16 May 2011
Security Council
SC/10252

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council

6536th Meeting (AM)


Anti-Terrorism Committees Must Continue to Strengthen Efforts,

 

Despite Death of Osama Bin Laden, Security Council Told

 


Members Hear Briefings by New Chairs of Three Subsidiary Bodies


Despite the death of Osama bin Laden, the Security Council’s three counter-terrorism committees must continue to strengthen their efforts through enhanced effectiveness and cooperation with Member States, speakers said today during the regular six-month briefings by the Chairpersons of the subsidiary bodies.


Peter Wittig (Germany), Chair of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999) on Al-Qaida and the Taliban, said Bin Laden’s death was clearly a turning point.  “However, it is neither the end of Al-Qaida nor the end of terrorism,” he stressed, adding that the Committee was assessing the implications of recent events and that its Monitoring Team would have to follow current and future developments closely.


He said the Committee had also discussed the possible implications of political dialogue in Afghanistan, adding that the Committee and the 1267 regime as a whole must not become a stumbling block to peace and security in the region, and would continue to take the dynamics of political processes into account.  He suggested that the Council might wish to consider options for granting an even more visible role to the Government of Afghanistan, with a view to the transition process and the principle of Afghan ownership.


He pledged to build on efforts by his predecessor to keep the Consolidated List of individuals and entities subject to sanctions under resolution 1267 (1999) up to date, transparent and fair.  The Committee had just agreed on 78 amendments to the List, and to make publicly available almost 200 additional summaries of reasons for listing.  He noted, however, that the Council had clearly flagged in resolution 1904 (2009) the need for further efforts to that end.


Joining Mr. Wittig in briefing the Council were Hardeep Singh Puri (India), Chair of the Committee established by resolution 1373 (2001) on counter-terrorism (Counter-Terrorism Committee), and Baso Sangqu (South Africa), Chair of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004) on the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction to non-State actors.


Mr. Puri said the three subsidiary bodies continued to work with international, regional and subregional organizations on issues of common interest, while the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force remained a useful framework within which the Committees’ expert group continued regularly to share information, particularly on technical assistance.


Mr. Sangqu recalled that the Council’s adoption of resolution 1977 (2011) had extended the 1540 Committee’s mandate for 10 years.  That enhanced its ability to help States implement resolution 1540 (2004) and allowed it to strengthen its role in facilitating technical assistance and enhancing cooperation with global, regional and subregional organizations.  It enabled the Committee to refine outreach and continue instituting measures for transparency, including regular open meetings with Member States, he said.


Following those presentations, speakers reaffirmed their support for the work of all three Committees and agreed that the elimination of Osama bin Laden did not mean an end to the anti-terrorism struggle.  The representative of the United States described his death as the most significant event in that fight, stressing, however, that much more work lay ahead and announcing additional funding for counter-terrorism efforts, those of the 1540 Committee in particular.


Speakers welcomed efforts by the three subsidiary bodies to improve their working methods, including those of the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee to make the listing and de-listing procedure more accurate, transparent and compliant with due process.  However, the representative of Costa Rica, speaking on behalf of like-minded States, reiterated its recommendation for a time limit for all listings, which would underscore the preventive, temporary nature of sanctions.


That proposed “sunset clause” would not result in automatic delisting once the time limit had expired, he explained.  Rather, the Council and its Sanctions Committee would retain the right to keep a name on the list upon review.  He proposed that a listed individual or entity be given access to sufficient information to present an effective defence.  Switzerland’s representative seconded those recommendations on behalf of the Human Security Network.


Some speakers said there was an application of double standards in the fight against terrorism, with Venezuela’s representative noting that, as long as the classification of some terrorists as “good” and others as “bad” persisted, State terrorism would be promoted and innocent people killed.  As long as the Charter and international law were violated, the world would not be a safer place.


Brazil’s representative stressed with regard to the 1540 regime that the complete elimination of weapons of mass destruction would be the most effective way to keep them out of the hands of terrorists, he emphasizing also that addressing the root causes of terrorism would be critical in efforts to end it.


Lebanon’s representative emphasized that the root causes of terrorism must be dealt with by eliminating occupation, ignorance, violations of human rights and other wrongs.  He also emphasized the importance of transforming the Middle East into a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


Other speakers today were representatives of Nigeria, Russian Federation, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Portugal, Gabon, Colombia, China, United Kingdom, France, Japan, Pakistan, Turkey, Cuba, Spain, Indonesia (on behalf of the Association of South-East Asian Nations), Israel, Morocco, Iran and Syria.


