of the future will work with renewed vigour and effectiveness in promoting peace, development, equality and justice and understanding among the peoples of the world;

  • Will give to the twenty-first century a United Nations equipped, financed and structured to serve effectively the peoples in whose name it was established.

    In fulfilment of these commitments we will be guided in our future cooperation by the following, with respect to peace, development, equality, justice and the United Nations Organization:

    PEACE

    1. To meet these challenges, and while recognizing that action to secure global peace, security and stability will be futile unless the economic and social needs of people are addressed, we will:

  • Promote methods and means for the peaceful settlement of disputes in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and enhance the capabilities of the United Nations in conflict prevention, preventive diplomacy, peace-keeping and peace-building;

  • Strongly support United Nations, regional and national efforts on arms control, limitation and disarmament and the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, in all aspects, and other weapons of mass destruction, including biological and chemical weapons and other forms of particularly excessively injurious or indiscriminate weapons, in pursuit of our common commitment to a world free of all these weapons;

  • Continue to reaffirm the right of self-determination of all peoples, taking into account the particular situation of peoples under colonial or other forms of alien domination or foreign occupation, and recognize the right of peoples to take legitimate action in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations to realize their inalienable right of self-determination. This shall not be construed as authorizing or encouraging any action that would dismember or impair, totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States conducting themselves in compliance with the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples and thus possessed of a Government representing the whole people belonging to the territory without distinction of any kind;

  • Act together to defeat the threats to States and people posed by terrorism, in all its forms and manifestations, and transnational organized crime and the illicit trade in arms and the production and consumption of and trafficking in illicit drugs;

  • Strengthen consultation and cooperation between regional arrangements or agencies and the United Nations in the maintenance of international peace and security.

    DEVELOPMENT

    2. A dynamic, vigorous, free and equitable international economic environment is essential to the well-being of humankind and to international peace, security and stability. This objective must be addressed, in greater measure and more effectively, by the United Nations system.

    3. The United Nations has played an important role in the promotion of economic and social development and has, over the years, provided life-saving assistance to women, children and men around the world. But the pledge recorded in the Charter that all Members of the United Nations shall take joint and separate action in cooperation with the Organization for the achievement of higher standards of living, full employment and conditions of economic and social progress and development has not been adequately implemented.

    4. It must be recognized that notwithstanding past efforts, the gap between the developed and developing countries remains unacceptably wide. The specific problems of countries with economies in transition with respect to their twofold transition to democracy and a market economy should also be recognized. In addition, accelerating globalization and interdependence in the world economy call for policy measures designed to ensure the maximization of the benefits from and the minimization of the negative effects of these trends for all countries.

    5. Of greatest concern is that one fifth of the world's 5.7 billion people live in extreme poverty. Extraordinary measures by all countries, including strengthened international cooperation, are needed to address this and related problems.

    6. In response to these facts and circumstances, the United Nations has convened a number of specifically focused global conferences in the last five years. From these conferences, a consensus has emerged, inter alia, that economic development, social development and environmental protection are interdependent and mutually reinforcing components of sustainable development, which is the framework of our efforts to achieve a higher quality of life for all people. At the core of this consensus is the recognition that the human person is the central subject of development and that people must be at the centre of our actions towards and concerns for sustainable development.

    7. In this context, we reaffirm that democracy, development and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the right to development, are interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

    8. In order to foster sustained economic growth, social development, environmental protection and social justice in fulfilment of the commitments we have made on international cooperation for development, we will:

  • Promote an open and equitable, rule-based, predictable and non-discriminatory multilateral trading system and a framework for investment, transfers of technology and knowledge, as well as enhanced cooperation in the areas of development, finance and debt as critical conditions for development;

  • Give particular attention to national and international action to enhance the benefits of the process of globalization for all countries and to avoid the marginalization from and promote the integration of the least developed countries and countries in Africa into the world economy;

  • Improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the United Nations system for development and strengthen its role in all relevant fields of international economic cooperation;

  • Invigorate the dialogue and partnership between all countries in order to secure the existence of a favourable political and economic environment for the promotion of international cooperation for development based on the imperatives of mutual benefit and interest and genuine interdependence, while recognizing that each country is ultimately responsible for its own development but reaffirming that the international community must create a supportive international environment for such development;

  • Promote social development through decisive national and international action aimed at the eradication of poverty as an ethical, social, political and economic imperative of humankind and the promotion of full employment and social integration;

  • Recognize that the empowerment and the full and equal participation of women is central to all efforts to achieve development;

  • Reduce and eliminate unsustainable patterns of production and consumption and promote appropriate demographic policies in order to meet the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, recognizing that environmental sustainability constitutes an integral part of the development process;

  • Intensify cooperation on natural disaster reduction and major technological and man-made disasters, disaster relief, post-disaster rehabilitation and humanitarian assistance in order to enhance the capabilities of affected countries to cope with such situations.

