13 December 2011
General Assembly
GA/AB/4018

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-sixth General Assembly

Fifth Committee

22nd Meeting (AM)


Fifth Committee Takes Up 2012-2013 Financing for Rwanda, Former Yugoslavia

 

Tribunals; Proposed Budgets for New Missions in Libya, South Sudan

 


The Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) today took stock of the financing requirements for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, as it heard Secretariat officials shed light on progress in completing the Tribunalsí work and preparing their transfer to residual mechanisms.


The resources needed for the Rwanda Tribunal, which had completed all of its trial-level work, continued to decline, falling from $257.08 million gross ($233.69 million net) for 2010-2011, to $174.32 million gross ($157.94 million net), before recosting, for the 2012-2013 period, said MarŪa Eugenia Casar, Assistant Secretary-General and Controller.


Introducing the Secretary-Generalís reports on both Tribunals and his report on their International Residual Mechanism for the 2012-2013 biennium, Ms. Casar said the key focus of the Rwanda Tribunalís completion strategy remained the referral of cases to national jurisdictions and the tracking and arrest of the nine fugitives still at large.† The Former Yugoslavia Tribunal, which would focus, in 2012, on completing six trials, would need $280.16 million gross ($294.64 million net) for the 2012-2013 period, down from $327.47 million gross ($286.01 million net) for the 2010-2011 period.


The Secretary-General, she said, had requested $40.43 million gross ($46.88 million net), before recosting, and creation of 67 posts to carry out the work in 2012 and 2013 of the mechanism set up to take over residual functions from the Tribunals.


Collen Kelapile, Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), introducing a related ACABQ report, endorsed the Secretary-Generalís budgeting and staffing proposals for both Tribunals and their Residual Mechanism, while encouraging both bodies to continue efforts to recruit and retain staff in order to complete their mandates on time.


Weighing in on the matter, the representative of the United Republic of Tanzania, speaking on behalf of the African Group, acknowledged the Rwanda Tribunalís contribution to restoring peace and stability in Rwanda, and encouraged its efforts to engage with donors to replenish the voluntary fund.† He echoed the Advisory Committeeís call for the Tribunal to press ahead with its campaign to find national jurisdictions willing to accept referred cases, a task that had thus far been unsuccessful.† He also warned that the proposed sharing of resources within the Residual Mechanism must not undermine that bodyís mandate.


Ms. Casar also introduced the Secretary-Generalís report on the 2012 budget estimates for the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL), which was set up in September to support Libyan national reconciliation and State-building efforts.† Next year, UNSMIL would need $36.1 million gross and $32.6 million net and 242 posts.


But, Mr. Kelapile, who introduced the Advisory Committeeís related report, said it was premature to adopt a full 2012 budget, as the needsí assessment for UNSMIL was still under way.† Instead, the Secretary-General should be asked to submit a revised budget proposal after his March meeting with the Security Council on the matter.† Mr. Kelapile also recommended that the Assembly authorize the Secretary-General to enter into commitments of no more than $16 million to cover UNSMILís operational requirements for the 1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012 period and that resources required beyond 15 March 2012 be made available to the Mission subject to the extension of its mandate.


In addition, Ms. Casar introduced the Secretary-Generalís report on the budget for the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) for the 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012 period, saying it would require $738.3 million, as well as 7,000 military personnel, 900 civilian police personnel, 3,553 staff and 81 Government-provided personnel.


In July, the Council set up UNMISS to succeed the United Nations Mission in the Sudan (UNMIS) and authorized the Secretary-General to draw on the latterís approved resources for the new Missionís work, she said.† UNMISSí budget was based on the standardized funding model ó which assesses what is realistically achievable in a start-up environment in the first year of operations.


But, Mr. Kelapile, who introduced the Advisory Committeeís related report, found fault with applying the standardized funding approach to a successor missions.† As the Assembly had already provided $278 million for the Missionís deployment for the period ending 31 December 2011, UNMISS did not face the time constraints of a typical start-up mission, leaving sufficient time to prepare a full budget for the Assemblyís consideration.


Notwithstanding those and other concerns, and given the budget cycleís timing, approving the Secretary-Generalís proposed budget remained the most practical approach, he said.† But, the Secretary-General should be asked to give comprehensive explanations on the resources utilized, as well as to detail the actual achievements in the context of the UNMISS performance report for 2011-2012.