Also speaking was the Acting Head of the European Union delegation.


The meeting began at 10:10 a.m. and ended at 1:50 p.m.


Background


The Security Council met this morning to hear briefings by the Chairs of its three subsidiary bodies on counter-terrorism: the Committees established pursuant to Council resolution 1373 (2001) on counter-terrorism; resolution 1267 (1999) on Al-Qaida and the Taliban; and resolution 1540 (2004) on the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction to non-State actors.


Briefings


HARDEEP SINGH PURI (India), Chair of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, said the three Committees continued to address non-reporting or late reporting through the exchange of information and joint visits, and to help Member States submit their responses on the implementation of the resolutions.  For example, this week, representatives of the three Committees would participate in a subregional workshop in Doha.  The three subsidiary bodies continued to work with international, regional and subregional organizations on issues of common interest.  The Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF) also continued to prove a useful framework within which the three expert groups continued regularly to share information, particularly on technical assistance.


He said the Counter-Terrorism Committee’s important tools included preliminary implementation assessments, visits to Member States, technical aid and the promotion of best practices.  It had organized important workshops, including one in London last January by the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED) on preventing abuse of the non-profit sector for terrorist financing within the framework of the CTITF Working Group on tackling the financing of terrorism, and another in Mauritania in April on challenges to effective border control in the Sahel and Maghreb.


He stressed the importance of enhancing transparency and public outreach, and of strengthening cooperation with international, regional and subregional organizations.  The Committee was working to update the global implementation survey of resolution 1373 (2001) by 30 June 2011 and the survey of resolution 1624 (2005) by 31 December 2011, he said, adding that it had adopted an action plan for implementing the latter.   The Committee’s special meeting with international, regional and national groups on the “prevention of terrorism”, held in Strasbourg, France, in April, had focused on prevention policies, comprehensive and integrated strategies and the role of law enforcement in preventing terrorism.  He said he had also participated in the meeting of the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington, D.C., in March.


PETER WITTIG (Germany), Chair of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and associated individuals and entities, pledged to build on efforts by his predecessor to keep the Consolidated List of individuals and entities subject to sanctions updated and transparent.  The Committee had just agreed to 78 amendments to the List, agreeing also to make publicly available almost 200 additional summaries of reasons for listing.  He noted, however, that the Council had clearly flagged in resolution 1904 (2009) the need for further efforts to that end.


He said a review was under way of 48 individuals reported to be deceased pursuant to paragraph 26 of resolution 1904 (2009).  The Ombudsperson established by that resolution had, as of today, received 10 requests for de-listing and the Committee was currently considering them.  As required, the Chair was insisting on the timely provision of reasons for objecting to de-listing requests, through case-by-case consideration.  The Consolidated List currently had 488 entries — 258 Al-Qaida individuals, 138 Taliban individuals and 92 Al-Qaida entities.


Since the last briefing, the Committee had added the names of six individuals, removed six others and amended 37 entries based on additional information gathered, he continued.  At the end of March, it had approved the posting of 69 narrative summaries related to listed individuals and entities associated with Al-Qaida.  Furthermore, the Committee had recently approved the remaining 125 narrative summaries concerning individuals associated with the Taliban.  Many of those summaries were on the Committee’s website, with more to be added in the near future.


He went on to say that the monitoring team had made 10 trips to Member States since the last briefing, in addition to having organized its ninth regional meeting for heads and deputy heads of intelligence and security services from Middle East and North African countries.  It continued to participate in many international seminars and to provide briefings to a wide variety of audiences, he said, adding that its cooperation with other international and technical organizations, as well as the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force, also continued.


Turning to the death of Osama bin Laden, he emphasized that while it was clearly a turning point, it was neither the end of Al-Qaida nor of terrorism.  The Committee would duly assess the implication of recent events, and the Monitoring Team would closely monitor current and future developments in that regard.  The Committee had also discussed the possible implications of political dialogue in Afghanistan, he said, adding that the Committee, and the 1267 regime as a whole, must not become a stumbling block on the road to peace and security in the region and would continue to take the dynamics of political processes into account.  He suggested that the Council might wish to consider options for granting an even more visible role to the Government of Afghanistan in that process, with a view to the transition process and the principle of Afghan ownership.


Finally, he explained that reforms being carried out in accordance with the requirements of resolution 1904 (2009) still represented a work in progress and their effects could not be evaluated as yet, particularly with regard to the Ombudsperson process.  At the present stage, it was clear that the political will of all Council members to promote fair and clear procedures had added weight and rigour to that process, and the Chair was committed to continuing to help build consensus for the further enhancement of fair and clear procedures as well as the role of the Ombudsperson.


