27 April 2010
Security Council
SC/9914

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council

6302nd Meeting (AM)


Security Council to Act on Indicators for Tracking Implementation


of Landmark Text Addressing Women, Peace and Security

 


October Will Mark 10 Years since Adoption of Resolution 1325 (2000)


The Security Council today expressed its intention to take action on a comprehensive set of indicators for use at the global level in tracking implementation of its resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security.  The Council will mark the tenth anniversary of the text’s adoption in October.


In a statement read out by Yukio Takasu ( Japan), its President for April, the Council took note of the indicators and recommendations contained in the Secretary-General’s report on women and peace and security (document S/2010/173).


By other terms of the presidential statement, the Council requested the Secretary-General to continue to consult with the Council, taking into account the views expressed by other relevant stakeholders, and the need to develop the indicators further, in order to present the Council with a comprehensive set of indicators, as well as a programme of work and time frame to make them operational.  It requested the Secretary-General to continue to ensure that all country reports to the Council provided information on the impact of conflict situations on women and girls, their particular post-conflict needs and obstacles to attaining them.


Briefing the Council earlier, Margot Wallström, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict, shared her assessment of gaps in efforts by the United Nations to address sexual violence, recommending top-priority treatment and continuous consideration of the issue.  Far from being a “niche” issue, sexual violence was part of a larger pattern, she said, pointing out that rape was used by political and military leaders to achieve political, military and economic ends.


She said the first gap in United Nations efforts was an analytical one, noting that the Organization had traditionally analyzed sexual violence through a gender, reproductive-health and development lens, which often overlooked security factors and actors.  A related gap was accountability, she said, welcoming in that regard the expansion of the child-soldier recruitment “list of shame” to include groups credibly suspected of patterns of sexual violence.  Another gap was the routine inclusion of sexual violence in discussions about the protection of civilians, she added.


Ms. Wallström said that, in June, she planned to launch an analytical inventory of peacekeeping practice to address conflict-related sexual violence.  It would capture promising practices and elements of an effective response, she said, adding that she had compiled a five-point priority agenda which involved:  ending impunity; empowering women; mobilizing political leadership; increasing recognition of rape as a tactic and consequence of conflict; and ensuring a more coherent response by the United Nations system.  She also planned to work with Governments to explore options for drawing on technical expertise in the rule of law, as mandated by resolution 1888 (2009).


Also briefing the Council, Rachel Mayanja, Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women, presented a set of 26 indicators contained in the Secretary-General’s report, saying they covered a broad range of substantive issues and were organized in four main groups:  prevention; participation; protection; and relief and recovery.  The indicators would require a testing and piloting phase before they could become fully operational, she said.


The report recommended that the Council urge the United Nations system to engage relevant organizations and parties with technical expertise in data collection and analysis to populate the indicators as soon as possible, she said.  It also recommended that the Council use the indicators as the basis for establishing a system for monitoring its own progress in monitoring the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).  “We all look forward to acceleration of the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in the hope that, 10 years from now, we can talk about full implementation with real, measurable changes on the ground,” she said.


Following the briefings, Council members called resolution 1325 (2000) a “landmark document”, but voiced concern at the slow pace of its implementation, noting the devastating and disproportionate effect of conflict on women and girls ‑‑ the very people relied upon to rebuild society and deliver peace and long-term stability after conflict.  They expressed hope that, at the upcoming tenth anniversary of the resolution’s adoption in October, the Council would be in a position to endorse the draft indicators, which required further work and refinement.  They stressed that that task should be carried out in a transparent manner and in consultation with all stakeholders, and with consideration for the special circumstances of each conflict and its root causes.


Some speakers drew attention to the role of women as agents of peace and the need to ensure their empowerment in post-conflict situations in order to ensure their participation in peacebuilding activities.  Brazil’s representative stressed that “the opportunity to rebuild a post-conflict society in a manner respectful of women must not be missed as it might not present itself again for a long time”.  Expressing hope that the indicators would allow for a more rigorous and results-oriented assessment of success in turning words into deeds, she warned against putting additional reporting burdens on developing States, especially those emerging from conflict.


