23 December 2008
General Assembly
GA/10804

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-third General Assembly

Plenary

74th Meeting (Night)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY ENDS MAIN PART OF SIXTY-THIRD SESSION, ADOPTING TEXTS ON HUMAN


RESOURCES MANAGEMENT, NEW SYSTEM FOR UNITED NATIONS ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE


Assembly also Endorses Doha Declaration on Development Financing,

President Urges Delegations to ‘Recharge Batteries’ for Busy Year Ahead


Following overnight deliberations on budgetary matters, the General Assembly concluded the main part of its substantive session with the adoption early this morning of resolutions and decisions recommended by its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) on topics ranging from the administration of justice and human resource management to financing for the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) and a plenary-generated text endorsing the Doha Declaration on Financing for Development.


Wrapping up the session, General Assembly President Miguel d’Escoto Brockmann highlighted the successful work of Member States during its fall meetings, which had taken place under the looming shadow of the global financial, food and energy crises.  In particular, he drew attention to the Assembly’s efforts towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, especially its convening of a high-level meeting on the Goals, and on the special needs of Africa, the latter of which had given African countries the opportunity to explain their needs, as opposed to being told what their needs were, by others.


The ongoing global crises had not been the only significant events marking the work of the sixty-third substantive session of the Assembly, he said, noting that 2008 was also the sixtieth anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  In commemoration, delegates had adopted a declaration recognizing the progressive nature of human rights and endorsed a new Optional Protocol to the Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights which established an individual complaints mechanism to address violations of those rights.


“We cannot afford to rest on our laurels after this intensive period,” he warned.  The Assembly had a busy schedule ahead with many important issues left on its agenda, not the least of which was the implementation of the declaration adopted at the Follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development, recently held in Doha, Qatar.  That Declaration included a crucial decision that entrusted the Assembly with the governance of international finance.


Mr. d’Escoto recalled that, in Doha, he had announced the establishment of an 18-member Commission of Experts to review the workings of the global financial system.  It was the duty of the plenary to further the implementation of the declaration, especially now, in light of the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system and the current economic and financial meltdown.


Earlier in the evening, delegates had taken steps in that direction by adopting, by consensus, the plenary-generated resolution on financing for development.  In doing so, Member States showed their determination to take “immediate and decisive actions” to overcome the multiple crises of food insecurity, commodity price volatility, climate change and the abrupt loss of confidence in the international economic system, specifically by calling on the United Nations to hold a high-level conference that would examine the impact of the world financial and economic turmoil on development, by March 2009.


That request was one of many contained in the sweeping resolution on the outcome document of the Follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development.  The text, which reaffirmed commitments outlined in the Monterrey Consensus to combat poverty and advance development, also examined the ways in which developed and developing countries could deepen their partnership in such areas as domestic and international resource mobilization, trade, international financial and technical cooperation, external debt and systemic issues in global monetary, financial and trading systems.  The need for policies that linked economic considerations to social ones was also underscored in the text, as was the need for greater efforts to mobilize more resources for the special care of persons with disabilities, older persons, women and children.


The Assembly also took action on a series of draft resolutions that were the end results of protracted deliberations in the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).  Among the texts recommended for adoption was a 13-part resolution on human resources, which -– in a major shift from the current system of contracts –- had the Assembly approve new contractual arrangements consisting of temporary, fixed-term and continuing appointments, as of 1 July 2009.  By further terms of the text, the Assembly addressed other issues of human resource management reform, including harmonization of conditions of service, recruitment and staffing, and gender and equitable geographic representation, among other things.  The resolution was 1 of 21 adopted by consensus.


By the resolution on the administration of justice at the United Nations, the Assembly adopted the statutes of the newly constituted United Nations Dispute and Appeals Tribunals, which would become operational as of 1 July 2009.  Emphasizing that all possible use should be made of the informal system of justice in order to avoid unnecessary litigation, the text also deals with the functioning of the Office of the Ombudsman.


