21 December 2009
General Assembly
GA/10907

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixth-fourth General Assembly

Plenary

66th Meeting (PM)


General Assembly Adopts Landmark Resolutions in Bid to Promote Recovery


from Global Economic Crisis, Tackle Challenges to Long-Term Growth


Taking 38 Development-related Actions, Members Pass First-ever Texts

On Food Security, Legal Rights for Poor, Humankind’s Relationship with Earth


In a bid to boost recovery from the global financial and economic crisis and tackle entrenched policy challenges to long-term growth, trade and sustainable development, the General Assembly today laid the groundwork for in-depth consideration of those issues by unanimously adopting –- out of 38 development-related actions put forward by its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) –- several comprehensive resolutions, as well as landmark texts on food security, legal rights for the poor, and principles governing humankind’s relationship with the earth.


After two months of intense debate in the Committee over the root causes of and appropriate solutions to the current global financial and trade woes, the Assembly adopted –- by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 47 against, with 8 abstentions (Marshall Islands, Mexico, Norway, Palau, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia, Turkey) -- a resolution that noted its deep concern over the particular impact of the crisis on developing-world trade, as well as the importance of expediting and concluding the Doha Development Round by the end of 2010 and advancing World Trade Organization negotiations on non-agricultural market access.  Also by that text, the Assembly called for facilitating World Trade Organization membership for all interested countries, particularly least developed ones, and implementing “aid for trade” funding commitments.  (See Annex II for details of the voting.)


By the terms of a related text -- adopted by a recorded vote of124 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Uganda, United States), with 51 abstentions--the Assembly urged the international community to adopt urgent, effective steps to eliminate the use of unilateral measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries, calling on the international community to condemn and reject their application.  (Annex III)


Aiming to keep debt relief and development funding centre stage, the Assembly adopted a text calling for continued concessionary and grant-based financing to help low-income countries respond to the economic and financial crisis and pay for gaps in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, as well as for measures to ensure their long-term debt sustainability through restructuring or outright external debt cancellation.


Another text on that theme, adopted without a vote, stressed the need to make global financial institutions and regulatory bodies more transparent, better supervised and skilled at debt management.  A third text referring to the Doha Declaration on Financing for Development –- the outcome of the 2008 International Conference to Review Implementation of the Monterrey Consensus -- stressed the essential role of official development assistance (ODA) in complementing, leveraging and sustaining financing for development in developing nations.


In a related text, the Assembly decided to hold its fourth High-level Dialogue on Financing for Development on 16 and 17 March 2010 to review the status of and tasks involved in implementing the Doha Declaration and the Monterrey Consensus.  The Dialogue would provide input for the Assembly’s high-level meeting on the subject in September 2010.


By other terms of the text, the Assembly decided that the Dialogue would comprise plenary and informal meetings and three round tables on reforming the international monetary system and its implications for development, the impact of the current crisis on foreign direct investment and other private flows, as well as on external debt and international trade, the role of financial and technical development cooperation in leveraging resources for development, and the link between financing for development and achieving the Millennium Development Goals.


Climate change, particularly the recent United Nations Conference in Copenhagen, was an underlying theme during the just-concluded session.  The Assembly adopted 13 resolutions in the Committee’s report on sustainable development, several of which set in motion the course of action to support related observances and events.


According to one text, the Assembly decided to convene a high-level event on 20 September 2010 to support the International Year of Biodiversity and the goal of significantly reducing biodiversity loss.  In another resolution, it encouraged financial and technical support for the United Nations Decade for Deserts and the Fight against Desertification (2010-2020).  One text invited the Assembly President to convene a high-level interactive dialogue on 22 March 2010 -– World Water Day -– on implementing the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015, and welcomed the offer by the Government of Tajikistan to host a high-level global conference next June to comprehensively review the Decade’s implementation.


