27 September 2010
Security Council
SC/10038

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council

6390th Meeting (AM)


Security Council Concerned about Continuing Threat of Terrorism,

 

Including Actions Driven by Intolerance, Extremism

 


Presidential Statement Stresses Comprehensive Cooperative

Anti-terror Action; Adherence to Human Rights, Humanitarian, Refugee Law


The Security Council noted with concern today that terrorism continued to pose a serious threat to international peace and security, the enjoyment of human rights and the social and economic development of all Members States, while the threat had become more diffuse and terrorist acts motivated by intolerance or extremism had increased.


In a presidential statement read out by Ahmet Davutoğlu, Council President and Minister for Foreign of Turkey, the Council condemned terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, reaffirming that all terrorist acts were criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivations, whenever and by whomsoever committed, and that terrorism could not and should not be associated with any religion, nationality or ethnic group.


Recognizing that terrorism would not be defeated by military force, law-enforcement measures and intelligence operations alone, the Council underlined the need to address the conditions conducive to its spread, including by strengthening efforts for the successful prevention and peaceful resolution of prolonged conflicts, promoting the rule of law, protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms, and ensuring good governance, tolerance and inclusiveness in order to offer a viable alternative to those potentially susceptible to radicalization and recruitment as terrorists.  In that regard, the Council recognized that development, peace and security, and human rights were interlinked and mutually reinforcing.


The Council emphasized that continuing international efforts to enhance dialogue and broaden understanding among civilizations, in an effort to prevent the indiscriminate targeting of different religions and cultures, could help counter the forces that fuelled polarization and extremism.  It also reaffirmed that Member States must ensure that any measures to combat terrorism were in compliance with all their obligations under international law, in particular international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law.  Effective counter-terrorism measures and respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms and the rule of law were complementary and mutually reinforcing.


Underlining that safe havens provided to terrorists continued to be a significant concern, the Council recalled that all Member States must cooperate fully in the fight against terrorism in order to find, deny safe haven and bring to justice any person supporting, facilitating, participating or attempting to participate in the financing, planning, preparation or commission of terrorist acts or provision of safe haven.


The Council also reiterated its concern regarding the increasing connection between terrorism and transnational organized crime, illicit drugs, money-laundering and illegal arms trafficking.  Enhanced coordination of national, subregional, regional and international efforts should strengthen a global response to that serious challenge.  It also expressed concern at the increase kidnapping and hostage-taking in some areas of the world, with the aim of raising funds or gaining political concessions.


During the ministerial-level meeting this morning, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon noted: “Terrorism may be a gathering storm, but the international response is gathering steam.”  Counter-terrorism demanded a multifaceted approach, he said, stressing that efforts in the fields of security and law enforcement must continue, including measures to further deprive terrorists of financial resources and mobility, while preventing them from acquiring and using weapons of mass destruction.


Education, development, intercultural dialogue and conflict prevention had growing relevance in addressing conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism, he continued.  “We must do more to better understand the reasons people are drawn to violence, so that we can do more to prevent others from following that path.”  Urging Member States and the international community to continue strengthening the legal regime by building on existing international counter-terrorism instruments and relevant Council resolutions, he emphasized: “No counter-terrorism approach would be complete without a full commitment to human rights and the rule of law.”  It was also important to support victims of terrorism, he said.


“All of us should broaden engagement with bodies that deal with measures listed under pillar 1 of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, such as the Alliance of Civilizations,” he said, describing the Alliance as a central part of the world body’s response to extremism and intolerance.  “No cause or grievance can justify terrorism.  Let me stress again the determination of the United Nations to rise to a global, cross-border challenge that seeks to do such harm to us all.”


Council President Davutoğlu, in opening remarks, said that given its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, the Council must continue to ensure that countries were sufficiently equipped to combat terrorism by honestly reviewing the steps taken and candidly assessing current threats, among other things.  The Council must re-energize the campaign against terrorism and highlight areas requiring priority action.


Hillary Rodham Clinton, Secretary of State of the United States, emphasized the importance of preventing people from becoming terrorists, by helping increase opportunities, strengthening the rule of law and promoting full support for human rights.  “We cannot abandon our values, we must defend them,” she said, adding that while her country supported fully the multilateral fight against terrorism, there must be more sharing of intelligence and cooperative action, through a shared understanding of the “big picture” and a comprehensive approach.  She cited border controls, justice systems and intelligence as areas in which cooperation must be improved.


Celso Amorim, Minister for External Relations of Brazil, echoing other speakers, emphasized the urgent need to finalize the text of a comprehensive counter-terrorism convention, with special attention to the relationship between organized crime and the financing of terrorism.  The total elimination of all nuclear weapons was the most effective way to reduce the risk of nuclear devices falling into the wrong hands, he added.  Warning against the effects of rhetoric that fuelled xenophobia and prejudice, he said initiatives such as the Alliance of Civilizations could help engender tolerance, which was of key importance in avoiding violent extremism.


