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United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UN Photo
Hello, I'm Nane Annan. It is wonderful to be here with you on the Cyberschoolbus. This time I want to talk to you about World Food Day, which is every year on October 16.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© Photographer: W. Ball
But first I want to show you a photo of my husband Kofi Annan. He is the Secretary-General of the United Nations. This is my favorite picture of him because it shows his wish to reach out to you so that you feel the UN is your UN. On this World Food Day, it is good to remember that the UN is working in many countries to bring food to people who are hungry.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/HQ96-1218/Pirozzi
In some parts of the world you go to the supermarket to buy food. In other parts of the world you go to the market. Here is a market in the Comoros, an island state off the East Coast of Africa. You can see all the different food being sold there.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/HQ95-0972/Noorani
There are two things you can do to keep healthy and strong: eat a variety of foods and get plenty of exercise. Just as I am talking to you about this, here is a woman in Bangladesh holding up a head of a cauliflower and talking about how important it is to eat vegetables. Vegetables are a good source of vitamins that our body needs to stay healthy. What do you like to eat?
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan

World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/93-0112/Roger Lemoyne
Here is a 13-year-old girl playing with her nephew while feeding him rice in their house in China. Rice is a kind of grain. Grains are a good source of energy that we need when we move our muscles. What kind of grains do you like to eat?

United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/93-COU 0239/Roger Lemoyne
This little boy in China is being weighed. Our weight can help tell us if we are eating too much or too little.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© Photographer: John Shaw
For those of us who have grown up in a city, we sometimes have a vague idea where food comes from. I remember how I thought that pineapples hung from trees to be picked. Then I went to Ghana with my husband and he showed me that they grow up from the ground. A friend of ours didn't realize that potatoes grow as lumps under the ground and above ground you just see a plant with green leaves. The farmer has to pull up the whole plant to see if the potatoes are ready to be dug up and eaten.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan

World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/HQ93-2247/Pirozzi
In most poor countries farms are small, about the size of a backyard. Families prepare the ground for planting with old-fashioned ploughs. And if the plants need extra water, they have to pour it themselves. Here are two women watering a vegetable patch in Mauritania, not far from the Sahara desert.

United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/DOI94-1246/Pirozzi
And here is a boy watering vegetables in Mozambique. Growing food is a lot of work and requires a lot of water (but not too much!). Sometimes there is no rain, or the weather is too cold, or there is a hurricane which destroys the plants that give us our food. These problems happen all over the world, and for many people, it means that they will not have enough food to eat.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan

World Food Day 2002
© World Food Programme
Over 800 million people are hungry. They live in every part of the world. Although there is enough food in the world to feed everyone it is not always in the places where hungry people live. Right now, 7 million people living in southern Africa don't have enough food because of drought. Here is a woman standing in a cornfield where all the corn has died. So what is being done to help those in need? Let us look at some examples.

United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan

World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/HQ98-0258/ Chalasani
The UN gives food to people who live in areas where there is little food to eat. The women in this picture live in Sudan and are carrying sacks of grain given by the UN back to their homes. The UN also helps in refugee camps - places where people stay when they have to flee from their countries because of war or disaster. The camps are often in very dry places where it is difficult to grow food, so the food is carefully weighed to make sure there is enough for everyone.

United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/HQ97-0536/Balaguer
Sometimes the UN must bring food to small villages. Here is a boy in Bolivia who is getting a portion of bread and fortified milk, a rare treat brought by UN workers to the far away village of Chayantacalacala--a beautiful name!
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/HQ97-1164/Pirozzi
When I visit schools in very poor areas I am often first taken to the school kitchen. A school kitchen is very important because a child cannot learn if she or he is hungry. The UN is helping many schools to give children lunch, like in this orphanage in Kenya where children are sharing a plate of beans and ugali (a kind of thick maize porridge) for lunch.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus

 

Visit the World of the UN with Nane Annan


World Food Day 2002
© UNICEF/HQ99-0833/Roger Lemoyne
After dealing with the immediate problem it is also important to think ahead. I have visited many places where UN workers are helping people in poor countries to help themselves. It is better to teach somebody to fish than to just give them a fish. If they know how to fish, like this father and his two children in Viet Nam, they can catch a fish every day.

I hope I have given you an idea of how important food is to everyone, no matter where they live. And know that in the year 2000 most of the world leaders came to the UN and decided to work together to make a better world for all. At this meeting they set some important goals for the future. One was to fight poverty, which also means to fight hunger. Check the progress that has been made toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals so far.
United Nations Cyberschoolbus