By a text titled “Harmony with Mother Earth” –- the first of its kind to be tabled in the Second Committee –- the Assembly invited Member States, relevant United Nations and other organizations to present their views to the Secretary-General on a possible declaration of ethical principles and values for living in harmony with Mother Earth.  It requested that he submit a report on that subject during the Assembly’s sixty-fifth session.


Another text, relating to the oil slick on Lebanese shores, requested that Israel expediently and adequately compensate Lebanon for the costs of repairing the environmental damage caused by the Israeli Air Force’s destruction of oil storage tanks near Lebanon’s El-Jiyeh electric power plant.  It asked Israel to do the same for Syria, whose shores had been partially polluted.  The Assembly also reaffirmed its decision to set up an Eastern Mediterranean Oil Spill Restoration Trust Fund to support clean-up and safe disposal of oily waste in the affected States.  The Assembly adopted that text by a recorded vote of164 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Bangladesh, Cameroon, Colombia, Fiji, Liberia, Panama, Tonga).  (See Annex IV.)


Also by a recorded vote -- of 165 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Fiji, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Tuvalu) -- the Assembly adopted a text reaffirming the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people and the population of the Syrian Golan over their natural resources in occupied lands, demanding that Israel stop exploiting, damaging, depleting or endangering those resources.  It also called on Israel to stop all actions that harmed the environment and destroyed vital infrastructure, and to comply strictly with its obligations under international law.  (Annex I)


Agriculture and technology gained increased attention within the development realm, according to some of the resolutions adopted this session.  For example, the Assembly adopted -- by a recorded vote of 146 in favour to 1 against (Somalia), with 32 abstentions -– a text that urged relevant United Nations bodies to use agricultural technology, research and development to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, and called for more efforts by everyone to make agricultural technologies available and affordable to smallholder farmers.  (Annex V)


By a related text on agriculture development and food security –- the first of its kind tabled in the Second Committee-- the Assembly stressed the need for direct action to immediately tackle hunger for the most vulnerable, and for medium- and long-term sustainable agricultural, food security, nutrition, and rural development programmes to eliminate the root causes of hunger and poverty, as well as new financial resources to fund them.  It further stressed that the core element of efforts to achieve food security for all was strengthening and revitalizing developing-world agricultural sectors.


In a text on commodities, the Assembly expressed concern over the large-scale land acquisitions by, among others, transnational corporations in developing countries that incurred risk to development efforts.  It also stressed the importance of responsible investment in agriculture and coherent international policy action to address excessive price volatility and mitigate its negative impact on commodity-dependent developing countries.


Under the poverty-eradication umbrella were four resolutions, among them a text on legal empowerment of the poor and the eradication of poverty -- the first of its kind tabled in the Second Committee, which developing countries had presented as a concept that should be broadly applied to ensure protection for all vulnerable groups.  By its terms, the Assembly called upon the international community to empower poor people through adequate, predictable financial resources or technical assistance, and for action to improve and expand education and training –- critical tools for empowerment, as well as administration of justice, identity and birth registration systems, awareness-raising regarding existing legal rights, and entrepreneurship.


By a second resolution, on the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017), the Assembly called upon donor countries to give adequate, predictable financing for developing countries trying to combat or erase that social ill, and reaffirmed the need for all nations to fulfil all their ODA-related commitments.  It also called on Member States to take ambitious steps to create a more inclusive, equitable, balanced, stable and development-oriented sustainable socio-economic model to overcome poverty and inequality.


A third text, on women in development, called on stakeholders to expedite steps to increase the number of women in decision-making and to build their capacity as agents of change and policymakers for development and poverty eradication.  A fourth text, on human resources development, called upon the international community to give financial and technical resources to help developing countries build human resources to tackle socio-economic and health-care challenges.


The Assembly also stressed the importance it attached to development in the context of globalization and interdependence, adopting three texts on that topic.  One draft -– adopted by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions -- requested the Secretary-General, in his next report on that subject, to give an overview of major global economic and policy challenges for equitable and inclusive sustained economic growth and sustainable development, as well as the Organization’s role in addressing them, in light of relevant principles set forth in the Declaration on the Establishment of a New International Economic Order and the programme of action for setting it up.  (Annex VI)


Another text recognized that globalization’s benefits and costs had been unevenly distributed and that policies linking socio-economic development could help reduce inequities, while a third called on the international community to take timely, targeted steps to address the development needs of middle-income countries.