Lebanon’s representative strongly rejected the association of terrorism with any religion, especially Islam, which, he stressed, was a religion of dialogue.  Terrorism had not spared Muslims, as evidenced by the many who had fallen victim in the attacks of 11 September 2001, he said, adding that there was an ongoing attempt to distort a religion that called for tolerance.  Provocative acts, such as the desecration of religious sites or objects did not reflect freedom of expression, but on the contrary, fed terrorism.  He also noted that, since Al-Qaida tried to exploit the suffering of the Palestinian people as a means to recruit terrorists, it was important to accelerate the quest for a comprehensive peace in the Middle East.


William Hague, Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs of the United Kingdom, said all Member States must build on the successful cooperation of the past to protect their own citizens against terrorism, while assisting those of other regions where terrorism had found a foothold.  The fiscal constraints common to most countries following the global financial crisis made it all the more important to help the most vulnerable countries, he said, noting that the situation on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border could be exacerbated by the recent floods, and remained the greatest long-term concern.  Regarding kidnapping, he said his country’s experience showed that paying ransom financed terrorism and encouraged more hostage-taking.  He proposed that the United Nations provide a platform for victims of terrorism from all over the world, calling them “the most effective antidote to the peddlers of violent ideology”.


Sam Kutesa, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Uganda, noted that the level of sophistication shown by terrorist networks in exploiting information technology had risen, as had their linkages with transnational criminal groups financing their operations.  Collective efforts should aim at denying terrorists safe haven, eradicating sources of terrorist financing, reducing State vulnerability and enhancing emergency preparedness and response capabilities.  Appropriately crafted counter-terrorism measures dealing with fundamental vulnerabilities such as economic distress and weak State structures could effectively deprive terrorists of safe havens and recruiting grounds, he said.


Other speakers included Michael Spindelegger, Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs of Austria; Paul Toungui, Minister for Foreign Affairs, International Cooperation and La Francophonie of Gabon; and Henry Odein Ajumogobia, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Nigeria.


Also delivering statements were representatives of France, Russian Federation, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Japan, Mexico and China.


The meeting began at 10:05 a.m. and ended at 11:53 a.m.


Presidential Statement


The full text of presidential statement PRST/2010/19 reads as follows:


“The Security Council reaffirms its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations.


“The Security Council notes with concern that terrorism continues to pose a serious threat to international peace and security, the enjoyment of human rights, the social and economic development of all Member States, and undermines global stability and prosperity, that this threat has become more diffuse, with an increase, in various regions of the world, of terrorist acts, including those motivated by intolerance or extremism, and expresses its determination to combat this threat.


“The Security Council condemns terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, reaffirms that any terrorist acts are criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivations, whenever and by whomsoever committed, and reaffirms that terrorism cannot and should not be associated with any religion, nationality or ethnic group.


“The Security Council recognizes the important accomplishments made in the fight against terrorism and also acknowledges that gaps remain in the overall fight against this scourge, urges all Member States and the United Nations system to address them, and stresses the need to ensure that counter-terrorism remains a priority on the international agenda.


“The Security Council reaffirms the importance of all its resolutions and statements on terrorism, in particular resolutions 1373 (2001) and 1624 (2005), as well as other applicable international counter-terrorism instruments, stresses the need for their full implementation, and calls for enhanced cooperation in this regard.


“The Security Council renews its call upon all Member States to become party, as a matter of urgency, to the relevant international conventions and protocols, whether or not they are a party to regional conventions on the matter, and to fully implement their obligations under those to which they are a party, and commends the technical assistance provided by the Terrorism Prevention Branch of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in this regard.


“The Security Council recognizes that terrorism will not be defeated by military force, law enforcement measures and intelligence operations alone, and underlines the need to address the conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism, including, but not limited to, the need to strengthen efforts for the successful prevention and peaceful resolution of prolonged conflicts, and the need to promote the rule of law, the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, good governance, tolerance and inclusiveness to offer a viable alternative to those who could be susceptible to terrorist recruitment and to radicalization leading to violence.


“The Security Council recognizes, in this regard, that development, peace and security, and human rights are interlinked and mutually reinforcing, and underlines the international effort to eradicate poverty and promote sustained economic growth, sustainable development and global prosperity for all.


“The Security Council emphasizes that continuing international efforts to enhance dialogue and broaden understanding among civilizations, in an effort to prevent the indiscriminate targeting of different religions and cultures, can help counter the forces that fuel polarization and extremism, and will contribute to strengthening the international fight against terrorism, and, in this respect, appreciates the positive role of the Alliance of Civilizations and other similar initiatives.