The Fifth Committee will reconvene at 10 a.m., on Friday, 16 December, to consider the second performance report on the programme budget of the biennium 2010-2011; backstopping and funding arrangements of the special political missions; financing of the Special Court for Sierra Leone; Human Rights Council financing; programme budget implications on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereof, and oceans and the Law of the Sea; limited budgetary discretion; and financing of the United Nations Operation in CŰte díIvoire (UNOCI).


Background


The Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) met today to consider financing of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, special political missions and peacekeeping operations.


It had before it six reports on the Tribunals.† In his report on the second performance report on the budget of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda for the biennium 2010-2011 (document A/66/557 and Corr.1), the Secretary-General estimates that $257.08 million gross ($233.69 million net) is required, as the final appropriation, for that period for the Tribunalís Special Account and he asks the Assembly to approve it.† That amount reflects a decrease of $722,600 gross ($1.64 million net, when taking into account income from staff assessment) compared with the revised appropriation for the biennium, due to decreases of $1.37 million gross ($2.22 million net) in post-incumbency and other changes, partially offset by $643,800 gross ($588,500 net) additional requirements for changes caused by the exchange rates and inflation


According to the Secretary-Generalís report on the budget for the International Criminal Tribunal for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/368 and Corr.1), the resource requirements for that biennium, before recosting, total $174.32 million gross ($157.94 million net, when taking into account income from staff assessment).† That reflects an $83.48 million gross decline in real terms ($77.39 million net) or a 32.4 per cent gross decline (32.9 per cent net) from the previous biennium period.


In his report on the second performance report on the budget of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia for the biennium 2010-2011 (document A/66/555), the Secretary-General estimates that $327.47 million gross ($286.01 million net, when taking into account income from staff assessment) is required, as the final level of expenditure, for that period for the Tribunalís Special Account and he asks the Assembly to approve it.† That revised requirement reflects an increase of $6.96 million gross (a decrease of $3.8 million net) compared with the revised appropriation for the biennium 2010-2011.† The increase is the result of the net effect of a $7.23 million gross increase ($6.88 million net) caused by exchange rate fluctuations and a $2.27 million gross increase ($1.88 million net), partly offset by a $2.54 million gross increase ($12.56 million net) in post incumbency and other changes.


According to the Secretary-Generalís report on the budget for the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/386 and Corr.1), the resource requirements for that biennium, before recosting, total $280.16 million gross ($249.64 million net, when taking into account income from staff assessment and other sources).† That reflects a $40.35 million gross decrease in real terms ($40.17 million net) or a 12.6 per cent gross decline (13.9 per cent net) from the previous period.† The decrease reflects reductions under Chambers ($1.95 million), the Office of the Prosecutor ($13.25 million), the Registry ($23.97 million) and the records management and archives component ($1.17 million) due mainly to the reduction in trial activity in 2013.


In his report on the budget for the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/537), the Secretary-General gives a breakdown of the initial resource requirements of $50.43 million gross ($46.88 million net), before recosting, for the Mechanism for that biennium and asks the Assembly to approve it.† It also asks the Assembly to approve the Mechanismís budget and the creation of 67 posts for that two-year period.


According to the report, the Mechanism, set up by the terms of Security Council resolution 1966 (2010) to carry out residual functions of the Rwanda Tribunal and the Former Yugoslavia Tribunal, will comprise two branches.† The Arusha branch, for the Rwanda Tribunal, will commence operations in Arusha on 1 July 2012.† The Hague branch, for the Former Yugoslavia Tribunal, will begin operating 1 July 2013.


The report also sets out the anticipated distribution of workload between the Mechanism and the two Tribunals, as well as other operational considerations.


The second performance reports for the biennium 2010-2011 and proposed budgets for the biennium 2012-2013 of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and proposed budget for the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/600) of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, recommends that the Assembly take note of the second performance report and approve the final appropriation for the biennium 2010-2011 in the amount of $257.1 million gross ($233.7 million net) to the Special Account for the Rwanda Tribunal.† It also recommends approval of the resource requirements outlined in the proposed budget for the biennium 2012-2013 for the Rwanda Tribunal.


