18 December 2009
General Assembly
GA/10905

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-fourth General Assembly

Plenary

65th Meeting (AM)


General Assembly Adopts 56 Resolutions, 9 Decisions Recommended by Third Committee


on Broad Range of Human Rights, Social, Cultural Issues


Texts Address, Among Others, Child Rights, Right to Food, Year of Youth;

Also Adopts Resolution on UN Cooperation with Shanghai Cooperation Organization


The General Assembly today adopted 56 resolutions and 9 decisions recommended by its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), acting with new-found consensus on several historically contentious texts, including those on the rights of the child, the right to food and the report of the Human Rights Council.


By the draft on the rights of the child -- which, with notable support from the United States, achieved consensus for the first time in eight years -- the Assembly recognized the right of children to be heard on all matters affecting them.  It also called on States to adopt or continue to implement arrangements for children’s participation in all settings, to ensure the equal participation of girls and to address, in their responses to ongoing multiple and inter-related global crises, any impact on children’s full enjoyment of their rights.


Also unanimous in reaffirming that hunger constituted an “outrage” that required urgent measures for its elimination, the Assembly adopted an updated text on the right to food, which described as “intolerable” the fact that, partly due to the food crisis, an estimated 1.02 billion people were now malnourished despite the planet’s ability to produce enough food to feed the world.  It encouraged States to ensure women’s equal access to resources so they could feed themselves and their families and recognized State support for small farmers, fishing communities and local enterprises as a key element for food security.


By the draft resolution on the report of the Human Rights Council, which enjoyed consensus after two years of recorded votes, the Assembly took note of the report and acknowledged the recommendations it contained.  Speaking after the text’s adoption, Israel’s representative said her delegation joined consensus despite growing concerns over the Council’s working methods, in the spirit of constructive engagement and in the hope the Council would make a shift in its work.


Forty-seven other texts passed by consensus, including all of the drafts related to refugees, social development, advancement of women, children’s rights, crime prevention and criminal justice and international drug control.  Of these, several sought to shore up protections of and extend opportunities for youth, including a resolution aimed at improving the situation of the girl child and one that welcomed the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children as a set of orientations to help inform policy and practice.


In an effort to encourage young people to devote their energy, enthusiasm and creativity to economic, social and cultural development and the promotion of mutual understanding, the Assembly also proclaimed 2010 as the International Year of Youth:  Dialogue and Mutual Understanding, beginning 12 August 2010. It also named 2011 as the International Year for People of African Descent and 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives.  It decided to hold a commemorative meeting to mark the 15th anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action during the March 2010 meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women.


By a text on international cooperation against the world drug problem, the Assembly adopted the Political Declaration and Plan of Action on International Cooperation towards an Integrated and Balanced Strategy to Counter the World Drug Problem, which was adopted at the fifty-second session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs.  Among other things, it recognized that sustainable crop control strategies require international cooperation and should include preventive alternative development programmes.


As in years past, however, unanimity proved unattainable on several texts related to eliminating racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and other intolerance. The Assembly adopted a resolution on global efforts for the total elimination of those phenomena, which also addressed the implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action, by 128 votes in favour to 13 against, with 43 abstentions.  (For further details, see Annex II.)


By that text, it expressed deep concern at inadequate responses to emerging and resurgent forms of racism and other intolerance and urged States to adopt measures to address these scourges with a view to preventing their practice and protecting victims.  It also decided to implement the outcome of April’s Durban Review Conference in the same framework and by the same mechanisms as the outcome of the original 2001 World Conference.


That outcome document was also welcomed in a draft decision on its adoption, which the Assembly passed with 166 votes in favour to 7 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, Palau and the United States), with 9 abstentions (Czech Republic, Georgia, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Tonga, and Vanuatu). (Annex III)


By a text on certain practices that fuel contemporary forms of racism and other intolerance, which was adopted by a vote of 127 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 54 abstentions, the Assembly noted the rise of skinhead groups and the resurgence of violence targeting members of ethnic, religious or cultural communities and national minorities, and called on States to put an end to those practices.  (Annex I)


Consensus also faltered on two texts that addressed the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (99 votes in favour to 20 against, with 63 abstentions, Annex XV) and Iran (74 in favour to 49 against, with 59 abstentions, Annex XVI), although, notably, no delegation called for a “no-action” motion on either text.


Despite adopting those country-specific drafts, the Assembly remained divided on their utility.   Cuba’s delegate echoed the Third Committee’s sharp debate on that issue today when she said they ran counter to the principles of non-selectivity and non-politicization.  She instead highlighted the Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review, which other States had argued was a more equitable and effective mechanism to address the human rights abuses that, they said, occurred in every country and over which no country or bloc had an exclusive right to pass judgment.


This emphasis on equitability was threaded throughout a number of other texts requiring recorded votes, many of which seemed to carry echoes of the widespread discontent felt throughout the international community this year in the wake of the global economic crisis.


By a draft on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights, adopted by a vote of 129 in favour to 54 against, with 3 abstentions (Brazil, Chile and Singapore), the Assembly called on Member States, United Nations agencies, intergovernmental organizations and civil society to promote equitable and environmentally sustainable economic growth for managing globalization, so poverty could be systematically reduced and international development targets achieved (Annex X).


The Assembly also affirmed the need for “equitable access to benefits from the international distribution of wealth”, as well as the shared responsibility of all nations in managing the world’s economic and social development by a draft on the promotion of a democratic and equitable international order, that it adopted with 127 votes in favour to 54 against, with 5 abstentions (Argentina, Armenia, Chile, Mexico and Peru) (Annex IX).


A text on combating defamation of religions received the most “no” votes of any text considered today, with 80 delegations voting in favour to 61 against, with 42 abstentions (Annex VIII).  Debate on the text in the Committee had largely centred on tensions between the freedom of religion and belief and freedom of expression, and how to balance them.


Speaking before today’s vote on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, Syria’s representative underscored that nearly all international covenants and treaties emphasized the need to exercise freedom of expression with responsibility.  In light of the fact that the “demonic” portrayal of Islam and Muslims had resulted in a situation whereby the Muslim identity had suffered tremendously, she called on States to take all possible legal and administrative measures to prevent anti-Islamic regulations.


Also today, the Assembly overturned the Third Committee’s rejection of an oral amendment to a draft resolution on the International Covenants for Human Rights.  Proposed in the Committee by Zambia on behalf of the African Group and today by Iraq on behalf of the Arab Group, that amendment eliminated a reference to General Comment No. 20 on non-discrimination in economic, social and cultural rights, which was issued earlier this year by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.


In introducing the amendment, Iraq’s delegate cautioned that including a reference to the general comment would recognize controversial concepts on sexual orientation.  It was paramount, he said, to prevent international instruments from being “strangely interpreted”.


Arguing against the amendment, the representative of Finland said it was quite usual for general comments to be noted in recent resolutions.  Moreover, given the comment’s opening statement -– that “discrimination undermines the fulfilment of economic, social and cultural rights for a significant proportion of the world’s population” -– she wondered if the Assembly was prepared to excise reference to a comment that reiterated such an important principle.  After the amendment was passed by a vote of 76 in favour to 72 against, with 26 abstentions (Annex VI), the Assembly adopted the amended draft as a whole with 185 States in favour to none against, with no abstentions (See Annex VII).


Also adopted by recorded vote today were texts on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination; the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination;  national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights; human rights and unilateral coercive measures; enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights; right to development; promotion of equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies; and human rights and cultural diversity.


Action on a draft related to the human rights situation in Myanmar was deferred, pending the review of the text’s programme budget implications by the Fifth Committee.


Turning to other matters on its agenda, the Assembly considered an item on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization”, and adopted by consensus a plenary resolution of the same name, introduced by the representative of Uzbekistan on behalf of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization.  By the text, the Assembly emphasized the importance of strengthening dialogue, cooperation and coordination between the United Nations system and that organization.  Among other things, it proposed that the Secretary-General hold regular consultations with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization’s Secretary-General through the existing inter-agency forums and formats.


Speaking before the text’s adoption, the Secretary-General of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization said it aimed to encourage regional cooperation in areas like trade, energy, transport, agriculture, finance, information and communication technologies, science, customs, education, healthcare, environmental protection and natural disaster risk reduction.  The organization’s members had already made significant contributions to ensuring post-conflict reconstruction in Afghanistan and he hoped to step up those efforts with United Nations agencies, funds and programmes, in the interest of jointly carrying out projects in these areas.


Speaking in explanation of position during action on the Third Committee texts were the representatives of Bolivia and the Solomon Islands.  Delegates from Myanmar, Cuba, Egypt and Argentina also spoke on procedural issues.  The Rapporteur of the Third Committee introduced that body’s reports.


The General Assembly will reconvene at 3 p.m. on Monday, 21 December, to consider the reports of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial).


Background


The General Assembly met this morning to consider the reports of its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural), as well as a draft resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization.