“The Council reaffirms its profound solidarity with the victims of terrorism and their families, stresses the importance of assisting victims of terrorism and providing them and their families with support to cope with their loss and grief, recognizes the important role that victims and survivor networks play in countering terrorism, including by bravely speaking out against violent and extremist ideologies, and in this regard, welcomes and encourages the efforts and activities of Member States and the United Nations system, including the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF), in this field.


“The Security Council reiterates its call upon Member States to enhance their cooperation and solidarity, particularly through bilateral and multilateral arrangements and agreements to prevent and suppress terrorist attacks, and encourages Member States to strengthen cooperation at the regional and subregional level, particularly through regional and subregional mechanisms and coordination and cooperation at the operational level.


“The Council reaffirms that Member States must ensure that any measures taken to combat terrorism comply with all their obligations under international law, in particular international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law, underscores that effective counter-terrorism measures and respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms and the rule of law are complementary and mutually reinforcing and are an essential part of a successful counter-terrorism effort, and notes the importance of respect for the rule of law so as to effectively combat terrorism.


“The Security Council underlines that safe havens provided to terrorists continue to be a significant concern and recalls that all Member States must cooperate fully in the fight against terrorism in order to find, deny safe haven and bring to justice, on the basis of the principle of extradite or prosecute, any person who supports, facilitates, participates or attempts to participate in the financing, planning, preparation or commission of terrorist acts or provides safe havens.


“The Security Council encourages Member States to develop and maintain an effective and rule of law-based national criminal system with provisions for judicial criminal cooperation regarding extradition and mutual legal assistance, in particular to expedite, simplify and give priority to extradition and mutual legal assistance requests in terrorism-related cases and implement international and regional best practices in the field of extradition and mutual legal assistance, consistent with international law, in particular international human rights, refugee and humanitarian law.


“The Security Council reminds Member States of their obligation to ensure, in conformity with international law, that refugee status is not abused by the perpetrators, organizers or facilitators of terrorist acts.


“The Security Council reminds Member States of their obligation to prevent the movement of terrorist groups by, inter alia, effective border controls, and, in this context, calls upon Member States to exchange information expeditiously, improve cooperation amongst competent authorities to prevent the movement of terrorists and terrorist groups to and from their territories, the supply of weapons for terrorists and financing that would support terrorists.


“The Security Council reiterates the obligation of Member States to refrain from providing any form of support, active or passive, to entities or persons involved in or associated with terrorist acts, including by suppressing recruitment of members of terrorist groups, consistent with international law, and eliminating the supply of weapons to terrorists.


“The Security Council also reiterates the obligations of Member States pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004), such as to refrain from providing any form of support to non-State actors that attempt to develop, acquire, manufacture, possess, transport, transfer or use nuclear, chemical or biological weapons and their means of delivery.


The Security Council reiterates the obligation of Member States to prevent and suppress the financing of terrorist acts, and criminalize the wilful provision or collection, by any means, directly or indirectly, of funds by their nationals or in their territories with the intention that the funds should be used, or in the knowledge that they are to be used, in order to carry out terrorist acts.


“The Security Council expresses concern at the increase in incidences of kidnapping and hostage-taking, in some areas of the world with a specific political context, with the aim of raising funds or gaining political concessions.


“The Security Council reiterates its condemnation in the strongest terms of the incitement to terrorist acts and its repudiation of attempts at the justification or glorification of terrorist acts that may incite further terrorist acts, and recognizes the importance that Member States act cooperatively to prevent terrorists from exploiting technology, communications and resources to incite support for terrorist acts.


“The Security Council considers sanctions an important tool in countering terrorism, remains committed to ensure that fair and clear procedures exist for placing individuals and entities on sanctions lists and for removing them, as well as for granting humanitarian exemptions, and recalls, in this context, the adoption of resolutions 1822 (2008) and 1904 (2009) including the appointment of an Ombudsperson and other procedural improvements in the Al-Qaida and Taliban sanctions regime.


“The Security Council reiterates its concern regarding the increasing connection, in many cases, between terrorism and transnational organized crime, illicit drugs, money-laundering and illegal arms trafficking, and emphasizes the need to enhance coordination of efforts on national, subregional, regional and international levels in order to strengthen a global response to this serious challenge and threat to international peace and security, and encourages UNODC to continue its work, in this regard, in collaboration with other relevant United Nations entities.


“The Security Council recognizes the importance of the support of local communities, private sector, civil society and media for increasing awareness about the threats of terrorism and more effectively tackling them.


“The Security Council acknowledges the technical and other counter-terrorism-related capacity-building assistance that United Nations entities and subsidiary bodies have provided to Member States, recognizes that some Member States lack the capacity to implement the Council’s counter-terrorism and related resolutions and notes with concern that terrorist groups and other criminal organizations seek to exploit such lack of capacity.


