16 January 2009
Security Council
SC/9574

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council

6068th Meeting (AM)


SECURITY COUNCIL EXPRESSES INTENTION TO ESTABLISH PEACEKEEPING MISSION IN SOMALIA,


SUBJECT TO FURTHER DECISION BY 1 JUNE, UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTING RESOLUTION 1863


Renews Authorization for Current African Union Force for Up to Six Months;

Requests Report by 15 April on Security Conditions, Possible Mandate of UN Force


The Security Council today expressed its intention to establish a United Nations peacekeeping operation in war-torn Somalia and called on Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to develop, by 15 April, a mandate for the proposed mission, which would replace an existing African Union force.


Unanimously adopting resolution 1863 (2009), the Council decided that deploying the proposed mission would “be subject to a further decision of the Security Council by 1 June 2009”.  In the meantime, the Secretary-General was called on to deliver a report that would include developments in Somalia, progress towards full deployment of the existing 3,200-strong African Union force, known as AMISOM, and progress in the political process and security conditions on the ground.


According to the resolution, the report would also set out the mandate for the proposed mission, whose tasks in and around Somalia’s beleaguered capitol, Mogadishu, would be to assist in the delivery of humanitarian aid; protect political actors and Government buildings and staff, and United Nations staff; monitor implementation of the Djibouti Peace Agreement and any subsequent ceasefires and joints security arrangement; and build up Somali security forces.


The Council requested the Secretary-General to establish a trust fund to provide financial support to AMISOM until a United Nations peacekeeping operation could be deployed and to assist in the re-establishment, training and retention of all-inclusive Somali security forces.  The Secretary-General was also requested to hold a donors conference as soon as possible to solicit contributions to the trust fund, and the African Union was asked to consult with him and submit budgetary requests to the fund.


Welcoming AMISOM’s contribution to lasting peace and stability in Somalia, the Council, acting under Chapter VII of the Charter, renewed for up to six months the authorization of African Union member States to maintain a mission in that country, and underlined that AMISOM was authorized to take all necessary measures to provide security for key infrastructure and to contribute, within its capabilities and mandate, to create the necessary security conditions for the provision of humanitarian assistance.


Further by the wide-ranging resolution, the Security Council requested the African Union to maintain AMISOM’s deployment and to reinforce it to help achieve the originally mandated force strength of 8,000 troops, “thereby enhancing the Mission’s capability to carry out its mandate and protect key installations in Mogadishu, including the airport, seaport and other strategic areas”.


Welcoming the Secretary-General’s recommendations on strengthening AMISOM contained in a letter dated 19 December 2008 (document S/2008/804), the Council welcomed his proposal for immediate in kind enhancement of AMISOM by transferring assets after the liquidation of the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE).  In order for AMISOM’s forces to be incorporated into the proposed United Nations peacekeeping operation, it requests the Secretary-General to provide a United Nations logistical support package to AMISOM, including equipment and services, until 1 June 2009, or until the Council reached a decision on establishing a United Nations force.


Calling the Council’s unanimous adoption of the resolution “the right step, in the right direction -- for the time being”, towards addressing the complex situation in Somalia, that country’s representative said Somalia would continue to require active attention and urgent measures.  It also required comprehensively addressing the root causes of nearly 20 years of instability, including the current plague of incidents of piracy and armed robbery off its coast.


He was concerned that, if the international community placed the acknowledged priority of a comprehensive peace on the ground ahead of its efforts to help the Somali Government promote and ensure stability and political progress in the meantime, “it might take another 10 years”.  With that in mind, the Somali Transitional Government was actively working to implement the Djibouti Agreement.  Still, that accord was complex and, if the Council waited until all its elements were implemented, he was afraid Somalia “will miss the boat”.  He urged the Council and the wider international community to ensure the full implementation of the current resolution.