Nigeria’s representative said the proposed indicators placed the role of women front and centre in the work of the United Nations on peace and security.  In executing pilot programmes, it was of the utmost importance to build consensus backed by commitment, and the sharing of knowledge was critical, she said, adding that monitoring and accountability measures should be meaningful and effective, and urging the Secretary-General to identify the necessary resources.


Austria’s representative proposed that, in its efforts to address the protection of women and children, the Council should include specific reporting requirements in resolutions establishing or renewing mandates.  He urged thorough investigation of sexual violence allegations, with perpetrators being brought to account through prosecution and screening by armed and security forces.  Victims should receive assistance and adequate reparations, he added.


Also delivering statements were the representatives of the United Kingdom, United States, Turkey, Lebanon, Gabon, France, Russian Federation, Bosnia and Herzegovina, China, Mexico, Uganda and Japan.


The meeting began at 10:15 a.m. and ended at 12:10 p.m.


Presidential Statement


The full text of Presidential Statement S/PRST/2010/8 reads as follows:


“The Security Council welcomes the appointment of Margot Wallström as Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict and reiterates its support of her mandate as outlined in resolution 1888 (2009).


“The Security Council welcomes the timely submission of the report of the Secretary-General (S/2010/173) requested in resolution 1889 (2009) and takes note both of the indicators and the recommendations contained in the report.


“The Security Council notes that indicators contained in the report would need technical and conceptual development before they could become operational.


“The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to continue to consult with the Security Council, taking into account views expressed by other relevant stakeholders, including broader United Nations membership, taking into account the need to further develop indicators contained in his report (S/2010/173) and the parallel ongoing work regarding resolution 1888 (2009), in order to include a comprehensive set of indicators in his next report on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) to be submitted to the Security Council in October 2010, as well as a programme of work containing roles and responsibilities vis-à-vis the indicators within the United Nations system and a time frame to render the indicators operational.


“The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to continue to ensure that all country reports to the Security Council provide information on the impact of situations of armed conflict on women and girls, their particular needs in post-conflict situations and obstacles to attaining those needs.


“The Security Council expresses its intention to take action on a comprehensive set of indicators on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of its resolution 1325 (2000) in October 2010, for use at the global level to track implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).


“The Security Council reiterates its desire to commemorate the 10th anniversary of its resolution 1325 (2000).”


Background


Council members had before them the report of the Secretary-General on women and peace and security (document S/2010/173), which concludes that, 10 years after its adoption, the overall implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) remains slow, and that an assessment of progress is constrained by an absence of baseline data and measurable indicators.


According to the report, a system-wide action plan to implement the resolution has been developed, organized around five thematic areas:  prevention; participation; protection; relief and recovery; and normative.  The Technical Working Group on Global Indicators for resolution 1325(2000) developed indicators in the first four of these areas, determining that the fifth was cross-cutting and therefore incorporating it into the other four.


After collecting information on indicators being used across the Organization as well as by Governments and other entities, the report says, the Technical Working Group developed a shortlist of indicators that could be used to monitor progress.  A pilot period of two to five years would be needed to make the set of indicators operational, entailing technical and baseline development.  The process would engage all stakeholders, including Member States, United Nations entities, regional institutions and civil society organizations.


The report recommends that the Council urge the United Nations system to engage relevant organizations and parties with technical expertise in data collection and analysis to populate the indicators.  United Nations country teams, “One UN” pilots and integrated missions would play a lead role in testing and piloting indicators for national-level data.  The Council is also urged to bring those indicators to the attention of Member States developing national action plans.


Briefings


MARGOT WALLSTRÖM, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict, shared her assessment of gaps in the Organization’s efforts to address sexual violence, recommending that prevention be made a top priority and receive continuous consideration.  The Council had helped redefine the relationship between rape and war, and, more broadly, between women and peace and security.  For example, resolution 1820 (2008), “a historic response to a heinous reality”, reflected an understanding that conflict-related sexual violence was collective violence aimed at destroying a people and their “sense of being a people”, she said.