Refugees


The Committee’s report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/64/431) contains three draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I on Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly strongly condemn attacks on refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced persons and call on all concerned States and parties involved in armed conflict, to take all necessary measures to ensure respect for human rights and international humanitarian law.  The Assembly would also express deep concern with the increasing number of attacks against humanitarian aid workers and convoys and would emphasize the need for States to ensure that perpetrators of such attacks committed on their territory did not operate with impunity by promptly bringing them to justice as provided for by national laws and obligations under international law.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution II on enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, approved without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly decide to increase the Executive Committee’s memberships from 78 to 79 States and would request the Economic and Social Council to elect the additional member at its resumed organizational session for 2010.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution III on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, which was approved without a vote on 23 November, would have the Assembly call on African Member States that had not yet signed or ratified the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa to consider doing so as early as possible to ensure its early entry into force and implementation.  It would recognize that forced displacement, return to post-conflict situations, integration in new societies, protracted situations of displacement and statelessness can increase child-protection risks and acknowledge that those generate different protection needs.  It would also condemn all acts that posed a threat to the personal security and well-being of refugees and asylum-seekers and deplore threats to the safety and security of staff of the Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees and other humanitarian organizations.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3969)


Social Development


The Committee’s report on social development (A/64/432) contains seven draft resolutions and one draft decision. 


Draft resolution I on policies and programmes involving youth was approved without a vote on 29 October.  It would have the Assembly call upon Member States to take concrete measures to further protect and assist young women and men in situations of armed conflict and also call on them to recognize young women and men as important actors in conflict prevention, peacebuilding and post-conflict processes.  They would be called on to ensure that young people enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health through access to sustainable health systems and social services without discrimination.  States would also be urged to develop policies and programmes to reduce youth violence and youth involvement in crime.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3962)


Draft resolution II on realizing the Millennium Development Goals for persons with disabilities, approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly call on Governments to include disability issues and persons with disabilities in reviewing progress to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and to step up efforts to include in their assessment of the extent to which persons with disabilities are able to benefit from efforts to achieve the Goals.  Governments would also be called on to build a knowledge base of data and information about the situation of persons with disabilities that could be used to enable development policy planning, monitoring, evaluation and implementation to be disability-sensitive.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3965)


Draft resolution III on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing, approved as orally revised without a vote on 22 October, would have the Assembly call on States to develop their national capacity for monitoring and enforcing the rights of older persons, in consultation with all sectors of society, including with organizations of older persons.  States would also be called on to address the adequate health care of older persons, including lack of access to proper food, shelter, health care and medicines, as well as cases of neglect, abuse and violence against older persons, wherever those situations exist.  They would also be called on to consider how best to improve international norms and standards pertaining to older persons.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3957)


Draft resolution IV on follow-up to the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family and beyond, approved as orally revised without a vote on 22 October, would have the Assembly urge Member States to create a conducive environment to support families, recognizing that equality between women and men and respect for the rights and freedoms of all family members were essential to family well-being and society.  It would also decide to consider preparations for, and observance of, the twentieth anniversary of the International Year of the Family at its sixty-sixth session.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3957)


Draft resolution V on proclamation of 2010 as International Year of Youth: Dialogue and Mutual Understanding, which was approved without a vote on 20 November, would have the Assembly proclaim that year beginning on 12 August 2010 and decide to organize a World Youth Conference under the auspices of the United Nations as that Year’s highlight.  The Assembly’s President would be invited to conduct open-ended informal consultations with Member States with the view to determining Conference modalities, which would be funded by voluntary contributions.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3968)


Draft resolution VI on implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly, which was approved without a vote on 20 November, would have the Assembly recognize that the concept of social development affirmed at those meetings had been weakened in national and international policymaking and that, while poverty eradication was central to development policy, further attention should be given to other commitments agreed to at the Summit, such as employment and social integration.  The Assembly would also stress that stable global financial systems and corporate social responsibility, among other things, were essential for creating an enabling international environment.  Governments would also be urged to develop systems of social protection and to extend or broaden coverage, including to workers in the informal economy.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3968)


Draft resolution VII on cooperatives in social development, approved as orally revised without a vote on 22 October, would have the Assembly recognize that cooperatives, in their various forms, promoted the fullest possible participation of all people in economic and social development and would recognize them as a major factor in economic and social development and as contributing to the eradication of poverty.  The Assembly would further proclaim 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives and urge States to use, and develop fully, the potential and contribution of cooperatives for the attainment of social development goals.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3957)


By the draft decision on the overview of the World Social Situation 2009, the Assembly would take note of the World Social Situation 2009 (document A/64/158 and Corr.1) (Press Release GA/SHC/3968)


Advancement of Women


The Committee’s report on advancement of women (document A/64/433) contains five draft resolutions and two draft decisions.


Draft resolution I on intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women, which was approved without a vote on 29 October, would have the Assembly call on all United Nations bodies, entities, funds and programmes and the specialized agencies, and invite the Bretton Woods institutions to intensify their efforts at all levels to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls.  It would call for the better coordination of their work through the Task Force on Violence against Women of the Inter-Agency Network on Women and Gender Equality. 


Prior to the approval of the text as a whole during the Committee’s meeting, a draft amendment (document A/C.3/64/L.25*) that proposed to insert a paragraph after the last preambular paragraph, was defeated by a recorded vote of 60 against to 52 in favour, with 40 abstentions.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3962)


Draft resolution II on Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, which was approved as orally amended without a vote on 22 October, would have the Assembly urge States parties to the Convention to comply fully with their obligations under the Convention and its Optional Protocol and to take into consideration the concluding observations, as well as the general recommendations of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women.  The text’s preambular paragraph refers especially to general recommendation No. 26, on women migrant workers.  It would have the Assembly strongly urge States parties to the Convention to take appropriate measures so that acceptance of the amendment to article 20, paragraph 1, of the Convention (relating to meeting time) by a two-thirds majority of States parties can be reached as soon as possible and the amendment can enter into force.(Press Release GA/SHC/3957)


Draft resolution III on violence against migrant women workers, which was approved as orally revised without a vote on 19 November, would have the Assembly call on all Governments to incorporate a human rights and gender perspective in legislation and policies on international migration, labour and employment consistent with their human rights obligations and commitments.  States would also be called on to ensure that such migration and labour policies do not reinforce discrimination and bias against women; to consider expanding dialogue among States on devising innovative methods to promote legal channels of migration in order to deter illegal migration; and to establish penal and criminal sanctions to punish perpetrators and intermediaries of violence against women migrant workers.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution IV on improvement of the situation of women in rural areas, which was approved as orally revised without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly recognize the critical role and contribution of rural women, including indigenous women, in enhancing agricultural and rural development, improving food security and eradicating rural poverty and, in this regard, urge Member States to continue their efforts to implement the outcome of, and ensure an integrated and coordinated follow-up to, the United Nations conferences and summits.  Among other things, States would also be urged to take steps towards ensuring that women’s unpaid work and contributions to on-farm and off-farm production are recognized and to support a gender-sensitive education system.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3965)


Draft resolution V on follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, which was approved without a vote on 19 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that States have an obligation to exercise due diligence to prevent violence against women and girls, provide protection to victims of violence and to investigate, prosecute and punish the perpetrators of such violence and that failure to do so violates and impairs or nullifies the enjoyment of their human rights and fundamental freedoms.  It also would welcome the opportunities provided in intergovernmental bodies in 2010 to accelerate progress in the achievement of gender equality and balance and women’s empowerment, including, among others, the 15-year review of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the Assembly’s twenty-third special session.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft decision I on the commemoration of the fifteenth anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which the Economic and Social Council recommended for the Assembly’s adoption, would have the Assembly decide to hold a commemorative meeting to mark the fifteenth anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action during the fifty-fourth session of the Commission on the Status of Women in March 2010.  That text, which was adopted without a vote on 15 October, would coincide with the review by the Commission on the Status of Women of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, as well as the outcomes of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3952)


Draft decision II on reports considered by the General Assembly in connection with the advancement of women would have it take note of:  the Report of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women on its forty-second and forty-third sessions (document A/64/38); note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report on the future operation of the International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (document A/64/79-E/2009/74); and the note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report on the activities of the United Nations Development Fund for Women (document A/64/164 and Corr.1.5).  The Committee decided to recommend this action on 19 November.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Report of the Human Rights Council


The Committee’s report on the report of the Human Rights Council (document A/64/434) contains three draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I on guidelines for the alternative care of children, which was approved as orally revised without a vote on 20 November, would have Assembly would welcome the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children as a set of orientations to help inform policy and practice.  It would further encourage States to take the Guidelines into account and to bring them to the attention of the relevant executive, legislative and judiciary bodies of government, human rights defenders and lawyers, the media and the public in general.  The Secretary-General would be requested to disseminate them, within existing resources, in all official United Nations languages, to Member States, regional commissions and other relevant organizations.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3968)


Draft resolution II on the report of the Human Rights Council, which was approved without a vote on 23 November, would have the Assembly take note of the report and acknowledge the recommendations contained therein.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3969)


Draft resolution III on the Office of the President of the Human Rights Council, which was approved without a vote on 23 November, would have the Assemby, underlining the crucial importance of appropriate resources to support the work of the Human Rights Council and its numerous mechanisms, and bearing in mind that the Council met regularly throughout the year in no fewer than three sessions per year for a total duration of no less than ten weeks, acknowledge the Council’s recommendation to establish an Office of the President of the Human Rights Council.  It would request the Council to address that question in the context of the five-year review of its work.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3969)


Promotion, Protection of Children’s Rights


The Committee’s report on the rights of children (document A/64/435 and Corr.1) contains two draft resolutions and a draft decision.