At the outset of the Council’s work, Council President Jean-Maurice Ripert ( France) noted that this was United States Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad’s last day in the Council.  Mr. Ripert regretted his departure and called Mr. Khalilzad a man of conviction, commitment and great talent.  He said that the role of Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations was not easy and, in his opinion, could be a rather solitary one.


He said Mr. Khalilzad was a skilled and tough negotiator, which all the Council members appreciated.  Following a difficult period, Mr. Khalilzad had brought the United States closer to the United Nations.  Indeed, the Organization needed the active participation of the United States in its work.  Mr. Ripert, and all the Council members who spoke during the meeting, expressed appreciation for Mr. Khalilzad’s work and wished him future success.


Also speaking today were the representatives of the United States, United Kingdom, Japan, Russian Federation, Mexico, Turkey, Uganda, Libya and Burkina Faso.


The meeting began at 10:20 a.m., and adjourned at 11:11 a.m.


Background


The Security Council met today to act on a draft resolution (document S/2009/37), sponsored by Burkina Faso, Burundi, Italy, Libya, Turkey, Uganda and the United States, which reads as follows:


The Security Council,


Recalling its previous resolutions concerning the situation in Somalia, in particular resolution 733 (1992), resolution 751 (1992), resolution 1356 (2001), resolution 1425 (2002), resolution 1519 (2003), resolution 1725 (2006), resolution 1744 (2007), resolution 1772 (2007), resolution 1801 (2008), resolution 1811 (2008), resolution 1814 (2008), resolution 1831 (2008), and resolution 1844 (2008) and the statements of its President, in particular those of 13 July 2006 (S/PRST/2006/31), 22 December 2006 (S/PRST/2006/59), 30 April 2007 (S/PRST/2007/13), 14 June 2007 (S/PRST/2007/19), 19 December 2007 (S/PRST/2007/49), and 4 September 2008 (S/PRST/2008/33),


Reiterating its commitment to a comprehensive and lasting settlement of the situation in Somalia,


Reaffirming its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia,


Further reaffirming that the Djibouti Peace Agreement represents the basis for a resolution of the conflict in Somalia, and stressing the importance of broad-based and representative institutions reached through a political process ultimately inclusive of all,


Welcoming the guiding principles agreed by the parties to the Djibouti Peace Agreement on 25 November 2008, in particular the establishment of a Unity Government and an inclusive Parliament,


Recognizing the need for all parties to contribute to an enhanced political process, calling on the Somali parties to the Djibouti Peace Agreement to fulfil their obligations set out therein, and taking note of the request from the parties for United Nations authorization and deployment of an international stabilization force,


Welcoming the contribution of the African Union Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) to lasting peace and stability in Somalia, expressing its appreciation for the continued commitment of the Governments of Uganda and Burundi in Somalia, condemning any hostilities toward AMISOM, and stressing the importance of reestablishment, training and retention of Somali security forces,


Welcoming the Secretary-General’s proposal for a partnership between the Somali parties, the United Nations, AMISOM and other international partners to develop a program of assistance to build Somali security capacity,


Reiterating its serious concern at the worsening humanitarian situation in Somalia, and calling on all Member States to contribute to current and future consolidated humanitarian appeals,


Recognizing that serious crimes have been committed against civilians in the ongoing conflict in Somalia and reaffirming the importance of the fight against impunity,


Noting the statement and 5-point communiqué of the African Union of 10 December 2008 and 22 December 2008 respectively, whereby the African Union Peace and Security Council calls for an interim stabilization force in anticipation of a United Nation peacekeeping operation in Somalia in order to take over from AMISOM and support the long-term stabilization and reconstruction of that country,


Determining that the situation in Somalia constitutes a threat to international peace and security in the region,


Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,


“1.   Welcomes the decision of the African Union that AMISOM will remain in Somalia until 16 March 2009, and requests the African Union to maintain AMISOM’s deployment in Somalia and to reinforce that deployment to help achieve AMISOM’s originally mandated troop strength of 8,000 troops, thereby enhancing the mission’s capability to carry out its mandate and protect key installations in Mogadishu, including the airport, seaport and other strategic areas;


