23 July 2010
Economic and Social Council
ECOSOC/6449

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Economic and Social Council

2010 Substantive Session

46th & 47th Meetings (AM & PM)


Global Jobs Pact, Advisory Group on Haiti, Gender Mainstreaming Among Issues,


As Economic and Social Council Adopts 18 Texts to Conclude 2010 Session

 


Council President Hamidon Ali ( Malaysia) Hails ‘Groundbreaking’

Session, Highlights Annual Ministerial Review, Development Cooperation Forum


With the adoption of 15 resolutions and three oral decisions spanning questions of international development cooperation, decolonization, human rights and the promotion of decent work, the Economic and Social Council concluded today what its President called a “groundbreaking” 2010 substantive session.


Giving an overview of the session, Council President Hamidon Ali, of Malaysia, said in closing remarks that the high-level segment’s Annual Ministerial Review, whose women-centred theme had helped to make 2010 a watershed year for gender equality and women’s empowerment, had heard a record 13 countries make National Voluntary Presentations on progress in implementing internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.  Such participation was instrumental to the overall success of global development priorities.


While the Council’s second Development Cooperation Forum had seen unprecedented participation from multi-stakeholder groups, he said its potential had been constrained by the fact it was held once every two years, produced only a Chair’s summary and was not institutionally linked to any other development cooperation processes.  The Coordination segment had seen significant participation by Governments, civil society and senior United Nations officials, while the interactive dialogues held in the Operational Activities segment had enriched perspectives on the relevance of the Council’s work at the country level.


Turning to the Humanitarian segment, he said panel discussions highlighted the challenge of maintaining humanitarian operations in insecure, high-risk environments, and in situations of extreme and chronic vulnerability.  In a similar vein, the Council’s “fruitful” dialogue with the Peacebuilding Commission on achieving the Millennium Goals in countries emerging from conflict underscored the importance of a target approach to collaboration between the two bodies.


Looking ahead, he said preparations for the 2011 Annual Ministerial Review, which would focus on education, had already begun.  Requests for the Council to take on new tasks was recognition that it was well on its way towards making itself fit for today’s challenges.  As requested in the recent General Assembly resolution on system-wide coherence, elections to the Executive Board of UN Women, the United Nations’ new gender entity, would be held by mid-October, and he was keen that the Council efficiently establish links between the Board and Commission on the Status of Women.


“The Council has grown stronger each year,” Sha Zukang, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, said in his remarks.  National Voluntary Presentations to the Ministerial Review had grown into a vital lessons-learned platform, while the Development Cooperation Forum had provided strategic input for the Millennium Development Goals summit this coming September.  It should strengthen its work on policy coherence and regularly assess trends in development assistance flows.  It was also heartening to have seen the high level of engagement of delegations throughout the session, especially from civil society.


The Council must now look ahead to the critical task it had set for itself next year, he said:  implementing the internationally agreed commitments relating to education.  His Department had started preparations for the next session in close collaboration with other United Nations agencies and, with that in mind, he urged everyone to fully engage in the national, regional and global preparatory activities to set the stage for a path-breaking session next year.


Among the texts adopted today was a consensus resolution by which the Council decided to extend the mandate of the Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Haiti until the Council’s 2012 substantive session, aiming to provide advice on Haiti’s long-term development strategy to promote post-disaster socio-economic recovery, stability and reconstruction.  In that work, the Council recommended that full use be made of the United Nations capacity to mobilize international aid, and that the leadership role of the United Nations in this respect be recognized and promoted on the ground.


Speaking after action, Haiti’s representative thanked Canada, which holds the Presidency of the Ad Hoc Group, for introducing the resolution.  The Council’s adoption of the text had shown that the “flame of solidarity with the Haitian people” since the January tragedy was still very much alive, despite the slow efforts on the ground to move his country from recovery to restitution.


The Council also adopted by consensus a resolution on recovering from the world financial and economic crisis, which reiterated that giving effect to the policy options of the Global Jobs Pact — launched by the International Labour Organization last year to stimulate economic recovery — required financing and capacity-building.  Least developed, developing and transition countries lacking the fiscal space to adopt appropriate recovery policies required particular support.  Donors, multilateral organizations and other development partners were invited to consider providing funding.