Emphasizing that the complementary efforts of other United Nations bodies to advance gender equality, development and justice had also been crucial, she pointed out, however, that the Organization’s approach was not enough to equip it to address systematic rape as a war strategy.  In terms of their intent, extent and impact, rape committed in times of peace and order and war-rape were incomparable.  Succeeding generations continued to be born of rape at gunpoint, and stigmatized as stepchildren of war, she said, adding that Governments and armed groups that tolerated sexual terror made a mockery of the United Nations Charter.  Those who employed sexual violence to punish, humiliate, terrorize or displace committed crimes against the victims and crimes against humanity.


In addition to perpetuating an atmosphere of insecurity, she continued, sexual violence led to a drastic decline in the number of girls able safely to attend school and the number of women able to access water points, marketplaces and polling booths.  It increased the burden of disease on communities, and dissolved community bonds by turning victims into outcasts, causing psychological scars to remain beneath the surface of society.


Far from a “niche” issue, sexual violence was part of a larger pattern, she stressed.  Rule by rape was used by political and military leaders to achieve political, military and economic ends.  Politically-motivated rape had been seen in the wake of Kenya’s contested elections in 2007/08, and more recently in the streets of Guinea.  She said the United Nations was generating proposals for effective monitoring and reporting to identify and plug gaps, measured against performance benchmarks, but there were a few critical gaps to which she wished to respond.


The first was an analytical gap, she said, adding that the most insidious was the notion that rape was an inevitable by-product of war, which left the perpetrators without any sense of having blood on their hands, whereas mass rape was no more natural, inevitable or acceptable than mass murder.  Research showed variations in the use of war-rape as well as situations in which it was rare, which indicated that it was not a necessary corollary of conflict.  The United Nations had traditionally analyzed sexual violence through a gender, reproductive health and development lens, often overlooking security factors and actors.  War-time sexual violence was a crime that could be commanded, condoned or condemned, she stressed, noting that once those dynamics were better understood, “prevention is within our power”.  To inform interventions, there was a need for data to capture trends, early-warning indicators and patterns of attack.


A related gap was accountability, she said, underscoring the need to put names to war’s most complex horrors.  She welcomed the expansion of the child-soldier recruitment “list of shame” to include groups credibly suspected of patterns of sexual violence, saying that the Secretary-General’s second report on resolution 1820 (2008), to be presented at the end of the year, would propose listing criteria aligned with those developed by the Office of the Special Representative on Children and Armed Conflict.  Concern for rape victims should not be cut-off at age 18, she said, adding that her vision included tracking the security dimension of sexual violence by making use of “women protection advisers” in the field.


She said another gap was the routine inclusion of sexual violence as part of the protection of civilians.  Ad hoc methods, such as firewood patrols in Darfur, had been employed, but they must be systemized.  She said that in June her Office, together with the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), planned to launch an analytical inventory of peacekeeping practice to address conflict-related sexual violence, which would capture promising practices and elements for an effective response.


Recalling her recent visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, she said the country was known as the “rape capital of the world”, which marred its potential for economic growth.  While mothers, daughters and sisters walked in shame, rapists walked free, even though the country had a robust legal framework and had declared zero tolerance.  It also had a comprehensive strategy on combating sexual violence, jointly owned by the Government and the United Nations.  The laws needed implementing and the strategy must be made operational, she said.  Political leadership was needed across the spectrum, from the President, the National Assembly and provincial governors, to religious and community leaders.


She went on to cite a recent report which suggested that 60 per cent of victims surveyed in the provinces of North and South Kivu were gang-raped by armed men, with more than half of the assaults taking place in the supposed safety of family homes, at night and often in the presence of husbands and children.  Four out of five women seeking care from health centres claimed to have been raped by men in uniform.  The core problem was impunity, she stressed, noting that rape was the rule rather than the exception, with victims receiving no justice or reparations.  South Kivu Province had just 54 magistrates, only two of whom were women.


The national police lacked practical means to respond to sexual violence, she said, adding that the Women and Child Protection Unit in Goma shared a single motorbike to go out and apprehend suspects.  Violent criminals sat in the back as they rode to the small shed that served as a holding station.  However, the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) had begun market-route patrols, she said, adding that, while very few women had followed at first, more had begun to take advantage of the escorts as confidence had grown over time.


