2 December 2010
General Assembly
GA/AB/3973

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-fifth General Assembly

Fifth Committee

19th Meeting (AM)


Fifth Committee Begins Discussion of Proposed Budget for UN Mission in Haiti


for Period 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011

 


Also Takes Up Reports on Financing for Decisions of Human Rights Council


Four days after Haiti held a first round of elections and nearly a year after a devastating earthquake hit the impoverished Caribbean nation, Secretariat officials proposed a budget of more than $850 million for the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) at today’s meeting of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).


The budget for the 12-month period from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011 was up about 18 per cent over the 2009/10 budget of $732.4 million.  It included financial backing for about 2,500 additional military and police personnel, hundreds of temporary staff, the reconstruction of Mission facilities and crucial ground transportation, said Assistant Secretary-General and Controller Jun Yamazaki as he introduced the Secretary-General’s report.  The budget covers nearly 9,000 military personnel and about 1,500 United Nations police officers.


The Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) recommended that the General Assembly appropriate $853.83 million for the Mission’s operation, said Chairperson Susan McLurg as she introduced the Advisory Committee’s report on the issue.  The Advisory Committee also recommended an assessment of $473.83 million, in addition to the $380 million already assessed under General Assembly resolution 64/278.


The Mission’s facilities were destroyed by the January earthquake that killed about 220,000 people and displaced 2 million others while destroying or damaging nearly 190,000 homes.  MINUSTAH is now helping the country battle a cholera epidemic.


In a report issued in October, the Secretary-General stated that the peaceful transfer of power after the inauguration of a new President in February 2011 would let the Mission consider drawing down the military and police surge capacity built up after the earthquake.  Depending on the country’s security situation, the number of military and police could return to previous levels by the beginning of 2012.


The first round of the presidential and legislative elections took place on 28 November and Haiti’s representative told the Committee he hoped the results would be ready between now and next Sunday.  The new President could enter office on 7 February and the new Government would begin its work.  He thanked the international community and the United Nations for its support in the reconstruction efforts, the elections and combating the cholera epidemic.


While it welcomed the budget proposal, Haiti would like to see an increase in the $7.5 million earmarked for so-called “quick impact” projects, he said. Those projects would help local people on the ground.  Further, Haiti was also concerned with the high vacancy rate in the Mission’s staff.


Speaking on behalf of the Rio Group, Chile’s delegate also stressed the importance of those quick-impact projects to meet the Haitian people’s immediate needs and build confidence in the peacekeeping operation.  Those were projects in areas such as infrastructure, the delivery of basic services and creating jobs.


While supporting the revised budget, Brazil’s representative stressed that the Caribbean nation’s problems could only be solved if Haiti’s institutions were strengthened.  It was essential to provide logistical support and technical expertise to Haitian authorities as quickly as possible.


In other business, the Fifth Committee also considered revised budget estimates totalling nearly $15 million for resolutions and decisions stemming from special sessions of the Human Rights Council during 2009 and 2010.


Introducing the Secretariat’s reports on the issue, Sharon Van Buerle, Director, Programme Planning and Budget Division, said actions taken during the Council’s twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth sessions totalled $4.99 million, including $4.7 million related to the current 2010-2011 budget period.  The financial implications of actions taken during the Council’s fifteenth session held this fall were about $7.91 million for the current biennium and $2.1 million in the upcoming 2012-2013 budget period.


Ms. McLurg introduced the Advisory Committee’s two reports on the revised budget estimates for the Council’s special sessions.


Also speaking on MINUSTAH’s financing were delegates from Canada (on behalf of Australia and New Zealand) and Cuba.


The representatives of Morocco and Cuba spoke on another matter.


The Committee will reconvene at 10 a.m. Monday, 6 December, to discuss financing for the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women).