“2.   Decides to renew for up to six months from the date of this resolution the authorization of Member States of the African Union to maintain a mission in Somalia, which shall be authorized to take all necessary measures to carry out the mandate set out in paragraph 9 of resolution 1772 (2007); and underlines, in particular, that AMISOM is authorized to take all necessary measures to provide security for key infrastructure and to contribute, as may be requested and within its capabilities and existing mandate, to the creation of the necessary security conditions for the provision of humanitarian assistance;


“3.   Calls upon the Somali parties and other stakeholders to uphold the principles of the Djibouti Peace Agreement, to cease hostilities, to ensure without delay unhindered humanitarian access and assistance to the Somali people, to terminate all acts of armed confrontation, to reach agreement on permanent ceasefire mechanisms, and to use the Joint Security Committee to resolve disputes over military issues; and requests the Secretary-General to report on ways to improve the implementation of the Djibouti Peace Agreement, including the option of an international peace conference to include local, regional and international actors;


“4.   Expresses its intent to establish a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation in Somalia as a follow-on force to AMISOM, subject to a further decision of the Security Council by 1 June 2009;


“5.   Requests the Secretary-General to submit a report for a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation by 15 April 2009, to include developments in the situation in Somalia, progress towards the full deployment and strengthening of AMISOM with a view to transition to a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation, progress in the political process and security conditions on the ground, in order to inform the Security Council of his assessment in advance of the decision referred to in paragraph 4 above and with a view to speedy deployment;


“6.   Further requests the Secretary-General in this report to develop recommendations on the mandate of such a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation taking into account the following tasks in Mogadishu and its environs:


“(a)  To facilitate humanitarian assistance and improve humanitarian access, including by securing key humanitarian infrastructure and maintaining liaison with all parties to the Djibouti Peace Agreement and related subsequent agreements, and to facilitate delivery of humanitarian assistance to internally displaced persons, children, and other affected persons;


“(b)  To assist with the free movement, safe passage and protection of those involved in the political process, to provide security for key political infrastructure, and to protect and assist the institutions of a future Unity Government to help them carry out their functions;


“(c)  To monitor, within its capabilities, the implementation of the cessation of hostilities under the Djibouti Peace Agreement, as well as any subsequent ceasefire arrangements and joint security arrangements agreed through the Joint Security Committee (JSC), to liaise with the JSC and provide technical assistance in the implementation of its functions, including in the investigation of ceasefire violations, and to support in the monitoring of illegal weapons traffic by informing the Monitoring Group of any related information;


“(d)  To ensure the security and freedom of movement of United Nations personnel and to protect its personnel, facilities, installations, equipment and mission;


“(e)  To assist, in conjunction with regional and international donor partners and other interested parties, in supporting the effective re-establishment, training and retention of inclusive Somali security forces, including military, police, and judiciary;


“7.   Affirms that the provisions set out in paragraphs 11 and 12 of resolution 1772 (2007) shall continue to apply;


“8.   Requests the Secretary-General to establish a trust fund to provide financial support to AMISOM until a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation is deployed and to assist in the reestablishment, training and retention of all-inclusive Somali security forces as provided in paragraph 4 (c) of resolution 1744 (2007); also requests the Secretary-General to hold a donors conference to solicit contributions to this trust fund as soon as possible; further requests the African Union, in consultation with the Secretary-General, to submit budgetary requests to this trust fund; and calls upon Member States to contribute to the trust fund, while noting that the existence of the trust fund does not preclude the conclusion of direct bilateral arrangements in support of AMISOM;


“9.   Stresses the need to create the conditions for the Special Representative of the Secretary-General to continue to make progress on the political process;