The Council then adopted by consensus, as orally amended, a resolution contained in an informal paper circulated in English only, urging least developed countries to strengthen ownership of the Brussels Programme of Action by translating its goals and targets into specific measures within their national development frameworks.  It also urged development partners to fully implement commitments made in the Programme in a timely and effective manner, and to exercise their best efforts to increase their financial and technical support for the Programme’s effective implementation.


Building on momentum from the recent creation by the General Assembly of UN Women, the Council adopted a consensus resolution to mainstream a gender perspective into all policies and programmes in the United Nations system.  By the text, the Secretary-General was requested to submit a report to the Council’s 2011 substantive session on progress made by United Nations entities in that regard, and on the challenges they faced in mainstreaming a gender perspective in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of all policies and programmes, and in capacity development.  That report should contain a section on how UN Women would carry out its work.


Making closing statements were the representatives of Canada, Chile, Yemen (on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China) and the United Republic of Tanzania.


The Economic and Social Council will reconvene at a time and date to be announced.


Background


The Economic and Social Council was expected to wrap up its 2010 substantive session today by taking action on a number of outstanding draft resolutions and draft decisions submitted under various agenda items, by its subsidiary bodies and others.


In an oral statement updating information that had been provided yesterday, SIMONE MONASEBIAN, New York Office of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), said additional information had been brought to the Secretary-General’s attention since the publication of his report on capital punishment and implementation of safeguards guaranteeing protection of the rights of those facing the death penalty (document E/2010/10).


Drawing the Council’s attention to Table 4 of the report’s annex, she said the Russian Federation had placed a moratorium on executions via a presidential decree in August 1996.  Killings by illegal armed groups had been reported as of 1999; therefore, a corrigendum would be distributed reflecting a stop after the year “1999” in footnote 4(c).  Moreover, the Secretariat stressed the importance of States responding to the periodic survey on capital punishment.


Action on Drafts


The Council started its day with action on resolutions pertaining to the implementation of General Assembly resolution 62/208, as well as international development cooperation.


It adopted by consensus a draft resolution on the Progress in the implementation of General Assembly resolution 62/208 on the triennial comprehensive policy review of operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document E/2010/L.32), submitted by Council Vice-President Alexandru Cujba of the Republic of Moldova.  By its terms, the Council encouraged the United Nations development system organizations to overcome obstacles to inter-agency mobility in general, including the rapid re-deployment of qualified national and international staff in crisis and post-crisis situations.  Council Vice-President SOMDUTH SOBORUN ( Mauritius) noted that there were no programme budget implications.


Speaking in explanation of position after action, Belgium’s representative, on behalf of the European Union, said the Council had the mandate to make recommendations to improve the United Nations system’s operational activities.  That mandate aimed at improving the Organization’s coherence, coordination and efficiency with regard to the situation of countries facing challenges, including those in post-conflict situations.


He regretted that an agreement had not been reached on the definition of such complex challenges, and thus an opportunity had been missed to address the question in the resolution.  There were countries facing very difficult situations, and whether they were formally considered “fragile States” or “countries facing specific challenges”, they were generally lagging behind in achieving the Millennium Development Goals.  In that regard, he stressed the need for the United Nations to become more effective, through improved United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAFs), in assisting those countries in implementing own policies.


Next, the Council adopted by consensus a draft resolution on Renaming of the title of the Executive Board of the United Nations Development Programme and the United Nations Population Fund to include the United Nations Office for Project Services (document E/2010/L.17), submitted by Council Vice-President Alexandru Cujba, (Republic of Moldova).  By its terms, it decided to change the name of the Executive Board to the “Executive Board of the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Population Fund and the United Nations Office for Project Services”.  It further decided that the functions of the Executive Board as set forth in General Assembly resolution 48/162 of 20 December 1993 applied mutatis mutandis to the United Nations Office for Project Services.  Council Vice-President SOBORUN noted that there were no programme budget implications.


In an oral decision, the Council took note of various reports submitted under its agenda item on “Operational Activities of the United Nations Development System” in documents:  A/65/39 Supp. No. 39; E/2010/5; E/2010/6; E/2010/14; E/2010/34 (Part I), Supp. No. 14; E/2010/34(Part I/Add.1), Supp. No. 14; E/2010/36, Supp. No. 16); E/2009/35, Supp. No. 15); and E/2010/L.7).