“The Security Council underlines, in this regard, the importance of capacity building and technical assistance with a view to increasing the capabilities of Member States for an effective implementation of its resolutions, encourages the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate (CTED) to continue to work with Member States, at their request, to assess and facilitate technical assistance, in particular, in close cooperation within CTITF, as well as with all bilateral and multilateral technical assistance providers, and welcomes the focused and regional approach of CTED aimed at addressing the counter-terrorism needs of each Member State and region.


“The Security Council reiterates the need to enhance the ongoing cooperation among the committees with counter-terrorism mandates established pursuant to resolutions 1267 (1999), 1373 (2001) and 1540 (2004), and their respective groups of experts, notes the importance of the committees’ ongoing interaction and dialogue with all Member States for their effective cooperation, encourages the committees to continue to pursue a transparent approach, and recalls resolution 1904 (2009), which requests the Secretary-General to make the necessary arrangements for the groups to be co-located as soon as possible.


“The Security Council reiterates its strong support for the adoption by the General Assembly of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy (A/60/288) of 8 September 2006, and the institutionalization of CTITF, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 64/235, to ensure overall coordination and coherence in the counter-terrorism efforts of the United Nations system, and the full participation, within their mandates, of relevant Security Council subsidiary bodies in the work of CTITF and its working groups, and welcomes the adoption by the General Assembly of resolution 64/297.


“The Security Council encourages Member States to make every effort to conclude the negotiations of the draft comprehensive convention on international terrorism.”


Background


Following the General Assembly’s 8 September meeting in which it reaffirmed support for the 2006 United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy (see press release GA/10977), the Security Council met this morning to consider “Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts”.


Before the Council was a letter dated 1 September 2010 from the Permanent Representative of Turkey addressed to the Secretary-General (document S/2010/462) conveying the concept note regarding today’s briefings, which notes the central role of the United Nations in countering global terrorism.


The Council’s three “anti-terrorism” subsidiaries are the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1373 (2001), also known as the Counter-Terrorism Committee; the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and associated individuals and entities, or the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee; and the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004) — the 1540 Committee concerning the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.  Their respective Chairs last briefed Council members on 11 May 2010.  (See Press Release SC/9923)


According to the concept note, the 1267, 1373 and 1540 Committees have played important roles within their respective mandates and made considerable progress since their establishment.  They have increased, particularly in recent years, their effectiveness by rendering themselves more transparent, improving their working methods and placing more emphasis on human rights and the rule of law while countering terrorism.  However, almost a decade since the adoption of Security Council resolution 1373 (2001), and despite determined endeavours by the Organization and Member States, terrorism remains a serious threat to international peace and security.


In some regions there has even been an increase in terrorist attacks and other illegal activities carried out by terrorist groups, mainly because of the evolving nature of terrorism, the note states, pointing out that terrorist organizations do not relent in adjusting and readjusting their tactics and techniques in organizing and financing their terrorist activities, as well as and recruiting for them.  For this reason, it is necessary for the international community also to adapt and evolve its responses at the national, regional and global levels.  It is equally important that such an effort be undertaken collectively.


Indeed, for the fight against terrorism to succeed, there is an absolute need to act decisively, but with a clear and common perspective, the note says.  Terrorism, which can have no justification under any circumstances, is not the unique problem of a certain country or region, but one to which all are exposed.  Thus, a firm and united stance by all Member States is required.  Moreover, it is a crime against humanity that violates fundamental human rights, particularly the right to life.  It is therefore necessary to pay utmost attention to ensure that terrorism is not, under any circumstances, associated with any culture, religion or ethnic group, which only weakens the collective resolve and united stance in a way that plays into the hands of terrorists and extremists.


While countering terrorism, there is also a need to take into account the political, economic and social factors that terrorists exploit, the note continues.  It is also important that respect for human rights and the rule of law have a central place in all counter-terrorism efforts.  In other words, the fight against terrorism should be a joint effort with a holistic approach and long-term dedication.  The resolve to fight the scourge should be firm and unyielding, while responses must be innovative and adaptable to changing circumstances.


According to the note, it was within that frame of mind that Turkey, in its capacity as Chair of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, organized a meeting on 17 June 2010 in Ankara, held with the participation of Security Council members and relevant United Nations officials, which set the stage for a focused discussion on the increasing challenges emanating from the threat of terrorism and how to address them more effectively at the United Nations level.


The note recalls that one of the main points of an informal summary note circulated by the Chair of that meeting to Council members emphasizes that countering terrorism must remain a priority on the international agenda, and more political attention should be given to combating it at the level of the Security Council.  It has been argued that the Council’s continuing attention in addressing the threat could serve as a deterrent in itself, while providing a renewed impetus and new ideas to efforts to redress the gaps hampering the effectiveness of the struggle against terrorism.  The guidance and direction that may come from the Council in that respect are considered to be of paramount importance.