“10.  Welcomes the recommendations contained in the Secretary-General’s letter of 19 December 2008 on strengthening AMISOM (S/2008/804); recalls that the Security Council bears primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security and that cooperation with regional and subregional organizations can improve collective security; further recalls that in resolution 1772 (2007) it called for planning for possible deployment of a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation replacing AMISOM and in resolution 1744 (2007) it took note that AMISOM was intended to contribute to an initial stabilization phase evolving into a possible United Nations operation; welcomes in this regard the Secretary-General’s proposal for immediate in kind enhancement of AMISOM through the transfer of assets following the liquidation of United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE); and requests the Secretary-General, in order for AMISOM’s forces to be incorporated into a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation, to provide a United Nations logistical support package to AMISOM including equipment and services, as described in paragraphs 7 and 8 of his proposal (S/2008/804) but not including transfer of funds to AMISOM, until 1 June 2009 or until the decision referred to in paragraph 4 above, whichever is earlier;


“11.  Requests the Secretary-General to oversee the assistance referred to in paragraph 10 above and further requests the Secretary-General to report no later than January 30 on the precise equipment and services being provided and to report to the Security Council at 30-day intervals thereafter on progress in the deployment of such goods and services;


“12.  Requests AMISOM to ensure all equipment and services provided by the United Nations pursuant to this resolution be used in a transparent and effective manner for the purposes intended and further requests AMISOM to report to the Secretary-General on the usage of such equipment and services in a manner to be detailed in a Memorandum of Understanding between the United Nations and the African Union based on appropriate internal control procedures;


“13.  Requests the Secretary-General to lend his support to African Union force generation efforts, to continue to support African Union planning and deployment preparations through the Secretariat’s Planners team in Addis Ababa and to continue planning, in close cooperation with the African Union, for force generation and logistical, administrative, financial and other arrangements necessary to transition from AMISOM to a United Nations Peacekeeping Operation;


“14.  Calls upon Member States to contribute personnel, equipment, and other resources to AMISOM; and encourages Member States to cooperate closely with the African Union, the United Nations, troop contributing countries and other donors to this end;


“15.  Calls upon all parties to cooperate fully in the deployment and operations of AMISOM, in particular by guaranteeing the safety, security, and freedom of movement of African Union and United Nations personnel as well as associated personnel throughout Somalia and to comply fully with their obligations under international law, including international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law;


“16.  Requests the Secretary-General, through his Special Representative for Somalia, to coordinate all activities of the United Nations system in Somalia, to provide good offices and political support for the efforts to establish lasting peace and stability in Somalia and to mobilize resources and support from the international community for both immediate recovery and long-term economic development of Somalia; decides that the United Nations Political Office for Somalia (UNPOS) and the United Nations country team shall continue to promote a lasting peace and stability in Somalia through the implementation of the Djibouti Peace Agreement, and to facilitate coordination of international support to these efforts; and requests the Secretary-General to conduct immediate contingency planning for the deployment of United Nations offices and agencies into Somalia;


“17.  Demands that all States in the region refrain from any action that might exacerbate instability in Somalia or the Horn of Africa region, and reiterates its intention to take measures against those who seek to prevent or block a peaceful political process, or those who threaten participants in the political process by force, or those who undermine stability in Somalia or the region;


“18.  Calls upon Member States to contribute to current and future consolidated humanitarian appeals;


“19.  Reaffirms its resolutions 1325 (2000) and 1820 (2008) on women, peace and security, and 1674 (2006) and 1738 (2006) on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, and stresses the responsibility of all parties and armed groups in Somalia to take appropriate steps to protect the civilian population in the country, consistent with international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law, in particular by avoiding any indiscriminate or excessive use of force in populated areas;


“20.  Reaffirms its resolutions 1539 (2004) and 1612 (2005) on children and armed conflict and recalls the subsequent conclusions of the Security Council Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict pertaining to parties to the armed conflict in Somalia (S/AC.51/2007/14);