Regarding the Former Yugoslavia Tribunal, the Advisory Committee recommends that the Assembly take note of the second performance report and approve the final appropriation for the biennium 2010-2011 in the amount of $327.47 million gross ($286.012 million net) to that Tribunalís Special Account.† It further recommends approval of the resource requirements outlined in the proposed budget for the biennium 2012-2013 for the Former Yugoslavia Tribunal, bearing in mind the observations and recommendations set out in the paragraphs above.


Regarding the Residual Mechanism, the Advisory Committee recommends the approval of the proposed budget for the International Residual Mechanism for the biennium 2012-2013, the approval of the establishment of 67 posts during the biennium 2012-2013 and the appropriation of a total amount of $50.4 million gross ($46.8 million net), before recosting, for the Mechanism for the biennium 2012-2013.


Under the special political missions heading, the Committee had before it two reports on the United Nations Support Mission in Liberia (UNSMIL).


In an addendum to his report on the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (document A/66/354/Add.6), the Secretary-General lays out the proposed 2012 resource requirements of $32.58 million net ($36.15 million gross) for that Mission, including $21.8 million in civilian personnel costs and $10.78 million in operational costs.


The related Advisory Committee report on United Nations Support Mission in Libya (document A/66/7/Add.13) says that, in view of the fact that an assessment of needs for mission planning is still under way and that the Secretary-General will submit to the Security Council in March 2012 proposals concerning the mandate of the Mission, it would be premature to adopt a full budget and establish the proposed staffing for the period from 1 January to 31 December 2012.


Under the peacekeeping heading, the Committee had before it two reports.† The Secretary-Generalís report on the budget for the United Nations Mission in South Sudan for the period from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012 (document A/66/532), issued 28 October 2011, details the $738.27 million budget for the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) for the 12-month period ending 30 June 2012.† The budget provides for the deployment of 166 military observers, 6,834 military contingent personnel, 900 United Nations police officers, 957 international staff, 1,590 national staff, 506 United Nations Volunteers, 81 Government-provided personnel and 500 temporary positions.


Security Council resolution 1996 (2011) established the mandate of UNMISS for an initial period of one year, with the intention to renew for further periods as required.† It is mandated to consolidate peace and security and set the conditions for development in South Sudan in order to strengthen the Governmentís capacity to govern effectively and democratically, and create good relations with its neighbours.


The actions to be taken by the Assembly in connection with the financing of the Mission are:


The Advisory Committeeís related report on (document A/66/592), which weighs in on the Secretary-Generalís report, recommends the Assembly approve his financing proposals, with some observations.† It notes that, as a successor mission to UNMIS, UNMISS is not typical of a start-up mission.† Therefore, the standardized funding model for missions, based on similarities in operations and resource requirements during their first year of existence, cannot be applied to it.† The report notes a lack of clarity and transparency regarding the Missionís real requirements.† Specific information is available on the number and type of personnel and assets currently deployed in the Mission, and consequently the 2011-2012 resource requirements.† But, the budgetary proposals are based on standardized funding model assumptions in terms of deployment of personnel and assets, which differ from the reality on the ground.


Further, the Mission did not face the time constraints of a typical start-up mission, as it was given $277.92 million for the rest of 2011 immediately after its establishment on 8 July 2011, and it had enough time to prepare a full budget for the Assemblyís consideration.† The Advisory Committee believes the Secretary-General should be asked to give a comprehensive explanation of the resources utilized in the 2011-2012 period and achievements in the context of the UNMISS performance report for that period.


The Committee opened the meeting with its consideration of the financing of the Tribunals.


Introduction of Reports


MARÕA EUGENIA CASAR, Assistant Secretary-General and Controller, introduced the Secretary-Generalís two reports on the financing of the Rwanda Tribunal (documents A/66/368 and Corr.1, and A/66/557 and Corr.1), his two reports on the financing of the Former Yugoslavia Tribunal (A/66/55, and A/66/386 and Corr.1), as well as his report on the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/537).


Concerning the report on the proposed budget for Rwanda Tribunal for the biennium 2012-2013 (A/66/368 and Corr.1), she said it demonstrated that the Tribunal had almost completed all its work at the trial level.† The Tribunal expected that the biennium would be the busiest period in terms of appeals, with at least 40 appeals expected.† The referral of cases to national jurisdictions remained a key pillar of the completion strategy; the tracking and arrest of the remaining nine fugitives remained a top strategy of the Prosecutor.† The Tribunal proposed retaining 416 posts during that biennium, representing a decrease through the abolition of 212 posts, or 33. per cent, over the current authorized staffing level of 628.