With that understanding, the note says, today’s thematic meeting is organized as a follow-up to the discussions in Ankara and in light of the views and suggestions raised there.  Turkey would suggest that the Council recognize the efforts, activities and achievements of the relevant United Nations bodies, including its subsidiary bodies, and encourage such efforts; focus on gaps and challenges in the implementation of the obligations identified in relevant resolutions; deliberate on the issues requiring more attention by the Council; and discuss what steps or measures the Council should and can take to better address the challenges.


The note concludes by stating Turkey’s intention, at the end of the thematic meeting, to table a presidential statement that would send a strong message confirming the importance of reinforced international cooperation and the Council’s determination in the fight against terrorism, and call upon Member States to work more closely, with a view to ensuring effective implementation of the obligations indicated in the relevant resolutions and seamless cooperation among all Member States.


Opening Remarks


AHMET DAVUTOĞLU, Council President and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Turkey, noted that almost a decade had passed since 11 September 2001, and resolution 1372 (2001) provided a sound and practical framework for measures to combat terrorism.  However, despite many steps taken, terrorism remained a serious threat to international peace and security.  Terrorists had proved to be extremely resilient, thus the importance of remaining committed in fighting them and avoiding complacency.  Considering that no country was immune to terrorism, it was necessary to act collectively against it, he said, adding that there was no better place than the United Nations to put up a strong, common stance.


Given its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, he said, the Council must continue to play a leading role in ensuring that countries were sufficiently equipped to combat terrorism by making an honest review of steps taken and a candid assessment of current threats, among other things.  The Council must re-energize the campaign against terrorism and highlight priority areas requiring action.  As Chair of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, Turkey had regularly emphasized the importance of close cooperation and coordination on the part of Member States, guided by a spirit of transparency and partnership.


BAN KI-MOON, Secretary-General of the United Nations, reiterated the grave threat posed by terrorism to international peace and security, stating: “Terrorism may be a gathering storm, but the international response is gathering steam.”  Over the past five years, the United Nations had expanded its counter-terrorism activities, increased inter-agency coordination and enhanced partnerships with a wide range of international and regional organizations.  Joint initiatives with Member States in many regions — including the Sahel, Horn of Africa, Middle East, as well as South and Central Asia — had shown that much could be done.


He said counter-terrorism demanded a multifaceted approach.  Efforts in the fields of security and law enforcement must continue, including measures to further deprive terrorists of financial resources and mobility, while preventing them from acquiring and using weapons of mass destruction.  Education, development, intercultural dialogue and conflict prevention had growing relevance in addressing conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism.  “We must do more to better understand the reasons people are drawn to violence, so that we can do more to prevent others from following that path.”


There was also a need to continue strengthening the legal regime, building on existing international counter-terrorism instruments and relevant Council resolutions, he said.  It was also important to improve the sharing of information and best practices, by, among other ways, establishing national focal points and regional networks and mobilizing civil society, the private sector and the media.  “No counter-terrorism approach would be complete without a full commitment to human rights and the rule of law,” he emphasized.  Since several States were eager to implement their obligations under the counter-terrorism framework, but lacked the resources and other capacities to do so, capacity-building was a priority, he added.


It was also important to support victims of terrorism, he said, announcing that, on 8 October, the United Nations would screen Killing in the Name, a documentary that not only highlighted the plight of victims, but that would also help empower them and others towards greater levels of engagement in bringing an end to such crimes.


“All of us should broaden engagement with bodies that deal with measures listed under pillar 1 of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, such as the Alliance of Civilizations,” he said, describing the Alliance as a central part of the world body’s response to extremism and intolerance.  “No cause or grievance can justify terrorism.  Let me stress again the determination of the United Nations to rise to a global, cross-border challenge that seeks to do such harm to us all.”


MICHAEL SPINDELEGGER, Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs of Austria, said the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy provided the first universally agreed strategic framework to combat terrorism in a holistic and integrated manner.  Its success depended on its implementation through concrete measures.  Some progress had been achieved, but more must be done to make the Strategy more widely known and implemented worldwide, he said, adding that coordination and cooperation were of key importance.  Member States, United Nations organs and entities, including the Council and the General Assembly, other international, regional and subregional organizations as well as civil society and the private sector must work together.


He called on the Council and its three subsidiary committees to examine how to provide better support for the work of the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force, incorporate the Strategy into their work and coordinate their activities in a transparent and effective manner.  Respect for human rights and the rule of law was a fundamental basis of all efforts to combat terrorism.  The development of effective national systems of law enforcement and criminal justice, rooted in the rule of law, was essential to preventing terrorist acts and bringing terrorists to justice, he said, commending the work of the Terrorism Prevention Branch of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).


As Chair of the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee, Austria had worked intensively to enhance due process, he said, recalling that the Committee had concluded its two-year review of its Consolidated List in July.  The recent appointment of the first Ombudsperson to receive delisting requests, in accordance with resolution 1904 (2009), constituted a major step forward.  While the Counter-Terrorism Committee had achieved commendable progress in addressing human rights issues, serious challenges remained, he said, calling for the development of best practices and guidelines to ensure a consistent approach by all States to human rights and counter-terrorism.  Combating terrorism would only be successful in the long term if conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism were addressed.  “We must win the hearts of the people through dialogue and mutual trust,” he said, commending the role of the Alliance of Civilizations in that regard.


HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON, Secretary of State of the United States, said the United Nations was the premier forum for sharing best practices and helping countries fight the terrorism threat.  Promoting transparency and coordination was therefore crucial, she said, welcoming the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee’s efforts to update its listing of targeted individuals and entities.  The United States supported fully the multilateral fight against terrorism, but it must be improved through more sharing of intelligence and cooperative action, through a shared understanding of the “big picture”, and through a comprehensive approach.


Border controls, justice systems and intelligence were areas in which cooperation must be improved, she stressed, emphasizing also the need to prevent people from becoming terrorists by helping to increase opportunities, strengthening the rule of law and promoting full support for human rights.  “We cannot abandon our values, we must defend them,” she said.  With determination, unity and constant adaptation of intelligence strategies, the scourge of terrorism could be beaten, she said in conclusion.


CELSO AMORIM, Minister for External Relations of Brazil, said his country had always condemned terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, and was a signatory to all relevant international conventions and protocols.  The scourge must be addressed through a holistic approach, with full consideration of its root causes, for which social and economic development, accompanied by an atmosphere of respect for “the other”, was the best antidote.  It was important to reinforce the capacity of the United Nations to implement the truly multilateral agreements necessary to fight terrorism, he said, adding that Brazil fully supported the Organization’s Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.


Warning about the effects of rhetoric that fuelled xenophobia and prejudice, he said that initiatives such as the Alliance of Civilizations could help engender tolerance, which was a key element in avoiding violent extremism.  Recalling the appeals by the President of Brazil for diplomatic initiatives rather than the mere repression of terrorism, he also emphasized the urgent need to finalize the text of a comprehensive counter-terrorism convention, with special attention to the relationship between organized crime and the financing of terrorism.


The total elimination of all nuclear weapons was the most effective way to reduce the risk of nuclear devices falling into the wrong hands, he said.  The strongest contribution that the Council could make would be to find just and sustainable solutions to long-standing agenda items and to support peacebuilding.  Emphasizing the importance of cooperation in counter-terrorism, he expressed full support for initiatives to facilitate technical assistance to countries that requested it, and offered Brazil’s cooperation in that regard.  The full realization of universal human rights, including the right to development, must be an integral part of all efforts to combat terrorism, he stressed.


WILLIAM HAGUE, Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs of the United Kingdom, said all Member States must build on the successful cooperation of the past to protect their own citizens against terrorism, while assisting those in other regions where terrorism had found a foothold.  While efforts by the United Nations had been improving, there was still scope for better coordination to help Governments develop and implement their own counter-terrorism strategies, complementing bilateral efforts.  The fiscal constraints common to most countries following the global financial crisis made it all the more important to assist the most vulnerable countries.


In that regard, the situation on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, which could be exacerbated by the recent floods, remained the greatest long-term concern, he said.  Since terrorists exploited misery around the world, efforts to alleviate suffering were extremely important, as recognized by the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.  For that reason, the Organization’s specialized agencies must play a full and active role in the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force.


Pointing to the spread of groups aligned with Al-Qaida, he said cooperation between Governments and a range of partners in relevant regions was crucial to disrupting, containing and reducing the threat.  Regarding kidnapping, he underlined his country’s experience, which showed that paying ransom financed terrorism and encouraged more hostage-taking.  In conclusion, he proposed that the United Nations provide a platform for victims of terrorism from all over the world, calling them “the most effective antidote to the peddlers of violent ideology”.


PAUL TOUNGUI, Minister for Foreign Affairs, International Cooperation and La Francophonie of Gabon, stressed his country’s universal condemnation of terrorism as well as the importance of finalizing a general convention against international terrorism for a strong united stance on the part of the international community.  While both large and small nations were threatened by terrorism, developing countries had much more difficulty in coming up with the resources necessary to fight the increasingly sophisticated methods of terrorists.  For that reason, the capacities of developing countries needed strengthening, taking into account their specific needs and identified threats.


Welcoming the meeting organized by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Libreville last June concerning illegal actions against maritime security, he said his country had taken important measures in the security, financial and banking sectors to strengthen, in synergy with other States of the Central African subregion, preventive and repressive actions against the financing of terrorism.  In conclusion, he stressed that common action against terrorism must also be in step with efforts to promote human rights.


HENRY ODEIN AJUMOGOBIA, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Nigeria, said significant progress had been made in the fight against terrorism since the adoption of resolution 1373 (2001), and the working methods of the Council’s subsidiary committees had been improved.  The most recent bombings, in Kampala, Uganda, among other places, were a stark reminder of the enormity of the challenges posed by terrorism.  The absence of counter-terrorism measures and inadequate policing of land and maritime borders provided a platform for terrorism, especially in weak States, which were the most vulnerable to infiltration by terrorist organizations.