BASO SANGQU (South Africa), Chair of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004), recalled that the Council’s adoption of resolution 1977 (2011) had extended the body’s mandate for 10 years, enhancing its ability to support the implementation of resolution 1540 (2004) and help States to that end.  The new resolution also provided for a five-year comprehensive review and an end-of-mandate review.  It gave the Committee the ability to strengthen its role in facilitating technical assistance and enhancing cooperation with global, regional and subregional organizations; to refine outreach; and to continue instituting transparent measures, including through regular open meetings with Member States.  The resolution also mandated the Committee to conduct annual reviews on the implementation of resolution 1540 (2004) in order to guide its activities and cite specific priorities in its annual work programme.


He said that in the last six months, the 1540 Committee had received initial reports from Ethiopia, Gabon and Rwanda, as well as additional information from Finland, Poland, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Ukraine.  By the end of 2010, it had reviewed and approved 192 matrices, which formed the foundation of the data that would appear in the 1540 Committee’s report to the Council, due by 24 May.  The Committee had continued to work on requests for assistance and on possible next steps, he said.


Reporting on the Chair’s activities, he recalled that last December in Vienna, he had participated in a meeting of 25 international, governmental, regional and subregional organizations on cooperation in promoting implementation of resolution 1540 (2004).  In February, he had addressed the Committee on Hemispheric Security of the Organization of American States.  In addition, the 1540 Committee and its groups of experts had participated in outreach events around the world to facilitate implementation of resolution 1540 (2004), including workshops on export controls, transhipment and proliferation financing.  Regarding transparency, he said approximately 180 Committee-approved country matrices were posted on the subsidiary body’s website, as well as information notes on its outreach activities.  The Working Group on outreach and transparency had examined the Committee’s media strategy in the context of resolution 1977 (2011) and the forthcoming 1540 Committee report to the Council, he said.


Statements


Mr. PURI (India), speaking in his national capacity, described Osama bin Laden’s death as a significant milestone in the fight against terrorism, stressing, however, that it was not the end of the struggle.  The syndicate of terrorism must be rooted out from Afghanistan and other areas, he said.  Warning that attempts to differentiate between Al-Qaida and the Taliban would not be easy, he also underlined that listing and de-listing must not be subject to political interest.  Regarding Afghanistan’s political efforts, he said that while he supported the integration of those fighters willing to lay down their arms and be integrated into a democratic Afghanistan, the principles laid down in international forums should not be diluted, otherwise the country risked sliding backwards.  He emphasized the importance of the regime intended to keep weapons of mass destruction out of the hands of terrorists, and the continuation of international cooperation in the fight against terrorism.


Mr. WITTIG ( Germany), also speaking in his national capacity, aligned himself with the statement to be made by the delegation of the European Union.  On the 1540 Committee, he expressed optimism that the broader United Nations membership would have a say on necessary adjustments, through comprehensive reviews on the status of implementation over the next 10 years.  Welcoming the creation of the group of experts and the focus on assistance on implementation as a top priority, he stressed that the collaboration and contributions of all Member States were critical to the work of all the Committees, and all measures to combat terrorism must be carried out in full compliance with international human rights norms.  On the 1267 sanctions, he said the listing and de-listing procedures should be further systematized, with listing limited in duration and requiring precise and sufficient identifiers accompanying any application.


Mr. SANGQU (South Africa), speaking in his national capacity, encouraged the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee to ensure that the Consolidated List remained up to date.  While resolution 1904 (2009) had made improvements on listing, there were still legal challenges to the sanctions regime that threatened its effectiveness.  Describing terrorism as a most dangerous threat to international peace and security, he said the Counter-Terrorism Committee’s efforts must continue with renewed commitment, focus and resolve, with the United Nations remaining at the forefront of those efforts.  Cooperation must be conducted within legal norms and standards, and in accordance with international human rights and humanitarian law, he stressed.


RAFF BUKUN-OLU WOLE ONEMOLA ( Nigeria) said resolution 1977 (2011) further strengthened the collective resolve to achieve global security through regular workshops.  To that end, it was important to help developing countries lacking administrative structures, he said, stressing also the great importance of the 1540 Committee’s clearinghouse role.  By finding potential donors, it would help more States benefit from the relevant technical support.  Resolution 1963 (2010) had led to an increased focus on defeating terrorist groups, he said, welcoming the Counter-Terrorism Committee’s action plan to implement resolution 1963 (2010) and commending its successful meeting in Strasbourg.  He also welcomed positive changes in the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee’s work programme, saying further measures to strengthen resolution 1904 (2009) must be considered.