Background


As it took up the financing of peacekeeping missions and revised budget estimates related to the Human Rights Council, the Fifth Committee was expected to take up two reports concerning the financing of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH).  The first, a report of the Secretary-General, Budget for the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti for the period from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011, was issued on 21 October 2010.


The report details a budget for the 12-month period, which totals $865.31 million and provides for the deployment of 8,940 military contingent personnel, 1,451 United Nations police officers (including 100 categorized as Government-provided personnel), 2,940 formed police personnel, 731 international staff, 1,478 national staff, and 277 United Nations Volunteers, including temporary positions.


Established by Security Council resolution 1542 (2004), the Mission’s mandate was extended until 15 October 2010 with Council resolution 1892 (2009).  After the 12 January 2010 earthquake that severely damaged Haiti’s capital and other major cities of the south, the Council endorsed the recommendation of the Secretary-General to increase the overall force levels to support the country’s recovery, reconstruction and stability efforts.  By its resolution 1944 (2010) of 14 October 2010, the Council decided to extend the Mission’s mandate until 15 October 2011 and maintain the current overall force levels, which consist of a military component of up to 8,940 troops of all ranks, and a police component of up to 4,391 police.


The Mission is established in all 10 of Haiti’s departments.  After the earthquake destroyed its main headquarters in Port-au-Prince, the Mission relocated to its logistics base at Port-au-Prince airport and was establishing additional office space in existing United Nations camps.  The MINUSTAH logistics base is also serving as temporary quarters for United Nations agencies, funds and programmes, whose premises were affected by the earthquake.


In connection with the financing of this Mission, the Secretary-General asks the Assembly to:  Appropriate $865.3 million for the Mission’s maintenance for the 12-month period from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011, including the $380 million previously authorized to maintain the Mission from 1 July to 31 December 2010, and in addition to the $23.04 million previously appropriated under the terms of General Assembly resolution 64/278.


He also asks that the Assembly assess $30.75 million for the period from 1 July to 15 October 2010, which represents the balance between the full amount of $252.38 million, and the amount of $221.67 million already assessed for the same period under the terms of General Assembly resolution 64/278.  Further, he requests that it assess $454.6 million for the period from 16 October 2010 to 30 June 2011, which represents the balance between the full amount of $612.93 million, and the $158.33 million already assessed for the period from 16 October to 31 December 2010, under the terms of General Assembly resolution 64/278.


The related Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions report (document A/65/586), issued on 24 November, notes a revised proposed budget for 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011 of $864.19 million, up nearly 18 percent, or $131.8 million from the $732.4 million appropriation for 2009/10.


Subject to its comments outlined in the report, the Advisory Committee recommends that the Assembly appropriate $853.86 million for the maintenance of the Mission from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011, inclusive of the $380 million previously authorized for the Mission’s maintenance during the 1 July 2010 to 31 December 2010 period, and in addition to the $23.04 million previously appropriated under the terms of General Assembly resolution 64/278.


The Committee also recommends that the Assembly approve an assessment of $473.83 million for the period from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011, in addition to the amount of $380 million already assessed under General Assembly resolution 64/278.


Regarding the Secretary-General’s proposals for a net increase of two national posts, 46 United Nations Volunteer positions, 339 temporary positions and a net decrease of 1 international post, the Advisory Committee recommends approval.  It notes the requested temporary positions should be seen as short-term to meet the Mission’s immediate needs.  The Committee urges MINUSTAH to regularly review its requirement for temporary assistance during the budget period and trusts that temporary positions will be phased out according to reduced operational requirements.


In view of changes in vacancy rates for international and national staff under general temporary assistance (see annex II), from 15 to 32 and 6 to 21 per cent, respectively, the Committee recommends that the related resource provisions be adjusted accordingly.


The Secretary-General states the elections in November 2010 and the inauguration of a new President in February 2011 will be key milestones and a peaceful transfer of power would allow consideration of drawing down the military and police surge capacity, depending on the prevailing security situation.  The Advisory Committee was informed that the drawdown of military and police personnel would begin in March 2011 after the elections and the transition to a new government, and the number of military and police deployed should return to pre-earthquake levels at the beginning of 2012, depending on the prevailing security situation.