Concerning the report on the proposed budget for the Former Yugoslavia Tribunal for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/368 and Corr.1), she noted that four main developments would affect the workload during that biennium.† They included the completion of the six trials in 2012, resulting in a decrease in first instance trial activity from the third quarter of 2012; an increase in the number and complexity of interlocutory and merits appeals, associated with trials of multiple and self-represented accused completed in 2011 and 2012; preparation for the transition to the Residual Mechanisms; and implementation of the Hague Branch of the Residual Mechanisms in July 2013.† The Tribunal proposed maintaining the current level of staffing of 546 posts, but gradually reducing the number of posts funded under general temporary assistance during the biennium from 319 to 156.


Concerning the report on the proposed budget for the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/537), she said it was proposed that the staffing for the Mechanismís continuous functions comprise 97 posts.† Taking into account the anticipated distribution of workload between the two Tribunals and the Mechanism, the commencement date of the Arusha and the Hague branches and other operational considerations, it was proposed that 67 posts be established for the Mechanism for that biennium and that the functions and responsibilities of the remaining 30 posts be covered by staff from the two Tribunals through the ďdouble-hattingĒ arrangement.


Advisory Committee Chair COLLEN KELAPILE introduced that bodyís report on the second performance reports for the biennium 2010-2011 and proposed budgets for the biennium 2012-2013 of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and proposed budget for the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals for the biennium 2012-2013 (document A/66/600), which had been considered together to address cross-cutting issues and the transition process to the Residual Mechanisms.


To that end, the Advisory Committeeís report dealt with two cross-cutting issues ó staff retention and the lump-sum legal aid system for defence counsel costs.† On staff retention, it noted that Tribunal staff continued to leave for more stable and long-term positions elsewhere.† It encouraged both Tribunals to continue their efforts to recruit and retain staff to allow the timely completion of their mandates.† In terms of the lump-sum legal aid system, it recognized the advantages of such a system in ensuring predictability in defence counsel costs and encouraged the former Yugoslavia Tribunal to extend the system to appellate-level proceedings.


Specifically regarding the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, he said the proposed budget was based on the outstanding trials, appeals and other tasks it was mandated to complete.† Not all first-instance trials had been completed as projected and, during the 2012-2013 biennium, the Tribunalís anticipated activities included three contempt of court trials, two genocide trials (if referral of those cases to Rwanda proved unsuccessful), 40 appeals, the tracking of nine fugitives, continued archiving of records and other ongoing activities.


He noted that the proposed budget for the 2012-2013 biennium amounted to $174.3 million gross ($157.9 million net) before recosting.† The Rwanda Tribunal proposed to retain 416 posts ó which represented an abolition of 212 posts ó in addition to funding though general temporary assistance for 254 positions for between 6 and 24 months each.† Further, the court received extra-budgetary funding for an outreach capacity-building programme, but that fundís balance was now depleted and the Advisory Committee recommended further efforts to replenish it.


Overall, with respect to the Rwanda Tribunal, the Advisory Committee recommended the Assembly take note of the second performance report and approve the final appropriation for the biennium 2010-2011 in the amount of $257.1 million gross ($233.7 million net) to the courtís Special Account.† It also recommends approval of the resource requirements outlined in the proposed budget for the 2012-2013 biennium.


Turning to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, he noted that there had been some slippage in that courtís estimated trial completion dates owing to various developments, including the arrest of the last two fugitives.† Accordingly, it was estimated that during the biennium 2012-2013, the Chambers would work on nine trials, 30 pre-appeal procedures, 11 final appeals and all interlocutory appeals arising form ongoing trials.


Estimated resource requirements for the former Yugoslavia Tribunal for the biennium 2012-2013 amounted to $280.2 million gross before recosting, reflecting a decrease of $40.4 million, or 12.6 per cent, gross as compared with the revised appropriation for 2010-2011.† The Advisory Committee noted that the decrease in requirements was due primarily to the anticipated reduction in trial activities in 2013.


