12 October 2009
General Assembly
GA/SPD/427

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-fourth General Assembly

Fourth Committee

7th Meeting (AM)


Fourth Committee, Recommending 10 Texts to General Assembly, Calls on Governments

 

to End Enterprises in Non-Self-Governing Territories Detrimental to Inhabitants

 


Calls on States to Intensify Efforts in United Nations Specialized Agencies

To Ensure Effective Implementation of Decolonization Declaration, Resolutions


The Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) would have the General Assembly reaffirm the right of peoples of Non-Self-Governing Territories to self-determination, while also calling once again on all Governments that had not yet done so to take legislative, administrative or other measures to put an end to enterprises in the Territories that were detrimental to the interests of the inhabitants, by one of 10 draft resolutions approved today.


That draft –- on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories –- was approved by a recorded vote of 146 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom).  (For details of the vote, see Annex II).


The Committee also proposed, in a resolution on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations, that the Assembly recommend that States intensify efforts in the specialized agencies and other United Nations organizations in which they are members to ensure the full and effective implementation of the Declaration and other relevant United Nations resolutions.


Also by that text, approved by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions, the Assembly would request the specialized agencies and other United Nations organizations to examine and review conditions in each Territory, so as to take appropriate measures to accelerate progress in the Territories’ economic and social sectors.  (See Annex III.)


Three other drafts were approved by a recorded vote, including on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations; on dissemination of information on decolonization; and on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.  (See Annexes I, IV, and V, respectively.)


Resolutions relating to 13 of the 16 remaining Non-Self-Governing Territories were approved without a vote.  Those included texts on the questions of New Caledonia and Tokelau, and an omnibus resolution on the questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands.


Also acting without a vote, the Committee approved a draft text on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories.


During consideration of the various draft texts, the representatives of United Kingdom, Argentina, and Sweden (on behalf of the European Union) spoke in explanation of position.


Also acting without a vote, the Committee approved a draft resolution on the University for Peace, which would have the General Assembly request the Secretary-General to consider ways to further strengthen cooperation between the United Nations and the University, as well as consider either reviving an existing trust fund or alternatively establishing a new trust fund for peace to facilitate receipt of voluntary contributions for the University.


The Committee had taken up consideration of the University for Peace at the start of the meeting, during which John J. Maresca, Rector of the University for Peace, introduced the Secretary-General’s report on the issue.  The representative of Costa Rica had introduced the draft text on the University for Peace, and the representative of Togo had spoken on the issue.


The Committee will meet again at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 13 October, to begin its general debate on questions relating to information.


Background


The Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) met this morning to take up the issue of the University for Peace, during which it was expected to hold an interactive dialogue with the Rector of the University.  It was also expected to take action on a draft resolution on the University for Peace (document A/C.4/64/L.6).


Consideration would also resume on the cluster of items on decolonization, and action was expected on 10 draft resolutions submitted under those items –- eight of them recommended by the Special Committee on Decolonization in its report on theSituation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (documents A/64/23 and A/64/23/Corr.2).  It was also expected to take action on a draft decision on the question of Gibraltar (document A/C.4/64/L.5), as well as a draft resolution on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/C.4/64/L.3). 


For its consideration of the item on the University for Peace, the Committee had before it the Secretary-General’s report on the issue (document A/64/281), which says that the University, approaching its thirtieth anniversary year,  continues its extraordinary growth and development, as it carries out the mandate given to it by the General Assembly in 1980.


Also according to the report, the University for Peace has enrolled a record number of master’s degree students at its main campus in Costa Rica for the academic year 2009-2010.  It has held graduations this year in Africa, Asia and North America, and is showing a steady growth in earned income.  It has also added new master’s programmes, such as one on responsible management and sustainable economic development, and is expanding its distance learning courses with the objective of offering an executive master’s degree for students who cannot travel to a campus for their studies.


University for Peace professors teach in many troubled regions and University alumni are serving in key positions throughout the world, making use of what they learned to help prevent or recover from conflicts, to ensure respect for human rights and to strive for justice, good governance, and sustainable and equitable development, the document states.