The Committee also was informed that, given the limited duration of their deployment, some uniformed personnel would remain in temporary accommodations longer than the normal practice.


On the issue of additional financing for actions taken by the Human Rights Council during four sessions in 2009 and this year, the Committee had four reports and one corrigendum to consider.


The Secretary-General’s report, Revised estimates resulting from resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth sessions (document A/65/333 and Corr.1), outlines budgetary requirements stemming from resolutions and decisions adopted by the Council during its sessions held in 2009 and 2010.  The information was contained in a Council report (document A/65/53) given to the General Assembly.


The report estimates these requirements at $4.7 million for the biennium 2010-2011 and $283,100 for the biennium 2012-2013.  The report notes that of the total estimated requirements of $4.7 million, provisions of $1.29 million have already been made in the programme budget for the biennium 2010-2011, and it is proposed to meet $2.94 million from the resources already appropriated for the biennium 2010-2011.


Regarding the remaining amount of $483,800, the Assembly is asked to authorize the Secretary-General to enter into commitments of $483,800 for the biennium 2010-2011.  This expenditure would be reported in the second performance report of the programme budget for the biennium 2010-2011.  The amount of $283,100 envisaged for the biennium 2012-2013 will be considered in the proposed programme budget for the biennium 2012-2013.


Of the $483,800 expenditure, $147,000 would fall under section 2, General Assembly and Economic and Social Council affairs and conference management; and $336,800 would fall under section 23, Human rights.


This expenditure would cover the implementation of activities stemming from resolution 14/1, “The grave attacks by Israeli forces against the humanitarian boat convoy”.  The resolution, adopted immediately on the third day of the Council’s fourteenth session, dispatched an independent, international fact-finding mission to investigate violations of international law resulting form the Israeli attacks on the flotilla ships carrying humanitarian assistance.


The reports also asks the Assembly to note that several reports on human rights-related issues will be considered at its sixty-fifth session, particularly with revised estimates relating to:  the increase in the membership of the Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment; the increase in membership of the Committee on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers; and the increase in membership of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the entry-into-force of the International Convention on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance.


It is estimated that the additional requirements stemming from the aforementioned mandates will also command a certain level of increases under sections 2, 23 and 28E of the programme budget for the biennium 2010-2011.


The Committee then considered a report of the Secretary-General, Revised estimates resulting from resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its fifteenth session (document A/65/333/Add.1), issued on 5 November 2010.


The report outlines the expenditures stemming from eight resolutions and decisions adopted by the Council at its fifteenth session, held 13 September to 1 October 2010.  The costs are estimated at a net amount of $7.9 million for the biennium 2010-2011.  These actions are included in the Human Rights Council’s report to the General Assembly (document A/65//53/Add.1)) and included, for example, resolution 15/7, “Human rights and indigenous people”, and decision 15/117, “Nelson Mandela International Day”.


The Secretary-General is proposing the following actions with regard to the estimated net amount:  provisions in the amount of $4.62 million relating to activities of a “perennial nature” have already been made in the programme budget for the biennium 2010-2011; an amount estimated at $967,500 (net) would be met from within the approved appropriations for the biennium 2010-2011; and the balance of the requirements estimated at $2.32 million (net) would be met under the provisions of the contingency fund for the biennium 2010-2011.


The report states that some of the new mandates extend into the biennium 2012-2013 and would require a total net additional amount of $2.1 million.  This would be considered in the context of the preparation of the proposed programme budget for the biennium 2012-2013.