Noting that the Advisory Committee had made a series of comments on the Tribunalís proposed staffing table in paragraphs 53 to 58, he said it had been informed that since the 2008-2009 biennium and in the context of its downsizing efforts, the court had been using general temporary assistance funding to continue the functions of abolished temporary posts.† At the beginning of the biennium 2012-2013, 319 positions funded in that way would be required.† While the Advisory Committee understood that that procedure allowed for more accurate and responsive budgeting, as well as greater flexibility regarding staffing levels, it considered that the presentation of the associated resource requirements was not clear and that greater efforts should have been made to streamline the staffing structure.


He said the Advisory Committee regretted that the budget document did not contain information justifying the continued need for all 547 temporary posts during the 2012-2013 biennium.† It expected that the staffing table for the next biennium would reflect a significant reduction in temporary posts, given that the bulk of the courtís work would be completed.


Overall, with respect to the former Yugoslavia Tribunal, the Advisory Committee recommended that the Assembly take note of the second performance report and approve the final appropriation for the biennium 2010-2011 in the amount of $327.5 million gross.† It also recommended approval of the resource requirements outlined in the proposed budget for the biennium 2012-2013 for the Tribunal, bearing in mind the observations and recommendations set out in its report.


Regarding the International Residual Mechanism for the Criminal Tribunals, which was established by Council resolution 1966 (2010) to complete the work of the Tribunals, he noted that the Arusha branch would commence operations on 1 July 2012, while the Hague branch would commence operations on 1 July 2013.† The Residual Mechanism would co-exist with both Tribunals during the biennium 2012-2013, thus allowing the three entities to share resources, provide mutual support and coordinate activities.


Further, the Residual Mechanism would engage in both continuous and ad hoc activities, he said.† The establishment of 67 posts was requested to undertake the Mechanismís continuous activities, in addition to 30 double-hatted staff from the two Tribunals.† Funding through general temporary assistance was requested in respect to 154 positions for an average of 12 months to carry out ad hoc activities.


He said that while the Advisory Committee recognized the Secretary-Generalís efforts to reduce costs through resource-sharing, it considered that more saving could have been achieved, and encouraged him to reflect further savings through increased resource-sharing in his next proposed budget.† Nevertheless, the Advisory Committee recommended the Assemblyís approval of the requested resources amounting to $50.4 million gross ($46.8 million net), before recosting, for the Mechanism for the biennium 2012-2013.† It also recommended the approval of the establishment of the 67 requested posts.


Statements


JUSTIN KISOKA (United Republic of Tanzania), speaking on behalf of the African Group, acknowledged the Rwanda Tribunalís contribution to restoring and maintaining peace and stability in Rwanda.† He noted the Assemblyís revised budget appropriation for 2010-2011 of $257.8 million.† He welcomed and encouraged its efforts to facilitate its completion strategy, reinvigorate outreach to Member States, engage with donors to replenish the voluntary fund in order to continue its important capacity-building projects, staff recruitment and retention, and efforts to digitize the audio-visual records.† He also encouraged efforts to ensure a smooth transition to the Residual Mechanism on 1 July 2012.† The Tribunalís 2010-2011 budget was based on projections that all first instance trials would have been completed by 30 June 2011.† But, the Tribunalís pace in completing trials had not matched those projections.† He noted that the Tribunal expected to complete the five trials projected for the biennium 2012-2013 by December 2012 at the latest, and noted that the heavy workload expected for the period would place a significant demand on the Tribunalís current resources.


The Prosecutorís efforts to find a national jurisdiction willing to accept the referral of cases from the Tribunal had so far been unsuccessful, he said.† He concurred with the Advisory Committee that the Tribunal should intensify outreach in order to ensure the successful referral of cases to national jurisdictions.† He welcomed the Secretary-Generalís $174.3 million budget proposal for the biennium 2012-2013 and efforts to improve the presentation quality of the Tribunal budget, which contained clear information on the estimated costs and proposed staffing changes for the biennium.† He encouraged continued improvements to that end.