In West Africa, the presence of small arms and light weapons facilitated terrorist activities, he said, calling in that regard for an arms trade treaty that would supplement the efforts of Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in the fight against the smuggling of illicit small arms and light weapons.  To support the implementation of relevant resolutions, States must develop national mechanisms based on the rule of law, he said, adding that Nigeria had established a national focal point in that regard.  He welcomed the activities of the Task Force in support of the national efforts and commended the activities of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, which should explore additional means to assist in border control and intelligence-led policing.


The fight against terrorism could not be left to one country or region, he said, stressing that it required coordinated international action.  The Council must take measures to enhance implementation of its resolutions and coordination with regional organizations.  State capabilities should include ways to address conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism.  Although the adoption of the Counter-Terrorism Strategy was a positive step, Council members should support the conclusion of a comprehensive convention on terrorism, he said, calling for better international coordination in apprehending and extraditing African terrorists.


SAM KUTESA, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Uganda, said his country had recently been the target of a cowardly attack by Al-Shabaab terrorists, which served as a reminder of the need to stand up against terrorism.  The United Nations had made important contributions to counter-terrorism efforts, including the adoption of the Counter-Terrorism Strategy, to enhance national, regional and international counter-terrorism efforts.  Recently, the level of sophistication shown by terrorist networks in exploiting information technology had risen, as had their links with transnational criminal networks aimed at financing their operations.


Collective efforts should aim at denying terrorists safe havens, eradicating sources of financing, reducing State vulnerability and enhancing emergency preparedness and response capabilities, he said.  Since terrorism and transnational criminal activities thrived on the same vulnerabilities and used almost similar actors, it was necessary that the United Nations support the implementation of counter-terrorism measures to sever their mutually reinforcing and symbiotic relationships.  Appropriately crafted counter-terrorism measures dealing with fundamental vulnerabilities such as economic distress and weak State structures could effectively deprive terrorist of havens and recruiting grounds.


Prevention must be given priority, he stressed, adding that the collective approach must emphasize building national and regional capacities and facilitating cooperation among States.  Greater emphasis must be placed on information sharing, operational planning and initiatives aimed at strengthening regional counter-terrorism capabilities and cooperation.  The importance of closer cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations must be underscored, he said in conclusion.


GÉRARD ARAUD (France), surveying anti-terrorism action already taken throughout the United Nations system, said the Organization must increase its role further, adding that strategies must adapt to changing developments.  Terrorism should never be excused, but it was important to understand the motivations of terrorists and their ways of operating.  Terrorist groups had recently become more regional, as witnessed by the rise of Al-Qaida in the Maghreb, and strategies must be developed to deal with that fact.


Respect for human rights must continue during the struggle against terrorism, and technical assistance must be part of the picture, particularly in the security and judicial sectors, he said, adding that development was also important.  In that light, strategies must be developed to deal with the destabilizing effects of terrorism, as well as its relationship with the illicit traffic in drugs.  France would continue to participate in the global struggle against the global menace of terrorism through its democratic principles, he pledged.


VITALY CHURKIN (Russian Federation) said that the brutal attacks on his and many other countries recalled the universal threat of terrorism as well as the central role of the United Nations in fighting it.  It was crucial that all Member States implemented Security Council resolutions and supported the counter-terrorism committees.  Border controls and severing terrorism’s links with organized crime and piracy were particularly critical, as was strengthening judicial regimes against terrorism.  Relevant in that area was the Russian proposal for international agreements on extradition and mutual legal assistance, he said.


He said that other areas that must be strengthened included fighting terrorism in cyberspace, through a universal convention on cybercrime.  Countering incitement to terrorism was also important, he said, while stressing that his country rejected the notion of a clash of civilizations and blaming the scourge of terrorism on any religion or culture.  The Russian Federation welcomed the Alliance of Civilizations initiative in that light, he said, pledging the country would continue to work strongly with other nations on counter-terrorism security.


IVAN BARBALIĆ (Bosnia and Herzegovina) said it was the common responsibility of all collectively to prevent and confront the global plague of terrorism through both national and coordinated international action.  The United Nations, and the Council, bore the greatest burden of responsibility for improving the effectiveness of counter-terrorism policies and developing international legal norms and standards.  The conclusion of negotiations and the adoption of a comprehensive convention on terrorism as a specific international law-enforcement instrument, as soon as possible, would provide the international community with an effective tool for strengthening cooperation and coordination in their joint counter-terrorism action.