The report summarizes the activities and development of the University during the past three years –- its successes as well as its challenges, including the quest for adequate funding and essential host country services, specifically safe and reliable road access to the campus.  Despite that lack of adequate support from Member States, the University is expanding its activities around the world.  The report urges all Member States to contribute to the University, in view of the fact that students from virtually every country represented in the General Assembly have benefited from its programmes.


The report concludes that the University’s continued success is dependent on the political and financial support of Member States, and it is essential that Member States reinforce their commitment to it by providing and increasing their financial contributions.  In that way, the University can establish a strong financial base and exploit its full potential to contribute to the aims and objectives of the United Nations Charter, with a view to reducing the causes of violence and conflict throughout the world.


Draft Texts


By the terms of draft resolution I, on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73e of the Charter of the United Nations, the General Assembly would request the administrating Powers concerned to transmit, or continue to transmit, regularly to the Secretary-General information relating to economic, social and educational conditions in the Territories for which they are respectively responsible.  It would also request the fullest possible information on political and constitutional developments in the Territories concerned, within a maximum period of six months following the expiration of the administrative year in those Territories. 


Also according to the text, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to continue to ensure that adequate information is drawn from all available published sources in connection with the preparation of working papers relating to the Territories concerned.


Draft resolution II, on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories, would have the Assembly reaffirm the right of peoples of Non-Self-Governing Territories to self-determination in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations and with General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV), containing the Declaration on decolonization, as well as their right to enjoy and dispose of their natural resources in their best interest.


Also according to the text, the Assembly would call once again on all Governments that have not yet done so to take legislative, administrative or other measures to put an end to enterprises in the Territories -– undertaken by those Governments’ nationals or corporate bodies under their jurisdiction -– that are detrimental to the interests of the inhabitants, in accordance with the relevant provisions of resolution 2621 (XXV) of 1970.


By further provisions, the Assembly would call upon the administrating Powers to ensure that the exploitation of the marine and other natural resources in the Non-Self-Governing Territories under their administration is not in violation of the relevant resolutions of the United Nations and does not adversely affect the interests of the peoples of those Territories.  The Assembly would also call upon the administrating Powers concerned to ensure that no discriminatory working conditions prevail in the Territories under the administration.


By other provisions, the Assembly would ask the Secretary-General to continue informing world public opinion of any activity that affects the exercise of the right of the peoples of Non-Self-Governing Territories to self-determination in conformity with the Charter and resolution 1514 (XV).  It would also decide to follow the situation in the Non-Self-Governing Territories, so as to ensure that all economic activities in those Territories are aimed at strengthening and diversifying their economies in the interest of their peoples, including the indigenous populations, and at promoting the Territories’ economic and financial viability.


By the terms of draft resolution III, on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations, the Assembly would recommend that all States intensify their efforts in the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system in which they are members to ensure the full and effective implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, contained in General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV), and other relevant United Nations resolutions. 


The Assembly would, by other provisions, request the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system to examine and review conditions in each Territory so as to take appropriate measures to accelerate progress in the economic and social sectors of the Territories.  It would also urge those specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system that have not yet provided assistance to Non-Self-Governing Territories to do so as soon as possible.


By that same draft, the Assembly would request the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system concerned to provide information on:  environmental problems facing the Non-Self-Governing Territories; the impact of natural disasters and other environmental problems on those Territories; ways and means to assist the Territories to fight drug trafficking, money-laundering and other illegal and criminal activities; and illegal exploitation of the marine and other natural resources of the Territories and the need to utilize those resources for the benefit of their peoples.


Also according to the text, the Assembly would recommend that the executive heads of the specialized agencies and other United Nations organizations formulate, with the active cooperation of the regional organizations concerned, concrete proposals for the full implementation of the relevant United Nations resolutions and submit the proposals to their governing and legislative organs.  It would also ask the Secretary-General to assist the specialized agencies and other United Nations organizations in working out appropriate measures for implementing the relevant United Nations resolutions and to prepare for submission to the relevant bodies a report on the action taken in implementation.