She said her five-point priority agenda involved:  ending impunity; empowering women; mobilizing political leadership; increasing recognition of rape as a tactic and consequence of conflict; and ensuring a more coherent response from the United Nations system.  If women continued to suffer sexual violence, it was not because the law was inadequate, but because it was inadequately enforced, she said, adding that she planned to work with Governments to explore options for drawing on technical expertise on the rule of law, as mandated by resolution 1888 (2009).  Women must not only be protected but also empowered, she stressed, pointing out that a ceasefire did not mean peace for women if rapes continued.


Declaring her intention to rally States, United Nations and regional bodies to own that agenda and feel accountable for its success, she said she would mobilize non-traditional stakeholders, since sexual violence was not just a “women’s issue”.  It must be recognized as a tactic and consequence of conflict, and those tolerating sexual terror should be on notice that they did so in defiance of the Security Council.  She would also work through the United Nations inter-agency network, United Nations Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict, which had provided strategic support in five integrated mission settings -- Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Sudan (Darfur), Chad and Côte d’Ivoire.  It was encouraging that the Council had amplified the call for comprehensive strategies to combat sexual violence in its mandate renewals for Côte d’Ivoire and Sudan, she said.


Noting that the most urgent gap lay in prevention, she underlined the need to ensure there were no more victims, adding that her Office would prepare an early-warning matrix of risk factors to “sound the alarm”, and that she looked forward to working with a military liaison officer who could interface with force commanders, defence ministries and armed groups to identify patterns of violence.  Understanding perpetrators was the missing piece of the puzzle.  Peer pressure was a powerful influence in armed groups, she noted, recommending the pioneering of a “peer education model” on sexual violence prevention, given that, in the moral universe of war, violence became a virtue and rape a rite of passage.


Going on the offensive against sexual violence would require the Council’s continuous consideration, she said, emphasizing that bold language in thematic resolutions must not be lost when it came to country-level action.  Well-framed mandates for MONUC had made a real difference, she added, applauding efforts during the Council’s mission to the country last May to ensure that the five army officers blacklisted for sexual violence were brought to justice.  Women had no rights if the violators of those rights went unpunished, she pointed out.  “I am haunted by what I heard in the Democratic Republic of the Congo -- that women are still not safe under their own roofs, in their own beds, when night falls.  Our aim must be to uphold international law so that women, even in war-torn corners of our world, can sleep under the cover of justice.”


RACHEL MAYANJA, Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women, said the report before the Council was the culmination of a comprehensive process involving Member States, United Nations entities, civil society as well as technical and substantive specialists.  The Inter-Agency Task Force on Women and Peace and Security had established the Technical Working Group which had initiated a comprehensive process for gathering information on indicators in use across the United Nations system and by national Governments.  Constituting the “raw material” for generating the indicators contained in the report, the initial 2,500 indicators mapped had been reduced to the 26 most “SMART” –- Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound.


She said the indicators covered a broad range of substantive issues and were at different stages of availability and technical development.  A testing and piloting phase would be required before they could become fully operational.  The pilot phase would also be an opportunity to work with Member States, United Nations country teams, civil society organizations and other stakeholders in cementing ownership of the process and its outcomes, she said, adding that the pilot phase would vary from two to five years.


Most of the indicators had been proposed for countries or areas affected by conflict, but it was important to be guided by the specific nature of each situation, she stressed.  The Council might wish to urge Member States to volunteer to pilot the indicators in order to ensure they were relevant to specific country situations and to establish best practices in data collection and analysis.  The report recommended that the Council use the indicators as the basis for establishing a system for monitoring its own progress in monitoring the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).  “We all look forward to acceleration the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) in the hope that 10 years from now we can talk about full implementation with real, measurable changes on the ground,” she said in conclusion.