As a result of the actions taken during the Council’s fifteenth session, the Assembly is asked to approve the Secretary-General’s proposals and charge $2.32 million ($780,000 under section 2, General Assembly and Economic and Social Council affairs and conference management; $1.53 million under section 23, Human rights; and $13,400 under section 28E, Administration, Geneva); and $147,100 under section 36, staff assessment (to be offset by an equivalent amount under Income section 1), against the contingency fund for the biennium 2010-2011.


The report notes that many of the Council resolutions adopted at its fifteenth session required immediate action and their implementation required additional resources, including those for conference services, which are not included in the calendar of conferences for the biennium 2010-2011.


The Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions presented two related reports concerning resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth sessions (document A/65/548), the Advisory Committee recommended that $3.42 million for the current biennium be accommodated within the resources appropriated under the programme budget for the biennium 2010-2011 and reported in the second performance report.


The Advisory Committee noted that the Human Rights Council, at its twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth sessions in 2009 and 2010, adopted a number of resolutions and two decisions that tallied costs of nearly $5 million, of which $4.7 million related to the biennium 2010-2011 and $283,100 related to the biennium 2012-2013.


Concerning resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its fifteenth session (document A/65/548/Add.1), the Advisory Committee noted that the Human Rights Council at its fifteenth session in 2010 adopted six resolutions and two decisions that generated a total requirement of $10.01 million (net), of which $7.91 million related to the biennium 2010-2011 and $2.1 million to the biennium 2012-2013.


In the Secretary-General’s report, details on the additional requirements under each resolution and decision are provided in section II and the requirements (new and perennial) related to the fifteenth session are summarized in annexes I and II.


The Advisory Committee is aware of the time lag between the adoption of Human Rights Council resolutions and decisions and the Assembly’s subsequent ex post facto approval of related resource requirements.  In this connection, the Committee recalls its recommendation that the current modalities for consideration of financial requirements stemming from resolutions and decisions of the Council be maintained, albeit on an annual basis (see A/63/629, para. 10).


The Advisory Committee recommends that the Secretary-General explore options aimed at streamlining and synchronizing the resource requests related to the Council’s resolutions and decisions with the resources requested in relation to the Secretariat’s biennial proposed programme budget.


The Advisory Committee recommends approval of the proposals of the Secretary-General outlined in paragraphs 41-47 of document A/65/333/Add.1, subject to its observations and recommendations in paragraph 7.  In this paragraph, the Advisory Committee refers to the additional resources need to support resolution 15/23 on the elimination of discrimination against women.  The Advisory Committee recommends resources for the establishment, under general temporary assistance, of one P-4, one P-2 and one General Service (other level) posts, as well as for consultant services for nine months.


Introduction of Reports


JUN YAMAZAKI, Assistant Secretary-General and Controller, introduced the Secretary-General’s report on the Haiti mission for the period from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011.  The total proposed was $865.31 million, which was a jump of $132.9 million, or 18.1 per cent, compared to approved resources of $732.4 million for the 2009/10 period.  Additional requirements of $22.8 million resulted from the full deployment of the additional 2,000 military personnel authorized in Security Council resolution 1908 (2010) after the earthquake.  Increased requirements of $21.9 million stemmed from the deployment of 480 additional formed police personnel authorized in Council resolution 1927 (2010) and the full deployment of 2,460 formed police personnel, as previously authorized in Council resolution 1908 (2010).


He said the proposed staffing for 2010/11 reflected a net increase of two national posts, 46 United Nations Volunteer positions, 339 temporary positions and a net decrease of 1 international post.  Additional requirements of $26.9 million related to the proposed establishment of a net total of 339 temporary positions, in line with the increase in the strength of military and police personnel.  These costs were partly offset by the $17.6 million decline, due to the exclusion of requirements for special measures provided in the 2009/10 period after the earthquake.  Increased requirements included $31.1 million under facilities and infrastructure for construction services; standard reimbursement to troop- and formed-police-contributing countries for self-sustainment; additional requirements for security services for residential and office premises throughout the Mission area; and the renovation of Mission premises affected by the earthquake.