By the terms of draft resolution IV, on the question of New Caledonia, the Assembly would urge all the parties involved to maintain, in the framework of the Nouméa Accord, their dialogue in a spirit of harmony.  It would also call upon the administering Power to continue to transmit to the Secretary-General information as required under 73 e of the United Nations Charter, and welcome all measures taken to strengthen and diversify the New Caledonian economy in all fields.


By further provisions of that text, the Assembly would decide to keep under continuous review the process the process unfolding in New Caledonia as a result of the signing of the Nouméa Accord.  It would also request the Special Committee on the Situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples to continue the examination of the question of New Caledonia and to report on it to the General Assembly at its sixty-fifth session.


As for draft resolution V, on the question of Tokelau, the General Assembly would note New Zealand’s ongoing recognition of the complete right of the people of Tokelau to undertake the act of self-determination when they consider it to be appropriate.  It would also commend the professional and transparent conduct of both the February 2006 and October 2007 referendums, monitored by the United Nations, and acknowledges General Fono’s decision that consideration of any future act of self-determination by Tokelau will be deferred.  It would also acknowledge Tokelau’s initiative in devising a strategic economic development plan for the period 2007-2010, and the ongoing and consistent commitment of New Zealand to meeting the social and economic requirements of the people of Tokelau, as well as the support and cooperation of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).


The Assembly would also note that a referendum to determine the future status of Tokelau held in February 2006 failed to produce the two-thirds majority of the valid votes cast required by the General Fono to change Tokelau’s status. It would further note that the October 2007 referendum also did not produce a two-thirds majority, and acknowledge the General Fono’s decision that consideration of any future act of self-determination by Tokelau will be deferred, and that Tokelau and New Zealand remain firmly committed to the ongoing development of Tokelau for the long-term benefit of the people of Tokelau, with particular emphasis on the further development of facilities on each atoll that meet their current requirements.


By further provisions, the Assembly would acknowledge Tokelau’s need for the international community’s continued support, and recall with satisfaction the establishment and operation of the Tokelau International Trust Fund to support that Territory’s ongoing needs.   It would also call upon Member States and international and regional agencies to contribute to the Fund so as to assist this emerging country in overcoming the problems of smallness, isolation and lack of resources.  By still other provisions of the text, the Assembly would request the Special Committee to continue to examine the question of Tokelau and to report thereon to the General Assembly at its sixty-fifth session.


Also before the Committee is draft resolution VI, on the questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands.


The draft’s general section, part A, would have the Assembly reaffirm the inalienable right of the peoples of the Territories to self-determination.


The Assembly would also reaffirm that, in the process of decolonization, there is no alternative to the principle of self-determination, which is also a fundamental human right.


The Assembly would further affirm that it is ultimately for the peoples of the Territories themselves to determine freely their future political status in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Charter, the Declaration and the relevant resolutions of the General Assembly, and, in that connection, reiterate its long-standing call for the administering Powers to develop political education programmes for the Territories that foster an awareness among the people of their right to self-determination.  It would also request that the administering Powers transmit regularly to the Secretary-General information called for under the Charter’s Article 73 e.


By further provisions, the Assembly would stress the importance of keeping the Special Committee apprised of the views and wishes of the peoples of the Territories.  It would also stress the importance of implementing the plan of action for the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism, particularly by expediting the application of the decolonization work programme of each Territory on a case-by-case basis.  It would also call upon the administering Powers to participate in and cooperate fully with the work of the Special Committee, and urge Member States to contribute to United Nations efforts to usher in a world free of colonialism, within the Second International Decade.


While reiterating its request that the Human Rights Committee collaborate with the Special Committee, within the framework of its mandate on the right to self-determination and with the aim of exchanging information, the Assembly would also request the Special Committee to collaborate with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and its relevant subsidiary intergovernmental bodies.  It would also request that the Special Committee continue to examine the question of the Territories and to report to it at its next session.


Part B of the text takes up the question of the 11 specific Territories.  On American Samoa, the Assembly would welcome the work of the Territorial Government and legislature resulting from recommendations made by the Future Political Status Study Commission of the Territory in preparation for a constitutional convention related to the Territory’s future status.  It would stress the importance of the invitation previously extended to the administering Power to facilitate a visiting mission to the Territory if the Territorial government so desires, and would request the Special Committee’s Chairperson to take all the necessary steps to that end.  The administering Power would also be requested to assist the Territory by facilitating a public awareness programme.