Statements


MARK LYALL GRANT ( United Kingdom) said the Council must continue to pay sustained attention to the matter of women and peace and security as it was not only a women’s issue but one of peace and security.  Members had spoken many times about the devastating and disproportionate effect of conflict on women and girls ‑‑ the very people relied upon to rebuild society and deliver peace and long-term stability after conflict.  Last year, they had adopted two resolutions to address the continuing threat of sexual violence in conflict, while ensuring women’s participation in post-conflict recovery and that the issue achieved the status it deserved.  During those discussions, many delegates had emphasized the need for more action to implement resolution 1325 (2000).


He said it was time to measure the number of women raped during war, the displaced who had never recovered their property and who had been killed for speaking out.  The Council now had 26 indicators to build upon before the tenth anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000) in October.  By then, the Council would hopefully be in a position to endorse, drawing on views from across the United Nations membership, the indicators against which it could set goals to ensure that the international community made good on the ambitions of those who had drafted and supported resolution 1325 (2000).  Where there was success, it was necessary to examine why, and where States were found wanting, more time and resources should be directed, especially true in the context of recovery from conflict.


SUSAN RICE ( United States) urged States to renew their support for resolution 1325 (2000) and related texts, and commended the efforts of Special Representative Wallström for having called attention to the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.  The United States looked forward to the inclusion of a military expert within her Office to address ways to halt gender-based violence during conflict, convince military leaders to prevent their forces from committing rape, and develop strategies to prevent it.


Turning to the challenges ahead, she said they included:  ending endemic sexual violence and linking those efforts with the work of peacekeeping missions; and creating an enduring team of experts, through the United Nations system, to halt gender-based violence, which continued even after conflicts had subsided.  The draft indicators developed under Special Adviser Mayanja should serve as a basis for much-needed consultations to ensure they were correctly chosen, that they could be realistically implemented, and to arrive at a final set of indicators that the United Nations could put into practice.  The need to boost women’s participation in peace processes and to combat sexual violence had not abated with the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), she said.


THOMAS MAYR-HARTING (Austria), describing the presidential statement as an “excellent basis” for future work, said his delegation expected that the Secretary-General’s report on the indicators would reflect the results and input from upcoming inclusive consultation processes.  In terms of what a review of resolution 1325 (2000) should achieve, there was wide agreement that a merely ceremonial meeting would be a lost opportunity for women globally.  The Council should therefore reaffirm its commitment to women, peace and security by striving for concrete results, with a focus on strengthening accountability for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000).  Looking ahead to the tenth anniversary in October, he said it was crucial to carry out preparations for 1325+10 with maximum transparency and cooperation, adding that Austria was ready to contribute.


Expressing full support for the establishment of the post of Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict, he emphasized that it was crucial for the holder of that position to coordinate with the Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict in order to improve Council action in cases where armed parties engaged in rape and other sexual violence.  In its efforts to address the protection of women and children, the Council should include specific reporting requirements in resolutions establishing or renewing mandates.  Additionally, allegations of sexual violence must be thoroughly investigated, with perpetrators brought to account through prosecution and screening by armed and security forces, while victims should receive assistance and adequate reparations.


ERTUĞRUL APAKAN (Turkey) noted the formidable remaining challenges to achieving goals such as the safety and prosperity of women in conflict situations and their participation in peacebuilding activities ahead of the tenth anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000).  Indicators to track the implementation of the resolution were extremely useful in assessing the status of implementation and determining the actions needed to overcome challenges.  Important issues to consider while further developing the indicators included collecting the necessary data, finding the right balance between quantitative and qualitative indicators, and the special circumstances of each conflict.


He said the continuation of broad consultations would certainly help to that end, while also ensuring a sense of broad ownership which would further strengthen and facilitate implementation.  Both resolutions 1820 (2008) and 1888 (2009) should be viewed as integral parts of the same whole, as they were extensions of resolution 1325 (2000).  There was also a need further to raise the international community’s awareness and for wider ownership of the four resolutions relating to women and peace and security issues, which should include the engagement of parliamentarians.  He voiced his country’s commitment to the goal of ensuring the basic and human rights of women, and reaffirmed Turkey’s continued support for all related resolutions.