The increase of $11.1 million under ground transportation related to the acquisition of 280 additional vehicles and the replacement of 110 light vehicles stemming from the surge in operations after the earthquake.  He said the actions requested by the Assembly were outlined in paragraph 289 of the report.


SUSAN MCLURG, Chair of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, said during the review of the budget proposal in the Haiti Mission, the Secretary-General presented a revised budget estimate of $864.2 million.  The reduction was based on a lower projected requirement for the rental of helicopters.  Based on an updated deployment schedule for the Mission, the Committee recommended an increase in vacancy rates for the Formed Police Units and national and international staff under general temporary assistance.


The Committee, therefore, recommended the General Assembly appropriate $853.83 million for the Mission for the period of 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011.  The Committee also recommended an assessment of $473.83 million, in addition to the amount of $380 million already assessed under General Assembly resolution 64/278.


OCTAVIO ERRAZURIZ (Chile), speaking on behalf of the Rio Group, said the Group renewed its commitment to cooperate in Haiti’s complete reconstruction after the earthquake on 12 January.  The situation created by the cholera epidemic and Hurricane Tomas in November created additional complications for the Mission’s work.  MINUSTAH had to respond urgently to a serious and unforeseen situation.  The Rio Group was concerned by the slow arrival of the financial assistance pledged to the Haitian authorities by several stakeholders in the international community, resources that were to be used for the country’s reconstruction and recovery.


The role played by the Mission in the various facets of the country’s economic, social and political life had been crucial during the initial phase of recovery. Although the Mission headquarters had been completely destroyed by the earthquake, the Mission had managed to reopen offices in 10 departments and maintain two regional sub-offices.  In addition, the military, maritime and police component of MINUSTAH was deployed in the 10 regions of the country, at 10 of the main sea ports and at four sites on the land frontier, and was staffing the 64 most important police stations.


The Rio Group thanked all of the Mission’s staff.  It was crucial to ensure that the presence of nearly 16,000 people representing the United Nations in Haiti provided added value, he said.  The quick-impact projects described in paragraphs 261 to 264 of the Secretary-General’s report were very important.  About $7.5 million was requested for those projects to finance 190 activities in such areas as infrastructure, delivery of basic services, livelihood and job creation, and training and capacity-building.  Those projects would make an important contribution by meeting the immediate needs of people and building confidence in peacekeeping operations.


The Rio Group said it was urgent that the international community fulfil its financial commitments to Haiti.  To make a lasting contribution in Haiti, the United Nations had to focus on security, promoting the country’s socio-economic development and consolidating its institutions to achieve a stable and lasting peace, he said.


PHILIPPE LAFORTUNE (Canada), speaking also on behalf of Australia and New Zealand, said long before this year’s tragic events, the delegations he spoke for had been strong supporters of MINUSTAH in its mandate to support stabilization and security in Haiti.  Work on reconstruction in that challenging environment must continue, and presidential and legislative elections were taking place at a critical juncture in the country’s development.  “The new leadership resulting from these elections will be called upon to guide the country through these challenges.  Supporting these elections was one of the key priorities for both MINUSTAH and the United Nations Country Team,” he said.


But the stabilization of Haiti would also not be achieved without ensuring security, public order and development of rule of law, he continued.  He commended the Secretary-General for his proposal to support the Haitian National Police to ensure the security of internally displaced persons camps, with special regard to women and children, and appreciated his intention to settle more than half the displaced population by December 2011.  After suffering such a serious blow, exceptional logistical and technical support was needed, so the Government could build the rule of law institutions that were crucial to the success of the mission.  “Moreover, we are confident that this enhanced support from the United Nations to the Haitian Government will be provided with strict accountability by all implementing partners,” he said.  During informal discussions, Canada, Australia and New Zealand would be seeking clarification on the temporary nature of MINUSTAH’s expanded role, and its implications for staff, budgets and other resources.