On Anguilla,the Assembly would, among other things, welcome the work of the Constitutional and Electoral Reform Commission and its report of 2006; the holding of a public forum in April 2008 to address constitutional reform issues and the subsequent agreement to seek full internal self-government; and the subsequent efforts of the Territorial Government to advance the internal constitutional review exercise.  It would also request the administering Power to assist the Territory by facilitating its work concerning public consultative outreach efforts, consistent with Article 73 b of the Charter of the United Nations.


Concerning Bermuda, the Assembly would stress the importance of the 2005 report of the Bermuda Independence Commission, which provides a thorough examination of the facts surrounding independence, and would express regret that the plans for public meetings and various presentations outlining policy proposals for an independent Bermuda had so far not materialized.  The administering Power would also be requested to assist the Territory by facilitating its public educational outreach efforts, consistent with the Charter’s Article 73 b.


Regarding the British Virgin Islands, the Assembly would welcome that Territory’s new constitution, which took effect in June 2007, while also noting the continued need expressed by the Territorial Government for minor constitutional amendments in the future.  It would further welcome the Territory’s efforts to focus its economic base more on local ownership and on professional service industries other than financial services.  


On the Cayman Islands, the Assembly would welcome the finalization in February of a new draft constitution, and its subsequent acceptance by referendum in May, and would request the administering Power to assist the Territory by facilitating its work concerning public awareness outreach efforts.  It would also welcome the efforts made by the territorial Government to address cost-of-living issues in various economic sectors.


Regarding the situation in Guam, the Assembly would call once again upon the administering Power to take into consideration the Chamorro people’s expressed will and would encourage the administering Power and the Territorial Government to enter into negotiations on the matter.  It would also request the administering Power to continue to transfer land to the Territory’s original landowners; and to recognize and respect the political rights and the cultural and ethnic identity of Guam’s Chamorro people.  It would also request the administering Power to cooperate in establishing programmes for the sustainable development of the economic activities and enterprises of the Territory, and to assist the Territory by facilitating public outreach efforts.


On Montserrat, the General Assembly would welcome the Territorial Government’s efforts to negotiate improvements to its constitution in order to preserve its ability to move towards greater self-determination at a later stage.The administering Power would be requested to assist the Territory by facilitating public outreach efforts, while the relevant United Nations organizations and regional organizations would be called on to provide assistance to the Territory, particularly in alleviating the consequences of the volcanic eruption.


Taking into account the unique character of Pitcairn in terms of its population and area, the Assembly would welcome all efforts by the administering Power that would devolve operational responsibilities to the Territorial Government.  The administering Power would also be requested to assist in public outreach efforts and to continue its assistance aimed at improving the economic, social, educational and other conditions of the Territory’s population.  It would also be requested to continue its discussions with the representatives of Pitcairn on how best to support their economic security.


Regarding Saint Helena, the Assembly would welcome the Territory’s publication of a new draft constitution for further public consultation, and would call on the administering Power to take into account the previously expressed concerns of Saint Helenians with regard to the right to nationality.  The administering Power and other relevant international organizations would also be requested to support the Territory’s efforts to address its socio-economic development challenges, including unemployment, and limited transport and communications infrastructure.  The administering Power’s decisions to consult on whether an airport is the most appropriate option for access to Saint Helena in the current economic climate was also noted, and the Assembly would call upon the administering Power to take into account the unique geographical character of Saint Helena in the process of consultation.


On Turks and Caicos Islands, the Assembly would, while recalling that the Territory’s Constitution took effect in 2006, request the administering Power to assist the Territory by facilitating its work concerning public outreach efforts, and notes with concern the ongoing situation in the Turks and Caicos Islands and the need to restore good governance and sound financial management in the Territory.  The Assembly would welcome the continuing efforts made by the Government addressing the need for attention to be paid to the enhancement of social cohesion across the Territory


Concerning the United States Virgin Islands, the Assembly would welcome the establishment, in 2007, of the Constitutional Convention and request the administering Power to assist the Territorial Government in achieving its political, economic and social goals, in particular, the successful conclusion of the ongoing internal Constitutional Convention exercise.  It would also reiterate its call for the inclusion of the Territory in regional programmes of the UNDP, consistent with the participation of other Non-Self-Governing Territories.