Regarding the Residual Mechanism, he noted that the Secretary-Generalís initial proposal for 2012-2013 totalled $50.4 million.† He further noted the proposal for sharing resources and stressed the need that such an approach did not undermine the Mechanismís mandate.† He also noted that an estimated $5.52 million was proposed to construct the new facility in Arusha to house the archives.† He concurred with the Advisory Committee on the need to closely monitor that construction project and to complete it in a timely manner.† He looked forward to receiving more information during informal consultations on several issues, including on the recruitment of the Registrar of the Mechanism.


Libya Mission


Introducing the Secretary-Generalís report on the 2012 budget estimates for the United Nations Support Mission in Libya, Ms. CASAR noted that, by resolution 2009 (2011), the Council mandated the Mission to assist and support Libyan national efforts to restore public security and order and promote the rule of law; undertake inclusive political dialogue, promote national reconciliation and embark on the constitution-making and electoral process; extend State authority; promote and protect human rights and support transitional justice; take immediate steps to initiate economic recovery; and coordinate support as requested from other multilateral and bilateral actors.


She recalled that, in its letter dated 4 October 2011, the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions concurred with the request to enter into commitments in an amount not to exceed $10 million.† The commitment authority provided for the Missionís immediate resource requirements during the initial mandate period of three months.† It included an interim staffing complement of 196 temporary positions of 146 international and 50 national staff to be deployed in a phased manner to Tripoli and Benghazi.


She said the Missionís total requirements for 2012 amounted to $32.6 million net ($36.1 million gross).† That amount was included in the overall 2012 proposed budget for special political missions of $617.6 million net ($662.3 million gross).† A total of 242 positions were requested for 2012 and were included in the total proposed staffing for special political missions of 4,815 positions for 2012.


Mr. KELAPILE introduced the Advisory Committeeís related report on UNSMIL (document A/66/7/Add.13), noting it was premature to adopt a full budget, as the assessment of the needs for mission planning was still under way.† Rather, the Secretary-General should be asked to submit a revised budget proposal following a decision of the Council on his March 2012 report, including fully justified staffing proposals and an organizational structure adapted to the mandate of the Mission.† To allow sufficient time to prepare and adopt the revised budget, the Secretary-General should be provided with sufficient time and adequate resources, for the time being.


Taking into account the pattern of expenditure of the Mission in 2011, as well as the Secretary-Generalís 2012 proposals, the Advisory Committee recommended that the Assembly authorize the Secretary-General to enter into commitments of no more than $16 million to cover UNSMILís operational requirements for the 1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012 period and that resources required beyond 15 March 2012 be made available to the Mission subject to the extension of its mandate.† He further emphasized that the Advisory Committeeís recommendation did not in any way prejudge the position it may take on the structure, staffing and other resource requirements for UNSMIL, subject to a future decision of the Council.† He expected the Secretary-General to provide details in his next budget submission on how resources for the 1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012 period would be used.


United Nations Mission in South Sudan


Introducing the Secretary-Generalís report on the budget for the United Nations Mission in South Sudan for the period from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012 (document A/66/532), Ms. CASAR said the proposed budget amounted to $738.3 million and provided for 7,000 military personnel, 900 civilian police personnel and 3,553 staff, as well as 81 Government-provided personnel.


Outlining the history of the Missionís establishment, she recalled that, in its resolution 65/257 B of 30 June 2011, the Assembly noted the Security Councilís intention, as stated in resolution 1978 (2011), to establish a successor mission to the United Nations Mission in the Sudan (UNMIS) and authorized the Secretary-General to draw on its approved resources in entering into commitments for the successor mission from 1 July to 31 December 2011.† By resolution 1996 (2011) of 8 July 2011, the Council officially established UNMISS, deciding it would consist of up to 7,000 military personnel, including military liaison and staff officers, up to 900 civilian police personnel and an appropriate civilian component.


She pointed out that, in the case of UNMISS, the standardized funding model had been used for the first time to develop the budget proposal and applying the start-up mission profile of 10,000 uniformed personnel operating in a large mission area and facing a challenging logistical environment.† That standardized funding model was based on an assessment of what was realistically achievable in a start-up environment in the first year of operations.


Consequently, the UNMISS budget proposal, based on the standardized funding model, comprised:† mandate-specific, results-based budgeting frameworks for the Missionís substantive and support components; detailed justification of the proposed staffing levels; and financial resources based on the scenario and profile that most closely resembled the Missionís mandate.