To facilitate the transition to the new system, the General Assembly decided to allow the current formal system to continue functioning until the end of the transition period and to ensure that all necessary measures were taken to reduce the backlog of cases.  On 1 July 2009, the Joint Appeals Boards and Disciplinary Committees would be abolished and the United Nations Administrative Tribunal would cease accepting new cases, in preparation for its own abolition on 31 December 2009.


In addition, the Assembly assessed about $449.86 million for financing the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), for the first six months of 2009, based on a revised deployment plan and projected expenditures in the amount of about $1.5 billion for the period from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2009.  The Assembly also provided $429.5 million for 27 special political missions, by one of the terms of a 14-part resolution on questions relating to the programme budget for 2008-2009.


As it usually did in “non-budget years”, the Fifth Committee had also laid the groundwork for preparing for the Organization’s next budget and, as a result, the Assembly adopted the budget outline for 2010-2011, in the amount of $4.87 billion.


Other resolutions introduced in the Fifth Committee and adopted by consensus included those on the Board of Auditors reports; programme planning; pattern of conferences; unpaid assessed contributions of the former Yugoslavia; United Nations common system; United Nations pension system; and financing of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.


Also adopted by consensus in the Assembly were resolutions on financing of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia; comprehensive proposal on appropriate incentives to retain staff of the International Criminal Tribunals; financing of the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE); conditions of service and compensation of “other-than-Secretariat” officials; development-related activities; strengthening the Department of Political Affairs; information and communications technology; and on other questions relating to the programme budget for 2008-2009.


On the recommendation of its First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) and following three separate recorded votes to retain operative paragraphs 3, 4 and 5, the Assembly also adopted the resolution on a possible arms trade treaty by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 19 abstentions.  (annex IV)


In other action, an omnibus resolution on the rights of the child was also adopted today.  That text -- one of five resolutions recommended for adoption by the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) -- was adopted by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions. (annex V)


Among the other resolutions introduced in the Third Committee and adopted today were two texts that addressed the issue of racism and racial discrimination.  The first, a resolution on the elimination of racism and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action, was adopted by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 13 against, with 35 abstentions.  (annex VI)  The other resolution, on the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, was adopted without a vote.


A resolution on the human rights situation in Myanmar was adopted by a recorded vote of 80 in favour to 25 against, with 45 abstentions (annex VII), despite objections by the representative of Myanmar, who rejected the resolution, calling it a “blatant interference” in the home-grown political process. A largely procedural text on the Committee on the Rights of the Child was also adopted by consensus, on the recommendation of the Third Committee.


In other matters, the Assembly also adopted a resolution by which it approved the report of the Credentials Committee and took note of the Committee’s recommendations, contained therein.


The representatives of the United States also spoke today, in relation to the resolutions of the Third Committee.


The representative of France introduced an oral amendment to the draft resolution on the Special Envoy for implementation of the Security Council resolution 1559 (2004).  Speaking before action on the amendment was the representative of Lebanon.  The representatives of United States, Syria and Lebanon spoke after the amendment was defeated by a recorded vote.


Patrick Chuasoto ( Philippines), Rapporteur of the Fifth Committee, introduced that body’s reports.


The General Assembly will reconvene at time and date to be announced.


Background


The Assembly met today to take action on a number of draft resolutions and reports, including a text on the Doha Declaration on Financing for Development:  outcome document of the Follow-Up International Conference on Financing for Development to Review the Implementation of the Monterrey Consensus (document A/63/L.57).  By the terms of that draft, the Assembly would decide to endorse the outcome document of the Follow-Up Conference -- held in Doha, Qatar, from 29 November to 2 December 2008 –- including its call for the United Nations to hold a high-level conference that would examine the impact of the world financial and economic turmoil on development, by March 2009.