Draft resolution VII, on dissemination of information on decolonization,would have the Assembly approve the activities of the Departments of Public Information and Political Affairs for disseminating decolonization information,particularly the leaflet entitled “What the UN Can Do to Assist Non-Self-Governing Territories”, which was updated in March 2009.  the Secretary-General to further enhance the information provided on the United Nations decolonization website and continue to include the full series of reports of the regional seminars on decolonization, the statements and scholarly papers presented at those seminars and links to the full series of reports of the Special Committee on the Situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.


By further provisions, the Assembly would ask the Secretary-General to enhance the information provided on the United Nations decolonization website, by including the full series of reports, statements and papers from the regional decolonization seminars, as well as the full series of the Special Committee’s reports.  It would also ask that the Public Information Department continue to update web-based information on the assistance programmes available to the Territories.


Also by that text, the Assembly would request that the Departments of Political Affairs and Public Information continue to publicize the Organization’s decolonization work through all available media, including publications, radio, television, and the Internet.  It would also request all States, including the administering Powers, to accelerate dissemination of decolonization information, and request the Special Committee to continue to examine this question and report on its progress to the General Assembly at its sixty-fifth session.


By the terms of draft resolution VIII, on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, the Assembly would reaffirm, once again, that the existence of colonialism in any form or manifestation, including economic exploitation, is incompatible with the United Nations Charter, the Declaration on decolonization and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.


The Assembly would also affirm its support for the aspirations of peoples under colonial rule to exercise their right to self-determination, including independence.  It would call on administering Powers to cooperate fully with the Special Committee to finalize, before the end of the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism, a constructive programme of work to facilitate the implementation of the Special Committee’s mandate and relevant decolonization resolutions, on a case-by-case basis, including those on specific Territories.


By further terms of the text, the Assembly would recall with satisfaction the professional, open and transparent conduct of both the February 2006 and October 2007 referendums on Tokelau’s status.  The Assembly would request the Special Committee to continue to seek suitable means for the immediate and full implementation of the Declaration and to carry out the actions approved by the Assembly regarding the First and Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism in all Territories that have not yet exercised their right to self-determination, including independence. 


In particular, the Special Committee would be asked to formulate specific proposals to end colonialism; examine the implementation by Member States of resolution 1514 (XV) and other relevant resolutions; and finalize, before the end of the Second International Decade, a constructive programme of work on a case-by-case basis for the Territories to facilitate the implementation of the Special Committee’s mandate.  The Special Committee would also be requested to continue dispatching visiting missions to the Territories; to conduct seminars for the purpose of receiving and disseminating information on its work; to take all necessary steps to enlist worldwide support among Governments, as well as national and international organizations, for achieving the objectives of the Declaration; and to observe the Week of Solidarity with the Peoples of Non-Self-Governing Territories.


By other terms of the draft, the Assembly would call upon all States, in particular the administering Powers, as well as United Nations specialized agencies, to give effect within their respective spheres of competence to the Special Committee’s recommendations for the implementation of the decolonization Declaration and other relevant United Nations resolutions.  It would call upon the administering Powers to ensure that the economic activities in the Territories under their administration do not adversely affect the interests of the peoples, but instead promote development, and to assist them in the exercise of their right to self-determination.


It would urge the administering Powers concerned to take effective measures to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable rights of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to their natural resources, and to establish and maintain control over the future development of those resources.  It would request the relevant administering Power to take all steps necessary to protect the property rights of the peoples of those Territories.   It would also call upon all administering Powers to cooperate fully in the work of the Special Committee and to participate formally in the Committee’s future sessions.


The Assembly would also approve the Special Committee’s report covering its 2009 session, including the programme of work for 2010.