Emerging aspects of science and technology issues were also reflected during the session.  For example, by a draft on the creation of a global culture of cybersecurity, the Assembly invited Member States to use the voluntary self-assessment tools, as listed in the draft’s annex, to protect critical information infrastructures and strengthen cybersecurity to aid national efforts and highlight areas for further action.


By another text, the Assembly requested the Commission on Science and Technology for Development to provide a forum within which to continue to assist the Economic and Social Council in the system-wide follow-up to the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information society, and, furthermore, address the special needs of developing countries in areas such as agriculture, rural development, information and communication technologies and environmental management.


Two other texts adopted by consensus focused on information and communications technology issues.  In one, on building connectivity through the Trans-Eurasian Information Superhighway, the Assembly stressed the importance of stronger and continued cooperation among all stakeholders to build and run information infrastructures so as to bridge the region’s digital divide and build connectivity.  Another requested the Secretary-General to submit during the Assembly’s next session a specific report reviewing progress in the last five years on implementing the outcome of the World Summit on the Information Society.  It also requested that the Commission on Science and Technology for Development organize, during its thirteenth session, a substantive debate in that regard.


A number of resolutions sought to bolster South-South cooperation and the economies of countries in special situations, such as least developed countries and landlocked and transit developing countries.  By those texts, the Assembly endorsed the Nairobi Outcome Document of the High-level United Nations Conference on South-South Cooperation, held from 1 to 3 December.  It also decided to hold the sixteenth session of the High-level Committee on South-South Cooperation in February and the Fourth United Nations Conference on Least Developed Countries in Turkey during the first part of 2011.


In addition, a text titled “Towards global partnerships” aimed to promote multi-stakeholder approaches to addressing development challenges in the context of globalization.  Other texts concerned the reports of the Executive Boards of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP); operational activities for development; and amendments to the Charter of the United Nations University.


Under the sustainable development umbrella, the Assembly also adopted texts on the follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the sustainable development of Small island Developing States, as well as implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa; and the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat).


Other sustainable development texts concerned the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, sustainable mountain development, the Report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-fifth session, and promotion of new and renewable sources of energy.


Among other actions today, the Assembly decided to adopt the Second Committee’s programme of work for its sixty-fifth session and an oral decision on the geographical rotation of its Rapporteur for future sessions.


Denise McQuade ( Ireland), Rapporteur of the Second Committee, introduced that body’s reports.


In other action, the Assembly adopted a text by which it decided to convene, from 20 to 22 September in New York, a high-level plenary meeting on expediting progress to achieve all the Millennium Development Goals by 2015, taking into account progress made through a review of successes, best practices, lessons learned, obstacles and opportunities, leading to concrete strategies for action.  It also requested that the Secretary-General submit a comprehensive report on the matter in March 2010 that would, together with the annual Millennium Development Goals Report and the report of the MDG Gap Task Force, serve as inputs for consultations ahead of the high-level meeting.


Further by that text, the Assembly decided to hold the general debate of its sixty-fifth session from 23 September, on the understanding that those arrangements would not create a precedent for the general debate at future sessions.  It requested that the Assembly President organize and preside over two days of informal interactive hearings, no later than June 2010, with non-governmental organizations, civil society and the private sector, and prepare a summary to be issued prior to the high-level plenary meeting.


In addition, the Assembly decided to extend the work of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) until Tuesday, 22 December, and to postpone the recess of its current session until Wednesday, 23 December.


Background


The General Assembly met this afternoon to consider the reports of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) that are the outcome of meetings held between 5 October and 11 December.