“21.  Calls upon the Somali parties to make further progress on establishing joint Transitional Security Forces, which ultimately would assume full responsibility for providing security in Somalia;


“22.  Requests the Secretary-General to advise urgently on the implementation of his plans to assist the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) and the Alliance for the Re-liberation of Somalia (ARS) in developing and coordinating, through his Special Representative for Somalia, in conjunction with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), other international donors, Member States and AMISOM as appropriate, a coherent strategy and package for command and control, training and equipment to build Somalia’s joint Transitional Security Forces and Police to an anticipated strength of some 15,000 personnel, as envisaged in his letter of 19 December 2008 (S/2008/804) and in line with the recommendations of the TFG/ARS Joint Security Committee, as well as rule of law and correctional facilities, and other key areas identified by the Somali parties; and calls upon Member States to contribute to this package;


“23.  Calls upon Member States, in response to the Secretary-General’s letter of 19 December 2008 (S/2008/804), to support strengthening and building capacity of the Somali government at the federal, state and local level, particularly in areas of institutional development, human resource development, public finance management and accountability processes and support to service delivery;


“24.  Welcomes the Secretary-General’s proposal of 19 December 2008 (S/2008/804) to establish within UNPOS a dedicated capacity that would include expertise in police and military training, planning for future Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration activities and Security Sector Reform activities, as well as a rule of law and correction components;


“25.  Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.”


Action


The Council unanimously adopted the text as Security Council resolution 1863 (2009).


Statements after Vote


ZALMAY KHALILZAD ( United States) said it had been a great honour to represent the United States in the Council and thanked all members for the work that had been done together and for the friendship that had been developed in dealing with the many challenges faced.  He wished the members all the best, as the Council continued to deal with its many challenges.  The United States needed the United Nations and the United Nations needed an active United States.


He also thanked members for the unanimous support for the resolution and took pride in the role the United States had played in moving Somalia, one of the most complex situations, to the forefront of the Council’s agenda.  Although the scourge of piracy had been addressed, there was a need for a comprehensive approach that addressed the root causes of the situation, including political, humanitarian and security issues.  The resolution provided for the United Nations to back up its commitments with logistical support of AMISOM.  By 1 June, the Council would decide on the establishment of a United Nations peacekeeping operation.  The United States strongly supported the political process and called on all stakeholders to renounce violence and engage in a unity Government.  The United States also attached great importance to the establishment under the Djibouti Peace Agreement of a Joint Somali Security Forces.


KAREN PIERCE ( United Kingdom) said, in Somalia, political, security and development factors had to be weighed together with the imperative to build a peace that could be kept.  The resolution was a good way forward, as it took account of several key factors.  It enhanced support for AMISOM and authorized a United Nations logistics mission that would support that Mission.  It also requested the Secretary-General to establish a trust fund for AMISOM.  The assessed contributions needed to be monitored carefully. 


She said the resolution also included provisions for taking a second decision to mandate a United Nations peacekeeping mission.  At that time, her country would look at the situation on the ground, consider whether there was a sustainable peace to keep, and weigh what was in the best interest of United Nations peacekeeping overall.  The resolution provided for renewed impetus for implementation of the Djibouti Agreement and reinforced it.  To that end, efforts of the parties would also be necessary.


YUKIO TAKASU ( Japan) said that his delegation shared the serious concern over the situation in Somalia, including the lack of political stability and continuing incidents of piracy and robbery off the country’s coast.  Concerted and intensified efforts by the international community were essential to addressing those concerns.  He appreciated the work being carried out by AMISOM and recognized the need to strengthen that Mission.  He stressed that Japan favoured a two-stage approach, akin to the recommendations of the Secretary-General, to bring about peace and stability in Somalia:  strengthening AMISOM and, as the necessary conditions were developed on the ground, establishing a United Nations peacekeeping operation.