LOIPA SANCHEZ LORENZO (Cuba) said the budget for the next operation cycle was presented amidst a very complicated situation in Haiti, which suffered the consequences of a powerful earthquake early this year that destroyed a great amount of infrastructure, then had a cholera epidemic and was battered by Hurricane Tomas.  “What happens in Haiti is another example of the devastating effects of the current unjust international order, which condemns millions of people to underdevelopment in the opulent today’s world.  As always, when epidemic outbreaks and natural disasters show, the poor suffer the worst consequences,” she said.  The most decisive support was needed for Haiti, so it was regrettable that, of the assistance urgently requested, only 20 per cent of the necessary $164 million had been received, and future prospects were not encouraging.


Quick-impact projects were of special significance, and the Cuban delegation hoped they would be carried out in consultation with the approval of the central Government.  The fate of Haiti was inherent to the existence of the Cuban nation, and her Government was preparing to reinforce its medical brigade to help control the ongoing cholera outbreak.  “We also wish to highlight that as part of the Medical Brigade in Haiti, there are 201 students graduated from the Latin American School of Medicine, coming from Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guinea Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic, Saint Lucia, the United States and Uruguay,” she said.  The Cuban medical brigade in Haiti already covered 37 medical centres facing the epidemic, where more than 27,000 people suffering from cholera had been treated, and would immediately add 12 other medical centres, which included 1,100 new beds.  “The current situation of Haiti requires swift and unconditional actions.  Promises must be kept and resources contributed in order to assist those most in need,” she said.


REGINA MARIA CORDEIRO DUNLOP (Brazil), aligning with the statement made on behalf of the Rio Group, said despite immense human and material losses, stability had been maintained, Haiti was making important strides in its recovery and key political processes had been resumed.  Nevertheless, recovery was far from finished and reconstruction remained an immense challenge.  Consolidating those achievements and facing challenges ahead required strong leadership from the Government and sustained support from MINUSTAH in three priority areas:  security; recovery and reconstruction; and the conclusion of the electoral process.


Brazil fully supported the revised budget; the budget increase was expected and necessary in light of the expansion of activities and responsibilities of the Mission in the aftermath of the earthquake, and the increased number of troops and police officers.  Resource requirements took into consideration military and police support to recovery and reconstruction efforts, assistance to State institutions and communities through expanded quick-impact projects and community-violence reduction activities, support to the Office of the Special Envoy and direct logistical and technical support to the Government.  In light of the immense task that the Mission faced in the near future, Brazil also supported the additional staff proposed for MINUSTAH, she said.


In the long-term, problems faced by Haiti could only be solved through capacity-building and strengthening of Haitian institutions, she said.  It was essential to provide logistical support and technical expertise to Haitian authorities as expeditiously as possible, she said, and the surge in police personnel allowed for expansion of United Nations police tasks, which was critical at this stage.  It was equally important to ensure the security of Haitians living in internally displaced persons camps, particularly women and children.  Enhanced community violence reduction programmes and additional resources for quick-impact projects would contribute to that effort.


She went on to emphasize the need for strengthening international community support for Haiti, particularly in light of the current electoral process and as the cholera epidemic reached graver proportions.  “We are following attentively the recent developments in Haiti concerning the presidential and legislative elections,” she said.  “We call upon the political leadership to remain committed to the electoral process, which is fundamental to the stabilization process and to create a more favourable environment for economic growth and investment.”  MINUSTAH must provide all necessary support to efforts led by the Government of Haiti, assisted by the international community, to contain the ongoing cholera epidemic.


LÉO MÉRORÈS (Haiti) said his delegation agreed with the statement made by Chile on behalf of the Rio Group, and thanked the other delegates who had expressed their support.  As had been emphasized in those comments, MINUSTAH had to rebuild immediately after the earthquake in January, a task that had been complicated by the cholera outbreak.  The Mission then cooperated with the Haitian Government to conclude the electoral process.