The outcome document endorsed by the draft resolution reaffirmed the goals and commitments of the 2002 Monterrey Consensus and laid out a series of actions on mobilizing domestic financial resources for development and international resources for development, including foreign direct investment and other private flows.


Issues such as global trade as an engine for development, external debt and systemic issues, like the coherence and consistency of the international monetary, financial and trading systems in support of development, were also addressed in the document, as was the need to increase international financial and technical cooperation for development.  The document concludes with a commitment to staying fully engaged –- nationally, regionally and internationally –- to ensure the proper and effective follow-up to the implementation of the Monterrey Consensus. 


The Assembly was also expected to consider the report of the Credentials Committee (document A/63/633), as well as to take up one outstanding draft resolution included in the report of the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) on general and complete disarmament, entitled towards an arms trade treaty:  establishing common international standards for the import, export and transfer of conventional arms (draft resolution XXV contained in document A/63/389).  (For background, see Press Release GA/10792.)


In addition, the Assembly was expected to take action on five draft resolutions recommended by its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian, Cultural) including texts on the rights of the child (contained in document A/63/426); global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (draft resolution II contained in document A/63/428); the International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination (draft resolution III contained in document A/63/428); the situation of human rights in Myanmar (draft resolution II contained in document A/63/430/Add.3); and a draft resolution that would have the Assembly take note of a decision taken by the Committee on the Rights of the Child, in which it requested approval to meet in parallel chambers (draft resolution XXIII contained in document A/63/430/Add.2).  (For background, see Press Release GA/10801.)


The reports of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) were also expected to be taken up by the Assembly in today’s meeting.  For background on draft resolutions contained in those reports, see Press Releases GA/AB/3883 of 15 December 2008 and GA/AB/3888 of 23 December 2008.


Action on Plenary Texts


The Assembly began its meeting by taking up the report of the Credentials Committee, which detailed the Committee’s 19 December meeting and contained a draft resolution in paragraph 12 that would have the Assembly take note of the Committee’s recommendations and approve the report, as a whole.


Taking the floor before action, CHARLES THEMBANI NTWAAGAE (Botswana), Chairman of the Committee, which is mandated to examine the credentials of representatives of Member States and report to the Assembly thereon, said that subsequent to the Committee’s report, Fiji and Switzerland had submitted their credentials, in accordance with rule 27 of the Assembly’s Rules of Procedure, and those two States, therefore, joined the list of States appearing in paragraph 5 of the report. He said further that, in addition to those States listed in the report’s paragraph 6, Comoros and Estonia had since submitted provisional credentials to the Secretary-General.


The Assembly then adopted by consensus a resolution on “credentials of representatives to the sixty-third session of the General Assembly”, by which it approved the Credential Committee’s report.


Following the conclusion of Fifth Committee deliberations, the General Assembly resumed its meeting, taking up a draft resolution on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the 2002 International Conference on Financing for Development and the preparation of the 2008 Review Conference (document A/63/L.57).  The President informed the Assembly that the programme budget implications of the draft were contained in the report of the Fifth Committee (document A/63/657).


The Assembly then adopted the text, without a vote.


Action on First Committee Text


The Assembly then turned to the report of its First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) on general and complete disarmament (document A/63/389), and draft resolution XXV entitled towards an arms trade treaty: establishing common international standards for the import, export and transfer of conventional arms.


The President informed the Committee that separate votes had been requested on operative paragraphs 3, 4 and 5 of the text, and on the text as a whole.