He went on to say that Japan was, therefore, pleased to join in the unanimous adoption of the current resolution, and would use the occasion to stress two important principles for establishing a United Nations peace operation in Somalia and extending the Organization’s support to an operation that had been authorized, but not established by the Council.  First, the United Nations had learned many important lessons regarding peace operations through the years, including that, when the Council took a decision to establish a new operation, it must not only be desirable, but effectively implementable.  It was the Council, not the Secretariat, which should take primary responsibility for the consequences of such a decision.


Japan would study most closely the assessment of the situation the Secretary-General would submit in his April report and would subsequently actively participate in the Council’s discussions on the possible deployment of a United Nations peacekeeping operation in Somalia.   Japan believed that such a decision should be made after careful consideration of the feasibility and effectiveness of such proposed deployment, so that the decision could be effectively implemented.


Secondly, he said it was important to respect the competence of the General Assembly on the financial and administrative aspects of United Nations peacekeeping operations and other activities, such as AMISOM, which are authorized by the Organization, but implemented by non-United Nations entities.  Japan would have serious reservations with regard to compromising the principle of financing only those expenses of United Nations activities by mandatory assessment -– particularly so if done by the Security Council.  In that regard, the resolution just adopted requested the Secretary-General to provide a logistical support to AMISOM and Japan considered that such a support package be carefully reviewed by the General Assembly.  Further, the proposed logistical support package should be implemented in a transparent and accountable manner.


VITALY CHURKIN ( Russian Federation) said, recently, the Council had been giving much attention to the situation in Somalia, particularly towards ensuring political settlement and to deal with ongoing piracy.  The resolution just adopted would further those efforts.  The Russian Federation supported AMISOM and the work that was being carried out in Somalia by the African Union.  It also supported the present resolution’s call for the full force deployment of AMISOM and for its eventual transformation into a United Nations-mandated peacekeeping operation.


Overall, the success of such a deployment and transfer of operations would depend largely on the Somali parties themselves.  His delegation supported the efforts of the Transitional Federal Government to restore peace, stability and territorial integrity in Somalia.  It also supported the Djibouti Agreement and looked forward to the full implementation of the current resolution, with the cooperation of the Somali parties, the African Union and other parties and organizations in the region.


CLAUDE HELLER ( Mexico) said that only through a holistic approach could conditions be achieved to make peace possible, including security and the return of refugees and internally displaced persons.  Acknowledging the importance of AMISOM and the commitments shown by Uganda and Burundi, he said the security situation had worsened significantly.  He expressed his deep concern at the deterioration of the humanitarian situation and crimes committed against civilians, and, in that regard, underlined the importance of fighting impunity. 


He urged the parties to strengthen the political process and to comply with their commitments under the Djibouti Peace Agreement.  The resolution was an initial step towards the possible establishment of a United Nations peacekeeping operation.  He hoped the requested Secretary-General’s report would address the minimum conditions necessary for a United Nations peacekeeping operation and would study recommendations from the Department of Peacekeeping Operations.  As Chairman of the Somali Sanctions Committee, he highlighted the importance for neighbouring countries and countries in the region to step up their efforts to fight the illicit trafficking of arms and munitions to armed groups in Somalia. 


FAZLI ÇORMAN ( Turkey) said his country attached great importance to the comprehensive and lasting settlement of the situation in Somalia and, therefore, supported the resolution.  Now, more needed to be done by the Somalis themselves.  While appreciating AMISOM’s activities, he expressed concern at the worsening humanitarian situation and welcomed the strengthening of AMISOM’s mandate in that regard.


He said the resolution provided for the Council to consider establishment of a United Nations peacekeeping operation.  For its consideration of such a mission, the security situation on the ground and progress in the peace process would play a role.  He said the Turkish armed forces were prepared to train prospective peacekeepers.  By adopting the resolution, the Council had done what was necessary.  Now, it was time for the parties to the Djibouti process to seize the opportunity offered.