Draft resolution I on the girl child, which was approved as orally revised without a vote on 24 November, would have the Assembly urge Governments to implement the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative.  It would also call on them to place enhanced emphasis on quality education for the girl child, including catch-up and literacy education for those who did not receive formal education, and to recognize the equal right to education.  States would also be urged to improve the situation of girls lacking nutrition, water and sanitation facilities, access to basic health care and shelter, among other things. 


By other terms, States would be asked to ensure that applicable requirements of the International Labour Organization for girls’ and boys’ employment were respected and effectively enforced and to develop Gender-sensitive measures to eliminate the worst forms of child labour, including commercial sexual exploitation, slavery-like practices, forced and bonded labour, trafficking and hazardous forms of child labour.  Further, States would be called on to address the factors that encourage early and forced marriage and to deplore sexual exploitation and abuse of women and children in humanitarian crises, including cases involving humanitarian workers and peacekeepers.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Draft resolution II on rights of the child was approved without a vote on 20 November.  That four-part text would have the Assembly commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the fiftieth anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, which provided a foundation for the Convention.  States not yet Parties to the Convention and its Optional Protocols would be urged to become Parties as a matter of priority and to implement them fully.  The Assembly would call on States to address, in their responses to the multiple, inter-related global crises, any impact on the full enjoyment of the rights of children. 


According to “the right to be heard”, the Assembly would call on States to assure that children are given the opportunity to be heard on all matters affecting them, without discrimination by adopting and/or continuing to implement regulations and arrangements that provide for and encourage their participation.  States would be called on to designate, establish or strengthen relevant Governmental structures for children, where appropriate; provide support to children and adolescents to enable them to form and register their own associations and other child- and adolescent-led initiatives; and ensure the equal participation of girls, including adolescents.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3968)


The draft decision on reports by the General Assembly in connection with the promotion and protection of the rights of children, which the Committee decided to recommend on 24 November, would have the Assembly take note of the report of the Secretary-General on the girl child (document A/64/315) and the note by the Secretariat on the appointment of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children (document A/64/182-E/2009/110).  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Indigenous Issues


The Committee’s report on indigenous issues (document A/64/436) contains a draft decision on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people, which would have the Assembly take note of the report of the Special Rapporteur on that situation (document A/64/338).  The Committee decided to recommend that decision to the Assembly on 24 November.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination


The Committee’s report on elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination (A/64/437) contains two draft resolutions and two draft decisions. 


Draft resolution I on inadmissibility of certain practices that contribute to fuelling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, which was approved by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 55 abstentions, on 19 November, would have the Assembly express deep concern about the glorification of the Nazi movement and former members of the Waffen SS organization.  It would note with concern the rise of skinhead groups responsible for racist incidents in several countries, as well as the resurgence of violence targeting members of ethnic, religious or cultural communities and national minorities.  It would emphasize the need to act to put an end to those practices, and would call on States to take more effective measures in that regard.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution II on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action was approved by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 13 against, with 45 abstentions, on 24 November.  By the five-part text, the Assembly would reaffirm itself as the highest intergovernmental mechanism for formulating and appraising policy relating to the economic, social and related fields and that with the Human Rights Council, it shall constitute an intergovernmental process for implementing and following up on the Durban Declaration and Plan of Action.  It would call on States to formulate and implement, plans of action to combat racism and related intolerance.  It would also decide that the implementation of the Durban Review Conference’s outcome shall be undertaken in the same framework and by the same mechanisms as the outcome of the 2001 World Conference.


By further terms, the Assembly would express its profound concern about and its unequivocal condemnation of all forms of racism and racial discrimination, as well as propaganda activities and organizations that attempt to justify or promote racism and related intolerance in any form.  It would also express deep concern at inadequate responses to emerging and resurgent forms of racism and other related intolerance and urge States to adopt measures to address these scourges vigorously with a view to preventing their practice and protecting victims.  States would be urged to review and, where necessary, revise their immigration laws, policies and practices to ensure they are free of racial discrimination.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Draft decision I on adoption of the outcome document of the Durban Review Conference was approved as orally revised by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Netherlands and the United States), with 12 abstentions, on 23 November.  By its terms, the Assembly, welcoming the outcome document of the Durban Review Conference, would decide to endorse the provisions of that outcome document and would also decide to implement the outcome of the Durban Review Conference as part of the wider implementation of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3969)


Draft decision II on the report of the Secretary-General on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action, which the Committee decided to recommend on 24 November, would have the Assembly take note of that report.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Rights of peoples to self-determination


The Committee’s report on the right of peoples to self-determination (A/64/438) contains three draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I on universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination, which was approved without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that the universal realization of the right of all peoples -- including those under colonial, foreign and alien domination -- to self-determination is a fundamental condition for the effective guarantee, observance, preservation and promotion of human rights.  It would also declare its firm opposition to acts of foreign military intervention, aggression and occupation.  It would call on those States responsible to cease immediately their military intervention in and occupation of foreign countries and territories, as well as all acts of repression, discrimination, exploitation and maltreatment.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution II on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination which was approved by a recorded vote of 171 in favour to 6 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau and United States), with 5 abstentions (Botswana, Cameroon, Canada, Tonga and Vanuatu).  That text would have the Assembly reaffirm the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, including the right to their independent State of Palestine.  It would urge all States and the specialized agencies and organizations of the United Nations system to continue to support and assist the Palestinian people in the early realization of their right to self-determination.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution III on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination was approved by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 53 against, with 5 abstentions (Fiji, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Switzerland, Timor-Leste, Tonga), on 19 November.  By that text, the Assembly would request States to be vigilant against the recruitment, training, hiring or financing of mercenaries by private companies.  It would request States to impose a specific ban on the intervention of such companies in armed conflicts or in actions to destabilize constitutional regimes.  States that did use private security services would be encouraged to establish mechanisms to register and license those companies, as well as regulatory mechanisms.  The Assembly would condemn any form of impunity granted to mercenaries and to those responsible for their use, recruitment, financing and training and would urge States, in accordance with their international legal obligations, to bring them, without distinction, to justice.  States would be called on to cooperate with and assist the judicial.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Promotion and protection of human rights


The Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439) contains one draft decision, which would have the Assembly take note of the following reports:


The report of the Committee against Torture, Forty-first session (3-21 November 2008), Forty-second session (27 April-15 may 2009) (document A/64/44); report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture (document A/64/264); report of the Secretary-General on the status of the United Nations Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery (document A/64/306 and Corr.1); report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies (document A/64/212); a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the chairpersons of human rights treaty bodies on their twenty-first meeting (document A/64/276). 


Also, the report of the Secretary-General on strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity (document A/64/175); report of the Secretary-General on the protection of migrants (document A/64/188); report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises (document A/64/216). 


Also, a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers: Independence of judges and lawyers (A/64/181); a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions: extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions (document A/64/187); a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants (document A/64/213 and Corr.1); and a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on adequate housing as a component of the right to an adequate standard of living:  The right to an adequate housing (document A/64/255). 


Also, a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health (document A/64/272); a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the interim report of the Special Rapporteur on the right to education (document A/64/273); a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the independent expert on the question of human rights and extreme poverty (document A/64/279); a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the independent expert on the effects of foreign debt and other related international financial obligations of States on the full enjoyment of all human rights, particularly economic, social and cultural rights (document A/64/289 and Corr.1); and the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (document A/64/36). 


Addendum 1 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.1) contains three draft resolutions on implementation of human rights instruments.


Draft resolution I on International Covenants on Human Rights was approved as orally revised and amended by a recorded vote of 111 in favour to none against, with 66 abstentions, on 12 November.  That text would have the Assembly strongly appeal to all States that had not yet done so to become parties to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and to consider acceding to their Optional Protocols.  The Assembly would also emphasize the need for States to ensure that any measure to combat terrorism complied with their obligations under relevant international law.  It would further stress the importance of avoiding the erosion of human rights by derogation and recall that certain rights were recognized as non-derogable in any circumstances. 