By the terms of the draft resolution on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/C.4/64/L.3), the Assembly would urge the administering Powers to take effective measures to ensure the widespread and continuous dissemination in the Territories under their administration of information relating to offers of study and training facilities made by States, and to provide all the necessary facilities to enable students to avail themselves of such offers.  It would also request the Secretary-General to report to the Assembly at its sixty-fifth session on the implementation of the present resolution.


By the terms of the draft decision on the question of Gibraltar (document A/C.4/64/L.5), the General Assembly would urge both the Governments of Spain and the United Kingdom, while listening to the interests and aspirations of Gibraltar, to reach a definitive solution to the question of Gibraltar, in the light of relevant resolutions of the General Assembly and applicable principles, and in the spirit of the United Nations Charter.


University for Peace


JOHN J. MARESCA, Rector of the University for Peace, introducing the report of the Secretary-General (document A//64/281), said that the University remained closely linked to the United Nations system.  In the past eight years, it had become a significant international institution, providing young leaders of every culture and nationality, convinced that peace, human security, and sustainable, equitable development could be ensured by mutual respect and understanding, and avoiding conflict.  The University was not composed of naïve “dreamers”; nor was it unrealistic.  Rather, it was convinced that conflict and human suffering were wasteful and destructive.


He said that the University, in pursuit of its mission, was expanding rapidly, with programmes now available in Africa, Asia, North America and Europe, in addition to the original Costa Rica campus, and partnerships were being sought with like-minded institutions.  All courses were being converted to correspondence versions, and the availability of online courses was planned for the near future.  Education was the best means for avoiding conflict, and it was also “much cheaper” and more effective than programmatic peacebuilding, conflict resolution, and post-conflict reconstruction.  Recalling the words of former Secretary-General Kofi Annan, education was “very simply peacebuilding by another name.”


However, he said, the University had received no financial support from most Member States.  That lack of support was “striking” and difficult to explain to outsiders and prospective donors.  He acknowledged countries that had given regular financial support, namely Canada, Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland.  Occasional support had also been given by others, including Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy and the United States.  Although the University was “profoundly grateful” for the support given, it was however “never enough”, and the institution was still in “desperate” need of assistance.


He said that enrolment continued to grow at a rate of about 20 per cent per year, which translated into a need for new classrooms, a bigger library, an auditorium, dormitories, a day-care centre, and other items.  Those were not frivolous or “luxury” items, but were directly related to the ability to produce young graduates who were committed to peace and destined for leading roles in society. As the United Nations and its member States was committed to peace, they should also be committed to providing minimal support to the institution created to educate young people for peace.


A visit some months ago by the then-President of the Security Council and then-Chair of the Peacebuilding Commission had convinced them of the value of the University’s activities, he said, urging Member Sates to visit as well.  They too would be impressed with the University’s activities.  As next year would mark its thirtieth anniversary, he said it was a suitable time for the United Nations to renew -– or begin -– support of its efforts.  The world had shown a new interest in peace and sustainable and ethical development, and it was therefore a good time to show the Organization’s interest in education for future leaders, which reflected those values.  Support was needed, therefore, in the interest of younger generations and for the future of the world.


Following the introduction of the report, the representative of Costa Rica introduced the draft resolution on the University for Peace (document A/C.4/ 64/L.6), emphasizing that, as an international institution, the University offered a framework for comprehension, understanding and peaceful existence between all human beings, pursuant to the United Nations Charter.  It contributed to the task of informing people about peace through education and post-graduate studies, as well as through the discussion of knowledge for the comprehensive development of human beings and societies.


He said that the University also strengthened direct education, as well as remote or tele-education.  It was also expanding its presence through cooperation in all parts of the world.  Since 2002, the University had awarded 696 diplomas to students from 91 countries.  It required the support of the international community, and the draft resolution would request a strengthening of its University’s programmes and budget.


The Committee then approved the draft resolution, as orally amended by the representative of Costa Rica.


YAWO KPAMATCHOU (Togo) said his country had a firm desire to ensure the success of the University’s mission, and congratulated those who had worked tireless on a daily basis to “infuse life” into the institution since its creation in 1980.  It was better to prevent than to cure, and it thus behoved the member Sates to “sow the seeds” for future generations of peace and justice, rather than douse the flames of conflict after they erupted.