Under consideration during that period were the Committee’s agenda items concerning the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (agenda item 40); information and communication technologies for development (item 50); macroeconomic policy questions (item 51); and follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development and the 2008 Review Conference (item 52).


Other topics considered during the session were sustainable development (item 53); implementation of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) (item 54); globalization and interdependence (item 55); groups of countries in special situations (item 56); eradication of poverty and other development issues (item 57); operational activities for development (item 58); towards global partnerships (item 59); agriculture development and food security (item 60); revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (item 118); programme planning (item 133); and the United Nations University (item 170).


The Assembly was also expected to take action on a plenary-generated resolution titled “Organization of the High-level Plenary Meeting of the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly” (document A/64/L.36).


Statement by General Assembly President on Plenary Draft Resolution


ALI ABDULSALAM TREKI ( Libya), President of the General Assembly, opened the meeting by stating that the High-level Plenary Meeting of the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly, called for in the plenary draft resolution, would take place in an environment of utmost uncertainty.  Still, it would be a unique opportunity to allow the Assembly to take decisive step towards honouring pledges to achieve the Millennium Development Goals by 2015.


Thanking the co-facilitators from Senegal and Denmark for their work in drafting the text, he noted that it called on the Secretary-General to provide a comprehensive report in March 2010.  Negotiations among all Member States should start in a transparent manner so as to reach an outcome document agreed by all States before the Summit.  He said he hoped to start work with all Member States, civil society and intergovernmental bodies in June, adding that, as Assembly President, he intended to cooperate with all States on the basis of transparency, cooperation and mutual respect.


Action on Plenary Text


The Assembly then took up the draft resolution on the High-level Plenary Meeting of the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly (document A/64/L.36*).


Speaking before action, the representative of Sweden welcomed the text on behalf of the European Union, saying that by its terms the Assembly jointly agreed that the High-level Meeting must accelerate progress towards achieving the Millennium Goals by 2015.  The text set out a meeting format that included plenary debate and round-table discussions.  The latter would allow for a frank, concrete and action-oriented discussion among all partners.


He stressed that deep engagement would be required from a multitude of actors -– ranging from Governments to international financial institutions, international organizations, non-governmental organizations and the private sector –- to achieve the Goals.  The European Union would welcome an appropriate and balanced schedule of round tables focused on the Goals and broader issues.  Moreover, it was important to know which policies worked and how they could best be implemented.  There was a need for as much evidenced-based and analytical information as possible in order to produce a meaningful outcome document.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted the draft resolution.


The representative of Canada, speaking on his own behalf, as well as that of Australia and New Zealand as CANZ, commended the constructive atmosphere that had prevailed during negotiations on the text.  CANZ had favoured a short, action-oriented meeting and was pleased that it would focus on accelerating progress towards attaining the Goals.  It was time to identify the bottlenecks preventing that.


He noted that, in preparation for the Meeting, the Secretary-General had been asked to provide a comprehensive review of lessons learned, as well as remaining challenges and gaps, among other things.  It was expected that other actors would want to submit their own reports, while States would also review progress.  Furthermore, regional meetings would be held.  All those perspectives would generate considerable information, and progress towards the outcome document should begin with a broad sharing of inputs.  They should be made available to stakeholders and be factored into the discussions, thereby greatly enhancing the dialogue among the high-level participants.


The representative of the Sudan, speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, welcomed the resolution’s adoption, which would provide a strong foundation for the plenary meeting’s preparatory process.  It had been nine years since Member States had decided to form a global partnership geared towards reaching the Goals, yet they remained far from reaching that aim.  As more and more time was spent on cross-cutting discussion, many in the developing world were dying.  How much longer would they wait for a world free of poverty?


He said the Group of 77 hoped the Meeting would attract widespread high-level participation.  Importantly, the Group looked forward to the Secretary-General’s report, which would hopefully be comprehensive.  Among other reports, it would provide the background necessary for the Meeting’s success.  The Group of 77 envisaged an action-oriented outcome.