During Committee deliberations, a separate vote was held on an oral amendment proposed by Zambia on behalf of the African Group which would delete the reference to General Comment No. 33 in operative paragraph 9.  That oral amendment was approved by a recorded vote of 70 in favour to 69 against, with 25 abstentions


A separate vote on second oral amendment, also proposed by Zambia, to delete references to General Comments No. 19 and 20 in operative paragraph 10 was defeated by vote of 71 in favour, and 72 against, with 23 abstentions.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution II on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, which was approved without a vote on 10 November, would have the Assembly condemn all forms of such acts, including through intimidation, saying it was and should remain prohibited at any time and place and could never be justified.  It would further condemn any action or attempt by States or public officials to legalize, authorize or acquiesce in torture and other inhuman treatment under any circumstances, including on grounds of national security or through judicial decisions.  It would also stress that wherever there was reasonable ground to believe torture and other inhuman treatment had been committed, those who encouraged, ordered, tolerated or perpetrated such acts must be held responsible and brought to justice, including officials in charge of the place of detention where the act was committed.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3965)


Draft resolution III on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto, which was approved without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly call on States that had not yet done so to consider signing and ratifying the Convention and the Optional Protocol as a matter of priority.  It would welcome the start of work of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.  The Secretary-General would be requested to continue implementing standards and guidelines for the accessibility of United Nations facilities and services, particularly when undertaking renovations.  He would also be requested him to promote the rights of persons with disabilities in the United Nations system in line with the Convention.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Addendum 2 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.2) contains 21 draft resolutions on human rights questions in two parts.


Part I contains a draft resolution on follow-up to the International Year of Human Rights Learning, which was adopted by the Assembly on 10 December.  (Press Release GA/10901)


Part II contains 20 resolutions.


Draft resolution I on strengthening the role of the United Nations in enhancing periodic and genuine elections and the promotion of democratization, which was approved as orally revised without a vote on 23 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that the electoral assistance provided by the United Nations should continue to be carried out in an objective, impartial, neutral and independent manner.  It would request the Organization to continue its efforts to ensure that adequate time existed to organize and carry out an effective electoral-assistance mission, conditions would allow a free and fair election, and the mission’s results would be reported comprehensively and consistently.  It would further express appreciation for the Declaration of Principles for International Election Observation and the Code of Conduct for International Observers.


During the Committee’s deliberations the Russian Federation proposed to delete the second part of operative paragraph 8 on the Declaration of Principles for International Election Observation and the Code of Conduct for International Observers.  The Committee decided to retain that language by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 19 against, with 28 abstentions.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3969)


Draft resolution II on combating defamation of religions was approved as orally revised by a recorded vote of 81 in favour to 55 against, with 43 abstentions, on November 12.  By that text, the Assembly would express deep concern at negative stereotyping of religions, and manifestations of intolerance and discrimination in matters of religion or belief.  It would strongly deplore all acts of psychological and physical violence and assaults against persons on the basis of religion or belief.  It would recognize that, in the fight against terrorism, defamation of religions and incitement to religious hatred had become aggravating factors contributing to the denial of fundamental rights and freedoms of members of target groups and express serious concern that Islam was frequently and wrongly associated with human rights violations and terrorism.  It would emphasize that freedom of expression carried special responsibilities, and might be subject to limitations as provided by law, and which were necessary for respecting others’ rights and protecting national security or public order, health or morals.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution III on promotion of a democratic and equitable international order was approved by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 54 against, with 5 abstentions ( Argentina, Armenia, Chile, Mexico, Peru) on 19 November.  The text would have the Assembly affirm that such an international order required the realization of the right to self-determination; that peoples and nations had the right to permanent sovereignty over their natural wealth and resources; and that they also had the right to development, peace and to an international economic order based on equal participation of all States in decision-making.  The Assembly would also affirm the need for “equitable access to benefits from the international distribution of wealth”, as well as the shared responsibility of all nations in managing the world’s economic and social development and the need to manage threats to international peace and security on a multilateral basis.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution IV on strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity, which was approved without a vote on 19 November, would have the Assembly express its conviction that an unbiased and fair approach to human rights issues contributed to the promotion of international cooperation, as well as to the effective promotion, protection and realization of human rights and fundamental freedoms.  It would stress the continuous need for impartial and objective information on the political, economic and social situations and events of all countries and request human rights bodies within the United Nations system, along with the special rapporteurs and representatives, independent experts and working groups, to take the resolution into account in carrying out their mandates.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution V on the right to food, which was approved as orally amended without a vote on 19 November, would have the Assembly reaffirm that hunger constituted an “outrage” and a violation of human dignity and, therefore, required urgent measures at all levels for its elimination.  It would also reaffirm everyone’s right to safe, sufficient and nutritious food for the development and maintenance of their physical and mental capacities, while expressing concern that women and girls were disproportionately affected by hunger, food insecurity and poverty.  State support for small farmers, fishing communities and local enterprises would be recognized as a key element for food security.  The Assembly would also stress that States parties to the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs) should consider implementing that agreement in a manner supportive of food security.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution VI on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights was approved by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 54 against, with 3 abstentions ( Brazil, Chile, Singapore) on 12 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would call on Member States, United Nations agencies, intergovernmental organizations and civil society to promote equitable and environmentally sustainable economic growth for managing globalization so that poverty was systematically reduced and international development targets were achieved.  Affirming that globalization was “a complex process of structural transformation”, with an impact on the enjoyment of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights -- including the right to development -- the Assembly would underline the need to analyse the consequences of globalization on the full enjoyment of all human rights.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution VII on national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights, which was approved without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly stress the importance of financial and administrative independence and the stability of national human rights institutions in promoting and protecting human rights.  It would note with satisfaction the efforts of those States that have provided their national institutions with more autonomy and independence, including giving them an investigative role or enhancing such a role.  It would underline the importance of the autonomy and independence of Ombudsman institutions and encourage increased cooperation between national human rights institutions and regional and international associations of Ombudsmen.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution VIII on protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons, which was approved as orally corrected without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly call on States to provide durable solutions, and to encourage stronger international cooperation through the provision of resources and expertise to affected countries.  It would emphasize the importance of consultation with internally displaced persons and host communities during all phases of displacement.  It would also recognize the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as an important international framework for the protection of internally displaced persons, while welcoming the fact that an increasing number of States and United Nations and other organizations were applying them as a standard.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution IX on the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms was approved without a vote on 20 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would condemn all human rights violations committed against persons engaged in promoting and defending human rights and fundamental freedoms around the world.  It would call on States to respect, protect and ensure the rights to freedom of expression and association of human rights defenders, and to ensure that procedures governing registration of civil society organizations were transparent, non-discriminatory, expeditious, inexpensive, allowed for the possibility to appeal and avoided requiring re-registration.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3968)


Draft resolution X on elimination of all forms of intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief, which was approved as orally revised without a vote on 23 November, would have the Assembly condemn all forms of intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief, as well as violations of freedom of thought, conscience and religion or belief.  It would stress that the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion applied equally to all persons.  It would also emphasize that freedom of religion or belief and freedom of expression were interdependent, interrelated and mutually reinforcing.  It would further condemn any advocacy of religious hatred that constituted incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence, whether it involved the use of print, audio-visual or electronic media or any other means.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3969)


Draft resolution XI on the Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa, which was approved as orally revised without a vote on 19 November, would welcome the brainstorming session held on 28 May 2009 between the Centre and the ambassadors of the subregion, as well as the main Cameroonian ministries, on possible orientations and activities of the Centre for the period 2009-2011.  By its terms, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner to continue to provide additional funds and human resources within the existing resources of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, to enable the Centre to respond to growing needs in promoting and protecting human rights and in developing a culture of democracy and the rule of law in the subregion.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution XII on protection of migrants, which was approved without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly call on States to promote and protect the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all migrants, regardless of their migration status, and to address international migration through international, regional or bilateral cooperation and dialogue and while recognizing the roles and responsibilities of countries of origin, transit and destination.  It would express concern over the impact of the economic and financial crisis on international migrations and migrants and, in that regard, would urge Governments to combat unfair and discriminatory treatment of migrants.  States would be requested to adopt concrete measures to prevent the violation of the human rights of migrants while in transit, through the training of public officials.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution XIII on International Convention for the protection of all persons from enforced disappearance, which was approved without a vote on 19 November, would have the Assembly call on States that have not yet done so to consider signing, ratifying or acceding to the Convention as a matter of priority, as well as to consider the option provided for in articles 31 and 32 of the Convention regarding the Committee on Enforced Disappearances, with a view to its entry into force by December 2009.  It would request United Nations agencies and organizations, and invite intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, to continue efforts to disseminate information on the Convention, to promote understanding of it, prepare for its entry into force and assist States parties in implementing their obligations.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution XIV on protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism was approved as orally revised and amended by a vote of 181 in favour to none against, with 1 abstention ( St Kitts and Nevis) on 24 November.  By the text, the Assembly would reaffirm that counter-terrorism measures should not discriminate on grounds such as race, colour, sex, language, religion or social origin.  It would also reaffirm States’ obligation, under article 4 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to respect certain rights as non-derogable in any circumstances.  Among other things, States would be urged, while countering terrorism, to fully comply with their obligations under international law and to ensure that no form of deprivation of liberty placed a detainee outside the protection of the law. 