He said that the University for Peace in Costa Rica had, in the last 30 years, obtained very positive results, especially in the past three years.  He pointed to the growth of its programmes and its expansion throughout the world, aimed at setting up tele-educational programmes.  Those “noble objectives” rightly merited the Organization’s unstinting support.  Through practical and varied programs, the University was on the path to becoming one of the important United Nations structures in the promotion of peace and peacebuilding worldwide, especially in regions where peace was threatened.  Given its historic tradition in the field of peace, Togo would spare no effort to back any draft resolution that strengthened the institution’s capacity and ensured its sustainability.


Decolonization


The Committee then took up all decolonization draft texts, except for the resolution on the question of Western Sahara, which was expected to be considered on Tuesday or Wednesday.


Draft resolution I, on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/63/23), was approved by a recorded vote of 140 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions (France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States).  (For details of the vote, see Annex I).


Following the vote, the representatives of Kuwait, Norway, C ôte d’Ivoire, and Timor-Leste said they had all intended to vote in favour of the draft resolution, but did not think that had been registered. 


Explaining his position after the vote, the representative of the United Kingdom said that, as in previous years, his delegation had abstained.  The Government did not take issue with the resolution’s main objective, and continued to meet its obligations in that regard.  His Government believed, however, that a decision as to whether a Non-Self-Governing Territory had reached a level of self-government was ultimately for the government of the Territory and the administering Power concerned, and not the General Assembly.


The representative of Nigeria requested an updated tally since several delegations had not officially voted.


Taking up draft resolution II, on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/64/23), the Committee approved the text by a recorded vote of 146 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom) (Annex II).


Speaking after the vote, the representative of Argentina said the applicability of the resolution in a given Territory depended on whether the right to self-determination was applicable to that Territory.  Thus, it was relevant to bear in mind that certain General Assembly resolutions noted that, in cases where there was a sovereignty dispute, such as in the Malvinas Islands, South Sandwich Islands and surrounding maritime areas, a negotiated solution was the only path to resolving the dispute, and not self-determination.  The resolution, therefore, was not applicable to the Malvinas Islands and the surrounding archipelagic areas.  The situation prevailing in this archipelago, belonging to the national territory of a country, resulted in the unilateral exploitation by the United Kingdom of the natural resources of the Malvinas Islands and surrounding marine areas.  That ran counter to the Assembly’s decisions in that field, and was a brazen violation.


The representative of the United Kingdom said that the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands was well-known, as the United Kingdom had expressed in the right of reply in the general debate on decolonization.  There was no doubt about that Territory’s sovereignty and there could be no negotiation about those issues unless and until such time as the islanders so wished.


The Committee then approved draft resolution III on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/64/23) by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions (Annex III).


Speaking in explanation of vote on behalf of the European Union, Sweden’s representative reaffirmed support for the specialized agencies of the United Nations in their efforts, particularly those in the technical and educational fields.  The Union favoured careful compliance with those agencies’ statutes.  It had therefore abstained from the vote.


The representative of Argentina stressed that the resolution should be in line with the previous resolutions and decisions of the General Assembly and the Special Committee on Decolonization.


Acting without a vote, the Committee then approved the draft resolution on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/C.4/63/L.3).


The Chairperson then said that there were technical problems in the draft decision on the question of Gibraltar (document A/C.4/63/L.5), requiring corrections to the text.  Thus, the Committee would consider that draft, as well as the draft concerning Western Sahara, on Wednesday.


Also without a vote, the Committee then approved draft resolution IV, on the question of New Caledonia (document A/64/23).


Next, the Committee approved draft resolution V, on the question of Tokelau (document A/64/23), without a vote.


Following that, the Committee took up draft resolution VI, on the questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands (document A/64/23 Corr.2, p. 68), also approving it without a vote.


Speaking in explanation after the vote, the representative of the United Kingdom said that his delegation had joined consensus on the last resolution, which reflected its full support for the right to self-determination.  However, his delegation regretted the outdated approach of the “Committee of 24”, which failed to take full account of the way that the relationship between the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories had been modernized in a way acceptable to both parties.  The resolution did not fully reflect that modern relationship, he said, and the United Kingdom did not accept the assertion that self-determination did not apply where there existed a sovereignty dispute.