The Council then concluded its consideration of that agenda item, and of its Operational Activities Segment.


Turning to its agenda item on the role of the United Nations in implementing the Council’s 2009 ministerial declaration, the Council adopted by consensus a draft resolution on The role of the United Nations system in implementing the ministerial declaration on the internationally agreed development goals and commitments in regard to global public health adopted at the high-level segment of the 2009 substantive session of the Economic and Social Council (document E/2010/L.13), submitted by Council Vice-President Morten Wetland of Norway.


By its terms, the Council stressed the importance of strengthening health systems and improving coordinated health-care service delivery as they related to the Millennium Development Goals, in particular Goals 4 (child mortality), 5 (maternal health) and 6 (HIV/AIDS).  Relevant United Nations entities were requested to support State efforts to strengthen health systems in delivering equitable health outcomes, including through the promotion of: investments to strengthen health infrastructure and training; and fiscal and administrative devolution, as appropriate, in order to improve governance.  It also encouraged all relevant funds, programmes and specialized agencies to join the fight against non-communicable diseases.  Council Vice-President SOBORUN noted that there were no programme budget implications.


The Council then resumed consideration of its agenda items 4 (role of the United Nations system in promoting full and productive employment and decent work) 6 (implementation of and follow-up to major United Nations conferences and summits) and 8 (implementation of the resolutions of the General Assembly).


Yemen’s representative, speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, introduced the draft resolution on Recovering from the world financial and economic crisis:  a Global Jobs Pact (document E/2010/L.9/Rev.1).  The draft expanded on a similar text adopted last year, and sent a strong message supporting a job-intensive recovery from the global financial crisis.  It ensured the issue would remain on the Council’s agenda for consideration next year.  He made corrections to an operative paragraph and submitted the draft as orally corrected to the Council.


The Council then adopted that resolution by consensus, as orally revised.  The text reiterated that giving effect to the recommendations and policy options of the Global Jobs Pact required consideration of financing and capacity-building, and that least developed, developing and transition countries lacking the fiscal space to adopt appropriate recovery policies required particular support.  Donors, multilateral organizations and other development partners were invited to consider providing funding.


Speaking after action, Yemen’s representative, on behalf of the Group of 77, welcomed the adoption of the resolution.  His delegation appreciated that provisions would be incorporated into the United Nations development system.  It recognized efforts undertaken by international bodies to give full effect to the Global Jobs Pact.


He said that on 22 April 2010, the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) had signed a Memorandum of Understanding to promote the Global Jobs Pact.  Commending those efforts, he called on all other United Nations funds and programmes to emulate them.  Despite national and international efforts, the impacts of the global crisis remained significant and many countries risked a double-dip recession in coming months.  As such, the Council must maintain on its agenda the issue of recovery from the crisis.  The Global Jobs Pact could offer States a framework for coherent policy action to counteract economic contraction.


Next, the Council adopted by consensus a draft resolution on the Follow-up to the International Conference on Financing for Development and the 2008 review conference (document E/2010/L.12/Rev.1), submitted by Mexico.  By the terms of the text, the Council reiterated its appeal to Member States and other potential donors to consider contributing generously to the Financing for Development Trust Fund, which would facilitate the implementation of a strengthened and more effective intergovernmental inclusive process to carry out the financing for development follow-up.  Council Vice-President SOBORUN noted that the resolution carried no budget implications.


Mexico’s representative thanked all delegations that participated in the informal consultations on an issue his country believed was of great importance.


Yemen’s representative, on behalf of the Group of 77, said the agreed text reaffirmed the role of the Council in promoting coherence, coordination and cooperation in the implementation of the Monterrey Consensus and the Doha Declaration on Financing for Development.  However, the Group was disappointed that the resolution did not fully address substantive issues of interest to developing countries.  It remained committed to the substantive texts presented during negotiations, and reserved the right to revisit the matters in future.