During the Committee’s meetings, separate votes were held on two amendments proposed by Zambia, on behalf of the African Group, prior to the vote on the draft as a whole.  The first proposed to delete references in operative paragraph 12 to the Special Rapporteur’s report and replace it with a reference to the “previous work of the Special Rapporteur of the Human Rights Council on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism undertaken according to his mandate, based on the Commission on Human Rights resolution 2005/80 of 21 April 2005, and the Human Rights Council resolutions 5/1 and 5/2 of 18 June 2007, and 6/28 of 14 December 2007.” It was approved by a vote of by a vote of 77 in favour to 73 against, with 23 abstentions. 


The second amendment proposed to delete the phrase “to continue” in operative paragraph 19.  The amended text would read: “Requests the Special Rapporteur to make recommendations within the context of his mandate, with regard to preventing, combating and redressing violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the context of countering terrorism.” It was approved by 81 votes in favour to 73 against, with 20 abstentions.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Draft resolution XV on International Year for People of African Descent, which was approved without a vote on 24 November, would have the Assembly proclaim the year beginning on 1 January 2011, with a view to strengthening national actions, and regional and international cooperation for the benefit of people of African descent in relation to their full enjoyment of all rights, their participation and integration in all aspects of society, and the promotion of a greater knowledge of and respect for their diverse heritage and culture.  The Secretary-General would be requested to submit to the Assembly at its sixty-fifth session a report containing a draft programme of activities for the International Year.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Draft resolution XVI on human rights and unilateral coercive measures, which was approved by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 52 against, with no abstentions on 12 November, would have the Assembly urge all States to cease adopting or implementing any unilateral measures not in accordance with international law, the United Nations Charter and the norms and principles governing peaceful relations among States, particularly those of a coercive nature.  It would condemn the continued unilateral application and enforcement by certain Powers of unilateral coercive measures and further reject those measures as being tools for political or economic pressure against any country, particularly developing countries.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution XVII on enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, which was approved without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly urge all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality and equity, human dignity, mutual understanding and promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights.  They would also be called on to reject all doctrines of exclusion based on racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance.  The Assembly would further reaffirm that the promotion, protection and full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms should be guided by the principles of universality, non-selectivity, objectivity and transparency, in a manner consistent with the purposes and principles set out in the Charter.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution XVIII on the right to development, which was approved by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 22 against, with 30 abstentions 19 November, would have the Assembly endorse the conclusions and recommendations adopted, by consensus, by the Working Group on the Right to Development of the Human Rights Council at its tenth session and call for their immediate, full and effective implementation.  It would endorse the Working Group’s recommendations that the criteria and subcriteria for the right to development address features of that right as defined in the Declaration on the Right to Development, including concerns of the international community beyond those in the Millennium Development Goals.  It would further stress that, once endorsed by the Working Group, those criteria and subcriteria be used in elaborating a set of standards to implement the right to development.  Those standards could take various forms, including guidelines on implementing the right to development that could be a basis for considering an international legally binding standard. (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution XIX on promotion of equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies was approved as revised by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 51 against, with 3 abstentions ( Chile, Timor-Leste and Vanuatu) on 12 November.  By that text, the Assembly would reiterate that, in the elections to the human rights treaty bodies, consideration shall be given to equitable geographical distribution of membership and to the representation of the different forms of civilization and of the principal legal systems.  It would recommend that, when considering the possible establishment of a regional quota for the election to each treaty body’s membership, flexible procedures should encompass certain criteria, including that each of the five regional groups be assigned a quota in equivalent proportion to the number of States parties to the instrument that it represents.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution XX on human rights and cultural diversity which was approved as orally revised by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 50 against, with 4 abstentions (Armenia, Fiji, Japan and Timor-Leste), on 24 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would urge all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on inclusion, justice, equality and equity, human dignity, mutual understanding and promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights, and to reject all doctrines of exclusion based on racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance.  It would also urge States to ensure that their political and legal systems reflect the multicultural diversity within their societies and, where necessary, to improve democratic institutions so that they are more fully participatory.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Addendum 3 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.3) contains three draft resolutions on human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives


Draft resolution I on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was approved by a recorded vote of 96 in favour to 19 against, with 65 abstentions on 19 November.  By its terms, the Assembly would express serious concern at persistent and continuing reports of torture and inhuman treatment, and at the absence of due process and rule of law.  That concern would extend to the practice of collective punishments, and the existence of a large number of prison camps and the extensive use of forced labour.  It would also express concern at limitations imposed on every person wishing to move freely within the country and travel abroad, as well as punishment of returned persons.  The Assembly would strongly urge the Government to engage in technical cooperation activities in the field of human rights with the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and her Office and in the Universal Periodic Review by the Human Rights Council.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution II on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, which was approved by 92 votes in favour to 26 against, with 65 abstentions, would have the Assembly strongly condemn the systematic violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of that country’s people.  It would express grave concern at the recent trial, conviction and sentencing of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, resulting in her return to house arrest, and would call for her immediate and unconditional release. It would further urge the Government to release all prisoners of conscience without delay or conditions and with full restoration of their political rights and to ensure necessary steps are taken towards a free, fair, transparent and inclusive electoral process.  The Government would also be called on to enact the required electoral laws and to allow the participation of all voters, political parties, and other relevant stakeholders in the electoral process. (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution III on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran was approved by a vote of 74 in favour to 48 against, with 59 abstentions.  By its terms, the Assembly would express its deep concern at serious ongoing and recurring human rights violations in Iran relating to:  torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; the rate of executions carried out in the absence of internationally recognized safeguards; stoning as a method of execution, notwithstanding a circular from the head of the judiciary prohibiting stoning; and arrests, violent repression and sentencing of women exercising their right to peaceful assembly, as well as continuing discrimination against women and girls.  Particular concern would be expressed at the Iranian Government’s response following the Presidential election of 12 June 2009 and the concurrent rise in human rights violations.  The Government would be called on to respect fully its human rights obligations, in law and in practice, and, among other things to end the harassment, intimidation and persecution of political opponents and human rights defenders and others imprisoned arbitrarily or on the basis of their political views.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3968)


Addendum 4 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.4), on the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, contains no draft proposals. 


Crime prevention and criminal justice


The Committee’s report on the crime prevention and criminal justice (A/64/440 and Corr.1) contains five draft resolutions. 


Draft resolution I on technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to terrorism, which was recommended by the Economic and Social Council and approved by the Committee without a vote on 15 October.  By its terms, the Assembly would urge the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime to provide technical assistance to Member States in training personnel to execute cooperative mechanisms in combating terrorism.  Member States would, in turn, be urged to strengthen international cooperation by concluding bilateral and multilateral treaties on extradition and mutual legal assistance, within the framework of the international conventions and protocols related to terrorism and relevant United Nations resolutions, and in accordance with international law.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3952)


Draft resolution II on improving the coordination of efforts against trafficking in persons, which was adopted without a vote on 12 November, would have the Assembly urge Member States that had not yet done so to consider ratifying or acceding to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children.  It would further urge them to ratify or accede to a number of other relevant international instruments, such as the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.  It would take note with appreciation the decision of the President of its sixty-third session to appoint co-facilitators to start consultations and consideration of a plan of action against human trafficking.  In that context, it would stress the need for consultations to be held in an open and transparent manner.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3966)


Draft resolution III on strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity, which was approved without a vote on 19 November, would have the Assembly request the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime to finalize the Santo Domingo Pact and other regional programmes, as well as the Managua Mechanism document for approval by States parties.  That Office would be urged to continue providing technical assistance to Member States to combat money-laundering and the financing of terrorism through the Global Programme against Money-Laundering.  The Secretary-General would be requested to convene, in the framework of the tenth anniversary of the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, a special high-level meeting of the Assembly on such crime and corruption in the second quarter of 2010.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Draft resolution IV on preparations for the Twelfth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, which was approved without a vote on 22 October, would have the Assembly request the Secretary-General to prepare an overview of the state of crime and criminal justice worldwide for presentation at the Twelfth Congress, which is scheduled to take place in Salvador, Brazil, from 12 to 19 April 2010.  It Assembly would reiterate its request to him to make available the necessary resources to ensure the participation of the least developed countries and ask him to facilitate the organization of ancillary meetings of non-governmental and professional organizations participating in the meeting.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3957


Draft resolution V on United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, which was also approved as orally revised without a vote on 22 October, would have the Assembly ask the Secretary-General to intensify efforts to mobilize all relevant entities of the United Nations system to provide the necessary financial and technical support to the Institute to enable it to fulfil its mandate.  The Secretary-General would also be requested to continue his efforts to mobilize the financial resources needed to maintain the Institute’s core professional staff.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3957)


International drug control


The Committee’s report on international drug control (A/64/441) contains a draft resolution on international cooperation against the world drug problem, which was approved as orally corrected without a vote on 19 November.  It would have the Assembly adopt the Political Declaration and Plan of Action on International Cooperation towards an Integrated and Balanced Strategy to Counter the World Drug Problem, as adopted at the high-level segment of the fifty-second session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, and call on States to implement the goals and targets therein.  The Assembly would further recognize that sustainable crop control strategies require international cooperation based on the principle of shared responsibility, as well as an integrated and balanced approach, and should include alternative development, preventive alternative development programmes and eradication and law enforcement measures, among other things.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3967)


Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly


The Committee’s report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/64/442) contains one draft decision on the programme of work for the Third Committee for the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly (document A/C.3/64/L.64).  It was approved without a vote on 24 November and would have the Committee take up 11 agenda items at its next session.  (Press Release GA/SHC/3970)


Plenary Text


The Assembly was also expected to consider a text on cooperation between the United Nations and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (document A/64/L.34).  By that text, it would emphasize the importance of strengthening dialogue, cooperation and coordination between the United Nations system and that organization. Among other things, it would propose that the Secretary-General hold regular consultations with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization’s Secretary-General through the existing inter-agency forums and formats.