    EQUALITY

    9. We reiterate the affirmation by the Charter of the dignity and worth of the human person and the equal rights of men and women and reaffirm that all human rights are universal, indivisible, interdependent and interrelated.

    10. While the significance of national and regional particularities and various historical, cultural and religious backgrounds must be borne in mind, it is the duty of all States, regardless of their political, economic and cultural systems, to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms, the universal nature of which is beyond question. It is also important for all States to ensure the universality, objectivity and non-selectivity of the consideration of human rights issues.

    11. We will therefore:

  • Promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms, which are inherent to all human beings;

  • Strengthen laws, policies and programmes that would ensure the full and equal participation of women in all spheres of political, civil, economic, social and cultural life as equal partners and the full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all women;

  • Promote and protect the rights of the child;

  • Ensure that the rights of persons who can be particularly vulnerable to abuse or neglect, including youth, persons with disabilities, the elderly and migrant workers, are protected;

  • Promote and protect the rights of indigenous people;

  • Ensure the protection of the rights of refugees and of displaced persons;

  • Ensure that the rights of persons belonging to national, ethnic and other minorities are protected, and that such persons are able to pursue economic and social development and live in circumstances of full respect for their identity, traditions, forms of social organization and cultural and religious values.

    JUSTICE

    12. The Charter of the United Nations has provided a durable framework for the promotion and development of international law. The continued promotion and development of international law must be pursued with a view to ensuring that relations between States are based on the principles of justice, sovereign equality, universally recognized principles of international law and respect for the rule of law. Such action should take account of developments under way in such areas as technology, transport, information and resource-related fields and international financial markets, as well as the growing complexity of the work of the United Nations in the humanitarian and refugee assistance fields.

    13. We are determined to:

  • Build and maintain justice among all States in accordance with the principles of the sovereign equality and territorial integrity of States;

  • Promote full respect for and implementation of international law;

  • Settle international disputes by peaceful means;

  • Encourage the widest possible ratification of international treaties and ensure compliance with the obligations arising from them;

  • Promote respect for and the implementation of international humanitarian law;

  • Promote the progressive development of international law in the field of development, including that which would foster economic and social progress;

  • Promote respect for and implementation of international law in the field of human rights and fundamental freedoms and encourage ratification of or accession to international human rights instruments;

  • Promote the further codification and progressive development of international law.

    UNITED NATIONS ORGANIZATION

    14. In order to be able to respond effectively to the challenges of the future and the expectations of the United Nations held by peoples around the world, it is essential that the United Nations itself be reformed and modernized. The work of the General Assembly, the universal organ of the States Members of the United Nations, should be revitalized. The Security Council should, inter alia, be expanded and its working methods continue to be reviewed in a way that will further strengthen its capacity and effectiveness, enhance its representative character and improve its working efficiency and transparency; as important differences on key issues continue to exist, further in-depth consideration of these issues is required. The role of the Economic and Social Council should be strengthened to enable it to carry out effectively, in the modern age, the tasks it has been assigned with respect to the well-being and standards of life of all people. These and other changes, within the United Nations system, should be made if we are to ensure that the United Nations of the future serves well the peoples in whose name it was established.

    15. In order to carry out its work effectively, the United Nations must have adequate resources. Member States must meet, in full and on time, their obligation to bear the expenses of the Organization, as apportioned by the General Assembly. That apportionment should be established on the basis of criteria agreed to and considered to be fair by Member States.

    16. The secretariats of the United Nations system must improve significantly their efficiency and effectiveness in administering and managing the resources allocated to them. For their part, Member States will pursue and take responsibility for reforming that system.

    17. We recognize that our common work will be the more successful if it is supported by all concerned actors of the international community, including non-governmental organizations, multilateral financial institutions, regional organizations and all actors of civil society. We will welcome and facilitate such support, as appropriate.

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