The representative of Japan said the Meeting should be an opportunity to galvanize the political will to achieve the Millennium Goals by 2010.  The high-level plenary would offer the last chance to address on-the-ground implementation.  There was a need to identify effective approaches for the delivery of the support and the means of achieving the Goals.  Japan would spare no effort in making the Meeting, as well as achievement of the Goals, a resounding success.


The representative of Switzerland said that, now that modalities for the Meeting had been agreed, Member States must join together in making the Summit a success.  It would offer an important opportunity to demonstrate that the United Nations was capable of taking on complex issues.  It was of paramount importance to reaffirm that the Organization remained a forum for such important debates.


He said negotiations must be based on the input of multiple stakeholders, as well as evidence and contributions from a variety of sources.  Deliberations on the outcome should not start too early, thus, giving States the time to take all inputs into consideration.  Indeed, June seemed a reasonable time for the membership to start negotiations.  The round tables would provide a platform for discussing ways to accelerate progress.  High-level engagement would be critical in giving political impetus to the assessment of development challenges.


Action on Second Committee Reports


DENISE MCQUADE ( Ireland), Rapporteur of the Second Committee, introduced that body’s reports.


Taking up the first report, on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/64/416), the Assembly adopted the related draft resolution by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Fiji, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Tuvalu).  (See Annex I for voting details.)


The Assembly then turned to the report on information and communication technologies for development (document A/64/417), adopting, by consensus, a draft resolution on building connectivity through the Trans-Eurasian Information Superhighway and another titled information and communication technologies for development.


Turning next to the report on macroeconomic policy questions (document A/64/418), the Assembly decided to take note of it and consider its addenda.  It took up addendum 1 (document A/64/418/Add.1), adopting a draft resolution on international trade and development by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 47 against, with 8 abstentions (Marshall Islands, Mexico, Norway, Palau, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia, Turkey).  (See Annex II.)


Later in the session, the representative of Sierra Leone said his delegation would have voted in favour of that text had it been present during the voting.


The Committee then adopted a draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries (document A/64/418/Add.1) by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Uganda, United States), with 51 abstentions.  (See Annex III.)


Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted three texts, the first on the international financial system and development (document A/64/418/Add.2), the second on external debt sustainability and development (document A/64/418/Add.3), and the third on commodities (document A/64/418/Add.4).


Taking up the report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the 2002 International Conference on Financing for Development and the 2008 Review Conference (document A/64/419 (Part II)), the Assembly adopted the related draft resolution without a vote.


The representative of Mexico then introduced a text on modalities for the fourth High-level Dialogue on Financing for Development (document A/64/L.41), saying it was in line with the recent Economic and Social Council recommendations on strengthening a more inclusive, effective intergovernmental process to follow up financing for development.  He stressed the usefulness of the Dialogue in creating input for the high-level event in 2010, noting that the financing for development process could promote inputs of the greatest relevance for that discussion, as had been the case with the 2005 World Summit.


A Secretariat representative read out an oral statement on the draft’s programme budget implications before the Assembly adopted it by consensus.


The Assembly then took up the report on sustainable development (document A/64/420), taking note of it and its addenda.  After a recorded vote was requested for the draft on the oil slick on Lebanese shores, the Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Bangladesh, Cameroon, Colombia, Fiji, Liberia, Panama, Tonga).  (See Annex IV.)


Acting again by consensus, the Assembly adopted a draft on harmony with nature (document A/64/420).


Speaking after that action, the representative of Bolivia said his country’s President would call for a world convention on climate change and harmony with nature next year.  He would also push for the adoption of a referendum on that subject.


Taking up addendum 1 of that report (document A/64/420/Add.1), the Assembly PRESIDENT informed delegates that action on a draft relating to Implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21, and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development would be postponed until a later date to allow time for the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) to review its programme budget implications.


The Assembly then adopted a draft resolution on agricultural technology for development by a recorded vote of 146 in favour to 1 against ( Somalia), with 32 abstentions.  (See Annex V.)