VITALY CHURKIN (Russian Federation) strongly supported the work of the three Committees, affirming the continuing terrorist threat.  Citing recent attacks, he said his country had carried out operations to root out terrorist groups in the North Caucasus.  Regarding Afghanistan, he expressed doubt over claims that the Taliban could become a national political group, or differentiating between the Taliban and Al-Qaida.  As for de-listing, he stressed that it was only possible on an individual basis.  Underscoring the particular importance of preventing incitement to terrorism, he noted his country’s participation with the Committees in that area, while expressing support for their efforts to cooperate with regional organizations.


IVAN BARBALIĆ (Bosnia and Herzegovina) stressed the importance of the Ombudsperson’s role in the overall counter-terrorism framework, which could only enhance and contribute to the regime’s fairness and transparency.  In that regard, effective implementation of resolutions 1373 (2001) and 1624 (2005) was essential to unyielding and consistent counter-terrorism efforts, while the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate remained key elements of the framework.  Regarding the 1540 Committee, he said full and effective implementation of the associated resolution required continuous efforts by Member States at the national, regional and international levels.  Because comprehensive implementation was a complex and costly process, Member States able to provide resources should extend voluntary financial contributions to those requiring assistance in implementing resolution 1540 (2004), he said, stressing that no financial cost was too high if it helped prevent the potentially devastating consequences of terrorist attacks involving the use of weapons of mass destruction.


JOÃO MARIA CABRAL (Portugal) said the preventive aspects of fighting terrorism under resolutions 1373 (2001) and 1624 (2005) should play an indispensable role in any counter-terrorism strategy.  Effective counter-terrorism and respect for human rights were mutually reinforcing, he emphasized, encouraging the Counter-Terrorism Committee to consider human rights and rule-of-law issues in its country visits, assessments and strategic action plans.  To better implement relevant Council resolutions, it should intensify its regional approach and develop its regional capacity and networks, he added, welcoming the Committee’s initiatives in Asia and the Africa’s Sahel subregion as key priorities for further engagement to counter international terrorism.  Portugal supported the creation of the Ombudsperson, he said, adding that the adoption of resolution 1904 (2009) was important for improving the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee’s procedures and working methods, and would reinforce the impact of a stronger sanctions regime.  He also hailed the adoption of resolution 1977 (2011), saying it would provide the time needed to continue work on preventing weapons of mass destruction from falling into the wrong hands, promote the sharing of experiences and lessons learned, and facilitate technical assistance.  Portugal also supported the creation of the group of experts, which would improve the 1540 Committee’s ability to carry out its mandate, he added.


ROSEMARY DICARLO (United States) said today’s meeting was taking place at an important time, marked by the recent death of Osama bin Laden and the forthcoming tenth anniversary of the attacks of 11 September 2001.  The death of Bin Laden was the most significant blow to Al-Qaida, but it did not mark the end of the group or of terrorism, she stressed, noting that much work remained in that regard.  The United States would actively pursue counter-terrorism efforts, including at the United Nations.  Noting that the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate had made great strides in 2010, she commended the latter’s focus on Africa and South-East Asia.  The United States supported the emphasis on addressing conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism and stressed the critical role of local communities and civil society in combating terrorism.


The Al-Qaida and Taliban sanctions regime was the most effective counter-terrorism tool of the United Nations, and the death of Bin Laden must not slow its work, she said.  She welcomed the enhancement of the regime’s de-listing and listing process, most notably the creation of the 0mbudusperson to ensure transparency, whose reports had provided valuable information.  In June, when the Council reviewed the work of the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee, Council members should consider a range of reforms, as well as more robust implementation of existing sanctions to make them more effective, she said.  She pledged that the United States would contribute $3 million to the 1540 Committee’s work, and that her delegation would coordinate with the group of experts a visit to the United States in September.


NOEL NELSON MESSONE (Gabon) said the events of early May were a landmark in the fight against terrorism, but the subsequent events in Morocco showed that the struggle must continue.  Paying tribute to the current and former Chairpersons of the three committees, he strongly supported their work, calling for sustained international cooperation, with special attention paid to helping poorer States implement the relevant resolutions and stressing the need to abide by international human rights law in carrying out their activities.  He welcomed the improvements in the Committees’ working methods, and their outreach to Member States, noting that his country had hosted a maritime security workshop for Central Africa.