In particular, the Group underlined that many of the same questions were being examined in the Millennium Development Goal Summit preparatory process.  More needed to be done to ensure the full implementation of the agreed financing for development commitments, he said.  In light of the establishment of UN Women, it would be fitting to initiate negotiations aimed at creating a functional commission on Financing for Development.  In that regard, he highlighted several proposals, including the establishment of an intergovernmental commission on financing for development.


Regarding the draft resolution on Establishment of an ad hoc panel of experts on the world financial and economic crisis and its impact on development (E/2010/L.37), a representative of the Secretariat said the text, which had been submitted yesterday, must now be submitted for review for possible programme budget implications.  The Budget Division had not had the time to perform that function and, as such, the Secretariat did not have a statement in that regard for the draft.


The Council deferred the draft text to the resumed substantive session.


Regarding the resolution entitled Role of the Council in the integrated and coordinated implementation of the outcomes of and follow-up to major United Nations conferences and summits, in the light of relevant General Assembly resolutions, including resolution 61/16 (document E/2010/L.11), the Secretariat made a correction to the text.


The Council Vice-President said the draft, as orally corrected, contained no programme budget implications and the Council adopted the text by consensus, taking note of the Secretary-General’s report on the role its role in integrated follow-up of the major United Nations conferences.


Suspending its Coordination Segment with that action, the Council then turned its attention to a draft resolution on Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Haiti (document E/2010/L.27).  The Secretariat made an oral statement relating to the programme budget implications of that text.


Adopting that resolution by consensus, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Haiti until the Council’s 2012 substantive session, with the purpose of providing advice on Haiti’s long-term development strategy to promote post-disaster socio-economic recovery, stability and reconstruction.  In that work, the Council recommended that full use be made of the United Nations capacity to mobilize international aid, and that the leadership role of the United Nations in this respect be recognized and promoted on the ground.


Speaking after action, Haiti’s representative thanked Canada, which holds the Presidency of the Ad Hoc Group, for introducing the resolution.  The Council’s adoption of the text had shown that the “flame of solidarity with the Haitian people” since the January tragedy was still very much alive, despite the slow efforts on the ground to move his country from recovery to restitution.


Next, the Council adopted by consensus a draft resolution entitled Mainstreaming a gender perspective into all policies and programmes in the United Nations system, (document E/2010/L.35), submitted to Council Vice-President Soborun on the basis of informal consultations.  By the text, the Secretary-General was requested to submit a report to the Council’s 2011 substantive session on progress made by United Nations entities in that regard, and on the challenges they faced in mainstreaming a gender perspective in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of all policies and programmes, and in capacity development.  That report should contain a section on how UN Women would carry out its work.


The text contained no programme budget implications.


Resuming next its consideration of agenda item 9 (matters related to decolonization), the Council had before it a draft resolution on support to Non-Self-Governing Territories by the specialized agencies and international institutions associated with the United Nations (document E/2010/L.22), submitted by Saint Lucia on behalf of the co-sponsors.


Before action, the United States’ representative said his country would abstain from voting.  While he believed that United Nations funds, programmes and agencies could provide support to territories that are not United Nations members, he did not agree with the draft’s recommendations regarding the participation of such territories within the Organization’s bodies.  The United States Federal Government, he said, had sole responsibility for its foreign relations, and thus the proposed language infringed upon that.  He hoped the draft text would be addressed again to reach consensus.


Belgium’s representative, speaking on behalf of the European Union, added that his delegation would also abstain, as it believed that the issue did not fall within the Council’s competence.


The Council then adopted that resolution by recorded vote of 26 in favour to none against, with 26 abstentions.


In an explanation of vote after vote, Russian Federation’s representative said his country had abstained.  His country’s approach on the issue of decolonization had remained the same, he said, noting that the Council’s consideration of such a “political situation” distracted it from its main purpose.  The Russian Federation was, however, willing to consider new approaches to consider the issue which would enable the Council to avoid its “politicalization”.


Argentina’s representative noted that the draft text should be implemented in keeping with relevant General Assembly resolutions, as well as the work of the United Nations Special Committee of the 24 on Decolonization.


The Council then turned its attention to the Secretary-General’s report on Regional cooperation in the economic, social and related fields (document E/2010/15/Add.1), which contained 4 draft resolutions.