Action on Third Committee Texts


The Assembly first moved to take action on the Committee’s reports, which were introduced by Rapporteur NICOLA HILL ( New Zealand).


Refugees


The Assembly first took up the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, questions relating to refugees, returnees and displaced persons and humanitarian questions (document A/64/431), which contains three draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I on Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II on enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution III on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa was also adopted without a vote.


Social Development


Next, the Assembly turned to the Committee’s report on social development (A/64/432), which contains seven draft resolutions and one draft decision


Draft resolution I on policies and programmes involving youth was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II on realizing the Millennium Development Goals for persons with disabilities was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution III on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing was also adopted without a vote.


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted Draft resolution IV on follow-up to the tenth anniversary of the International Year of the Family and beyond.


Draft resolution V on proclamation of 2010 as International Year of Youth: Dialogue and Mutual Understanding was also adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution VI on implementation of the outcome of the World Summit for Social Development and of the twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly was then adopted without a vote.


Next, draft resolution VII on cooperatives in social development was adopted without a vote.


Adopting the draft decision contained in the report on social development without a vote, the Assembly took note of the overview of the World Social Situation 2009 (document A/64/158 and Corr.1).


Advancement of Women


The Assembly then took up the Committee’s report on advancement of women (document A/64/433), which contains five draft resolutions and two draft decisions.


Draft resolution I on intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women was then adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II on Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution III on violence against migrant women workers was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution IV on improvement of the situation of women in rural areas was also adopted by consensus.


Draft resolution V on follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly was adopted without a vote.


Draft decision I on commemoration of the fifteenth anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action was adopted without a vote.


Draft decision II on reports considered by the General Assembly in connection with the advancement of women was also adopted without a vote.


Speaking after action, the representative of Israel said it was fitting that the Assembly was reconfirming Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women today, on the very day it had first adopted that convention 30years ago.  She reaffirmed her country’s support for that instrument, which set the standard on protection of women’s rights.   Israel was fully committed to fulfilling this principle. She would like the record to reflect that her delegation had intended to co-sponsor the text in the Committee, but had been unable to do so due to technical reasons.


Report of the Human Rights Council


The Assembly next turned to the report of the Human Rights Council (document A/64/434), which contains three draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I on guidelines for the alternative care of children was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II on the report of the Human Rights Council was then adopted without a vote.


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution III on the Office of the President of the Human Rights Council.


Speaking after action, Israel’s representative said her delegation had growing concerns on the working methods of the Human Rights Council.  Nevertheless, Israel had decided to join consensus in the spirit of constructive engagement and in the hope that the Council would make a shift in its work, which would allow it to gain credibility and legitimacy.  Regrettably, the Council’s report that was before the Assembly today continued the discredited approach of its predecessor in addressing and neglecting human rights situations, particularly those in the Middle East, in stark contrast to its founding principles of non-selectivity and objectivity. Israel joined consensus, while reserving judgment on the Council’s work.


Promotion, Protection of Children’s Rights


It then took up the report on the rights of children (document A/64/435 and Corr.1), which contains two draft resolutions and a draft decision.


Draft resolution I on the girl child was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II on rights of the child was also adopted without a vote.


The draft decision on reports by the General Assembly in connection with the promotion and protection of the rights of children was adopted without a vote.


Indigenous Issues


Taking up the Committee’s report on indigenous issues (document A/64/436), the Assembly adopted the draft decision on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people contained therein without a vote.


Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination


The Assembly then turned to the Committee’s report on elimination of racism and racial discrimination (A/64/437), which contains two draft resolutions and two draft decisions.


Speaking before action, the representative of Israel said that for reasons elaborated during the Committee’s deliberations, her delegation wished to reiterate its objections to the two texts referring to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action and the Durban Review conference. These texts were, she said, draft resolution A/C.3/64/L.54/Rev.1 and draft decisions A/C.3/64/L.55.


The Assembly then adopted draft resolution I on the inadmissibility of certain practices that contribute to fuelling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance by a vote of 127 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 54 abstentions.  (For further details of the vote, see Annex I.)


Draft resolution II on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action was then adopted by a vote of 128 in favour to 13 against, with 43 abstentions.  (See Annex II)


Draft decision I on adoption of the outcome document of the Durban Review Conference was adopted by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, Palau and the United States), with 9 abstentions (Czech Republic, Georgia, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Tonga, and Vanuatu).  (See Annex III)


Acting without a vote, the Assembly next adopted draft decision II, by which it took note of the report of the Secretary-General on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action.


Rights of peoples to self-determination


The Assembly next turned to the report on the right of peoples to self-determination (A/64/438), which contains three draft resolutions. 


Draft resolution I on universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination was then adopted by a vote of 176 in favour to 6 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau and United States), with 3 abstentions (Cameroon, Canada and Tonga).  (See Annex IV)


Draft resolution III on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination was then adopted by a vote of 126 in favour to 53 against, with 4 abstentions ( Fiji, Switzerland, Timor-Leste and Tonga).  (See Annex V)


Promotion and protection of human rights


The Assembly then took up the report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439), which contains a draft decision by which it would take note of reports submitted under the item entitled “promotion and protection of human rights”.


The representative of Iraq, speaking on behalf of the Arab Group, said that he would like to make an oral amendment to references contained in draft resolution A/C.3/64/L.22 [re-issued in the plenary as draft resolution I in document A/64/439], which addressed the International Covenants on Human Rights.


Specifically, he proposed that the reference to General Comment No. 20 in operative paragraph 10 should be deleted. The amended paragraph would then read: “Also welcomes the results of the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on its thirty-eighth and thirty-ninth sessions and on its fortieth and forty-first sessions, and takes notes of the General Comment adopted by the Committee, No. 19 on the right to social security.” 


He said the Arab Group shared the view of the African Group expressed in the Third Committee. Taking General Comment No. 20 into consideration in the draft resolution on the universal covenants was self-contradictory and it gave recognition to a controversial concept. Among other things, he noted that this general comment had not been presented by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights to the Economic and Social Council. Moreover, it was of paramount importance to make it clear that international instruments should not be “strangely interpreted”.  He hoped that delegations would be in favour of that change.


The SECRETARY said that this amendment applied to the next agenda item. The assembly was taking action on the decision contained in paragraph 5 of the report.  Following action on that text, the Assembly would move to consider the amendment proposed by Iraq.


The Assembly then adopted that draft decision contained therein, thus taking note of reports submitted under the item entitled “promotion and protection of human rights”.


Next, it took up Addendum 1 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.1) contains three draft resolutions on implementation of human rights instruments.


The Assembly first turned to draft resolution I on International Covenants on Human Rights.


The representative of Finland requested a recorded vote on the amendment proposed by Iraq on behalf of the Arab Group. She said that, given the intense negotiations on this text to reach consensus, Finland regretted that Iraq had proposed that amendment. It was deeply disappointing that the Arab Group did not respect the decisions of the Third Committee. Her delegation did not believe the Arab Group had put forward convincing arguments for the amendment. It was usual for general comments to be noted in recent resolutions, whether or not they had been included in reports to the Economic and Social Council.


Moreover, the resolution was about raising awareness of the international covenants in general, she said. Notwithstanding their non-binding character, general comments could be used toward this end. In that regard, she recalled the 1990 decision which said the Committee may prepare general comments with a view to assisting States parties with a view toward fulfilling their obligations. She highlighted the word “assisting,” stressing that the general comments were about helping States, not imposing any decisions on them. It was true that General Comment No. 20 had not been annexed to a report, since it had not been issued in time. But, this should not hinder the Assembly in any way. It had been issued as an independent document of the United Nations.