It first retained operative paragraph 3 by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 19 abstentions.  (For details of the vote, see annex I)


It then adopted operative paragraph 4 by a recorded vote of 131 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 19 abstentions.  (annex II)


Next, operative paragraph 5 was adopted by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 20 abstentions.  (annex III)


Moving to the text as a whole, the Assembly adopted the resolution by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 19 abstentions. (annex IV)

Action on Third Committee Texts


Next, the Assembly took up the report of its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) on the promotion and protection of the rights of Children (document A/63/426), containing a draft resolution on the rights of the child.  The report of the Fifth Committee on the budgetary implications of the draft was contained in document A/63/655.  Following a minor oral revision the Assembly adopted the resolution by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions. (annex V)


Turning to the outstanding drafts contained in the Third Committee’s report on the elimination of racism and racial discrimination (document A/63/428), the Assembly took up draft resolution II on global efforts for the total elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action, whose programme budget implications were contained in document A/63/653.


The resolution was adopted by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 13 against, with 35 abstentions.  (annex VI)


The Assembly then moved to adopt, without a vote, draft resolution III in the same report, entitled International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.  The programme budget implications of that draft were contained in document A/63/656.


The Assembly then resumed its discussion on human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, and adopted without vote, resolution XXIII in document A/63/430/Add.2 on the Committee on the Rights of the Child.  The programme budget implications of that draft were contained in document A/63/652.


Speaking after action, the representative of the United States said his delegation disassociated itself from consensus on the resolution, for the reasons as explained in Third Committee deliberations.


Turning to the final Third Committee text, the Assembly then took up document A/63/430/Add.3, which contained outstanding draft resolution II on the situation of human rights in Myanmar.  That text was adopted by a recorded vote of 80 in favour to 25 against, with 45 abstentions.  (annex VII)


Speaking after action, the representative of Myanmar said that the exploitation of human rights for political purposes was not acceptable to his country.  Myanmar’s domestic political process had made significant strides, and the country was now on track for a smooth transition to democracy, with a seven-step political process, including preparations for multiparty elections in 2010.


He said the resolution just adopted was particularly objectionable, as it delved into areas that were essentially within domestic jurisdiction.  Myanmar could not allow nor accept the “blatant interference” in its home-grown political process and, as such, it had voted against the highly politicized, country-specific resolution.  While continuing to cooperation with the United Nations and the Secretary-General’s good offices, Myanmar would not be bound by the resolution at hand.


Action on Fifth Committee Texts


The Assembly took up the reports of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), which were introduced by Rapporteur Patrick Chuasoto ( Philippines).


The Assembly first considered the report of the Fifth Committee on financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors (document A/63/637), adopting without a vote a draft resolution of the same name. By its terms, the Assembly accepted the financial reports and audit opinions of the Board of Auditors on the organizations of the United Nations system and endorsed the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) in that regard.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on programme planning contained in the report of the Fifth Committee (document A/63/611), by which it endorsed the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee for Programme and Coordination on the programme performance of the United Nations for the biennium 2006-2007 and the proposed biennial programme plan for the 2010-2011 period.


Next, the Assembly adopted the draft decision entitled “budgetary and financial situation of the organizations of the United Nations system,” contained in the report of the Fifth Committee on the administrative and budgetary coordination of the United Nations with the specialized agencies and the International Atomic Energy Agency (document A/63/612).


The Assembly then adopted a five-part draft resolution without a vote on the “pattern of conferences”, contained in the Fifth Committee report of the same name (document A/63/638).  By its terms, the Assembly approved the draft revised calendar of conferences and meetings of the United Nations for 2009 and authorized the Committee on Conferences to make any adjustments that may become necessary.


Turing to the report on “scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of the United Nations” (document A/63/472/Add.1), the Assembly, acting again without a vote, adopted the draft resolution contained therein on the “unpaid assessed contributions of the former Yugoslavia.”  That text recommended that unpaid assessments, in the amount of about $1.25 million, be apportioned among the successor States of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and, after taking into account the remaining advance of $26,000 to the Working Capital Fund, that the net balance of the unpaid dues to the account of the former Yugoslavia in the amount of some $14.82 million be charged against respective fund balances.