LEONARDO LUÍS GORGULHO NOGUEIRA FERNANDES (Brazil) stressed with regard to the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee that fairness and due process in listing and de-listing was critical.  Regarding the 1540 regime, the complete elimination of weapons of mass destruction would be the most effective way to keep them out of the hands of terrorists, he emphasized, underscoring also that addressing the root causes of terrorism would be critical in efforts to end it.


NÉSTOR OSORIO (Colombia) welcomed the review of the format for preliminary assessment of implementation and the strengthening of dialogue with Member States, saying greater transparency in preparing assessments would allow for more accurate information on the status of implementation and on the assistance needed by Member States.  The Counter-Terrorism Committee should promote measures to protect and promote the rights of terrorism victims, he said, noting that the fight against terrorism, as reflected in the Global Strategy, had not been properly developed.  Welcoming the reforms undertaken in resolution 1904 (2009) aimed at improving certain procedures, particularly respect for due process, transparency and the quality of information on the Consolidated List, he said the reform process must be deepened so as to establish fair, transparent procedures.  The Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee should ensure greater availability of and access to information on the listing and de-listing of individuals and entities.  He called for strengthening the Ombudsperson’s Office and giving it sufficient funds to carry out its mandate.  It was also necessary to strengthen coordination among the three Committees and the competent United Nations entities as part of the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force.


YANG TAO (China) said he hoped that the resolution to be adopted in June would help the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee improve its work in safeguarding the effectiveness of the sanctions regime.  China supported the Counter-Terrorism Committee’s work in terms of workshops, improving national preliminary assessment reports, facilitating technical aid and continuing dialogue with Member States, he said, adding that resolution 1977 (2011) reflected the resolve of Member States to implement resolution 1540 (2004).  China hoped the 1540 Committee would work in a practical, prudent manner to that end, he said, adding that his country would continue to join other Member States in promoting further progress on non-proliferation.


NAWAF SALAM (Lebanon) welcomed efforts by all the Committees to coordinate with regional groups, Member States and each other, saying he awaited the assessment of the scope of application of resolution 1373 (2001) in order to discuss further improvements in that regime.  He stressed the importance of nuclear disarmament in efforts to keep weapons of mass destruction out of the hands of terrorists, and emphasized also the need to help Member States implement resolution 1540 (2004) and the importance of turning the Middle East into a nuclear-weapon-free zone.  While the death of Osama bin Laden had turned a new page, it had not brought an end to terrorist actions, he cautioned, calling for continuing constructive dialogue on a common definition of terrorism.  Root causes must be dealt with by eliminating occupation, ignorance, violations of human rights and other wrongs, he emphasized.


PHILIP PARHAM (United Kingdom) said Osama bin Laden’s death was a significant but not a mortal blow to terrorism, and the need for high vigilance remained.  On de-listing and listing processes, he said a message must be sent to individuals associated with the Taliban that it was time to separate from Al-Qaida and cooperate with the democratic process in Afghanistan.  The Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee must help send that message, he added, noting that following the death of Bin Laden, the terrorist threat was becoming even more diffuse and United Nations regimes must adapt to that change.  In the area of concern to the 1540 Committee, it was of key importance to move from reporting to implementation in order to prevent nuclear materials falling into the hands of terrorists, he said, stressing the importance his country attached to the work of all three Committees.


Council President MARTIN BRIENS (France), speaking in his national capacity, also pointed out that the death of Osama bin Laden was not the end of terrorism.  Emphasizing that the three Committees must continue to evolve, he said the upcoming review of resolution 1624 (2005) would provide an opportunity to adapt the sanctions regime to constantly evolving threats.  To do that, the changing relationship between Al-Qaida and the Taliban in the last 10 years must be taken into account, he said, adding that the sanctions regime should have a more direct impact on the search for a resolution of the conflict in Afghanistan.  It was also necessary to improve the mechanisms set up pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999), he added.  Noting that the Counter-Terrorism Committee continued to pursue the fight against terrorism, he said counter-terrorism required more States to improve their technical capacity, welcoming the adoption of resolution 1977 (2011), which strengthened efforts in the field of assistance.