She went on to say that whether a general comment was referred to in a resolution was a political decision, nothing more nor less. She asked the membership to assess the general comment on the basis of the text as a whole and not on the basis of a single reference. This general comment began by stating that, “Discrimination undermines the fulfilment of economic, social and cultural rights for a significant proportion of the world’s population. Economic growth has not, in itself, led to sustainable development, and individuals and groups of individuals continue to face socio-economic inequality, often because of entrenched historical and contemporary forms of discrimination.”  Was the Assembly really prepared to say that it was not going to take note of a general comment that reiterated such an important principle?


She stressed that the only rights referred to in the general comment addressed the right of privacy, the right to pensions and the right to freedom from harassment in school or the workplace. These were rights to which all individuals were entitled. She also reminded the Assembly that the 18 experts serving on the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights were distributed throughout the world and should be in a position to produce results and views that were truly representative. Finland would vote against the oral amendment and requested all delegations to do so, as well, by pushing the red button.


The SECRETARY recalled that the delegation of Iraq had submitted an oral amendment on operative paragraph 10 and said the Assembly would first take a decision on that amendment.


By a vote of 76 in favour, to 72 against, with 26 abstentions, the Assembly then adopted the amendment proposed by Iraqto delete references to General Comment No. 20 in operative paragraph 10.  (See Annex VI)


Turning to draft resolution I as a whole, as orally amended, it then adopted the text by a vote of 185 in favour to none against, with no abstentions.  (See Annex VII)


Draft resolution II on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment was then adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution III on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto was also adopted without a vote.


Speaking after action, the representative of Cuba restated her delegation’s principled stance against any type of discrimination on the basis of any social condition. Cuba had voted in favour of the amendment proposed by Iraq on behalf of the Arab Group taking into account its technical nature, as it understood the procedures of the Economic and Social Council.


The Assembly then turned to Addendum 2 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.2) contains 21 draft resolutions on human rights questions in two parts.


The draft resolution contained in Part I on follow-up to the International Year of Human Rights Learning was adopted by the Assembly without a vote on 10 December.


The Assembly first turned to Part II, which contains 20 resolutions.


Speaking before action, the representative of Syria said, on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, that the real consequences of defamation constituted an outright campaign of hate speech, negative stereotyping and targeting the tenets and adherents of Islam.  Almost all international covenants and treaties emphasized that freedom of expression should be exercised with responsibility, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which enjoyed universal application.  Freedom of expression was important to OIC members, and in upholding that right, it was necessary to bear in mind article 18 of the International Covenant, which stipulated that everyone should have the right to manifest his religion or belief in worship, observance, practice and teaching.


Achievements in information and communication technologies had transformed the world into a single community, she said, which afforded both threats to and opportunities for peaceful coexistence.  Her delegation’s position was firmly anchored in relevant provisions of international law, and mainly in international human rights instruments.  The “demonic” portrayal of Islam and Muslims had resulted in a situation whereby the Muslim identity had suffered tremendously.  Among such instances of “Islamophobia” was the continued negative projection of Islam and Muslims in the media and campaigns for anti-Muslim legislation -– including the imposition of restrictions on the construction of places of worship. Apathy and inaction to prevent such discrimination could not be justified.


Unfortunately, intolerance against Islam was being fostered by scholars and political parties that espoused anti-Muslim or anti-immigrant agendas, she explained. Further, OIC States were deeply concerned that Islam had been wrongly associated with human rights violations and terrorism.  The United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, adopted in 2006, clearly confirmed that terrorism could not be associated with any religion, nationality, civilization or ethnic group.  Discriminatory acts directed against Muslims and Islam were inconsistent with the spirit of the United Nations Charter and States were clearly obliged to prevent such acts under international human rights law and numerous United Nations resolutions, including the General Assembly resolution adopted annually on “Combating Defamation of Religions”.


In that context, she reminded delegates of the joint statement by the Secretaries-General of the United Nations and the OIC, and the High Representative for Common Foreign and Security Policy of the European Union in Doha, on 7 February 2006, in which they underscored the need to show sensitivity in such matters. Islam is a religion that implies “peace for all humankind”, she said.  It advocated respect for all religious beliefs, and the Group called on States to take all possible legal and administrative measures to prevent anti-Islamic regulations.


Speaking on a point of order, the representative of Myanmar said that as a co-sponsor, his delegation intended to vote “yes” on draft resolution I contained in document A/64/437 on the inadmissibility of certain practices that contribute to fuelling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance.  He asked that this be reflected in the meeting’s official records.


The Assembly then took up draft resolution I on strengthening the role of the United Nations in enhancing periodic and genuine elections and the promotion of democratization, adopting it without a vote.


Next, draft resolution II on combating defamation of religions was adopted by a vote of 80 in favour to 61 against, with 42 abstentions.  (See Annex VIII)


Draft resolution III on promotion of a democratic and equitable international order was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 54 against, with 5 abstentions ( Argentina, Armenia, Chile, Mexico and Peru).  (See Annex IX)


Draft resolution IV on strengthening United Nations action in the field of human rights through the promotion of international cooperation and the importance of non-selectivity, impartiality and objectivity was then adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution V on the right to food was also adopted without a vote.


Speaking on a point of order, the representative of Cuba drew the Assembly’s attention to operative paragraph 13 on the right to food.  She reminded delegations that at the time of the draft’s approval and before the Assembly’s adoption, an oral correction had been made. She asked the Secretariat to effect that correction.


The SECRETARY said the Assembly had taken note of this and it would be reflected in the official records.


Next, draft resolution VI on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 54 against, with 3 abstentions ( Brazil, Chile and Singapore). (See Annex X)


Draft resolution VII on national institutions for the promotion and protection of human rights was then adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution VIII on protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons was adopted as without a vote.


Draft resolution IX on the Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms was also adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution X on elimination of all forms of intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XI on the Subregional Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Central Africa was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XII on protection of migrants was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution XIII on International Convention for the protection of all persons from enforced disappearance was adopted without a vote.


The Assembly next turned to draft resolution XIV on protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, adopting it without a vote.


Draft resolution XV on International Year for People of African Descent was then adopted without a vote.


Next, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XVI on human rights and unilateral coercive measures by a vote of 132 in favour to 54 against, with no abstentions.  (See Annex XI)


Acting without a vote, it adopted draft resolution XVIIon enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights.


Draft resolution XVIII on the right to development was then adopted by a vote of 133 in favour to 23 against, with 30 abstentions. (See Annex XII)


Draft resolution XIX on promotion of equitable geographical distribution in the membership of the human rights treaty bodies was adopted by a recorded vote of 131 in favour to 53 against, with 2 abstentions ( Chile and Timor-Leste). (See Annex XIII)


Proceeding again to a recorded vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XX on human rights and cultural diversity by 126 in favour to 52 against, with 5 abstentions ( Armenia, Fiji, Japan, Maldives and Timor-Leste). (See Annex XIV)


Speaking on a point of order on resolution XIV to addendum 2, Egypt’s delegate said there were editorial mistakes in his version.  The French version was different in operative paragraph 19 from the English version.  One part had been moved in Rev.1 in the Committee and adopted as such.  He hoped that that would be corrected.  Also, a comma had mistakenly been removed from the second line and should come before the phrase “within the context of his mandate.”


Argentina’s delegate, speaking on a point of order, said her country was co-sponsor of the draft resolution on globalization and its impacts on the full enjoyment of all human rights and had voted in favour of it.  She wished for that to be reflected.


The Assembly then turned to Addendum 3 of the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.3), which contains three draft resolutions on human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives.  The President informed the Assembly that action on draft resolution II on the situation of human rights in Myanmar would be deferred pending the review of the text’s programme budget implications by the Fifth Committee.


The Assembly then took up draft resolution I on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, adopting it by a vote of 99 in favour to 20 against, with 63 abstentions. (See Annex XV)


It then turned to draft resolution III on the situation of human rights in Iran, adopting it by a vote of 74 in favour to 49 against, with 59 abstentions.  (See Annex XVI)


The representative of Cuba said her delegation maintained its traditional view on country-specific texts.  Only genuine international cooperation on a non-discriminatory basis could ensure the promotion and protection of human rights. The Universal Periodic Review mechanism provided an opportunity to consider the observation of human rights in all countries on such a basis.  The drafts just adopted ran counter to the principles of non-selectivity and non-politicization.


Specifically with regard to draft resolution I, she said the policy of isolation and diplomatic pressure against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was unjustified.  The situation must be analysed regarding human rights in all countries under conditions of equality.  Thus, Cuba had voted against the draft due to its objections to operative paragraph 2.  Her delegation believed there was a just and honourable solution in this case.


The representative of Ethiopia said his delegation would like to put on record that it supported the oral amendment proposed by Iraq.  It had wrongly abstained, but definitely supported it.


Offering an explanation of vote after the vote, the representative of the Solomon Islands said that, due to external pressure, her delegation had changed its vote today. She recalled that its views on country–specific texts had been expressed in the Third Committee.  In that regard, she asked that States respect that position. Her delegation would keep this issue under consideration.


The Assembly then took note of Addendum 4 to the Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/64/439/Add.4), on the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, which contains no draft proposals.