Following that action, several representatives said their votes had not been recorded properly.  The representative of Egypt said his vote should have been recorded as an abstention, while the representative of Jordan said his vote should have been recorded as a vote against the draft.


The representative of Israel thanked those who had voted in favour, saying the wide spectrum of co-sponsors and supporters of the draft demonstrated the importance and wide appeal of the issue at hand.  The text reaffirmed the belief that developing and disseminating agricultural technologies for development was important, possible and necessary.  However, conviction was not enough, and practical ways were needed to implement the draft.  States must work individually and collectively with partners and stakeholders to share and receive life-altering agricultural technology.


Also pointing to technical malfunctions during the voting, the representatives of Bolivia and Algeria said their votes should have been recorded as abstentions.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a text on the mid-term comprehensive review of the implementation of the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015.


Taking up addendum 2 of that report (document A/64/420/Add.2), it adopted, also without a vote, the text on the follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.


Speaking after that action, the representative of Venezuela said she wished to ratify her country’s support for small island developing States.  In the region that commitment had been implemented mainly through PETROCARIBE, a petroleum-support initiative that allowed energy consolidation.  Among other things, the scheme aimed to make the most of available resources in the region so as to guarantee energy security and fair trade.  More than an agreement to supply energy, it also sought to provide social protections in the areas of tourism, education, health, agriculture and infrastructure support.  However, Venezuela did not ratify the same position with respect to the Mauritius Strategy since paragraphs 26 and 27 of its Programme of Action referred to the Law of the Sea, to which the country was not a party.  The standards of the Law of the Sea Convention were not applicable, except those that Venezuela would expressly recognize in the future.


Taking up the draft on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (document A/64/420/Add.3), the Assembly adopted it without a vote.


It then took up addendum 5 of that report (document A/64/420/Add.5).  The Assembly adopted, without a vote, texts on the United Nations Decade for Deserts and the Fight against Desertification (2010-2020) and on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa.


Acting again by consensus, it then adopted a text on the Convention on Biological Diversity (document A/64/420/Add.6).


The Assembly took note of the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), adopting, again by consensus, a text on the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-fifth session (document A/64/420/Add.7).


Itthenwent on to adopt a text on sustainable mountain development (document A/64/420/Add.8) and promotion of new and renewable sources of energy (document A/64/420/Add.9).


The Assembly adopted, without a vote, a text on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) (document A/64/421), contained in the eponymous report.


It then took up the report on globalization and interdependence (document A/64/422), adopting, by consensus, a text on development cooperation with middle-income countries (document A/64/422/Add.1).


By a recorded vote of 124 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions, the Assembly then adopted a draft titled “Towards a new international economic order”.  (See Annex VI.)


The representatives of Senegal and Colombia said their votes should have been recorded as being in favour of the text.


Acting by consensus, the Assembly then adopted a text on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence (document A/64/422).


Turning to addendum 2 of that report (document A/64/422/Add.2), the Assembly PRESIDENT informed delegates that action on the text on preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of assets of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries or origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption would be postponed until a later date so as to allow time for the Fifth Committee to review its programme budget implications.


Taking up addendum 3 of the report (document A/64/422/Add.3), the Assembly adopted, without a vote, texts on creation of a global culture of cybersecurity and taking stock of national efforts to protect critical information infrastructure and on science and technology.


The Assembly then took up the report on groups of countries in special situations (document A/64/423), adopting the draft resolution on the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries (document A/64/423/Add.1) by consensus.


Also by consensus, it then adopted the text on groups of countries in special situations:  specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation (document A/64/423/Add.2).


The Assembly then took up the report on eradication of poverty and other development issues (document A/64/424), adopting a text on legal empowerment of the poor and eradication of poverty without a vote.


Speaking after that action, the representative of Bangladesh said his delegation had coordinated the draft resolution and was pleased that it had gained consensus.  He stressed that, even as the resolution had been discussed in the Assembly, a billion people had been going to bed hungry.  Because of the prevailing global situation, 50 million more people had been driven to extreme poverty.  Nevertheless, Member States had spoken in unison that they would fight to free the world of poverty.  That was the responsibility of each country and the United Nations at large.