The Assembly then moved to adopt, by consensus, as orally corrected, the 13‑part draft resolution on “human resources management”, contained in the Fifth Committee’s report of the same name (document A/63/639).  That text dealt with issues such as human resources management reform; contractual arrangements and harmonization of conditions of service; and recruitment and staffing; among other matters.


Turning to the report on the United Nations common system (document A/63/640), the Assembly then adopted without a vote a draft resolution of the same name, in which it expressed appreciation for the work of the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) and took note of its report for 2008, encouraging the Commission to continue to coordinate and regulate the conditions of service of staff of the common system, bearing in mind the limitations imposed by Member States on their national civil services.


It next adopted a draft resolution on the “United Nations pension system” contained in the report of the same name (document A/63/641), also by consensus.  By the terms of the text, the Assembly approved an increase of $2.2 million in the budget of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund, while noting that the revised estimates for 2008-2009 would amount to a total of $153.2 million.  It also admitted the Special Tribunal for Lebanon as a new member of the Fund, effective 1 January 2009, and took note of the status of implementation of resolution 62/241 regarding a one-time exceptional payment to retirees residing in Ecuador.


The Assembly then turned to a draft resolution on “administration of justice at the United Nations”, contained in the similarly titled Fifth Committee report (document A/63/642). By that text, it reaffirmed its previous resolutions on the establishment of the new system of internal justice at the United Nations.  The text was adopted without a vote, as orally corrected.


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly then adopted a draft resolution on “financing of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Genocide and Other Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Rwanda and Rwandan Citizens Responsible for Genocide and Other Such Violations Committed in the Territory of Neighbouring States between 1 January and 31 December 1994”, contained in the Fifth Committee report of the same name (document A/63/643).  By the text, it decided on a revised appropriation for the Rwandan Tribunal of a total amount of $305.38 million gross ($282.6 million net) for the biennium 2008-2009.


It next approved without a vote a draft resolution on “financing of the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991”, contained in the relevant report of the Fifth Committee (document A/63/644), by which it decided on a revised appropriation for the Tribunal of a total amount of $376.23 million gross ($342.3 million net) for the biennium 2008-2009.


The Assembly then took up the report entitled financing of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda; financing of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (document A/63/645) and adopted a draft resolution contained therein on the “comprehensive proposal on appropriate incentives to retain staff of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia”.  By the resolution, the Assembly took note of the Secretary-General’s report on the comprehensive proposal on appropriate incentives to retain staff of both tribunals, and endorsed the conclusions and recommendations contained in the relevant report of ACABQ.


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly then adopted a draft resolution on the “financing of the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE),” contained in the report of the same name (document A/63/646), by the terms of which it adjusted the 2008/09 budget of the Mission, following its termination on 31 July, from $100.37 million approved under the terms of resolution 62/259 to $37.02 million, which would provide for the liquidation of the Mission.


It next adopted by consensus a draft resolution on financing of the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), contained in the report of the same name (document A/63/647).  By its terms, it apportioned among Member States the amount of $449.86 million for the period from 1 January to 30 June 2009, in addition to the amount of $919.4 million already apportioned among them by the terms of resolution 62/232B, comprising $849.86 million for the maintenance of the Operation for the period from 1 July to 31 December 2008, $60.52 million for the support account for 2008/09 and $8.92 million for the United Nations Logistics Base for the same period.


The Assembly then took up the reports of the Fifth Committee on the programme budget of the biennium 2008-2009.


It adopted without a vote a draft resolution contained in document A/63/648 on the “conditions of service and compensation of other-than-Secretariat officials”, by the terms of which it addressed the unintended impact of resolution 61/262, which, effective 1 January 2007, set a new annual base salary for members of the International Court of Justice and judges of the International Criminal Tribunals, with additional post adjustment, to replace the previous larger base salary without post adjustment.


It next considered the five resolutions and the two draft decisions contained in documents A/63/648/Add.1, 2, 3 and 4.