CAROLINE ZIADE ( Lebanon) said resolutions 1325 (2000), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009) constituted a solid framework for the protection of women during conflict as well as an opportunity to raise their voices during peacebuilding processes.  However, there remained a wide gap between the theoretical framework and the practical impact of the texts on the lives of women in conflict situations.  It was impossible to empower women when they were under threat of violence, including sexual violence, which caused the collapse of families and communities while the perpetrators of those crimes acted with impunity.  Countries should therefore strengthen their judicial institutions, the better to prosecute those crimes, in addition to providing assistance to victims of sexual violence.


She said the indicators presented in the report should take into consideration the characteristics of every community as well as the root causes of conflict.  Despite the international community’s increasing consciousness of the need to involve women in peace negotiations, the percentage of women participating was still low, she said, adding that they should also participate in peacebuilding activities.  Disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programmes should include elements targeted at women and girls, she said, noting that, in addition to health service, the right to own property and land education for women could facilitate their empowerment.


U. JOY OGWU (Nigeria), expressing concern about the persistence of rape and sexual violence, said she was somewhat optimistic that, given collective will, an end could be brought to impunity on the part of the perpetrators.  For countries involved in peacekeeping efforts, now was the time to achieve the realization of resolution 1325 (2000), she said, noting that the slow pace of its implementation was also a cause for concern.


Welcoming the Secretary-General’s report, which proposed indicators and addressed issues of women and peace and security with greater clarity, she said it placed the role of women “front and centre” in the work of the United Nations in the peace and security field.  In executing pilot programmes, building consensus backed by commitment was of the utmost importance.  The international community’s undertaking to share knowledge was critical in that regard, she said, noting that the objectives would ultimately constitute the bedrock of peacekeeping and peacebuilding procedures.  Monitoring and accountability measures should be meaningful and effective, she added, urging the Secretary-General to identify the necessary resources.


ALFRED ALEXIS MOUNGARA MOUSSOTSI ( Gabon) said the Council had two main aims at present:  to promote the role of women in peace processes and conflict prevention; and to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war.  Ten years after the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), the lack of indicators to measure progress had been a major obstacle in its implementation.  To make future indicators operational, it was important to strengthen cooperation among States, United Nations agencies, regional institutions and civil society, he said.


Since it might be difficult for some countries to collect reliable data, they must be given extra support, he continued, noting that that the thematic areas covered by the indicators were “highly relevant.  They were another way to counter the tendency to marginalize women in the various phases of conflict resolution.  Gabon viewed the involvement of women in peace processes as important, he said, pointing out that his country’s Ministry of Defence was led by a woman, and that many other women held positions of responsibility in the military.  Together, they contributed to the formulation of national security solutions in Gabon.


NICOLAS DE RIVIÈRE ( France) said the Council must continue to take account of women’s needs during conflict, in the context of international peacekeeping and security missions.  Efforts by peace operations should complement actions by other United Nations entities working to advance the status of women.  The United Nations system should strengthen coherence in that area, he said.  For its own part, the Council should continue to integrate the issue of women and peace and security into peacekeeping the mandates, while persuading parties to conflict to agree to its incorporation into peace agreements.


He said Ms. Wallström’s observations on the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo would help prepare the Council’s mission to that country, especially as it pleaded with leaders to bring known perpetrators to justice.  Some trials had started but were going too slowly.  The Council had outlined various options for confronting sexual violence, such as the deployment of experts and counsellors to the field as part of United Nations peacekeeping operations.  Today’s presidential statement would open a phase of consultation leading to the Secretary-General’s presentation of a set of coherent indicators in October, in accordance with resolution 1889 (2009).


SERGEY N. KAREV ( Russian Federation) said the efforts of the Special Representative should be aimed at providing support to countries that suffered most from sexual violence in such a way that it did not duplicate the work of other United Nations bodies active on gender issues.  Combating sexual violence was part and parcel of a comprehensive approach to post-conflict situations, he said, stressing that the focus should not only be on rape and sexual violence, but also the gender perspective of other matters.