The first round took place on 28 November and, in spite of a few incidents, the counting of the votes continued and he hoped the results would be ready between now and next Sunday.  The new President would enter office on 7 February and, if the electoral process ended in February, the new Government had to begin its work to consolidate stability and continue reconstruction efforts.  He appealed to all donors to meet the promises made at the 31 March conference, held here in New York, to rebuild the country.


Haiti thanked the international community for its support and expressed its deepest gratitude to the United Nations and all Governments that gave their support in rebuilding after the earthquake, in the electoral process and combating the cholera epidemic.


Haiti welcomed the budget proposal made by the Secretary-General, but had two points of concern.  Haiti would like to see the $7.5 million earmarked for quick impact projects increased to 1 per cent of the Mission’s total budget, as allowed under peacekeeping budget guidelines.  He would like these projects to be implemented as soon as possible in cooperation with other stakeholders to avoid any duplication of efforts.  Haiti also was concerned with the Mission’s high vacancy rate for the 2010/11 period, which had reached 21 to 22 per cent.  He asked the Secretary-General to make every effort to remedy the situation.


SHARON VAN BUERLE, Director, Programme Planning and Budget Division, introduced two reports from the Secretary General:  revised estimates resulting from resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth sessions (A/65/333 and Corr.1), and revised estimates resulting from resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its fifteenth session (A/65/333/Add.1).


Concerning the first report, which referred to outcomes reached during the Human Rights Council sessions 12 to 14, she said the resolutions and decisions resulted in total requirements of $4.99 million, of which $4.7 million related to the biennium 2010-2011 and $283,100 related to the biennium 2012-2013.  She said the Council holds three regular sessions each year and could hold special sessions when needed, in accordance with Assembly resolution 60/251.


She said the conclusions and action required by the Assembly were detailed in part III of the report.  The Assembly was requested to authorize the Secretary-General to commit $483,800 under the programme budget for the biennium 2010-2011, under sections 2 and 23 to implement activities foreseen in resolution 14/1.


Turning to the second report that focused on resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its fifteenth session, she said many of those actions required immediate action and their implementation required additional resources, such as for conference services that were not included in the calendar of conferences for the biennium 2010-2011.


The financial implications of those resolutions and decisions resulted in a net total requirement of $7.91 million for the biennium 2010-2011.  Some of the new mandates extended into the biennium 2012-2013 and an estimated additional amount of $2.1 million (net) would be considered as the proposed programme budget for the biennium 2012-2013 was prepared, she said.  Those conclusions and actions required of the Assembly were detailed in Part III of the report.


MS. MCLURG, Chair of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, addressed the revised estimates from resolutions and decisions adopted by the Human Rights Council at its twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth sessions.  She recommended additional requirements in the amount of $3.42 million for the current biennium be accommodated within the resources appropriated under the programme budget for the biennium 2010-2011 and be reported in the context of the second performance report.


Turning to the fifteenth session of the Human Rights Council, she recommended approval of the Secretary General’s proposals, with the exception of the additional resources requested in support of resolution 15/23 on elimination of discrimination against women.  In that regard, the Advisory Committee found some of the tasks of the P-4 and P-3 posts overlapped, and therefore recommended resources to establish, under general temporary assistance, one P-4, one P-2 and one General Service (other level) post.


Given the time lag between adoption of Human Rights Council resolutions and decisions and subsequent ex post facto approval by the General Assembly of related resource requirements, she recommended the Secretary-General consider options to streamline and synchronize resource requests of the Human Rights Council with those resource requests related to the biennial proposed programme budget of the Secretariat.


Responding to comments by the representative of Cuba, the representative of Morocco objected to reference to an institution that was not recognized by the United Nations.


The representative of Cuba said, after listening carefully to the statement by the delegation of Morocco, it would continue to offer public scholarships and medical grants to students from other countries, including the Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic.


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