The Council then deferred action on two resolutions contained in that report:  Upgrading the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia Section for Emerging and Conflict-Related Issues to the level of a division and establishing a governmental committee on emerging issues and development in conflict settings; and on Upgrading the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia Centre for Women to the level of a division and follow-up to the implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the Arab countries after 15 years: Beijing+15.


Resuming consideration of item 11 (Economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory) the Council turned its attention to a similarly titled draft resolution (document E/2010/L.31).  The Council Vice-President noted that the text contained no programme budget implications.


Saint Lucia’s delegate said he had not seen the resolution and requested to consider it before any action was taken on the text.


Speaking in general statement before the vote, Israel’s delegate recalled that “declarations of peace were the precursors of peace” and asked how the words of the text reflected peace, or any progress towards the realization of two States, one Israeli the other Palestinian.  The text had spared no opportunity to accuse Israel and ignore the threat against Israeli civilians, as well as other existential dangers in the region.  The fact that there was no humanitarian crisis had not stopped the texts’ authors from describing one.


She said the resolution was incapable of discussing Israel in the context of its cooperation with the Palestinian Authority.  It also ignored Israel’s policy to allow materials into the Gaza Strip, a move that had been welcomed by the Quartet.  In what had become a predictable resolution, sponsors had hijacked the Council to promote an agenda that demonized Israel and blocked peace prospects.  “Peace will require political risks”, she said, as well as difficult compromises from all sides.  The same resolution was adopted, year after year, irrespective of realities on the ground.  Israel called for voting against the resolution.


Speaking before the vote, the United States’ delegate supported improving the economic and social condition of Palestinians, adding that his Government was working to support the Palestinian Authority’s two-year plan to reform institutions and build a strong economy.  Since the Council last considered the issue, Israel had lifted checkpoints and eased barriers.  Combined with sound fiscal policies by the Palestinian Authority, among other things, such actions had led to impressive economic growth in Ramallah, Jenin and other Palestinian cities.


Moreover, Palestinians in the West Bank were finding jobs, he said, noting also a steady, positive trend in Gaza that had been seen since Israel’s 20 June announcement of its new policy, he said.  More goods entering that area were reducing prices and demand for “tunnel products”.  For its part, the United States had worked to bring a just resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.  Given that, his Government was perplexed by the text that had emerged from negotiations.  Support for a two-State solution required supporting both sides.  The resolution had been presented with little advance notice and was fundamentally unbalanced.  As such, the United States would vote against the resolution with deep regret, but would continue working with the Quartet and regional States to advance the achievement of two States living side by side in peace and security.


Belgium’s delegate, speaking on behalf of States including Estonia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Slovakia and the United Kingdom, said that delegation would vote in favour of the text.  In that context, she emphasized the importance of international humanitarian law and protection of civilians in line with such law.


By a recorded vote of 45 in favour to 3 against (Australia, Canada, United States), with 3 abstentions (Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Mongolia), the Council adopted the resolution on Economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan.


Speaking in explanation of vote after the vote, Australia’s delegate was deeply concerned at the worsening situation in the occupied Palestinian territories.  Australia’s assistance to Palestinians was helping to build schools and health clinics, among other things.  However, the country’s opposition to the text reflected its strong concern that it introduced political issues into the forum.  It did not reflect the responsibility of all parties to address issues and did not help improve the situation on the ground.  Australia had supported efforts to achieve an enduring peace based on an enduring solution.  He urged parties to use talks initiated by the United States to work in that direction.


Saint Lucia’s representative said his delegation had voted in favour of the text, as it was concerned with persons everywhere in the world, whether in occupied territories or colonies.  He thanked all delegations that had voted in favour of the text and those that had not voted against it.


Speaking in general statement after action, the observer for Palestine said the worsening situation in the Gaza Strip required the international community to take action to bring tangible improvements on the ground.  The adoption of the resolution reflected the serious concern at the situation in Palestine.  It sent a message to Palestinians that the international community recognized their hardship.  Concrete measures must now be adopted to assist Palestinians, especially in the Gaza Strip, to persevere until the occupation had ended and peace was achieved.  She thanked Egypt for introducing the text, as well as the United Nations and donor countries for their efforts to provide assistance to Palestinians.