TSUNEO NISHIDA ( Japan) said Osama bin Laden’s recent death did not mean the end of the fight against terrorism.  The threat remained serious and the international community must cooperate closely in all areas of counter-terrorism.  Welcoming the adoption of resolution 1977 (2011) and its focus on implementation, assistance, international cooperation and transparency, he said it was necessary to address Member States’ limited resources, expertise and capacity fully to implement the resolution, as well as to raise awareness among Member Stats through aid and outreach.  In that context, Japan would organize a seminar on 31 May to exchange views on non-proliferation, including with regards to resolutions 1540 (2004) and 1977 (2011), he said.  Noting that the Counter-Terrorism Committee would make a visit to his country by the end of 2013, he said Japan would continue its efforts to strengthen national capacity while helping to bolster the counter-terrorism capacities of other countries.  He expressed hope that during the Council’s June review of resolution 1904 (2009), the credibility of the Consolidated List would be enhanced and the Al-Qaida and Taliban sanctions regime strengthened.


RAZA BASHIR TARAR (Pakistan), supporting the efforts of the three Committees to promote greater transparency in the fight against terrorism, said the attack in his country 72 hours ago that had killed more than 80 soldiers of the Frontier Corps once again “highlighted the enormous sacrifices that Pakistan continues to undergo in order to rid the world of terrorism”, having lost 30,000 civilians and more than 5,000 armed forces personnel in the struggle.  In the global effort, a holistic approach was needed to eliminate extremism, with a high priority on promoting socio-economic development in areas afflicted by it.  He described his country’s efforts to counter the financing of terrorism, and welcomed the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee’s efforts to enhance accuracy, fairness, transparency, efficacy and due process of the sanctions regime.  Constant improvement must be carried out, he stressed, adding that, in the same way, a follow-up mechanism must make the 1540 Committee’s regime more inclusive, transparent and balanced in terms of State responsibility and the international cooperation needed.  The extension of the 1540 Committee’s mandate should have been negotiated after an open debate in the Security Council, which could have helped increase the level of confidence among Member States, who were ultimately required to implement the resolution.


HÜSEYIN MÜFTÜOĞLU (Turkey) said that despite Bin Laden’s death, there was “no room for complacency”.  The international community must strive to improve the effectiveness of its actions, by further strengthening the sanctions regime in particular, he said, adding that the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee’s Consolidated List needed constant updating to keep it effective.  Combating incitement was critical to fighting terrorism, he said, pointing out that deficiencies remained in the implementation of resolutions 1373 (2001) and 1624 (2005).  Member States must understand their obligations fully, so there must be constant interaction between them and the Counter-Terrorism Committee.  Regarding the 1540 regime, he welcomed the improvement in the level of implementation, and stressed the need to review progress on a continuous basis.


EDUARDO ULIBARRI (Costa Rica) spoke on behalf of the like-minded States — an informal group with a specific interest in fair and clear procedures concerning targeted sanctions.  He hailed the successive improvements to the Al-Qaida and Taliban sanctions regime, notably the creation of a focal point and narrative summaries, the comprehensive review and detailed periodic reviews of the Consolidated List, and the different categories of listings.  In April, he said, the like-minded States had sent a letter to the Council outlining proposals for its consideration, including the introduction of a time limit for all listings, which would underscore the preventive, temporary nature of sanctions.  That proposed “sunset clause” would not result in automatic de-listing once the time limit had expired, he said.  Rather, the Council and its Sanctions Committee would retain the right to maintain a name on the List upon review.


The like-minded States had also proposed that a listed individual or entity be given access to sufficient information to present an effective defence, he continued.  Upon request, the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee should, after consulting with the designated State, inform the petitioner, through the Ombudsperson, about the identity of the designated State.  Moreover, the like-minded States wished to highlight the need for enhanced cooperation between Member States and the Ombudsperson, particularly in terms of access to information, he said.  They proposed a series of improvements regarding the de-listing procedure, including de-listing by majority vote.  Where there were no grounds, in the Ombudsperson view, to retain an entry on the List, the Ombudsperson should be able to recommend de-listing, he said, adding that without the Committee’s reasoned decision within 30 days to confirm the entry on the List, the entry should be de-listed.  However, the Sanctions Committee would retain its full prerogative of deciding whether or not to maintain a name on the List, he said, adding that in cases where a de-listing was rejected, the Committee should provide reasons for its decision.


Mr. Ulibarri then spoke in his national capacity, saying that achieving a consistent policy to guarantee human rights and counter terrorism was a major institutional challenge in the United Nations.  Despite major progress, the final aim must be to set up an independent review mechanism, and to make publicly available the name of each designated State.  Costa Rica trusted that the regimes would be strengthened through procedures that would be increasingly fair and just.