He said that, although the Secretary-General’s report and set of proposed indicators would facilitate implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), the indicators still required careful consideration and further work, which should be carried out in a completely transparent manner.  The Russian Federation hoped that work on the indicators would continue, taking into account the wishes of Council members and other stakeholders.  Ensuring the rights of women in armed conflict could only be achieved by the combined efforts of all stakeholders, he added.


MILOŠ VUKAŠINOVIĆ ( Bosnia and Herzegovina) underlined the importance of women’s participation in all peacebuilding activities and of their inclusion in decision-making processes.  The proposed set of indicators was a solid basis for future work in that regard, he said, stressing that all quantitative indicators should be accompanied by an analysis reflecting the country-specific context.  It should also be made clear which data should be collected by the United Nations system and which by Member States, so that the latter would not be overburdened.


The process of further developing the indicators should be transparent, he said, adding that it should continue in consultation with relevant stakeholders.  The indicators were critical not only to identifying gaps in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), but also for efficient monitoring and evaluation.  It was of key importance that, during the upcoming tenth anniversary commemoration, the Council assess the goals not yet met with a view to implementing them within a defined time frame.


LONG ZHOU ( China) described resolution 1325 (2000) as a landmark document which had laid the foundation of international cooperation in the area of women and peace and security.  There had been much follow-up by the Council and Member States, as required by the resolution, and efforts to increase support for combating sexual violence had produced remarkable results.  But a lot remained to be done, he said, adding that relevant agencies should work within their respective mandates to build synergy.  Meanwhile, the Council should pay close attention to reducing the outbreak of conflicts, the special needs of women during and after hostilities, and supporting their full participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding.


Joining others in welcoming Ms. Wallström’s appointment, he expressed hope that her Office would enhance cooperation among States while providing them with the help they needed.  There must be greater coordination within the United Nations in combating sexual violence and protecting women.  China welcomed the Secretary-General’s report, in response to resolution 1889 (2009), to track implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), and appreciated the work carried out by the Secretariat in that regard.  He pointed out that it would be difficult to quantify progress in some areas, and some might be hard to implement, given variations in development, historical and cultural tradition.  China hoped those issues would be given full consideration during the work towards a final set of indicators, and that in doing so, the parties concerned would draw on the collective wisdom of all States.


GUILLERMO PUENTE-ORDORICA ( Mexico) said all parties to conflict must respect and enforce international humanitarian law.  There was a need to respect human rights law directed at protecting women and girls.  Women were in a position to play a fundamental role in resolving armed conflict, and could be seen as the engine of reconstruction.  They had the strength and courage to be agents of change and to promote national reconciliation.  However, certain States lacked effective mechanisms and tools to guarantee their participation, and that inequality meant that solutions to conflicts were delayed.  Even after the adoption of the Beijing Platform for Action and 10 years after Council’s own efforts to consolidate the role of women in society, some in the international community were taking “worrying backward steps”, he said, stressing that the tenth anniversary was a chance to strengthen women’s progress.


He said a set of indicators for measuring progress would be useful in helping the United Nations better track the role of women in situations of conflict, and to better help States devise protection and recovery policies with a gender perspective in mind.  Different United Nations agencies must work together to maintain a wide-ranging dialogue with States and other actors, such as women’s organizations and civil society, as they used the indicators to assess their progress.


Mexico supported all the indicators presented in the report and was ready to examine them in depth, seeing them as valuable for planning and decision-making, he said.  To produce the best results, the final, chosen indicators must be inter-related and mutually reinforcing.  In addition to being useful for regions affected by armed conflict, they could also be used as a guide for all States acting together from the perspective of shared responsibility.  They could also prove useful in efforts to empower women and promote gender equality, and boost the capacity of the United Nations to attain those goals.


RUHAKANA RUGUNDA (Uganda) said that, based on the experience of his country, resolutions 1325 (2000), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009) were landmark texts, not only because they emphasized the important part that women played in post-conflict situations, but also their role in conflict prevention and mediation efforts.  Although the indicators presented in the Secretary-General’s report would require further technical development, the initial identification of a best set of 26 indicators to track progress in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) was in itself a major milestone.