Crime prevention and criminal justice


The Assembly then turned to the report on crime prevention and criminal justice (A/64/440 and Corr.1), which contains five draft resolutions. 


Draft resolution I on technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to terrorism, which was recommended by the Economic and Social Council, was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution II on improving the coordination of efforts against trafficking in persons was also adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution III on strengthening the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Programme, in particular its technical cooperation capacity was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution IV on preparations for the Twelfth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice was adopted without a vote.


Draft resolution V on United Nations African Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders was also adopted without a vote.


The representative of France said a language correction should be made in draft resolution II to operative paragraph 8.


International drug control


The Assembly then turned to the Committee’s report on international drug control (A/64/441), which contains a draft resolution on international cooperation against the world drug problem.


Bolivia’s delegate said his country reiterated its firm commitment to combating the global problem of drugs, drug trafficking and organized crime. The draft resolution that was approved in the Third Committee by consensus and would be similarly ratified by the Assembly on international cooperation against he world drug trade reflected in operative paragraph 7(c) that due account should be taken of the traditional licit uses of chewing coca leaves in their natural state. This was an age-old tradition of the indigenous peoples of the Amazon. Respecting this practice, which was an expression of cultural identity, a proposal on chewing coca leaf had been submitted by Bolivia to the Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs.  That precept should be supported in this respect.


The representative of the Solomon Islands took the floor to put on record her delegation’s support for the amendment proposed by Iraq on the International Covenants on Human Rights. On the resolution on combating defamation of religions, her delegation had not voted, although it supported the text.  It would like that to be reflected in the meeting’s records.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly then adopted the draft resolution.


Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly


Turning to the Committee’s report on the revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/64/442), which contains one draft decision on the programme of work for the Third Committee for the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly (document A/C.3/64/L.64), the Assembly adopted the decision without a vote.


Finally, it took note of the report of the Third Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/64/443).


Plenary


The Assembly then turned its attention to agenda item 124 on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization” and had before it a draft resolution of the same name.


Introducing a plenary text on cooperation between the United Nations and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (A/64/L.34), on behalf of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, MURAD ASKAROV (Uzbekistan) said the organization aimed to strengthen trust and friendship among its member States, encourage efficient cooperation in politics, trade and economy, and science and technology, among other areas, and consolidate efforts to maintain peace and security.  The Council of Heads, its governing body, determines priorities and decides on issues of internal functioning.  The Council of National Coordinators coordinates cooperation between ministries and agencies of member States.


The Shanghai Cooperation Organization had enjoyed observer status with the General Assembly since 2004, he said, and cooperated closely with the United Nations in most major areas.  Prospects for joint work looked promising in environmental protection, humanitarian issues and migration.  To address common objectives, the relationship between the two bodies had to be placed on a more systematic basis.  That was the purpose of the draft resolution, which noted that the Shanghai Cooperation Organization aimed to strengthen peace, security and stability in the region; counter terrorism and extremism, and promote regional cooperation in areas like trade and economic development, energy and transportation.


Further, the draft emphasized the importance of strengthening dialogue and cooperation between the two bodies, he said, and proposed that the United Nations Secretary-General hold regular consultations with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization’s Secretary-General through existing inter-agency forums and formats. It proposed that United Nations specialized agencies, programmes and funds cooperate with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization with a view to implementing programmes to achieve their goals.  He believed the draft text would be adopted by consensus.


BOLAT NURGALIEV, Secretary-General of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, said consideration of the draft resolution reflected Shanghai Cooperation Organization’s increasing role in security in the Asian region.  The Shanghai Cooperation Organization’s activities aimed to encourage regional cooperation in areas like trade, energy, transport, agriculture, finance, information and communication technologies, science, customs, education, healthcare, environmental protection, and natural disaster risk reduction.


He said Members had made significant contributions to ensuring post-conflict reconstruction in Afghanistan, efforts which he hoped to step up, with United Nations agencies, funds and programmes, in the interest of jointly carrying out projects in those areas.  In closing, he expressed his appreciation to States that supported inclusion of the item on the Assembly’s agenda.


The Assembly then adopted by consensus the resolution on cooperation between the United Nations and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (A/64/L.34), by which it emphasized the importance of strengthening dialogue, cooperation and coordination between the United Nations system and that organization. Among other things, it proposed that the Secretary-General hold regular consultations with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization’s Secretary-General through the existing inter-agency forums and formats.


ANNEX I


Vote on Practices Fuelling Racism


The draft resolution on the inadmissibility of certain practices that fuel racism (document A/64/437) was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 1 against, with 54 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Chad, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Myanmar, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia.


ANNEX II


Vote on Global Efforts to Eliminate Racism


The draft resolution on global efforts to the total elimination of racism and implementation of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/64/437) was adopted by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 13 against, with 43 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Israel, Italy, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, Palau, Poland, Romania, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Myanmar, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia.


ANNEX III


Vote on Durban Review Conference


The draft decision on adoption of the outcome document of the Durban Review Conference (document A/64/437) was adopted by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 7 against, with 9 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Czech Republic, Georgia, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Tonga, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Chad, Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Myanmar, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Palestinian self-determination


The draft resolution on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination (document A/64/438) was adopted by a recorded vote of 176 in favour to 6 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Cameroon, Canada, Tonga.


Absent:  Gambia, Kiribati, Myanmar, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Vanuatu.


ANNEX V


Vote on mercenaries


The draft resolution on the use of mercenaries (document A/64/438) was adopted by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 53 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Fiji, Switzerland, Timor-Leste, Tonga.


Absent:  Gambia, Kiribati, Myanmar, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX VI


Vote on Amendment to OP Para 10


The amendment to operative paragraph 10 of the draft resolution on International Covenants on Human Rights (document A/64/439) was adopted by a recorded vote of 76 in favour to 72 against, with 26 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Benin, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guyana, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu.


Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brazil, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Liberia, Mauritius, Nepal, Samoa, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago.


Absent:  Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Gambia, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Maldives, Mongolia, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Venezuela, Viet Nam.


ANNEX VII


Vote on International Covenants


The draft resolution on International Covenants (document A/64/439) was adopted by a recorded vote of 185 in favour to none against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Central African Republic, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Tonga.


ANNEX VIII


Vote on Combating Defamation of Religions


The draft resolution on combating defamation of religions (document A/64/439/Add.2, part II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 80 in favour to 61 against, with 42 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Chad, China, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen.


Against:  Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu.


Abstain:  Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Belize, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, Paraguay, Peru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia.


Absent:  Central African Republic, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Zimbabwe.


ANNEX IX


Vote on Promotion of a Democratic Order


The draft resolution on promotion of a democratic and equitable international order (document A/64/439/Add.2 part II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 127 in favour to 54 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Chile, Mexico, Peru.


Absent:  Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles.


ANNEX X


Vote on Globalization


The draft resolution on globalization and its impact on human rights (document A/64/439/Add.2 part II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 54 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Brazil, Chile, Singapore.


Absent:  Argentina, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles.


ANNEX XI


Vote on Unilateral Coercive Measures


The draft resolution on human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/64/439/Add.2 part II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 132 in favour to 54 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Fiji, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles.


ANNEX XII


Vote on Right to Development


The draft resolution on the right to development (document A/64/439/Add.2 part II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 23 against, with 30 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Lithuania, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, New Zealand, Palau, Poland, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Croatia, Cyprus, Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Norway, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovenia, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles.


ANNEX XIII


Vote on Equitable Geographic Distribution


The draft resolution on the promotion of equitable geographic distribution on human rights treaty bodies (document A/64/439/Add.2 part II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 131 in favour to 53 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Chile, Timor-Leste.


Absent:  Gambia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles.


ANNEX XIV


Vote on Human Rights and Cultural Diversity


The draft resolution on human rights and cultural diversity (document A/64/439/Add.2 part II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 52 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Armenia, Fiji, Japan, Maldives, Timor-Leste.


Absent:  Gambia, Kiribati, Myanmar, Nauru, Rwanda, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Tonga.


ANNEX XV


Vote on Human Rights in Democratic People’s Republic of Korea


The draft resolution on situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (document A/64/439/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 99 in favour to 20 against, with 63 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Turkey, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu.


Against:  Algeria, Belarus, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Malaysia, Myanmar, Namibia, Oman, Russian Federation, Sudan, Syria, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Gabon, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Senegal, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia.


Absent:  Armenia, Djibouti, Gambia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mongolia, Sao Tome and Principe, Serbia, Seychelles, Tunisia, Uzbekistan.


ANNEX XVI


Vote on Human Rights in Iran


The draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Iran (document A/64/439/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 74 in favour to 49 against, with 59 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kiribati, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Montenegro, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Vanuatu.


Against:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia, Brunei Darussalam, China, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Benin, Bhutan, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Paraguay, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Zambia.


Absent:  Bahrain, Djibouti, Gambia, Maldives, Sao Tome and Principe, Serbia, Seychelles, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Yemen.


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For information media • not an official record