He underscored that the Prime Minister of Bangladesh believed the right to food was a basic human right.  Despite the fact that the global development agenda, including the Millennium Development Goals, had been halted mid-effort, the country had been devising schemes to reach Vision 2021, irrespective of its limited resources.  That scheme aimed to free Bangladesh from all forms of discrimination and exclusion and it invited all others to join in that effort.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a text on the Second United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2008-2017) (document A/64/424/Add.1).


It then adopted texts on women in development (document A/64/424/Add.2) and human resources development (document A/64/424/Add.3) by consensus.


Taking up the report on operational activities for development (document A/64/425), the Assembly adopted, again without a vote, a draft on the reports of the Executive Boards of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP) -- Appointment of the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund.


The Assembly then took up addendum 1 to that report (document A/64/425/Add.1), adopting a text on operational activities for development of the United Nations system without a vote.


Taking up addendum 2 (document A/64/425/Add.2), it adopted, also without a vote, a text on South-South Cooperation.  It also adopted a text on the Nairobi Outcome Document of the High-level United Nations Conference on South-South Cooperation (document A/64/L.37), as orally revised.


Following that action, the representative of Japan voiced support for countries of the South through triangular cooperation, stressing the importance of moving forward with concrete action on South-South, as well as triangular, cooperation.  Japan was willing to further support South-South and triangular cooperation while respecting ownership by the host country.


The Assembly then took up the report titled “Towards global partnerships” (document A/64/426), adopting an eponymous text by consensus.


Taking up its report on agriculture development and food security (document A/64/427), the Assembly adopted an eponymous text in another consensus action.


The Assembly then took up the report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/64/428), adopting a decision on the Committee’s programme of work for the sixty-fifth session and another on the rotation of the post of Rapporteur of the Second Committee.


It then adopted by consensus the Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/64/429).


Schedule of Assembly Session


The Assembly adopted a decision to extend the work of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) until Tuesday, 22 December, and a decision to postpone the recess of its current session until Wednesday, 23 December.


Action on Second Committee Reports


Taking up the report on the United Nations University (document A/64/430), the Assembly adopted it by consensus.


The representative of Japan said that, as host country of the United Nations University, it welcomed the draft’s adoption, which allowed the University to expand its activities by granting graduate degrees.


(annexes follow)


ANNEX I


Vote on Permanent Sovereignty over Natural Resources


The draft resolution on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/64/416) was adopted by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 8 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Fiji, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Tuvalu.


Absent:  Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Honduras, Kiribati, Liberia, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Vanuatu.


ANNEX II


Vote on International Trade and Development


The draft resolution on international trade and development (document A/64/418/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 47 against, with 8 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Marshall Islands, Mexico, Norway, Palau, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia, Turkey.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Honduras, Kiribati, Liberia, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX III


Vote on Unilateral Measures


The draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries (document A/64/418/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 3 against, with 51 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Uganda, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Azerbaijan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Honduras, Kiribati, Liberia, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Timor-Leste, Vanuatu.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Oil Slick on Lebanese Shores


The draft resolution on the oil slick on Lebanese shores (document A/64/420) was adopted by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 8 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Bangladesh, Cameroon, Colombia, Fiji, Liberia, Panama, Tonga.


Absent:  Azerbaijan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Honduras, Kiribati, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX V


Vote on Agricultural Technology


The draft resolution on agricultural technology for development (document A/64/420/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 146 in favour to 1 against, with 32 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Somalia.


Abstain:  Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Namibia, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Yemen.


Absent:  Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Honduras, Iran, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Turkmenistan, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu.


ANNEX VI


Vote on New International Economic Order


The draft resolution titled “Towards a new international economic order” (document A/64/422/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Albania, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Honduras, Kenya, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


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For information media • not an official record