The representative of Argentina expressed full support for the right of people who were still subjected to colonization, and for the right to self-determination of the 11 Territories in the resolution just adopted.  At the same time, as had been expressed in a letter to the Secretary-General distributed on 7 July (document A/64/90), the annual resolution adopted by the General Assembly on the questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands and the considerations contained therein were strictly related to the Territories referred to in those questions. The question of the Malvinas Islands was subjected to separate treatment in specific resolutions that gave due consideration to the special and particular features inherent in it, which were derived from the existence of a sovereignty dispute between the Argentine Republic and the United Kingdom.


The Committee next approved draft resolution VII on dissemination of information on decolonization (document A/64/23) by a recorded vote of 150 in favour to 3 against (France, United Kingdom, United States) with 1 abstention (France) (Annex IV).


Following the vote, the representative of El Salvador said his delegation had wanted to vote in favour of the resolution.


Speaking in explanation of vote, the United Kingdom’s representative said his delegation had voted against the text because it remained of the view that the obligation it placed on the Secretariat to disseminate information represented an unwarranted drain on the Organization’s resources.  As such, the resolution was unacceptable to the United Kingdom.


The representative of Argentina said his delegation wished to express support for the right of self-determination.  Despite that, the text should be interpreted and implemented in keeping with pertinent General Assembly resolutions and the various resolutions and statements of the Special Committee on Decolonization, which recognized the existence of a sovereignty dispute between his country and the United Kingdom over the Malvinas Islands.


Next, the Committee approved draft resolution VIII on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/64/23) by a vote of 152 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 2 abstentions (Belgium, France) (Annex V).


Speaking in explanation of vote after the vote, the representative of Argentina stressed that, regarding operative paragraph 7, visiting missions proceeded only in cases where self-determination was applicable, specifically those for which there was no sovereignty dispute.


The representative of the United Kingdom said his delegation had voted “no” because it continued to find some parts of the text unacceptable.  Nevertheless, the Government of the United Kingdom remained committed to modernizing its relationship with its Overseas Territories, while taking fully into account the views of the peoples of the Territories.


Following that, the representative of Guinea said that his delegation had intended to vote in favour of draft resolutions I, II and III, and requested that that be duly noted in the record.


Singapore’s representative said that his delegation had wished to vote in favour of the resolutions pertaining to item 35, on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the United Nations Charter, and on item 36, on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories.


The representatives of Pakistan and Chile said that their delegations had wanted to vote in favour of resolutions concerning item 35, and item 37, on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations.


The representatives of Sierra Leone and Burkina Faso said they had wished to vote in favour of the resolutions concerning item 35.


ANNEX I


Territories


The draft resolution on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/64/23 CPT XII P.54) was adopted by a recorded vote of 140 in favour to none against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Belize, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Namibia, Nauru, Norway, Pakistan, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia.


ANNEX II


Vote on Economic Effects on Non-Self-Governing Territories


The draft resolution on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/64/23 CPT XII P.55) was adopted by a recorded vote of 146 in favour to 2 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United States.


Abstain:  France, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Belize, Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Djibouti, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Namibia, Nauru, Pakistan, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia.


ANNEX III


Vote on Implementation of Decolonization Declaration


The draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations               (document A/64/23 CPT XII P.58) was adopted by a recorded vote of 98 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Djibouti, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Micronesia (Federated States of), Namibia, Nauru, Pakistan, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Dissemination of Decolonization Information


The draft resolution on dissemination of information on decolonization (document A/64/23 CPT XII P.83) was adopted by a recorded vote of 150 in favour to 3 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  France.


Absent:  Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Djibouti, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia.


ANNEX V


Vote on Implementation of Decolonization Declaration


The draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/64/23 CPT XII P.85) was adopted by a recorded vote of 152 in favour to 3 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Belgium, France.


Absent:  Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Djibouti, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Tajikistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia.


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For information media • not an official record