He said that because implementation of resolutions was a common challenge for several Member States, the existence of indicators created a tangible path that they could follow in monitoring their own performance.  The indicators had been compiled through consultations with a wider partnership, which was crucial for implementation.  Implementation of the resolution was integral to other measures and programmes on gender and women empowerment, he said, urging the Secretary-General to continue consulting the Council and the wider membership so as to come up with a further set of refined indicators that were understood and acceptable to those Member States that were required to use them.


MARIA LUIZA RIBEIRO VIOTTI ( Brazil) noted that in post-conflict scenarios there was often a window of opportunity to surmount historical gender inequalities or insensitivities.  It was during the time when the redistribution of powers and roles within a society was being redrawn after the trauma of war that efforts must be made to ensure that the concerns and needs of women were duly considered.  The opportunity to rebuild a post-conflict society in a manner respectful of women must not be missed as it might not present itself again for a long time, she said, adding that the participation of women in efforts to rehabilitate and reactivate the economy was of particular relevance.


The indicators contained in the report would hopefully allow for a more rigorous and results-oriented assessment of success in turning words into deeds, she said, warning that one should be careful not to put additional reporting burdens on developing States, especially those emerging from conflict.  The Council’s decision to establish the post of Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict was a potential watershed as it provided the United Nations system with an authoritative voice, empowered to provide coherent and strategic leadership in the fight against sexual violence in conflict and to fill a void that had so far made it difficult for the several parts of the system to work as closely together as they should.


Council President YUKIO TAKASU (Japan), speaking in his national capacity, said his country attached great importance to the Special Representative’s mandate to provide coherent and strategic leadership and advocacy efforts on that important issue.  In view of Japan’s interest in activities with an impact on the ground, he said he had highly appreciated hearing her report on the views of survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in addition to those of high-level officials.  It was important to follow up on her visit and to deploy a team of experts in that country.


He said the Special Representative’s five-point priority plan making women’s protection and empowerment a simultaneous goal dovetailed with Japan’s approach to human security.  Hopefully, she would make it a priority in building the resilience of women and boosting their preventative capacity.  It was also important to address gaps in the United Nations system’s monitoring of the issue, and Japan looked forward to hearing the Secretary-General’s proposals to that end.  In developing benchmarks, it was important to keep in mind the global indicators still under development, as well to list criteria on violence against children.


The work being carried out by the Special Adviser was also much appreciated, he said, highly commending Ms. Mayanja’s leadership as well as the work of the Technical Working Group in developing a set of interrelated indicators.  Some of those indicators would require several years of preparation before becoming operational, he said, adding that it was important for the Secretary-General to produce a road map for making them operational.  It was equally important to mobilize political will among States to use the indicators, which, if applied properly, could serve as an early-warning mechanism to prevent the recurrence of conflict.


Council President YUKIO TAKASU (Japan), speaking in his national capacity, said his country attached great importance to the Special Representative’s mandate to provide coherent and strategic leadership and advocacy efforts on that important issue.  In view of Japan’s interest in activities with an impact on the ground, he said he had highly appreciated hearing her report on the views of survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in addition to those of high-level officials.  It was important to follow up on her visit and to deploy a team of experts in that country.


He said the Special Representative’s five-point priority plan making women’s protection and empowerment a simultaneous goal dovetailed with Japan’s approach to human security.  Hopefully, she would make it a priority in building the resilience of women and boosting their preventative capacity.  It was also important to address gaps in the United Nations system’s monitoring of the issue, and Japan looked forward to hearing the Secretary-General’s proposals to that end.  In developing benchmarks, it was important to keep in mind the global indicators still under development, as well to list criteria on violence against children.


The work being carried out by the Special Adviser was also much appreciated, he said, highly commending Ms. Mayanja’s leadership as well as the work of the Technical Working Group in developing a set of interrelated indicators.  Some of those indicators would require several years of preparation before becoming operational, he said, adding that it was important for the Secretary-General to produce a road map for making them operational.  It was equally important to mobilize political will among States to use the indicators, which, if applied properly, could serve as an early-warning mechanism to prevent the recurrence of conflict.


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For information media • not an official record