PEDRO NÚÑEZ MOSQUERA (Cuba) said his country had suffered first hand many different terrorist attacks since the triumph of its revolution.  Cuba had lost 3,478 people to terrorist attacks, and 2,099 had been permanently disabled over half a century of attacks.  Cuba had an impeccable record in addressing terrorism, he said, pointing out that his country had systematically presented several wide-ranging reports on its efforts.  It had strict, efficient border controls, which made it possible to foil many terrorist acts.  Cuba did not have any weapons of mass destruction, he said, reiterating his country’s rejection of the unilateral drawing up by the United States of a list of countries that abetted terrorism, as well as Cuba’s inclusion on it, which was politically motivated.  No Government had the right to define or characterize the actions of other nations, particularly a Government that applied double standards, he emphasized, adding that the United States had unjustly jailed five Cubans for trying to prevent it from perpetrating terrorist acts against their country.  Cuba continued strictly to comply with resolutions 1267 (1999), 1373 (2001) and 1540 (2004), he said, underscoring his country’s willingness to cooperate with any State, including the United States, to prevent and combat terrorism.


JUAN PABLO DE LAIGLESIA (Spain) said that although the Security Council had made a great effort in building a generally satisfactory system to combat terrorism, it could be improved, and the Council’s efforts should be complementary to those of the General Assembly.  The United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy was a valuable tool against the global threat of terrorism, he said, calling on the international community to move forward together in an effective manner that would balance the implementation of the Strategy and its Plan of Action.  He reaffirmed his country’s commitment to the fight against all forms of terrorism, regardless of motivation or manifestation, emphasizing Spain’s determination to ensure that the task remained an ongoing priority on the Organization’s agenda.


PAUL SEGER (Switzerland), speaking on behalf of the Human Security Network, which advocated a people-centred approach to security, welcomed the leadership role of the United Nations in the fight against terrorism, emphasizing that adherence to human rights and the rule of law was of particular importance in that fight, particularly in the work of the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee.  He reaffirmed the Organization’s important role in strengthening the international legal architecture by promoting the values of the United Nations Charter, and underlined the importance of international cooperation in both combating and preventing terrorism.  While applauding the Security Council’s considerable efforts to enhance the clarity and fairness of the Al-Qaida and Taliban Committee’s procedures, he said the Network still had concerns about the rights of listed individuals and entities, and encouraged the Council to consider its recommendations on targeted sanctions.


HASAN KLEIB, (Indonesia), speaking on behalf of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), announced the imminent entry into force later this month of the ASEAN Convention on Counter-Terrorism, describing it as an important tool in the regional body’s arsenal.  ASEAN leaders, during their eighteenth Summit in Jakarta last week, had agreed to continue promoting the effective implementation of their Comprehensive Plan of Action on Counter-Terrorism, and to develop initiatives to address the root causes of terrorism, as well as conditions conducive to terrorism, and to promote cooperation on de-radicalization and interfaith dialogue.  ASEAN was approaching that task by promoting equitable and inclusive development, which would embody peaceful and mutual respect among various communities, taking into account their diversity and historical uniqueness.


Calling for the implementation of all Council resolutions dealing with counter-terrorism, he said ASEAN member States had carried out their obligations, particularly regarding the Al-Qaida and Taliban Committee.  To be effective, a global counter-terrorism strategy must be broad, comprehensive and based on a profound respect for human rights and respect for the dignity of the person, he said.  Underscoring the importance of cooperation on capacity-building programmes both for ASEAN as well as on a country basis, he said such a two-pronged approach would benefit all regional stakeholders as well as the wider larger international community.  Furthermore, ASEAN member States had taken measures to strengthen export controls and prevent proliferation, financing and shipments, in addition to securing sensitive materials that could be used for weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery.


MERON REUBEN (Israel) described his country’s expanding technical assistance with many countries and regions, much of it facilitated by the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, and the cooperation of its agencies with a large number of regional organizations as well as the United Nations.  He affirmed that, despite the removal of Osama bin Laden and other advances in the fight against terrorism, “we must be ever more vigilant”.  Noting the worldwide anguish caused by terrorism, including his own country’s first-hand experience, he said it particularly importance that United Nations initiatives gave voice to victims.  He stressed, in particular, the devastating consequences of arms smuggling into Gaza by Iran and Syria.  Welcoming efforts to improve the working methods of the three Committees and the progress made in improving the accuracy of the Consolidated List, he added that it was critical to continue developing international standards on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and dual-use items.  The struggle against global terrorism called for political resolve and tireless action, he said, stressing that the culpability of those who sought to incite, sponsor, justify or harbour terrorists must not be overlooked.