Turning to draft resolution I on “development-related activities”, contained in document A/63/648/Add.1, the Assembly moved to adopt the resolution without a vote and, by doing so, took note of the relevant reports of the Secretary-General, decided to establish 91 new posts, and decided not to abolish the post of the Special Adviser on Africa at the Under-Secretary-General level.


The Assembly also adopted draft resolution II on “strengthening the Department of Political Affairs”, contained in document A/63/648/Add.2, by consensus, by the terms of which it requested the Secretary-General to explore potential synergies and complementarities among special political missions, to avoid duplication and overlap.


Again acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the six-part draft resolution III on “information and communications technology (ICT)/enterprise resource planning (ERP)/Security, disaster recovery and business continuity (DRBC0)”, contained in document A/63/648/Add.3, by which it decided –- among other things -- to establish the Office of Information and Communication Technology as an independent organizational unit under separate budget section, to be headed by the Chief Information Technology Officer at the level of Assistant Secretary-General.


The Assembly then turned to document A/63/648/Add.4, which contained draft resolutions IV and V, and draft decisions I and II.  It first took up the 14-part draft resolution IV on “questions relating to the programme budget for the biennium 2008-2009”, by which it addressed a wide range of topics, ranging from the construction of additional conference facilities in Vienna and at the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) in Addis Ababa, as well as improvements and modernization of additional office facilities at the United Nations Office at Nairobi to the human resources management, and the estimates in respect of special political missions, good offices and other political initiatives authorized by the Security Council and/or the General Assembly, by which it approved the budgets totalling some $429.5 million for the Organization’s current 27 special political missions, while taking note of the estimated unencumbered balance of $15.85 million.


Taking the floor before action, the representative of France, speaking on behalf of the European Union, submitted an oral amendment to the operative paragraph 3 bis of section XI of the draft resolution IV to the effect that it be deleted.  He requested a vote on his proposal to delete the operative paragraph.


The representative of Lebanon said his delegation was against France’s proposal for procedural and substantive reasons.  The paragraph had been discussed in the Fifth Committee.  The paragraph Lebanon had proposed was in line with concerns it had raised in the formal meeting of the Fifth Committee, and informals on the draft. For such reasons, he was against the deletion of the paragraph, and called on States to vote against deletion.


By a recorded vote of 88 against to 50 in favour, with 3 abstentions ( Cameroon, Nigeria, Panama), the Assembly rejected the oral amendment presented by France.  (annex VIII)


The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution as a whole without a vote.


Speaking after the vote, the representative of the United States expressed regret over having been forced to vote on the paragraph.  Unfortunately, the introduction of such language only served to politicize the proceedings and had distracted all parties from the important work at hand.  He expressed hope that, in the future, delegations would refrain from inserting political language in drafts concerning administrative and budgetary matters.


The representative of Syria said that, since the establishment of special political missions, his delegation had always sought to have a transparent dialogue with the Secretary-General and other relevant bodies on the matter.  Indeed, Syria had undertaken wide-ranging efforts to explain its position to the Secretary-General, to other delegations or to other interested parties.  The role of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General was to implement the 2004 Security Council resolution 1559.  However, the logical framework of the budget of the Special Envoy was filled with political and legal falsehoods, and Syria was still seized with doubt regarding gaps in drawing up the budgets of special political missions and the results-based budgetary management method used.


He recalled Syria’s previously voiced concerns regarding the objectives and performance indicators of special political missions that increasingly went beyond the legislative mandates within which they had been created.  Those indicators and objectives were often not in line with the rules governing programme planning or the rules that governed results-based budgeting.  Recalling operative paragraph 2 of Security Council resolution 1559 (2004), which called for the withdrawal of foreign troops from Lebanon, he noted that Israel still occupied parts of Lebanon and he expressed regret over the fact that the Secretariat had not included an objective that would see an Israeli withdrawal from those areas.