Resuming its consideration of agenda sub-item 13 (e) (environment), the Council adopted by consensus a draft resolution onthe Consolidated List of Products Whose Consumption and/or Sale Have Been Banned, Withdrawn, Severely Restricted or Not Approved by Governments (document E/2010/L.38).


Turning to agenda sub-item 13 (g) (public administration and development), the Council, in an oral decision, decided to defer consideration of the report of the Committee of Experts on Public Administration on its ninth session (document E/2010/L.44) to a later stage and before its 2011 substantive session.


The Council also adopted by consensus a draft resolutionon Provisional agenda for the sixth session of the Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters (E/2010/L.36).  Council Vice-President SODORUN said the draft text carried no budget implications.


Next, the Council adopted by consensus a draft resolution on the Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters (document E/2010/L.39).  In light of the adoption, sponsors withdrew a previous version of the draft text under the same name (document E/2010/L.10).


Speaking after action, Yemen’s representative, on behalf of the Group of 77, welcomed the text’s adoption.  The Group was, however, disappointed that no constructive movement had been made to fulfil the Council’s mandate of strengthening institutional arrangements to promoted international cooperation until now.  While it was not entirely happy with current process on that issue, the Group welcomed the “constructive step” and anticipated a results-oriented outcome to the resolution.


Strengthening international cooperation in tax matters through the strengthening of institutional arrangements at the international level, he stressed, must ensure that the international community supported national efforts to enhance domestic public resources.  There must be a transparent, impartial and multilateral approach for monitoring and assessing compliance with international standards on the part of all jurisdictions, as well as a level playing field for all tax jurisdictions.


He went on to stress that the United Nations was the only true global forum, urging Member States to consider the conversion of the United Nations Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters into an intergovernmental subsidiary body of the Council.


In an oral decision, the Council next took note of the Secretary-General’s transmission a note by the Chairperson of the Committee on World Food Security on the reform of the Committee and on progress made towards implementation (document A/65/73-E/2010/51).


The Council then concluded its consideration of agenda item 13.


Turning to social and humanitarian rights questions, the Council next adopted by consensus a draft resolutionon Genetic privacy and non-discrimination (document E/2010/L.34), by which it decided to postpone consideration of matters relating to genetic privacy and non-discrimination to its 2011 substantive session, and to encourage the Inter-Agency Committee on Bioethics to further its work in that field.


The Council then took note of the following documents under its agenda item on social and human rights questions:  E/2010/10; E/2009/30/Add.1; E/2009/28/28/Add.1; E/2010/89; A/65/41; and E/2010/43.


Resuming consideration of item 6 (b) (implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010,) the Council Vice-President said the draft resolution submitted under that item contained no programme budget implications.


Bangladesh’s delegate said delegations had negotiated late last night, which had resulted in the delay of the draft to the Council.  He noted one correction to be made to the draft.


The Council then adopted by consensus, as orally amended, a resolution contained in an informal paper circulated in English only, on the Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010, submitted by Council Vice-President Soborun.  By its terms, the Council urged the least developed countries to strengthen country ownership in the implementation of the Programme by translating its goals and targets into specific measures within their national development frameworks.  It also urged development partners to fully implement commitments made in the Programme in a timely and effective manner, and to exercise individual best efforts to continue to increase their financial and technical support for the Programme’s effective implementation.


The Council Vice-President then said, in light of the adoption of that text, draft resolution E/2010/L.20 had been withdrawn by its sponsors.


After action, Nepal’s representative welcomed the text’s adoption, saying it had both taken note of least developed countries’ efforts over the last decade, and expressed concern at insufficient progress under the 2001 Brussels Programme of Action.  It called for partners to implement commitments and take into account the need for resources.  Many new challenges must be continuously analysed to ensure a comprehensive approach to poverty alleviation.  Against the backdrop of multiple crises, concerted, robust and global support was crucial to attaining common objectives.  He looked forward to more engagement ahead of the Fourth United Nations Conference on Least Developed Countries, to be held in Istanbul, Turkey, in 2011.


Returning to resolution E/2010/L.31, the representative of the Netherlands clarified that Belgium’s delegate had not spoken on behalf of the European Union, but rather on behalf of the 10 countries she mentioned in her explanation of vote.