She noted that actions to be taken by the Assembly were laid out in paragraph 223 of the Secretary-Generalís report.


Introducing the Advisory Committeeís report on the Mission in South Sudan (document A/66/592), Mr. KELAPILE noted that the Secretary-General proposed resources in the amount of $738.3 million for the period 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012, which provided for the deployment of 7,900 uniformed personnel and 3,053 civilian personnel, as well as 500 temporary positions.


Among other things, he noted the proposals for the establishment of multifunctional clusters in the Mission to facilitate a coherent approach to mandate delivery, as well as the decentralized approach of its organizational structure.† The Advisory Committee expected the Secretary-General to document, disseminate and apply lessons learned, while also drawing from experiences in deploying other complex and decentralized Missions.† Further, it considered that the number of posts requested under executive direction and management may be excessive and made specific comments and recommendations on that issue in the report.


He pointed out that the key premise on which the standardized funding model was based ó namely, the similarity of operations and resource requirements of missions in their first weeks as they build up personnel and assets ó did not fully apply to the Mission in South Sudan, given its inheritance of uniformed and civilian personnel and assets from the Mission in Sudan.† Moreover, the Assembly had already provided $278 million for the Missionís deployment for the period ending 31 December 2011, meaning that UNMISS did not face the time constraints of a typical start-up mission, leaving sufficient time to prepare a full budget for the Assemblyís consideration.


Thus, in light of the fact that UNMISS was not typical, the Advisory Committee had certain difficulties considering its budget proposals for 2011-2012, he said, highlighting in particular, the lack of clarity and transparency regarding the Missionís actual requirements.† Rather than providing greater flexibility to the Missionís leadership to translate the total funding envelop into mission-specific programmatic and support requirements, the application of the standardized funding model for the Missionís first year of operation appeared to have created an artificial constraint impeding the full presentation of the current and known requirements.


In addition, he questioned whether the use of a standardized funding model in the case of UNMISS met the Secretary-Generalís key objective to accelerate the process of obtaining the necessary start-up funding.† At the same time, the voluminous budget document did not appear to be designed to accelerate its production by the Secretariat and its consideration by the Assembly.


However, notwithstanding those concerns, and given the budget cycleís timing, the Advisory Committee considered that approving the Secretary-Generalís proposed budget remained the most practical approach, he said.† But, the Secretary-General should be requested to provide comprehensive explanations on the resources utilized, as well as to detail the actual achievements in the context of the UNMISS performance report for 2011-2012.† As the Advisory Committee recognized that its recommendations on specific positions or operational costs would not result in a reduction in the proposed resources, it further recommended that the Secretary-General take them into account during the start-up period and in preparing the full budget for the period from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013.


Because of the unique circumstances of UNMISS, the Advisory Committee was unable to comment in greater detail on the application of the standardized funding model to start-up missions.† For his part, the Secretary-General had indicated the standardized funding model did not apply to UNISFA.† Because the model did not apply to either new mission established in 2011, the Advisory Committee questioned whether it was sufficiently flexible to actually accommodate the operational requirements and conditions of start-up missions.† Indeed, the modelís current design was limited to six profile/scenario combinations, and subsequent overall funding levels for each combination could be too restrictive.† Alternative methodologies should, therefore, be explored based on the experience of applying the standardized model to UNMISS.


Mr. KISOKA (United Republic of Tanzania), speaking again on behalf of the African Group, said that in resolution 1996 (2011), the Council mandated UNMISS to consolidate peace and security and to help establish the conditions for development in the Republic of South Sudan, with a view to strengthening the Governmentís capacity to govern effectively and democratically, and to establish good relations with its neighbours.† He noted the proposals for the establishment of multi-functional clusters, which were expected to facilitate a coherent approach to mandate delivery.† The Group looked forward to getting more details on the decentralized approach taken in the Missionís organization structure and its stated focus on national capacity-building.


He further emphasized the need for strong coordination and cooperation among all United Nations Missions in the region and between the Mission and key actors, including the host Government and the United Nations country team.† Like the Advisory Committee, the Group would be keen to receive further details on the standardizing funding model in the context of the performance report.† The Group welcomed and supported the Secretary-Generalís proposed funding requirements totalling $738.27 million for the Missionís financing from 1 July 2011 to 30 July 2012.


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For information media • not an official record