Continuing, he said the Secretariat had “gone around” the mandate of 1559 by not including such an objective.  In addition, indicators on operative paragraph 1 of resolution 1559, in which the Council reaffirmed its call for the strict respect for the sovereignty and political independence of Lebanon, should also be reflected in the text.  Such actions would consolidate the credibility of the Secretary-General, on the basis of the resolutions adopted on special political missions.  In closing, he asked that his comments be inserted into the relevant reports, which would be considered by Fifth Committee in its resumed session.


The representative of Lebanon, speaking after action, thanked all States that had voted to retain the paragraph.  Positive developments had taken place since previous General Assembly resolutions on special political estimates.  Resumed political dialogue and recent developments with Syria, related to the mandate of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for the implementation of Security Council resolution 1559 (2004).  Such developments attested to Lebanon’s commitment to strengthening relations with Syria.  Recent developments, on top of Lebanon’s long-standing position on Israel’s continued occupation of Lebanese lands, fell within the mandate of the Special Envoy.


The Assembly next adopted draft resolution V on “programme budget for the biennium 2008-2009” (document A/C.5/63/L.24), without a vote.


It next turned to draft decision I entitled “United Nations Fund for International Partnerships”, adopting it without a vote.


It then adopted without a vote draft decision II entitled “rental of office space in the Secretariat by the Group of 77 developing countries and China”.


Next, the Assembly adopted without a vote a two-part draft resolution entitled “report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) on its activities, contained in the relevant Fifth Committee report” (document A/63/658). By that text, it stressed the importance of full implementation of accepted recommendations of that Office and requested the Secretary-General to ensure that complete information is provided on their implementation and, in cases where full implementation has not been achieved, detail why.


The Assembly then turned to the Fifth Committee report on “review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial functioning of the United Nations” (document A/63/649).  It first adopted without a vote the draft resolution on the proposed programme budget outline for the biennium 2010–2011.


Finally, by a draft decision entitled “questions deferred for future consideration”, adopted without a vote, the Assembly deferred a number of items and related reports, including those on the accountability framework, ERP framework and results-based management; the contingent liability reserve for the United Nations Postal Administration; and the scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of the United Nations.


The Assembly then took note of the report of the Fifth Committee entitled “request for an advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on whether the unilateral declaration of independence by Kosovo is in accordance with international law” (document A/63/654).


In final business, regarding the General Assembly’s programme of work, the Assembly took note of those items on the agenda that remained open for consideration during the sixty-third session.


Closing Remarks


MIGUEL D’ESCOTO BROCKMANN of Nicaragua, President of the General Assembly, said that, in September, Member States had defined the priorities that would guide the 192-member body’s work throughout the sixty-third session.  The session had kicked off with a general debate that had been attended by more Heads of State and Government than any in recent years.  Moreover, in its early weeks, the Assembly had convened a high-level meeting devoted to the Millennium Development Goals and a meeting on the special needs of Africa, which had given African countries the opportunity to draw attention to what they really needed, and not what others thought they might need.


Against the backdrop of the ongoing financial crisis and the food and energy crises, he said, the General Assembly had also organized an interactive round table to allow renowned experts to share their views on the matter with Member States.  Further, a high-level meeting on interfaith dialogue had highlighted the importance of global values to foster genuine solidarity, transcending differences in religious beliefs and ethical and philosophical traditions. 


Turning to the Follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development to Review the Implementation of the Monterrey Consensus, held in Doha, he underscored the declaration adopted at the Conference, which had entrusted the General Assembly with the governance of international finance.  “That decision is crucial and it is the duty of this plenary body to endorse and implement it,” he said.  To that end, he recalled his announcement in Doha to establish an 18-member commission of experts on reforms of the international monetary and financial system, to review the workings of the global financial system.  That comprehensive review would include bodies such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and would suggest steps to be taken by Member States to secure a more stable, sustainable and just global economic order.