Introduction of Draft Resolution


The representative of Yemen introduced the draft resolution on the establishment of an ad hoc panel of experts on the world financial and economic crisis and its impact on development (document E/2010/L.33), which sought to implement paragraph 56 (e) of the Outcome of the Conference on the World Financial and Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Development.  It completely fulfilled the mandate of the Conference, seeking the independent advice and recommendations of experts on global financial and systemic issues, he said.


By the terms of the draft, panel members would be nominated by Member States from a list of candidates with well-known and recognized expertise in economic and financial matters.  The Council would invite former members of the Commission of Experts of the President of the United Nations General Assembly on Reforms of the International Monetary and Financial System to provide advice and guidance to the panel.  However, given the limited time available, the Secretariat had not been able to assess possible programme budget implications.


Council President Hamidon Ali ( Malaysia) said the Council would defer its consideration of the text to its resumed substantive session later in the year.


The representative of Cameroon said that, while he agreed to the deferral, it was not true that the Secretariat could not provide programme budget implications on time, because he had knowledge of the process.


The representative of Belgium, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said the text had been deferred because it had only been presented this morning, and presenting a draft resolution on the last day of a session was “simply not correct”.


The representative of Australia added that there had been confusion earlier today, whereby the Council Vice-President Soborun ( Mauritius) had considered the draft resolution at the same time that an informal consultation was being held to discuss whether consideration of the text should be deferred.  She stressed the need for the Council to exercise some discipline in order to finish its work during the substantive session.


Action


Resuming its consideration of issues relating to sustainable development, the Council adopted, by consensus, a draft resolution entitled Review of United Nations support for small island developing States (document E/2010/L.33), by which it would decide to make available the independent views and perspectives of the Committee for Development Policy, together with a summary of the session’s debate, on progress made in addressing the vulnerabilities of small island developing States.


In light of the adoption of resolution E/2010L.33, the President stated that resolution E/2010/L.24 would be withdrawn by its sponsors.


When the Council concluded its work, the representative of Canada said the body’s members could have shown a great deal more discipline during the substantive session.  Several substantive issues had been deferred to the resumed substantive session, and even to the organizational session.  In that regard, he feared that the Council would “not enjoy what we have done to ourselves”, stressing that the ultimate source of the Council’s effectiveness was the discipline and efforts of its members.


The representative of Chile commended efforts during the session to address the challenges involved in helping communities affected by emergencies and natural disasters, noting that providing humanitarian assistance in situations that represented a threat was a major issue.  With regard to Haiti, he welcomed measures to send a special team to help with the country’s reconstruction.   He also welcomed the establishment of UN Women, which he believed would help with regard to mainstreaming gender perspective.  He hoped that the new gender entity would be fully operational as soon as possible and that financing would be provided.  Lastly, he highlighted the adoption of a resolution on the Global Jobs Pact.


The representative of Yemen, speaking on behalf of the Group of 77, said the Council’s High-Level Segment on gender equality and empowerment of women had provided a timely opportunity to assess the progress made, share lessons learned, and find appropriate ways to overcome remaining obstacles and challenges in that area.  He welcomed the adoption of the Ministerial Declaration, which not only reaffirmed Council members’ commitment, but also addressed important issues relating to gender equality and empowerment of women.


He went on to say that, during the Coordination Segment, the role of Member States and the United Nations System were examined and discussed, with regard to ensuring a more coordinated implementation of the health-related Millennium Development Goals.  He welcomed the adoption of the resolution “Recovering from the World Financial and Economic Crisis:  a Global Jobs Pact”, as that resolution reaffirmed that employment creation was essential to recovery efforts.


During the Operational Segment, the Group of 77 had emphasized the need for a strengthened global partnership for development, based on the recognition of national leadership and ownership of development strategies which should be a guiding principle of United Nations operational activities at the country level.  The Group remained convinced, he said, that through the Council, the United Nations could play a stronger role in advancing the international development agenda.  With respect to the Humanitarian Affairs Segment, he welcomed the adoption of the resolution entitled “Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations”, and said the Group had engaged actively and constructively during the negotiations.


The representative of the United Republic of Tanzania thanked President Hamidon Ali for his leadership during the substantive session.  The Council had demonstrated more strength day by day, and encouraging developments had been seen.


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