PEDRO SERRANO, Acting Head of the Delegation of the European Union, said the death of Osama bin Laden could be an important opportunity to re-examine the relationship between Al-Qaida and the Taliban, taking into account the evolving nature of terrorist threats and the current political situation in Afghanistan.  Welcoming the creation of the Ombudsperson’s Office and the Council’s encouragement of individuals seeking de-listing to pursue their cases through it, he said the Council should also encourage States and international organizations to refer individuals and entities seeking de-listing to that Office.  The Council’s upcoming review of the Ombudsperson’s first activity report could be an opportunity to further clarify elements for implementing the process.


The Ombudsperson needed access to information, including classified information, he said, adding that the Council should encourage all Member States to agree on appropriate arrangements to that end.  It should also consider publishing the observations in the Ombudsperson’s case reports so that they would be available to petitioners.  The Council should also consider seriously the options proposed by the Monitoring Team’s most recent report on the Consolidated List, including those on time limits for listings, he continued.  The European Union was becoming a key supporter of measures to build law enforcement, judicial cooperation and anti-radicalization capacities in third countries, he said.  In consultation with the Office on Disarmament Affairs, it was finalizing a new decision by the Council of the European Union in support of implementation of resolution 1540 (2004).


JORGE VALERO BRICEÑO (Venezuela) said that 10 years after the terrible events of 11 September 2011, the world was not a safer place.  The same State claiming to wage a global war against worldwide terrorism refused to condemn the vicious terrorist Luis Posada Carriles, or to extradite him to Venezuela.  Like him, other terrorists lived freely in the United States, he said, adding that while convicted terrorists were protected, five innocent Cubans who had worked to fight terrorism remained detained in the United States.  As long as the classification of some terrorists as “good” and others as “bad” persisted, State terrorism would be promoted and innocent people killed, he emphasized, adding that as long as the Charter and international law were violated, the world would not be a safer place.  Terrorism fed on the terrible stigma of deplorable living conditions afflicting part of the world’s population, in addition to discrimination, foreign occupation and intervention in sovereign countries, he said, calling for the eradication of such practices.  Venezuela was committed to the Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, and to fighting all forms of terrorism, including State terrorism, he added.


MOHAMMED LOULICHKI (Morocco) said the 28 April attacks on his country had strengthened its resolve to fight such violence.  Reiterating Morocco’s support for the three Committees, he stressed the importance of transparency in their work and assistance to States in implementing the relevant resolutions.  There was a need for greater transparency in the listing and de-listing process, and for special attention to problems caused by the unfair freezing of assets.  Morocco had made progress on bringing its legal code into compliance with the 1540 regime, he noted.


ESHAGH AL HABIB (Iran) said a genuine fight against terrorism required addressing its root causes, including foreign intervention, aggression, occupation, exclusion, selectivity and expansionist economic and political policies.  There was a double standard at work, he said, pointing out that certain States confronted some terrorist groups while overlooking others.  The “Monafeghin” group had killed and wounded tens of thousands of civilians and officials in Iran, but attempts were being made to remove it from the terrorism lists of some States.  That would represent a double standard and weaken international solidarity, he warned, adding that the Jundullah terrorist group and the Party for a Free Life in Kurdistan (PJAK) enjoyed the support of some countries.  In response to the statement by Israel, he said that country was guilty of State terrorism.


BASHAR JA’AFARI (Syria) said his country had stated on many occasions that it cooperated fully and continuously with the three Committees.  Syria condemned terrorism in all its forms, particularly State terrorism, he stressed, adding that terrorism was a crime that affected everyone and should not be linked to any culture or civilization.  It was not appropriate to equate terrorism with a people’s right to self-determination and independence, he emphasized.  Israel may say what is wished, but when it came to lies and untruths and international legality, many resolutions condemned its actions.  Israel’s representative had once again taken advantage of the Council to make propaganda, he said, adding that the delegate thought that by pointing at Syria, he could deflect attention from the root cause of problems in the Middle East.  Israel was implementing a sadistic holocaust against the Palestinians, he reiterated, describing State terrorism as the worst form of terrorism.  State terrorism perpetrated by Israel had affected the United Arab Emirates, Sudan and other countries, he said, pointing out that it had carried out assassinations of Palestinians and other Arabs in both European and non-European capitals.


The representative of Israel said it was somewhat surreal to hear the representative of a regime that had killed hundreds of its own citizens in the past few weeks, and that continued to do so, talking about terrorism.  As a country that actively harboured and hosted terrorist organizations, Syria’s practices indeed represented its long-standing perspective on sponsoring terrorism.  It was a disgrace for Syria to exploit the memory of Holocaust victims, he added.


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For information media • not an official record