He went on to highlight a number of other successes, such as the General Assembly’s declaration recognizing the progressive nature of human rights, as well as an Optional Protocol on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, both particularly significant in that they had occurred during the sixtieth anniversary year of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  The consensus that had emerged among the five regional groups regarding the election of members to the Peacebuilding Commission was also noted, as were the steps taken by the Assembly towards intergovernmental negotiations on Security Council reforms.


“The Secretary-General and I see eye to eye on all that needs to be done to achieve the Millennium Development Goals,” he continued, while underscoring the agreement reached on the comprehensive preparatory process.  To that end, he invited Member States to set out strategic development priorities to make it possible to achieve, if not exceed, the goals set.


In closing, he expressed his sincere appreciation to the Secretary-General, his staff, conference management officials, the interpreters, facilitators and co-chairs for their work, and urged all parties to take advantage of the holiday season to recharge their batteries, with a view to returning, in 2009, with renewed vigour.  “We cannot afford to rest on our laurels,” he said, adding that there was a busy schedule ahead with many important issues that required dedication and diligence from all.


ANNEX I


Vote on Arms Trade Treaty/OP Para 1


Operative paragraph 1 of the draft resolution on “towards an arms trade treaty” (document A/63/389) was retained by a recorded vote of 129 in favour to 1 against, with 19 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Bahrain, Belarus, China, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Kuwait, Libya, Myanmar, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Yemen.


Absent:  Andorra, Bahamas, Belize, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan., Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX II


Vote on Arms Trade Treaty/OP Para 4


Operative paragraph 4 of the draft resolution on “towards an arms trade treaty” (document A/63/389) was retained by a recorded vote of 131 in favour to 1 against, with 19 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Bahrain, China, Egypt, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Libya, Myanmar, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Yemen.


Absent:  Andorra, Bahamas, Belize, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX III


Vote on Arms Trade Treaty/OP Para 5


Operative paragraph 5 of the draft resolution on “towards an arms trade treaty” (document A/63/389) was retained by a recorded vote of 130 in favour to 1 against, with 20 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Bahrain, Belarus, China, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Kuwait, Libya, Myanmar, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Yemen.


Absent:  Andorra, Bahamas, Belize, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Arms Trade Treaty


The draft resolution on “towards an arms trade treaty” (document A/63/389) was adopted by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 1 against, with 19 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Bahrain, Belarus, China, Egypt, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Libya, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Yemen.


Absent:  Andorra, Bahamas, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liberia, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Suriname, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX V


Vote on Rights of the Child


The draft resolution on Rights of the Child (document A/63/426) was adopted by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 1 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam., Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Andorra, Bahamas, Belize, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Liberia, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Suriname, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.


ANNEX VI


Vote on Elimination of Racial Discrimination


The draft resolution on implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (document A/63/428) was adopted by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 13 against, with 35 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Israel, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, New Zealand, Palau, Poland, Romania, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine.


Absent:  Andorra, Bahamas, Belize, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Liberia, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Suriname, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.


ANNEX VII


Vote on Human Rights Situation on Myanmar


The draft resolution on the human rights situation in Myanmar (document A/63/430/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 80 in favour to 25 against, with 45 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Eritrea, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay.


Against:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brunei Darussalam, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, India, Iran, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Libya, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Oman, Russian Federation, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahrain, Barbados, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Colombia, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zambia.


Absent:  Andorra, Bahamas, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Kiribati, Liberia, Madagascar, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Suriname, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu.


ANNEX VIII


Vote on Oral Amendment to Special Political Mission Draft


The oral amendment to the draft resolution on the Special Envoy for implementation of Security Council resolution 1559 (2004) (document A/C.5/63/L.23) was rejected by a recorded vote of 88 against to 50 in favour, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


Against:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia.


In favour:  Albania, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Cameroon, Nigeria, Panama.


Absent:  Andorra, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belize, Bhutan, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Suriname, Tonga, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zimbabwe.


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For information media • not an official record