He said that, while Member States had primary responsibility to implement the Counter-Terrorism Strategy, the leading role of the United Nations in coordinating counter-terrorism activities, through the Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force, continued to be of high importance, as did the Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee, the Counter-Terrorism Committee and the 1540 Committee.  The promotion and protection of human rights and the rule of law should remain a priority, he stressed.  Any measure undertaken by States to combat terrorism, including the prosecution and conviction of perpetrators and the protection of and reparations for victims, must be anchored in the rule of law and be in compliance with obligations under international law.


He said that the increasing correlations between terrorism, transnational organized crime, drug-trafficking, arms smuggling and money-laundering, in addition to the frequent use of new information technologies by terrorists, called for a global and integrated approach requiring the cooperation of State institutions and civil society at the national level, as well as cooperation and coordination with subregional and international organizations.  Cooperation at the regional and international levels, including continuous exchanges of information, intelligence and best practices, and technical assistance for countries needing it, would enable States to fulfil their obligations under relevant international instruments and Council resolutions.


NAWAF SALAM (Lebanon) strongly rejected the association of terrorism with any religion.  Islam was not a religion of terrorism but one of dialogue.  Terrorism had not spared Muslims, he pointed out, noting that many of them had fallen victim in the attacks of 11 September 2001, and continued to fall victim daily in Afghanistan, Somalia and Iraq, among other places.  There was an ongoing attempt to distort a religion that called for tolerance, and to spread horror stories about it, which had led to Islamophobia, he said, adding that provocative actions like desecrating religious sites or objects did not reflect freedom of expression, but on the contrary, fed terrorism.


A distinction should be made between terrorism and the right of people to fight foreign occupation, he emphasized, recalling that nobody had described the French resistance against Nazi rule as terrorism, for instance.  Terrorism could not be combated by military means alone, he said, underlining the importance of addressing its root causes without double standards.  Lebanon called for an end to foreign occupation, injustice, poverty and the trampling of human rights as well as for the strengthening of the dialogue among civilizations.


As Al-Qaida tried to exploit the suffering of the Palestinian people in order to recruit terrorists, the quest for a comprehensive peace in the Middle East should be accelerated, he said.  Lebanon had suffered terrorist bombings that claimed the lives of many politicians, journalists and civilians, he said, adding that for decades, the country had also suffered Israeli State terrorism.  Israel had bombed not only civilian targets, including hospitals, but also a headquarters of the United Nations.  He expressed the hope that the adoption of a global convention would deal with terrorism in a unified way.


TSUNEO NISHIDA (Japan) emphasized the continuing global threat of terrorism and stressed that it must be eradicated through a multilateral programme led by the United Nations.  The Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy was important in making that happen, and coordination was crucial, as was the work of the Security Council and its counter-terrorism committees.  Japan welcomed the improvements in the regimes of those subsidiary bodies, including the updating of the Al-Qaida and Taliban listing and delisting procedures, he said, affirming also the importance of enhancing the counter-terrorism capacity of developing countries through technical assistance.  Japan reiterated its commitment to fighting terrorism effectively, together with the rest of the international community.


CLAUDE HELLER (Mexico) reiterated his country’s absolute condemnation of terrorism and its steadfast commitment to the fight against it, while adhering to complete respect for human rights, as well as humanitarian and refugee law.  “Legitimacy and effectiveness go hand in hand,” he stressed, welcoming the improvements in the transparency and fairness of the regimes of the counter-terrorism committees, while stressing the continuing need for an effective listing and delisting methods.


He stressed the need for a holistic approach that also strove to reduce poverty and injustice, noting that the four-pillar Strategy of the United Nations took the right approach.  It was also important to finalize the overdue global convention on terrorism.  To strengthen national implementation of counter-terrorism strategies, there was a need for more proactive technical assistance that would take local needs into account.  An integrated approach to strengthening the rule of law was also needed in light of the opportunities provided to terrorists by globalization.


Council President DAVUTOĞLU (Turkey), speaking in his national capacity, said his country’s own painful experience with terrorism had taught it the indispensable value of international cooperation and the central role of the United Nations in laying the ground to make that fight possible.  However, there was still a regrettable gap between the objectives behind measures taken by the Organization and the stark reality.  The collective determination of the international community must be used to its full extent, he said, emphasizing that it was incumbent upon Security Council members to make a candid assessment of the nature of continuing shortcomings and to seek remedies.


Loopholes in the prosecution of terrorism must be closed he emphasized, adding that the international community must also have a uniform and consistent approach to preventing terrorist financing.  In addition, despite Council resolution 1624 (2005), there had been an increase in terrorism-related propaganda, particularly that which exploited new technologies.  There must be a common effort to prevent terrorists from exploiting the right of freedom of expression for their aims and purposes.  To fill such gaps, the stance of the international community must be unwavering, both in rhetoric and action, he said, adding that it must avoid “selective action based on national perceptions”.


ROSEMARY DICARLO ( United States) took the floor to stress that the purpose of today’s and other sessions was to strengthen the Security Council’s work against terrorism, and in that context, other grievances should not be discussed.


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For information media • not an official record