FRANCIS BUTAGIRA ( Uganda) said that his delegation welcomed the adoption of the resolution and thanked the United States and all the delegations that had worked hard to draft the text.  He thanked the Council for taking the decision unanimously and stressed that it was an expression that the United Nations was exercising its mandated duty to ensure peace, stability and reconciliation in Somalia.  He also said that Uganda was a part of AMISOM and, therefore, welcomed the current resolution’s two-stage approach, which called for the strengthening of that African Union Mission ahead of final decision on transferring the operation to the United Nations.


Addressing the instability on the ground in Somalia –- an acknowledged abiding concern for some Council members -– he stressed that waiting for a complete restoration of peace ahead of the deployment of a United Nations peacekeeping force might not be the best way to ensure success.  Rather, in some cases, it had been shown that the mere presence of United Nations operations and peacekeeping troops could be an important catalyst for peace on the ground.


IBRAHIM O. A. DABBASHI ( Libya) said the adoption of the current resolution was an important step forward to help war-torn Somalia restore real peace, after nearly two decades of political instability and insecurity.  His delegation had long called for the strengthening of AMISOM and for the eventual deployment of a United Nations peacekeeping force, and was pleased that the Council had finally taken such a decision.  Indeed, the fact that the situation on the ground in Somalia remained troubling should not hamper the Council from taking a final decision to re-hat the African Union peacekeepers.  The Council had frequently deployed peacekeepers in fluid situations with great success.  Finally, he said the Council should follow up this resolution with another text aimed at bolstering the political process in Somalia, including supporting the Government and other stakeholders and mechanisms in line with the Djibouti Agreement.


PAUL ROBERT TIENDRÉBÉOGO ( Burkina Faso) said that, for some time now, the Council had been confronted with a dilemma:  how to act effectively in a chaotic situation.  Through the resolution, the Council was laying an important milestone on the road to peace.  He would have liked a firmer commitment on the intentions currently expressed.  However, he supported the dynamic process, as it took into account African Union recommendations relating to strengthening AMISOM.  He hoped the Council could quickly reach a decision to establish a United Nations mission and called on donors to contribute to the trust fund. 


JEAN-MAURICE RIPERT ( France), speaking in his national capacity, welcomed the unanimous adoption of the resolution and thanked Mr. Khalilzad for his decisive role in moving it forward.  Failure to act was not an option in Somalia, he said.  To establish a peacekeeping operation now, when the situation was not right, however, would have sent the Blue Helmets to failure and would have created false hope among the population.  The approach of the resolution sent a strong political signal to Somalia, namely that the Council was ready to create a peacekeeping mission once necessary conditions had been met. 


He said that, after recent major events -– Ethiopia’s withdrawal and the President’s resignation, as well as the planning for presidential elections -– it was crucial that Somali parties implement the Djibouti Agreement and start work on improving security.  The resolution provided for support to AMISOM and supported the Joint Security Force.  It called for establishment of a trust fund and a logistic support package for AMISOM.  All that should be done quickly and with transparency. 


ELMI AHMED DUALE ( Somalia) welcomed the adoption of the resolution, calling it “the right step, in the right direction, for the time being”, towards addressing the complex situation in Somalia, which would continue to require active and urgent measures.  It also required comprehensively addressing the root causes of nearly 20 years of instability in that country, which was now being plagued by ongoing incidents of piracy and armed robbery off its coast.


While welcoming the Council’s active engagement, he was concerned that, if the international community placed the acknowledged priority of a comprehensive peace on the ground ahead of its efforts to help the Somali Government promote and ensure stability and political progress in the meantime, “it might take another 10 years”.  With that in mind, the Somali Transitional Government was actively working to implement the Djibouti Agreement.  However, that accord was complex and, if the Council waited until all its elements were implemented, he was afraid Somalia “will miss the boat”.  He urged the Council and the wider international community to ensure the full implementation of the current resolution.


* *** *


For information media • not an official record